22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

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22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Movies are all about capturing that perfect moment. Cinemagraphs, gifs that isolate specific movements while freezing the rest, allow us to relive our favorite scenes over and over again.posted on Aug. 8, 2012, at 11:00 p.m.

22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Fifth Element

2.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Fifth Element

3.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Big Lebowski

4.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Big Lebowski

5.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

2001: A Space Odyssey

6.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

A Clockwork Orange

7.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Sneakers

8.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Full Metal Jacket

9.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Full Metal Jacket

10.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

11.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

12.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Pulp Fiction

13.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Godfather

14.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Shining

15.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Shining

16.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Fargo

17.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Fight Club

18.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

American Psycho

19.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Napoleon Dynamite

20.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Napoleon Dynamite

21.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

Amélie

22.
22 Amazing Movie Cinemagraphs

The Truman Show

COOL PEOPLE -GEORGE HARRISON AND BHAKTIVEDANTA MANOR’S GEORGE HARRISON MEMORIAL GARDEN OPENS IN ALDENHAM

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George_56_Rosetti GeorgeinHelloGoodbye WEBSITE_103721-11-49-1 GeorgeHarrison 0georgeharrisontributepagepromobann pressgeorge_performing

CONCERT FOR BANGLADESH

http://youtu.be/AV9P3GZ71hM

GEORGE HARRISON-INTERVIEW WITH DICK CAVETT 1971

http://youtu.be/bTsoXqAeQ7M

HERE COMES THE SUN

http://youtu.be/1Y1wSvfrfYw

GEORGE HARRISON BIO

George Harrison

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Known first as “The Quiet Beatle,” George Harrison was a great songwriter who had the misfortune to be surrounded by two stone cold geniuses whose work often obscured his talents. Yet Harrison compositions such as “Something” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” are as good as anything the Beatles ever recorded. And with his solo debut All Things Must Pass, he stepped completely out of the shadows of his Beatle band mates to reveal himself a powerfully spiritual songwriter with an expansive sense of melody. Harrison was also a gifted, fluid guitarist and hugely influential in introducing the Beatles — and, by extension, the entire Sixties generation – to Eastern religion and musical influences. His devotion to Hinduism was expressed publicly through rock and roll’s first massive charity event, the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh.

Before all that, Harrison was a teen guitarist in thrall to Britain’s 1950s skiffle revival — a working class kid with a band called the Rebels. It was Paul McCartney, a schoolmate one year ahead of Harrison, who invited the 15-year-old to jam with the Quarrymen, a group led John Lennon. (Harrison had come three years behind Lennon at his previous school.) This band would become the Beatles — and Harrison would himself become, like Lennon and McCartney, one of his generation’s great seekers. His response to fame, however, was to direct that search inside of himself.

As a songwriter, Harrison was continually out-gunned by Lennon-McCartney. The intense trio of songs he contributed to Revolver — “Taxman,” “I Want to Tell You,” and “Love You To” — would be his most significant contribution to a single Beatles album. He had other classics to his credit, including “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something,” his first Beatles A-side, a track which would top the charts in America. (Both came off 1969′s Abbey Road) But Harrison also funneled his creativity into the guitar, a suitably introspective pursuit. From his raw, early rock-and-roll influences he extrapolated a wide-ranging and poetic style. In the late sixties, he helped introduce the slide guitar to prominence; he also popularized the 12-string Rickenbacker guitar and its ultra-distinctive sound on 1964′s A Hard Day’s Night.

Harrison introduced the Byrds to the Rickenbacker; they, in turn, led him to what would become a calling card: the sitar. With the Indian composer Ravi Shankar as his teacher, the guitarist introduced the instrument (which dates to the middle ages) into the Beatles, and rock music, with “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown,” off 1965′s Rubber Soul. Two years later, Harrison’s unique, and principal, contribution to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band would be “Within You Without You,” a centerpiece for sitar. It was his experimental sliver of that experimental album, but it also a declaration of his independence. In 1966, the band gave up performing live (which suited the shy, perfectionist Harrison). In 1969, during filming of recording sessions for The Beatles, Harrison quit the band. He returned 12 days later, after negotiations, but he was the first splinter in the band as it finally broke apart in 1970.

Meanwhile, Harrison lived his life increasingly under the guidance of Hinduism. Shankar, who he’d made world famous, had become a close friend, and would remain so for life. He married Pattie Boyd, who he’d met on the set for the Hard Days Night movie, in 1966; in 1969, he bought a private estate in Henley-on-Thames called Friar Park. Creatively, he’d clearly built a head of steam. His Wonderwall Music soundtrack (Wonderwall Music, 1968) was the first solo effort from a Beatle, and as a ramshackle mix of traditional Indian music and rock, hardly one for the screaming fans. For Electronic Music (1969), he partnered with composers like Bernie Krause for an exercise in Moog synthesizer noodling.

