Category Archives: humorous

Hunter S. Thompson on Outlaws | Blank on Blank | PBS Digital Studios

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About That Time #Hunter S. Thompson Joined Hells Angels, For Journalism

Edgy animation memorializes Studs Terkel’s interview with the great Hunter S. Thompson.

Hunter S. Thompson on Outlaws | Blank on Blank | PBS Digital Studios

https://youtu.be/P3QoKqEHS8s

Few figures rank above Studs Terkel and Hunter S. Thompson in the pantheon of American journalism greats. So what, exactly, could be better than Terkel interviewing Thompson? Oh, that’s right: Terkel interviewing Thompson about his time studying the Hells Angels.

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Not to mention a wry cartoon animation of the interview from the PBS web series “Blank on Blank,” which debuted Tuesday. The old-school illustrations capture Thompson’s self-deprecating yet hardbitten tone, as he reveals details about his time with the Hells Angels, and lessons he learned from getting repeatedly “stomped.”

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Terkel conducted a radio interview with Thompson in 1967, as Thompson was poised to take off as a superstar of gonzo journalism. He had just written Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga, a book that stemmed from a breakout article he’d contributed to The Nation magazine.

“Hunter Thompson, our guest, is a new kind of journalist,” Terkel said upon introducing him. “The journalist who is not detached […] in fact he was almost an honorary member, or a dishonored member of the the Oakland Hells Angels.”

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Thompson speaks sympathetically about the Hells Angels, without whitewashing their violent predilections. “I think the Angels came out of World War Two,” he posits to Terkel. “This whole kind of alienated, violent, subculture of people wandering around looking for either an opportunity, or if not an opportunity then vengeance for not getting an opportunity.”

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Though he ruefully recalls falling victim to “bylaw number 10 or 11 […] ‘When an Angel punches a non-Angel all other Angels will participate'” — apparently he once made the fatal mistake of giving a member a hard time for beating his wife — Thompson even sees himself in the frustrated bikers. He confesses to a tendency toward throwing “beer bottles into bar mirrors” and admits enjoying the visceral rush he found in speeding down the highway on a powerful motorcycle.

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Thompson only sped down the open road with the Hells Angels for around a year, but he told Terkel he learned about broader society during that time. “I wouldn’t just call Hells Angels in Oakland the only violent part of our society,” he said. “The Angels reflect not only the lower segments of the society but the higher, where violence takes a much more sophisticated and respectable form.”

He wasn’t just referring to easy marks, like political wheeler and dealer Lyndon B. Johnson, whom he named as having great Hells Angel potential. “I learned a lot about myself just writing about the Angels,” he admitted. “I was seeing a very ugly side of myself a lot of times.”

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In the mid-Sixties, gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson spent about a year with the world’s most notorious biker gang to write the book Hell’s Angels, which came out in 1967. He spoke with radio broadcaster Studs Terkel that year for an interview that PBS has now animated whimsically for its Blank on Blank series.

“The Angels claim that they don’t look for trouble,” Thompson said in the interview. “They just try to live peaceful lives and be left alone, but on the other hand they go out and put themselves into situations deliberately and constantly that are either going to humiliate somebody else or cause them to avoid humiliation by fighting.”

But he went on to question their desire for peace, explaining that one of the gang’s bylaws stipulated that “when an Angel punches a non-Angel, all other Angels will participate.” He also said that he was on the receiving end of their wrath. “All during this stomping, I could see the guy who had originally teed off on me that just out of nowhere, with no warning, circling around with a rock [that] must have weighed about 20 pounds,” the journalist said. “I tried to keep my eyes on him because I didn’t want to have my skull fractured.”

Later in the interview, Thompson confided that, like the Angels’ claims, he was then trying to keep a peaceful existence – for his own safety. “I keep my mouth shut now,” he said. “I’ve turned into a professional coward.”

The year Hell’s Angels hit bookstore shelves, the first issue of Rolling Stone also came out. Thompson would go on to become one of the magazine’s most venerated contributors, penning “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” and covering everything from the Nixon-McGovern presidential campaigns in 1972 to Bill Clinton 20 years later for the magazine. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in 2005. An online archive of his Rolling Stone writing is available here.

