Author Archives: ana christy

About ana christy

Hi I am an old hippie and a "beat" poet and writer. I have 40 book of poetry, and have had 3 tours of U.S. and Europe. My work has been taught in colleges in the U.S and Soviet Georgia. I was co editor and publisher of "Alpha Beat Press" alpha beat soup, bouillabaisse and cokefish and cokefishing in alpha beat soup magazines with my late husband Dave Christy. I am passionate about writing, My novel "eeenie meenie minee moe is for sale on amazon books. I also write short stories and create collages. Do check out my other blogs http://museaholic.com all about #art. and http://beatnikhiway.com about #hippies and #beatniks, #counterculture, #america, and #cool people and tilliespuncturedromance.wordpress.com about #trends, #humor and the #weird. The blog is named after a Charlie Chaplin movie.

HIWAY AMERICA-THE ATLANTIC CITY BOARDWALK, ATLANTIC CITY N.J.

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BEACHES & BOARDWALK

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Duality, Atlantic City’s 3D Lightshow at Boardwalk Hall

http://youtu.be/P6APD4x9Mb0

 THE BOARDWALK VIDEO

http://youtu.be/cp-MXQF3MYE

Atlantic City Beach: 1900 to 1910

http://youtu.be/AYBFWE1UKWo

Miss America Winners 1921-2013

The Miss America Pageant began as a marketing idea. The Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City needed to develop a plan to keep tourists on the boardwalk past Labor Day. They organized a Fall Frolic and held it on September 25, 1920. There were many events that day, but the most popular was a parade of young women being pushed along the Boardwalk in rolling chairs. Ernestine Cremona, dressed in a flowing white robe, was in charge of this event. This event was such a success that a similar one was planned for the following year, and so on. At the same time, in an effort to increase circulation, newspapers on the East Coast had begun sponsoring beauty pageants judged on photograph submissions. The Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City got ear of this and decided to capitalize on this idea. They invited the winners of these local newspaper beauty contests to the next Fall Frolic to compete in an “Inter-City Beauty” Contest. This contest had two parts—a popularity contest and a beauty contest. The winner of the beauty contest, the “Most Beautiful Bathing Girl in America”, was to be awarded the title of “Golden Mermaid”. On September 8, 1921, one hundred thousand people came to the Boardwalk to watch the contestants, a turn out much more than the Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City had expected. A panel of artists serving as judges named sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman of Washington, D.C., the winner of both contests and awarded her a $100 prize. When Gorman returned in 1922 to defend her laurels, she was draped in the American flag and called “Miss America”.

http://youtu.be/2T1vqCrtlkI

Beaches with boardwalks offer big benefits!

Sun, sand, towering resort hotels, the bustling boardwalk, the awe-inspiring Atlantic — this is one beach party you don’t want to miss. The South Jersey beaches of Atlantic City are famous, and rightly so. Everything you could possibly want is right here within walking distance, from shops to five-star restaurants to casinos, attractions and great shows — all benefits of being one of the few American beaches with boardwalks. What better way to cap a day of shopping, shows and gourmet dining than a sunset walk on the beach? And should you want to venture into the waves, you can surf, fish, parasail or embark on a relaxing cruise.

Construction on Atlantic City’s world-famous Boardwalk began in 1870, and from then on it has become an icon in America as one of the few beaches with boardwalks. Stroll along the Boardwalk and enjoy ocean views on one side and shopping on the other, ranging from high-end retail to saltwater taffy shops.

Atlantic City Beach and Boardwalk activities include surfing, kayaking, windsurfing and fishing. Explore the Boardwalk and beaches in Atlantic City here. Make Atlantic City’s beaches your destination for summer fun – start planning your trip today!

About the Atlantic City Boardwalk

The Boardwalk in Atlantic City starts at Absecon Inlet and runs along the beach for four miles to the city limit. An additional one and one half miles  of the Boardwalk extend into Ventnor City. There are many retail stores, restaurants, and amusements on the Boardwalk as well as world famous Casinos. Several piers including Morey’s Piers extend the boardwalk over the Atlantic Ocean.