Throat cleared, he then released All Things Must Pass, a three-record, Number One album of songs he’d originally written for the Beatles. It would become his masterwork. Produced by Phil Spector and featuring guests Eric Clapton and Traffic’s Dave Mason, the record produced “My Sweet Lord,” his biggest solo hit. That this achingly tender evocation of his religious beliefs was eventually shown, in civil court, to have its melody taken from a sixties hit by Chiffons (“He’s So Fine”) did little to dull its resonance. (It was determined that Harrison “unknowingly” plagiarized the song. In 1976 he would have a hit with Thirty Three & 1/3‘s “This Song,” a kidding take on the lawsuit featuring vocals by Eric Idle of Monty Python.)

Harrison followed this statement of faith with another, even larger-scale gesture, putting together with Ravi Shankhar a massive 1971 benefit for Bangladeshi refuges. Performers at the two Madison Square Garden concerts included Bob Dylan — who alone gave a historic show — Eric Clapton, and Ringo Starr. The shows and resulting documentary and three-record album (both called Concert for Bangladesh) provided a minor hit for Harrison, “Bangla Desh,” and millions for the intended beneficiaries. (Another asterisk: the majority of this money was held up for 10 years while Apple records was audited by the IRS.)

Picking up where “My Sweet Lord” left off — and capturing the easy-going uplift of the times, lacing it with his slide guitar — Harrison picked up another Number One single with 1973′s “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth),” off Living in the Material World. The next year he released Dark Horse on his own label of the same name, but despite the title track’s climb to Number 15, the mellow times seemed to evaporate. Harrison and Pattie Boyd would not officially divorce until 1977, but Boyd had already taken up with Eric Clapton, whom she would later marry. In a bizarre move, Harrison had the two cover “Bye Bye Love,” an Everly Brothers hit, with him. Worse yet, on his big U.S. tour with Pandit Ravi Shankar & Friends, Harrison’s voice, never strong, seem to fail him. A backlash reared up. And with that, he shrunk from one major spotlight: Those were his last shows in the United States.

Between 1975 and 1979, Harrison kept plugging away, to unspectacular commercial and critical results. Extra Texture (Read All About It) (1975) and 33 1?3 (1977) were more the work of a (still talented) journeyman than a seeker, although the latter album produced a stalwart fan favorite in “Crackerbox Palace.” (Critic Robert Christgau, never a Harrison fan, wrote that the song was “the best thing he’s written since ‘Here Comes the Sun.’”) The slick George Harrison (1979) didn’t juice his mojo, either. But he had other things going for him: Besides his passion for Formula 1 racing (celebrated in Harrison‘s “Faster”), there was his 1978 marriage to Olivia Arias, mother to his son Dhani, who he would spend the rest of his life with. In 1979, he self-published a loose memoir, I Me Mine, and began executive producing Monty Python films. Still, his next album, Somewhere in England, encountered trouble even before it was released. Warner Bros. (parent to Harrison’s Dark Horse) demanded the replacement of four songs.

On December 8, 1980, John Lennon was assassinated by Mark Chapman. Harrison hadn’t reconciled with Lennon after the breakup of the Beatles. I Me Mine didn’t even mention Lennon, and when Lennon reached out to Harrison after discovering this, Harrison did not respond. His public statement offered a reserved, if not especially profound or feeling, conclusion: “To rob life is the ultimate robbery in life.” Harrison reframed “All Those Years Ago,” a song originally about Ringo Starr, to honor Lennon, and added it to the reworkedSomewhere in England. The song went to Number Two.

Harrison hit musical bottom with the 1982 bomb Gone Troppo, and retreated from the studio and stage for years. He made an uncharacteristically brash return in 1987 withCloud Nine, which featured George in mirrored shades on its cover. The record went platinum and delivered a sticky Number One hit “Got My Mind Set on You,” a song derived from an obscure sixties number by Rudy Clark. Whatever the state of Harrison’s inner focus, it wasn’t probed here. But producer Jeff Lynne (of Electric Light Orchestra) helped Harrison lay on a fine sheen, and kept him to a tidy 11 tracks.