Blank on Blank animates archival interviews with musicians, actors and other notable people. Recent installments have included Joni Mitchell, Michael Jackson, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Tupac Shakur and Jim Morrison.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/news/see-hunter-s-thompson-talk-hells-angels-in-newly-animated-interview-20150728#ixzz3hPHTeXzX
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This #Exam Is FINAL

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This Exam Is FINAL

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Two guys were taking Chemistry at the University of Mississippi.  They did pretty well on all of the quizzes and the midterms and labs, such that going into the final they had a solid “A”.  These two friends were so confident going into the final that the weekend before finals week (even though the Chemistry final was on Monday), they decided to go up to the University of Tennessee and party with some friends.

They had a great time, however, with hangovers and everything, they overslept all day Sunday and didn’t make it back to Mississippi until early Monday morning. Rather than taking the final then, they found their professor after the final to explain to him why they missed the final.

They told him that they went up to the University of Tennessee for the weekend, and had planned to come back in time to study, but that they had a flat tire on the way back, and didn’t have a spare, and couldn’t get help for a long time, so they were late in getting back to campus. The professor thought this over and told them they could make up the final on the following day.  The two guys were elated and relieved. They studied that night and went in the next day for the final.

The professor placed them in separate rooms, and handed each of them a test booklet and told them to begin.  They looked at the first problem, which was worth 5 points.  It was something simple about Molarity & Solutions.

“Cool ,” they thought.  “This is going to be easy.”  They did that problem and then turned the page.

They were not prepared, however, for what they saw on this page. It said: (95 Points).  Which tire?

COOL PEOPLE -# CARROL O’CONNER AND ALL IN THE FAMILY

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Carroll O’Connor Biography

Film Actor, Television Actor (1924–2001)

 Quick Facts

Carroll O’Connor was born on August 2, 1924, in New York City. He served in World War II as a merchant marine. He became a stage actor and appeared regularly as a character actor on TV in the 1960s, but it was his portrayal of Archie Bunker in the 1970s sitcom All in the Family that made him a star. He won four Emmy Awards for the role. He died on June 21, 2001.

Early Career

Carroll O’Connor was born on August 2, 1924 to a lawyer and a school teacher. His family moved from the Bronx to Elmhurst and then Forest Hills, Queens, where young O’Connor developed a strong interest in baseball. He entertained the idea of becoming a sportswriter and attended college at Wake Forest University in North Carolina in 1941.

He left college and returned to New York after the start of World War II and volunteered for the Naval Air Corps. The Navy rejected him partly because of his poor college grades, and he joined the United States Merchant Marine Academy instead as a midshipman. He was called out by officers for having a bad attitude and dropped out to join the National Maritime Union and become a merchant seamen.

After World War II, O’Connor returned to New York and worked for an Irish newspaper run by his family. He considered a career in journalism and returned to Wake Forest in 1948 and then took courses at Montana State University where he met another student, Nancy Fields, whom he married in 1951.

Still unsure about his career path, he took a trip to Dublin in 1950 and enrolled at the University College where he began to act, using the stage name George Roberts. He appeared in productions at the Dublin’s Gate Theater and performed Shakespeare at the Edinburgh Festival and throughout Ireland. He graduated in 1952 and wanted to pursue an acting career.

But when he returned to New York, he couldn’t find acting jobs so he worked as a New York City school teacher until he auditioned for a stage production of James Joyce’s Ulysses, produced by the actor Burgess Meredith. O’Connor won that role and then starred in an Off Broadway production of Clifford Odet’s Big Knife. O’Connor’s portrayal of a greedy studio boss drew attention and his acting career began to take off.

Television CareerIn 1960, O’Connor broke into television, playing the role of the prosecutor in the Armstrong Circle Theater production of The Sacco-Vanzetti Story. Over the next decade, he worked as a character actor in television shows includng The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Bonanza and The Outer Limits, as well as movies such as Cleopatra (1963), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Otto Preminger’s World War II epic In Harm’s Way (1965) and the 1970 war comedy Kelly’s Heroes. He had also been up for the role of the Skipper in the TV show Gilligan’s Island, but lost the part to Alan Hale. However, another role was about to define him as one of the greatest TV actors of all time.