COOL PEOPLE- ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

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Annie Leibovitz Biography

documentary

http://youtu.be/f2lbAN-_0A0?list=PLR5VLD3NyAZvA0C26CEN5-UIKHXxlrrGV

Photographer (1949–)
Annie Leibovitz, considered one of America’s best portrait photographers, developed her trademark use of bold colors and poses while at Rolling Stone.

Synopsis

Photographer Annie Leibovitz was born October 2, 1949, in Waterbury, Connecticut. In 1970 she took a job at Rolling Stone magazine. In 1983 she began working for the entertainment magazineVanity Fair. During the late 1980s, Leibovitz started to work on a number of high-profile advertising campaigns. From the 1990s to the present, she has been publishing and exhibiting her work.

Rolling Stone Magazine

Photographer. Born Anna-Lou Leibovitz, on October 2, 1949, in Waterbury, Connecticut. She was one of the six children born to Sam, an Air Force lieutenant, and Marilyn Leibovitz, a modern dance instructor. In 1967, Leibovitz enrolled at the San Francisco Art Institute, where (although initially studying painting) she developed a love for photography.

After living briefly on an Israeli kibbutz, Leibovitz returned to the U.S., in 1970, and applied for a job with the start-up rock music magazine Rolling Stone. Impressed with Leibovitz’s portfolio, editor Jann Wenner offered her a job as a staff photographer. Within two years, the 23-year-old Leibovitz was promoted to chief photographer – a title she would hold for the next 10 years. Her position with the magazine afforded her the opportunity to accompany the Rolling Stones band on their 1975 international tour.

While with Rolling Stone, Leibovitz developed her trademark technique, which involved the use of bold primary colors and surprising poses. Wenner has credited her with making many Rolling Stone covers collector’s items, most notably an issue that featured a nude John Lennon curled around his fully clothed wife, Yoko Ono. Taken on December 8, 1980, Leibovitz’s photo of the former Beatle was shot just hours before his death.

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Vanity Fair

In 1983, Leibovitz left Rolling Stone and began working for the entertainment magazine Vanity Fair. With a wider array of subjects, Leibovitz’s photographs for Vanity Fair ranged from presidents to literary icons to teen heartthrobs. To date, a number of Vanity Fair covers have featured Leibovitz’s stunning – and often controversial – portraits of celebrities. Demi Moore (very pregnant and very nude) and Whoopi Goldberg (half-submerged in a bathtub of milk) are among the most remembered actresses to grace the cover in recent years. Known for her ability to make her sitters become physically involved in her work, one of Leibovitz’s most famous portraits is of the late artist Keith Haring, who painted himself like one of his canvases for the photo.

More Accomplishments

During the late 1980s, Leibovitz started to work on a number of high-profile advertising campaigns. The most notable was the American Express “Membership” campaign, for which her portraits of celebrity cardholders, like Elmore Leonard, Tom Selleck, and Luciano Pavarotti, earned her a 1987 Clio Award.

In 1991, Leibovitz’s collection of over 200 color and black-and-white photographs were exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Later that year, a book was published to accompany the show titledPhotographs: Annie Leibovitz 1970-1990. In 1996, Leibovitz was chosen as the official photographer of the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. A compilation of her black-and-white portraits of American athletes, including Carl Lewis and Michael Johnson, were published in the book Olympic Portraits (1991).

Later Work

Widely considered one of America’s best portrait photographers, Annie Leibovitz published the book Women (1999), which was accompanied by an essay by friend and novelist Susan Sontag. With its title subject matter, Leibovitz presented an array of female images from Supreme Court Justices to Vegas showgirls to coal miners and farmers. Currently, many of her original prints are housed in various galleries throughout the United States.

In 2005, the Brooklyn Museum of Art did a retrospective on her work entitled “Annie Leibovitz: A Photographer’s Life, 1990-2005.” As busy as ever, Annie Leibovitz continues to be in demand as portrait photographer, often capturing arresting images of today’s celebrities.

Annie Leibovitz is the mother of three children. At the age of 51, she had her daughter, Sarah. In 2005, her twin daughters, Susan and Samuelle, were born with the help of a surrogate mother.