Late Eighties rock was, briefly, very good to George Harrison. Before long he and Lynne hooked up with Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, and Roy Orbison to record a song for Harrison — which led to the Traveling Wilburys, the last word on the rock super group. Their two albums — the irrepressible Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1 (1988) and scattershot Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3 (1990) — goosed the careers of all involved, and led to Harrison’s 1991 tour of Japan with Eric Clapton, which in turn led to the solid Live in Japan.

After this, Harrison returned to quietude. In 1995, he, Paul McCartney, and Ringo Starr produced two “new” Beatles songs “Free as a Bird” and “Real Love” for The Beatles Anthology documentary and albums. In 1998, at Linda McCartney’s funeral, the three appeared in public together for the first time in 30 years. Also in 1998, Harrison revealed he had been treated for throat cancer, and he was soon beset by more difficulty: On December 30, 1999, a mentally unstable man named Michael Abram broke into the Friar Park estate, lured Harrison out of his bedroom, and stabbed him repeatedly. The attack finally ended when Abram collapsed from injuries sustained when Olivia Harrison fought him off with a fireplace poker.

Harrison continued to suffer from cancer, an on November 29, 2001, at only 58 years old, Harrison died of the disease. He was memorialized around the world. On the first anniversary of his death, McCartney, Starr and many of Harrison’s other friends gathered for the Concert for George, which benefited the Material World Charitable Foundation. McCartney and Starr collaborated on “For You Blue,” Eric Clapton and Jeff Lynne performed “Here Comes the Sun,” and all artists at the concert gathered for several Harrison classics, including “Something” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.”Brainwashed, which Harrison had been working on with his son Dhani just before his death, was released in 2002 to warm critical reception. In 2004 Harrison was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist (the Beatles were inducted in 1988), and in 2009 EMI released Let it Roll: Songs by George Harrison, a career-spanning compilation.

Shortly after his death, Harrison’s family issued a statement that summed up his legacy: “He left this world as he lived in it, conscious of God, fearless of death and at peace, surrounded by family and friends. He often said, ‘Everything else can wait but the search for God cannot wait, and love one another.’”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/george-harrison/biography#ixzz38JofwEGv
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Bhaktivedanta Manor’s George Harrison memorial garden opens in Aldenham

Watford Observer: Hare Krishna Temple's George Harrison memorial garden opens

Hare Krishna Temple’s George Harrison memorial garden opens

  • Watford Observer: Hare Krishna Temple's George Harrison memorial garden opens
  • Watford Observer: Hare Krishna Temple's George Harrison memorial garden opens

A special memorial garden in honour of George Harrison was officially opened at Aldenham’s Hare Krishna Temple.

The George Harrison Memorial Garden was officially opened at the Bhaktivedanta Manor, in Hilfield lane, last month.

When the former Beatles guitarist passed away on November 29, 2001, Bhaktivedanta Manor resolved to create a quiet garden in his memory.

His widow, Olivia Harrison, was joined by television presenters Monty Don and Peter Owen-Jones at the garden’s opening on Saturday, May 25.

NEW BLOG O’ MINE

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CHECK OUT MY NEW BLOG :- WEIRD  WACKY  WAY OUT  ♥♥

TILLIES PUNCTURED ROMANCE  

http://tilliespuncturedromance.wordpress.com

 

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 SERIOUSLY AMUSING—

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 THIS BLOG IS NAMED AFTER A CHARLIE CHAPLIN MOVIE

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Clinton’s Marijuana Usage

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Clinton’s Marijuana Usage -she was a hippie after all!

Abdullah Saeed's avatar image By Abdullah Saeed  17 minutes ago

A New Book Makes a Bold Claim About Hillary Clinton’s Marijuana Usage
Image Credit: AP

The news: A new book claims that potential presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was an “enthusiastic pot user,” according to a quote from a former law school classmate.

Clinton recently denied ever having tried weed in an interview while promoting her book, claiming, “I didn’t do it when I was young. I’m not going to start now.”

However, after being against decriminalization during her 2008 presidential bid and calling for more research into its medical benefits, this time around, Clinton has recently said, “I think for people who are in extreme medical conditions and who have anecdotal evidence that it works, there should be availability under appropriate circumstances.”

It’s a somewhat noncommittal kind of support, but it is worlds away from her previous opposition to decriminalizing.

With the status quo. If Clinton was an “enthusiastic pot user” in college, she’s not much different from nearly half of the population. According to a 2013 Pew Research poll, 48% of Americans have tried cannabis at some point. Clinton’s political views on the topic are also shifting with the national trend, with amajority of the country in favor of legalization. Her statements signal favorable leadership for the pro-legalization majority.