All in the Family

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All in the Family / Archie Bunker’s Place Opening Credits  

https://youtu.be/0d8FTPv955I

The “N” Word Unbleeped, All in the Family/ The Jeffersons

https://youtu.be/NuznDnDlTuI

All in the Family S3 E17 – Archie Goes Too Far

https://youtu.be/uDeNxdjh7tg

imagesTO9VMWY5

O’Connor was offered the role of the working-class bigot Archie Bunker in Norman Lear’s All in the Family, but he wasn’t confident it would be a success. He was living in Rome at the time and asked producers to buy a round-trip ticket so he could return when the show was cancelled. But the show became one of the highest-rated on television from 1971 to 1979 with a spin-off Archie Bunker’s Place that remained on the air until 1983.

O’Connor, who was a political liberal, took on the controversial role of the conservative bigot Archie Bunker when other actors, including Jackie Gleason and Mickey Rooney, had turned it down. His portrayal of Archie showed the character’s humanity with humor that connected to audiences and earned him four Emmy Awards.

Later Career & Death

After his award-winning portrayal of Archie Bunker, O’Connor starred in another hit series In the Heat of the Night, based on the 1967 movie. O’Connor played a tough Mississippi police chief from 1988 until 1992. He starred alongside his real-life son Hugh O’Connor, who played Officer Lonnie Jamison.

Tragically, Hugh, who had struggled for years with drug addiction, committed suicide in 1995. O’Connor dealt with the tragedy of losing his son by appearing in several public service announcements to raise awareness about drug addiction. He also lobbied the State of California to pass the 1997 Drug Dealer Civil Liability Act, also known as The Hugh O’Connor Memorial Law, which makes drug dealers civilly liable to families whose lose a child to illegal drugs and others injured by illegal drugs.

While dealing with the loss of his son, O’Connor underwent heart surgery in 1998 to clear blockage in a cardiac artery, and in June 2001, O’Connor suffered a fatal heart attack. Actor Martin Sheen delivered the eulogy at his funeral which was attended by hundreds of actors and fans who gave him a final standing ovation as 76 doves were released to represent every year of the actor’s life.

All in the Family

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Premise

All in the Family revolves around Archie Bunker (Carroll O’Connor), a working-class World War II veteran living in Queens, New York. He is an outspoken bigot, seemingly prejudiced against everyone who is not a U.S.-born, politically conservative, heterosexual White Anglo-Saxon Protestant male, and dismissive of anyone not in agreement with his view of the world. His ignorance and stubbornness seem to cause his malapropism-filled arguments to self-destruct. He often responds to uncomfortable truths by blowing a raspberry. He longs for better times when people sharing his viewpoint were in charge, as evidenced by the nostalgic theme song “Those Were the Days,” the show’s original title. Despite his bigotry, he is portrayed as loveable and decent, as well as a man who is simply struggling to adapt to the changes in the world, rather than someone motivated by hateful racism or prejudice.

By contrast, Archie’s wife, Edith (Jean Stapleton), is a sweet and understanding, if somewhat naïve, woman who usually defers to her husband. On the rare occasions when Edith takes a stand she proves to be one of the wisest characters, as evidenced in the episodes “The Battle of the Month” and “The Games Bunkers Play“. Archie often tells her to “stifle” herself and calls her a “dingbat”.  Despite their different personalities they love each other deeply.