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LIFE Rides With Hells Angels, 1965

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LIFE Rides With Hells Angels, 1965

hobo hippie:

THE HELLS ANGELS

Originally posted on LIFE:

From Jesse James and Butch Cassidy to Scarface and Tony Soprano, outlaws have always held a singularly ambiguous place in America’s popular imagination: we fear and loathe the gangster’s appetite for violence; we envy and covet his radical freedom. In early 1965, LIFE photographer Bill Ray and writer Joe Bride spent several weeks with a gang that, to this day, serves as a living, brawling embodiment of our schizoid relationship with the rebel: Hells Angels.

Here, along with a gallery of remarkable photographs that were shot for LIFE but never ran in the magazine, Ray and Bride recall their days and nights spent with Buzzard, Hambone, Big D and other Angels (as well as their equally tough “old ladies”) at a time when the roar of Harleys and the sight of long-haired bikers was still new and — for the average, law-abiding citizen — utterly unfathomable. The day-to-day existence of these…

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Real Life Story of Friends Who Discovered a Beautiful Message in a Bottle

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These days, finding a message in a bottle seems like something out of a storybook. But this heartwarming tale is a real life experience that took place just recently along the shores of California. While some friends were fishing, they came upon a glass bottle that had washed up on the sand. Upon closer inspection, they discovered that it had a message sealed inside.Finding that the bottle was tightly sealed, the friends used a pocket knife corkscrew to open the container. Upon unrolling the laminated, sealed message, they discovered a photo and a note from a family who had recently suffered the loss of a beloved family member, Mel. According to the short story on the page, Mel had a love for the ocean and so, after he passed, the family wanted him to continue his journey through the sea. They wrote down a brief summary of his life and placed it, along with a family photograph, into the…

 

COOL PEOPLE -The 5 unusual habits of Audrey Hepburn

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Who Are All Those People In Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band

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Who Are All Those People In Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band

posted by ricky smith, Spacious Planet, May 08, 2012

The album art from Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles is one of themost popular album covers in music history.
beatles sgt pepper
The cover is a collage of more than 60 famous people. Most of the people selected for the collage were requested by The Beatles. For example, George Harrison requested the three Hindu gurus who appear in the collage.
Lennon requested Adolf Hitler, Mahatma Gandhi and Jesus Christ. However, Jesus and Hitler were rejected because the record label feared a public backlash. The record label was nervous because of the controversy over the US Butcher Cover a year earlier. Mahatma Gandhi was excluded because EMI was worried about a negative reaction in India.EMI needed the permission of all living persons in the collage, creating a nightmare for their legal department. All the celebrities in the collage gave their permission. Only one person, Leo Gorcey was removed from the collage because he demanded a payment of $400.

The following is the complete list of all the people on the cover of Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band:

Top Row- from left to right
Yukteswar Giri – Hindu guru
sri yukteswar giri

Aleister Crowley – Magician
aleister crowley

Mae West – Actress
mae west

Lenny Bruce – Comedian
lenny bruce

Karlheinz Stockhausen – German Composer
karlheinz stockhausen

W. C. Fields – Comedian
wc fields

Carl Jung – Psychologist
carl jung

Edgar Allan Poe – Writer and Poet
edgar allan poe

Fred Astaire – Actor
fred astaire

The Vargas Girl – Fictional Pin-up Girl
the vargas girl

Richard Merkin – Artist
richard merkin

Huntz Hall – Actor
huntz hall

Simon Rodia- Designer
simon rodia

Bob Dylan – Musician
bob dylan

Second Row
Aubrey Beardsley- Illustrator
aubrey beardsley

Sir Robert Peel- 19th Century British Prime Minister
sir robert peel

Aldous Huxley – Writer
aldous huxley

Dylan Thomas – Poet
dylan thomas

Terry Southern – Writer
terry southern

Dion – Singer
dion

Tony Curtis – Actor
tony curtis

Wallace Berman – Artist
wallace berman

Tommy Handley – Comedian
tom mix

Marilyn Monroe – Actress
marilyn monroe

William S. Burroughs – Writer
william s burroughs

Mahavatar Babaji – Hindu Guru
sri mahavatar babaji

Stan Laurel – Comedian
stan laurel

Richard Lindner – Artist
richard lindner

Oliver Hardy- Comedian
oliver hardy

Karl Marx- Political Philosopher
karl marx

H. G. Wells – Writer
hg wells

Paramahansa Yogananda- Hindu Guru
sri paramahansa yogananda

Sigmund Freud – Psychiatrist
sigmund freud

Second Row
Stuart Sutcliffe- Musician / Former Beatle
stuart sutcliffe

Max Miller- Comedian
max miller

A Petty Girl – A Series of Cartoon Pin-up Girls by Artist George Petty
a second petty girl appears in the front row
the petty girl

Marlon Brando – Actor
marlon brando

Tom Mix – Actor
tom mix

Oscar Wilde- writer
oscar wilde

Tyrone Power- Actor
tyrone power

Larry Bell- Artist
larry bell

David Livingstone – Missionary
david livingstone

Johnny Weissmuller- Actor
johnny weissmuller

Stephen Crane – Writer
stephen crane

Issy Bonn – Comedian
issy bonn

George Bernard Shaw – Playwright
george bernard shaw

H. C. Westermann – Sculptor
hc westermann

Albert Stubbins- English Football Player
albert stubbins

Sri Lahiri Mahasaya – Guru
lahiri mahasaya

Lewis Carroll – Writer
lewis carroll

T. E. Lawrence- The Historical Lawrence of Arabia
te lawrence

Front Row
Sonny Liston- Boxer
sonny liston

Shirley Temple (appears three times on the cover)
shirley temple

Albert Einstein – Physicist
albert einstein

The Beatles (John Lennon, Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney and
George Harrison) all appear twice – once as wax models.
the beatles

Bobby Breen – Musician
bobby breen

Marlene Dietrich – Actress
marlene dietrich

Diana Dors – Actress
diana dors

A few additional facts about the Sgt Pepper Album Art:

  • Two figures in the cover photo are hairdresser’s wax dummies.
  • It was the first UK album to have the lyrics printed on the inside cover.
  • There was a long running urban legend that the green plants in the photo are cannabis.

HIWAY AMERICA-MOJAVE PHONE BOOTH

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‘Adventures With the Mojave Phone Booth’, A Book About

an Isolated Phone Booth’s Rise to Internet Fame

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Adventures with the Mojave Phone Booth is an upcoming book by Doc Daniels that tells the tale of theMojave phone booth, a phone booth in an isolated stretch of California desert that became Internet-famous in the late 1990s. Daniels propelled the phone booth to fame with the creation of the originalMojave phone booth website back in 1997. Soon fans from around the world were calling the phone booth or traveling to the Mojave National Preserve in California to visit the booth in person (and answer calls). Unfortunately for its fans, the phone booth was removed in May 2000. Daniels is raising funds for the book on Kickstarter. The book is due out in 2015. We first posted about the Mojave phone booth back in 2007.

Adventures With the Mojave Phone Booth by Doc Daniels

 

photo via Doc Daniels

Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74. The man of giantesque stature was best known for his iconic role of Jaws in the Bond movies.

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Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74. The man of giantesque stature was best known for his iconic role of Jaws in the Bond movies.

Richard Kiel, with his wife Diane and children Richard and Jennifer

Despite his remarkable height, colleagues dubbed Kiel “a gentle giant”. The actor had four children with his second wife, Diane, pictured here at the Cannes Film Festival in 1978 with son Richard and baby daughter Jennifer.

Richard Kiel, as Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me

Kiel’s iconic turn as Jaws in the 1977 Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me secured his place in the pantheon of movies’ most memorable villains. In fact, producers were so impressed by his performance that they altered the screenplay so Jaws survived and was able to return two years later in Moonraker.

Richard Kiel as Jaws, in the film Moonraker

Kiel reprised the role of Jaws in the 1979 film Moonraker. The film culminated with Jaws changing sides and joining forces with Bond to save the world. It also saw romance blossom between Jaws and Dolly, a small, pig-tailed blonde with braces, comically played by Blanch Ravalec.