Insult turned to favor. The book making the claim, Clinton, Inc.: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine, is essentially a takedown of both Bill and Hillary Clinton’s political careers. Its timing suggests that it hopes to detract from Clinton’s anticipated 2016 presidential run. However, considering popular public support for marijuana legalization, accusations of pot use may simply make her seem more relatable. All in all, it could mean a higher IQ rating for Clinton and a better chance that we might have a cannabis-supportive president come 2016.

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Meet the cops who give Doritos to potheads!

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After Washington voters legalized pot in November, Seattle’s PD

wants to be “cool,” and connect with the weed crowd

TOPICS: POLICESEATTLEMARIJUANAWASHINGTON STATEMARIJUANA LEGALIZATIONPOLICE BRUTALITY,EDITOR’S PICKS

Meet the cops who give Doritos to potheads!Seattle Police Department Detectives hand out bags of Doritos during the Hempfest rally in Seattle, August 17, 2013. (Credit: Reuters/Matt Mcknight)

“Never in my career did I guess that I’d be passing out delicious snacks at Hempfest,” Sean Whitcomb told Salon. “But that happened.” Hempfest goers seemed equally surprised to find Whitcomb, a sergeant in the Seattle Police Department, handing out bags of Doritos and not court summonses among the bong vendors and joint smokers at the city’s annual outdoor pot festival.

They’re typically arch-nemeses, potheads and police officers, but the munchies were a big hit and both sides seemed to relish the irony, with the bags now selling on eBay for as much as much as $50 a pop.

Whitcomb and his fellow officers are trying to make positive interactions like this between two groups historically skeptical of each other more commonplace after voters in the Evergreen State legalized pot in November. They’re trying to educate — the Doritos bags came with information about the new law — but beyond that, they’re trying to make a connection.

Like parents who look the other way as their kids drink a few beers with friends (but confiscate everyone’s keys), the Seattle cops also seem almost desperate to be liked. They return confiscated stasheswrite funny blog posts and use their official Twitter account to announce that the chief of police pulled over a truck adorned with fake pot leaves — in order to give the driver directions to Hempfest. And so what if there’s nothing less cool that someone trying really hard to be cool — can you really blame them?

“Absurd marijuana prohibition laws have long fueled contempt for law enforcement officials, and this type of outreach can help patch up that relationship between police and the public,” said Mason Tvert of the Marijuana Policy Project, a pro-legalization group based in Washington, D.C. “It is great to see … The Seattle Police Department appears to be moving forward with the voters, as opposed to resisting the changes demanded by voters, which is unfortunately still the case in far too many communities that have embraced reform.”

COOL PEOPLE – See Paul McCartney Jam With Johnny Depp in ‘Early Days’ – Premiere

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Sir Paul shares the story behind the black-and-white clip for his “memory song” about growing up with John Lennon
JULY 7, 2014 10:00 AM

“Early Days” is one of the highlights of Paul McCartney’s most recent album, 2013′s New, but its music video — which you can watch exclusively here — might never have happened if it was left up to McCartney. “When I’ve got a song, I don’t think about the video,” the singer says. “I’m sure some people do, but I don’t. I just think about the song, first writing it, then recording it.”

Behind Beatlemania: Intimate Photos of Paul McCartney

Earlier this year, though, director Vincent Haycock sent over a video treatment for “Early Days” that caught his eye. “It’s a memory song for me, about me and John in the early days,” McCartney says. “But Vince came up with this great idea: Instead of having young lookalikes of me and John walking the streets of Liverpool, guitars slung over our backs, and literally acting out the song, what if it was any two aspiring musicians? I thought that was such a cool idea.”

Haycock spent a month scouting locations in Natchez, Mississipi, and Faraday, Louisiana, and casting local actors for the video’s main storyline, set in the American South in the 1950s. He also traveled to Los Angeles to film a jam session between McCartney and some special guests. “I happened to ring Johnny Depp,” McCartney says. “I said, ‘Come along and we’ll sit around and jam with these blues guys.’ He said, ‘Yeah, OK, count me in, man.’ I knew it was an offer he couldn’t refuse.” (Other musicians at the session included Roy Gaines, Al Williams, Dale Atkins, Henree Harris, Motown Maurice, Lil Poochie and Misha Lindes; see an exclusive photo from the video shoot below.)

 

Paul McCartney at Early Days music video shoot in Los Angeles, California.
MJ KIM/MPL Communications

“Early Days” marks the third McCartney video Depp has appeared in, after 2012′s “My Valentine” and 2013′s “Queenie Eye.” “It’s getting to be a running gag,” McCartney says. “He’s like the Alfred Hitchcock of my videos. And he’s good! He used to be a musician before he was an actor, you know. One of his old band mates actually organized getting me that cigar-box guitar that I played with Dave Grohl on ‘Cut Me Some Slack,’ that we ended up getting a Grammy for. So I knew he could play.”