They have one child, Gloria (Sally Struthers) who, for the most part, is kind and good natured, like her mother, but who also on occasion displays traces of her father’s stubbornness; she becomes more of an outspoken feminist as the series progresses. Gloria is married to college student Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner). Michael is referred to as “Meathead” by Archie and “Mike” by nearly everyone else. Mike is a bit of a hippie, and his morality is influenced and shaped by the counterculture of the 1960s. He and Archie represent the real-life clash between the Greatest Generation and the Baby Boomers. They constantly clash over religious, political, social, and personal issues. For much of the series, the Stivics live in the Bunkers’ home to save money, providing even more opportunity for the two men to irritate each other. When Mike finally finishes graduate school and the Stivics move out, it turns out to be to the house next door. The house was offered to them by George Jefferson, the Bunkers’ former neighbor, who knows it will irritate Archie. In addition to calling him “Meathead”, Archie also frequently cites Mike’s Polish ancestry, referring to him as a “dumb Polack.”

The show is set in the Astoria section of Queens, one of New York City’s five boroughs, with the vast majority of scenes taking place in the Bunkers’ home at 704 Hauser Street (and later, frequently, the Stivics’ home). Occasional scenes take place in other locations, most often (especially during later seasons) Kelsey’s Bar, a neighborhood tavern where Archie spends a good deal of time and which he eventually buys. The house seen in the opening is at 89-70 Cooper Avenue near the junction of the Glendale, Middle Village, and Rego Park sections of Queens. According to the US Postal Service, the official address is: 8970 COOPER AVE, REGO PARK NY 11374-

Cast

Main character

The Bunkers & the Stivics: standing, Gloria (Sally Struthers) and Michael (Rob Reiner); seated, Archie (Carroll O’Connor) and Edith (Jean Stapleton) with baby Joey.

  • Carroll O’Connor as Archie Bunker. Frequently called a “lovable bigot”, Archie was an assertively prejudiced blue-collar worker. Former child actor Mickey Rooney was Lear’s first choice to play Archie, but Rooney declined the offer because of the strong potential for controversy and, in Rooney’s opinion, a poor chance for success. Scott Brady, formerly of the western series Shotgun Slade, also declined the role of Archie Bunker, but appeared four times on the series in 1976 in the role of Joe Foley.
  • Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker, née Baines. It was Stapleton who developed Edith’s recognizable voice. Stapleton remained with the show through the original series run but decided to leave before the first season of Archie Bunker’s Place had wrapped up. At that point Edith was written out as having suffered a stroke and died off-camera, leaving Archie to deal with the death of his beloved “dingbat”. Stapleton appeared in all but four episodes of All in the Family and had a recurring role during the first season of Archie Bunker’s Place. In the series’ first episode, Edith is portrayed as being less of a dingbat and even sarcastically refers to her husband as “Mr. Religion, here…” after they come home from church, something her character wouldn’t be expected to say, later.
  • Sally Struthers as Gloria Stivic, née Bunker. The Bunkers’ college-age daughter was married to Michael Stivic. Gloria frequently attempted to mediate Archie’s and Michael’s arguments. The roles of the Bunkers’ daughter and son-in-law (then named “Dickie”) initially went to Candice Azzara and Chip Oliver. However, after seeing the show’s pilot, ABC, the original production company, requested a second pilot expressing dissatisfaction with both actors. Lear later recast the roles of “Gloria” and “Dickie” with Struthers and Reiner. Penny Marshall (Reiner’s wife, whom he married in April 1971, shortly after the program began) was also considered for the role of Gloria. During the earlier seasons of the show, Struthers was known to be discontented with how static her part was, frequently coming off as irritating and having only a few token lines. As the series continued Gloria’s character became more developed, satisfying Struthers. Struthers appeared in 157 of the 202 episodes during the first eight seasons—from January 12, 1971 to March 19, 1978. She later reprised the role in the spin-off series Gloria, which lasted for a single season in 1982-83.
  • Rob Reiner as Michael Stivic. Gloria’s Polish-American hippie husband was part of the counterculture of the 1960s. He constantly sparred with Archie (in the original pilot, he was Irish-American). Michael was, in many ways, as stubborn as Archie, even though his moral views were generally presented as being more ethical and his logic somewhat sounder. Though this was true, he was generally portrayed in a more negative light than Archie; Archie was portrayed in a more sympathetic sense, while Michael was portrayed as loudmouthed and at times, demanding. He consistently tried to prove himself correct (as evidenced in the episode “The Games Bunkers Play”) and seemed desperate to convince people that his way was the right way to go all the time, even more than Archie, who gave up giving advice about his way when there was no point. This would occasionally, if not often, end him up in conflict with his friends and wife. For his bullheadedness, Stivic was sometimes criticized for being an elitist. He also struggled with assumptions of male superiority. He spoke of believing in female equality, but often tried to control Gloria’s decisions and desires in terms of traditional gender roles. While Archie was a representative of supposed bigotry and demonstrated the lion’s share of the hypocrisy, Michael, on many occasions, showed his own. As discussed in All in the Family retrospectives, Richard Dreyfuss sought the part but Norman Lear was convinced to cast Reiner. Reiner appeared in 174 of the 202 episodes of the series during the first eight seasons—from January 12, 1971 to March 19, 1978. Reiner is also credited with writing three of the series’ episode1]
  • Danielle Brisebois as Edith’s 9-year-old grandniece, Stephanie Mills, who is a regular throughout the 9th season. The Bunkers take her in after the child’s father, Floyd Mills, abandons her on their doorstep in 1978 (he later extorts money from them to let them keep her). She remained with the show through its transition to Archie Bunker’s Place, and appeared in all four seasons of the latter show.