(l-r) Christopher Lee, Kiel, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens

Kiel joined fellow Bond baddies, Sir Christopher Lee, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens, at a Bafta tribute to the Bond films in 2002. He reportedly said: “It is always more fun to play a bad guy than to be yourself as you can create a character unlike your own and be someone you are not for a change.”

Richard Kiel,  May 2000

Kiel had been in frail health for some years, following a serious car accident in the early nineties which affected his balance. He regularly used a walking stick or a mobility scooter, but retained an upbeat disposition.

(l-r) Britt Ekland, Tania Mallet, Richard Kiel and Eunice Gayson

Richard Kiel was reunited with former Bond girls Britt Ekland (The Man with the Golden Gun), Tania Mallet (Goldfinger) and Eunice Gayson (From Russia With Love) in London for the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Bond franchise in 2012.

Richard Kiel and Roger Moore

Sir Roger Moore and Kiel were last together just a week ago, when they recorded the BBC Radio 4 show The Reunion, with Britt Ekland. Sir Roger said he was “totally distraught to learn of my dear friend Richard Kiel’s passing”. The pair will forever be linked in the minds of 1970s film-goers – with Moore’s Bond squaring up to Kiel’s steel-toothed villain.

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THE NORTH POND HERMIT

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The ‘North Pond Hermit:’ the Man That Lived Without Human Contact for 28 Years

August 25, 2014

For nearly thirty years, he was only a legend in small towns – a ghost that slunk into homes at night and surviving on whatever food he could steal without being noticed by scared residents. Such a phantom couldn’t possibly live in the nearby forest.

Well, that phantom was finally arrested for stealing last year, and he’s being called the last true hermit.

When he was captured, the hermit was out for a late night raid at the Pine Trees Summer Camp near North Pond in central Maine. While searching through the kitchen for food, he unknowingly set off an alarm that led to his arrest at the hands of Sergeant Terry Hughes, a warden that had become obsessed with capturing the man, known as the North Pond Hermit in the surrounding community.

Hughes, with the help of some Maine state police, apprehended the burglar and asked him his name. He didn’t say a word, and he had no identification on him. He admitted to the state trooper, Diane Perkins-Vance, saying in a broken voice that he was ashamed to ask questions.

His name, the trooper learned, was Christopher Thomas Knight. He was born in 1965, had no address, and had no vehicle. He lived in the woods, alone. He had gone to live in the woods when he was only 20 years old — now, he was 47.

His way of life is truly remarkable. He never lit a fire, as he was afraid of being detected, and moved only at night, sleeping in a tent during the day. When he was captured, he had no idea if his parents were alive, and had lived without money, car, and phone — he’d never even heard anything of the internet. He admitted to committing about 40 break-ins a year to keep himself well-fed.

Before that night — April 4 of last year — Knight had only said one word to another human being in the last 27 years. He said “hi” to a passing hiker.

The man had long been a legend in the nearby town of North Pond, where residents had suffered break-ins for so long. But most claim they didn’t really believe that such a thing could be true — after all, what man could survive in the woods through the freezing cold of a Northeast winter?

Knight, somehow, managed it. Unfortunately, he didn’t keep a journal or snap any photos to document his long time alone. He had pledged, after all, to live his entire life in secret after he went to the forest as a young man, just out of high school.

While, many have tried to contact him since to hear his story, he hasn’t been saying much. A writer over at GQ managed to get a short response letter from Knight, staying in prison, the two of them bonding over a shared love of literature — Knight had stolen many books during his time in the woods.

They exchanged more and more letters, Knight offering his regrets on a life of crime and reflections on the differences between the two ways of life he had led. One fascinating, surprisingly literate, tidbit:

Solitude did increase my perception. But here’s the tricky thing—when I applied my increased perception to myself, I lost my identity. With no audience, no one to perform for, I was just there. There was no need to define myself; I became irrelevant. The moon was the minute hand, the seasons the hour hand. I didn’t even have a name. I never felt lonely. To put it romantically: I was completely free.

To learn more of his stunning story, read the long feature article at GQ, which we’ll again link to here. Trust us, the whole piece, though lengthy, is fascinating.