Music and acting, McCartney notes, often go hand in hand. “They’re similar gigs, really. Ringo used to know Peter Sellers very well, and Peter wanted to be a drummer – that was his secret closet ambition. You run into a lot of guys who play who are actors. There a bunch you can think of. Bruce Willis does it. Then there are people who do both, like Jared Leto.”

As for himself, the former Beatle disavows any interest in taking up acting. “No, I don’t think it’s my thing,” he says. “I get self-conscious in front of a movie camera. Off-camera, I can impersonate, I can do this and that, and I’ll think, ‘I could be such a great actor.’ Then they say ‘Action!’ and turn the camera on, and I go uh-uh-uh-uh-uh…I just don’t think I’m a natural.

“But you know what?” he adds with a laugh. “I’ve got enough to do.”

 

 

Irish Cafe Just Lost All Of Its Tourist Traffic With Sign Banning ‘Loud Americans’

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Irish Cafe Just Lost All Of Its Tourist Traffic With Sign Banning ‘Loud Americans’ (Photo)
WORLD •  • 

At least, this cafe in Waterville, Country Kerry, Ireland, with a red, white and blue sign banning “Loud Americans” doesn’t.

The sign on the window of Peter’s Place cafe and hostel in Waterville was spotted by a Northern Irish visitor named Maurice Campbell, who posted a photo of the sign and tweeted: “It must be a great thing in life to have your money made!”

 

Maybe It’s A Good Thing We Can’t See Noise

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hobo hippie:

very cool

Originally posted on Atomic Flash Deluxe:

The June 1961 issue of Parents’ Magazine featured a story entitled, You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy, in the Better Homemaking section. Writer H. Robert Childs made some common sense suggestions, i.e. acoustical fiberboard ceiling tiles, wall-to-wall carpeting, heavy drapes, felt cushions to ‘dissipate the vibration of such devices as typewriters,’ etc.

What stood out most about the article, though, were the illustrations. Imagine if you could see the noise that is all around you. Illustrator Robert J. Lee presents that scenario in a just-short-of-jarring almost whimsical way. Below are select scans from the article provided by flickr member Leif Peng.

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy top illustration, Parent's Magazine, 1961

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy top illustration, Parents’ Magazine, June 1961

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy full illustration, Parents' Magazine, 1961

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy full illustration, Parents’ Magazine, 1961

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy girl's room detail, Parents' Magazine, 1961

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy teenage girl’s room detail, Parents’ Magazine, 1961

You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy dad's workshop detail, Parents' Magazine, 1961 You Can Make Your Home Less Noisy dad’s workshop…

View original 53 more words

people living off the grid

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PEOPLE LIVING OFF THE GRID

Photographer Antoine Bruy not only traveled and lived with off-grid families for three years, but captured captivating photos of their #Walden-ePsque existence.

Credit: Antoine Bruy

When screeching city noises and demands from the 9-5 job become too much, most people can only dream of what quiet isolation in the rural countryside could be like. But French photographer Antoine Bruy turned that dream into a reality by hitchhiking across Europe from 2010 to 2013.

The artist wandered through remote mountain regions without any fixed destination or route in mind, but along the way met several individuals who had willingly abandoned hectic city life in exchange for retreat in the deep wilderness. These people sacrificed modern comforts for greater autonomy and freedom, and in result became inspiration to the inquisitive photographer.

Credit: Antoine Bruy

In Bruy’s series Scrublands, he documented the homes and faces of the people he countered, by chance, who live far away from civilization. Living with these individuals for days to weeks at a time, Antoine helped them farm land and raise livestock while becoming educated on their self-sufficient lifestyles. Once teachers, students, and engineers, these people now rely on makeshift buildings, recovered materials, and agriculture in order to survive off-grid.

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

The compelling photos capture the rustic beauty and idyllic setting of people who have chosen a -#Walden-esque existence tucked away in secluded, wild environments. “The people and places depicted in my pictures display various fates which I think should not only be seen at a political level, but more importantly, as daily and immediate experiences,” he explains. “These are, in some ways, spontaneous responses to the societies these men and women have left behind. This documentary project is an attempt to make a kind of contemporary tale and to give back a little bit of magic to our modern civilization.”

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Credit: Antoine Bruy

Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/incredible-photos-of-people-living-off-the-grid-who-abandoned-civilization-for-life-in-the-wilderness/