A TOUCH OF ART – 12 Reasons To Love Nudity And Celebrate NYC #Body painting Day

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12 Reasons To Love Nudity And Celebrate NYC Body painting Day

Posted: 07/16/2015 8:15 pm EDT Updated: 07/16/2015 8:59 pm EDT
  • It’s Free
    Michael Loccisano via Getty Images
    Just come down to Dag Hammarskjold Plaza (47th Street at 2nd Avenue) on July 18. Full details at Bodypainting Day 2015.
  • 2
    All Are Welcome
    Andy Golub
    You can volunteer to be a model, artist, volunteer or just enjoy the show.
  • 3
    People Of All Races And Colors Will Be All Colors
    Andy Golub
  • 4
    It’s Clothing Optional (Sort Of)
    Andy Golub
    If you want to model, you have to take it all off. But if you just want to enjoy the show, you’ll need to put something on. Your choice.
  • 5
    It’s A Great Way To Enjoy New York City
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Once the models are painted, they’ll parade from Dag Hammarskjold Plaza (47th and 2nd Avenue) to the United Nations.
  • 6
    It’s About Free Artistic Expression
    TIMOTHY A. CLARY via Getty Images
    Artist Andy Golub didn’t change New York City nudity laws, but he did influence how they were enforced. If you’re naked in a public space because you’re creating art, it’s legal. Thanks, Andy!
  • 7
    It’s About Body Acceptance
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • 8
    It’s A Great Way To Meet People
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • 9
    You’ll Definitely Fit In
    Andy Golub
  • 10
    It’s Art
    Andy Golub
  • 11
    And, of course, The Body Is Beautiful
    Michael Loccisano via Getty Images
  • 12
    . . . In All Its Forms
    Buck Wolf

 Our producer Katelyn Bogucki doesn’t need body paint. She’s already a work of art. Editor Jorge Corona and sound engineer Brad Shannon are our Picassos.

Have feedback or an idea for a segm

Body Painting

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my fun blog-http/tilliespuncturedromance.wordpress.com

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In a previous post I gave you the wrong link –  here is  the corrected version-sorry about that.

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weird wacky and way out

http://tilliespuncturedromance.wordpress.com has been changed and revamped  – come on over for a good laugh

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THIS BLOG IS INTENDED TO PRODUCE BURSTS OF LAUGHTER, SMILES AND EYEBROW RAISING-IT IS PURELY FOR AMUSEMENT AND NO OTHER PURPOSE -ANA

70's9how the corn dog came about

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Animal welfare officer investigating an abused #donkey discover it is actually a model

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Animal welfare officer investigating an abused donkey discover it is actually a model

 This fake donkey has made a fool of some animal welfare investigators
Up close it’s obvious, but from a distance… (Picture: Scottish SPCA/PA Wire)

Animal welfare officers were called in to deal with a donkey who was allegedly being neglected recently.