‘North Pond Hermit’ pleads guilty to burglary, theft
Christopher Knight, the man known as the North Pond Hermit, pleaded guilty on Monday and will be entered into a special program. WMTW News 8’s Aly Myles…

WE VISITED AND ARCHIVED THE NYC STREETS NAMED AFTER 9/11 VICTIMS

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WE VISITED AND ARCHIVED THE NYC STREETS NAMED

AFTER 9/11 VICTIMS

By Sonja Sharp

On the sweaty September morning I went to visit Doris Torres and Angel Juarbe, the weather was warm and the skies as eerily clear and blue as the day they were killed. Except it’s Sunday, not Tuesday, and this is not Manhattan but the Bronx. At the corner of Doris Torres Way and Angel Luis Juarbe, Jr. Avenue in the Melrose section of the South Bronx, mostly everyone appeared already drunk.

Like many of New York’s sacred dead, Angel Luis Juarbe, Jr. was a firefighter. Doris Torres was an office worker. Both died 13 years ago this week, in the aftermath of the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. Both names haunt New York City’s urban landscape in quasi-official limbo, on the city’s records but not its maps, sometimes on its street signs, clinging to the periphery of its collective memory. Not quite forgotten—to forget them would be blasphemous—but not really remembered either.

By all rights, the opposite should be true: Juarbe and Torres number among more than 400 of the nearly 3000 9/11 dead whose names are not only on carved on the popular Downtown Manhattan site where their lives were cut short, but cemented onto honorary stretches of concrete where those lives were once conducted, ghost streets like theirs scattered across the five boroughs. Most are forlorn byways on forgotten edges of the city where no tourist has ever intentionally stopped to pay respects.

Staten Island alone is home to almost 200 of them.

Salman Hamdani Way EMT, NYPD Cadet 9-11-01 is a random, lonely corner of a brick-and-leaf lined maze of residential streets in deepest Flushing. 9/11/01 Hero – Abe (Averemel) Zelmanowitz Way is the western edge of an overgrown traffic circle on Kings Highway, rededicated in 2007 with someone else’s name on the plaque. A few people remember the story of how he sacrificed his life to stay by the side of his paraplegic colleague. His family must live right here, they muse.

“I remember reading about him,” said former neighbor Elise Matis, who stopped in the turnabout to chat with a friend early Sunday. “It’s tragic,” she conceded, but that was then. “Everybody’s involved in their own lives now.”

A group of 14 year olds folding their underwear together inside the laundromat at 147th Street and Wales Avenue in the Bronx agrees, it was sad. Very sad. Lots of people died or whatever. We were born, they say, and wave their boxer-briefs like handkerchiefs against the window on Doris Torres Way toward the murals of Firefighter Angel Luis Juarbe, Jr.

“I think about it every day,“ said 25-year-old Zev between long, slow sips from a bottle of beer, one hand on the stroller where her three-year-old son naped while the clothes spun in the wash. “I remember I was in class [at a vocational school on Wall Street] and I saw people running away covered in ash. Human ash,“ she added, as an afterthought.

She’d never heard of Doris Torres, and only knew Angel Juarbe from his mural.

Rosie Perez, 43, knew Angel better, and wanted her picture taken with the neighborhood’s fallen hero, of whom there are two adjacent murals. In one, a square-jawed firefighter backed by the statue of liberty and a translucent American flag overlooks a fire engine careening down a suburban street toward the smouldering World Trade Center, a billboard for the musical Stomp further orienting us to the New York of the early aughts. In the other, a baby-faced young man smiles from beneath a black firefighter’s helmet like the one he undoubtedly wore when he charged into the wreckage 13 years ago.

Rosie’s sweat smelled like gin. She posed: chin down, hip out. I asked whether she also knew Doris Torres, who also died heroically in the aftermath of 9/11, on whose honorary street we were technically standing. She ran back to her floor to help her coworkers and later succumbed to severe burns. Rosie stared at me blankly. I pointed to the street sign.

“Angel and I even have the same birthday,” she replied, pulling me back toward the mural. “We grew up together.”