However when they arrived to deal with the poor animal they discovered exactly why it had been standing outside in the rain for several weeks.

It was a life-size model.

Like a scene from a bad 90s sitcom, the fake donkey was actually a nativity scene prop and is kept in the garden of Reverend Georgie Baxendale when not performing.

The Scottish SPCA say they don’t know if the call was made as a prank or by a well-meaning but short-sighted walker.

Senior inspector Bill Little said: ‘When I arrived, the owner asked me if I wanted a laugh and when she showed me the ornamental donkey it certainly gave me a chuckle.

‘The donkey is made of fibreglass and goes by the name Joshua.’

The confusion didn’t bother Rev Baxendale, who called it the ‘funniest thing I’ve ever heard in my life’.

‘I used to have two donkeys and bought Joshua as a reminder,’ she added.

Despite the mix up, Mr Little said it is always ‘better to be safe than sorry and we’d encourage anyone with concerns about an animal to call our helpline on 03000 999 999′.

This isn’t the first time the Scottish SPCA have been fooled by model animals.

An officer in Aberdeen was called to a report of owl neglect a couple of years ago, but when he arrived he discovered the distressed bird was in fact a plastic garden water feature.

22 Amazing Quotes from The Master of Sarcasm: George Carlin

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22 Amazing Quotes from The Master of Sarcasm: George Carlin

Posted On 12 Jun 2015

George Carlin

Comedy can often be a sword and a shield. George Carlin is one of the few comics that comes to mind when I think of a comedian who could make a point about a touchy subject, and make you laugh at the same time. Carlin had the verbal skill to have you laughing one minute, and the next minute drop an insightful message. George Carlin was a comedian who practically defined the word “edgy”. His material was often political and he was well known for pointing out hypocrisies which earned him the title “Master of Sociological Comedy”. Very few people have had the ability to say the things that need to be said in a way that makes you think and laugh like Carlin could. Carlin’s observations on life, people, politics, and religion will certainly be missed.

22 Brilliant Quotes from George Carlin:

“But when you’re in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you’re guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It’s very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That’s when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow.”

“If a man smiles all the time, he’s probably selling something that doesn’t work.”

“I don’t like ass kissers, flag wavers or team players. I like people who buck the system. Individualists. I often warn people: “Somewhere along the way, someone is going to tell you: ‘There is no “I” in team.’ What you should tell them is: ‘Maybe not. But there is an “I” in independence, individuality, and integrity.’”

“I do this real moron thing, and it’s called thinking. And apparently I’m not a very good American because I like to form my own opinions.”

“I’m completely in favor of the separation of Church and State. … These two institutions screw us up enough on their own, so both of them together is certain death.”

“May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house.”

“The most unfair thing about life is the way it ends. I mean, life is tough. It takes up a lot of your time. What do you get at the end of it? A Death! What’s that, a bonus? I think the life cycle is all backwards. You should die first; get it out of the way. Then you live in an old age home. You get kicked out when you’re too young, you get a gold watch, you go to work. You work forty years until you’re young enough to enjoy your retirement. You do drugs, alcohol, you party, you get ready for high school. You go to grade school, you become a kid, you play, you have no responsibilities, you become a little baby, you go back into the womb, you spend your last nine months floating …and you finish off as an orgasm.”

“I like it when a flower or a little tuft of grass grows through a crack in the concrete. It’s so fuckin’ heroic.”

“Religion is like a pair of shoes…..Find one that fits for you, but don’t make me wear your shoes.”

“Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.”

“Religion has actually convinced people that there’s an invisible man living in the sky who watches everything you do, every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a special list of ten things he does not want you to do. And if you do any of these ten things, he has a special place, full of fire and smoke and burning and torture and anguish, where he will send you to live and suffer and burn and choke and scream and cry forever and ever ’til the end of time! But He loves you. He loves you, and He needs money! He always needs money! He’s all-powerful, all-perfect, all-knowing, and all-wise, somehow just can’t handle money!”

“Life gets really simple once you cut out all the bull shit they teach you in school.”

“How come when it’s us, it’s an abortion, and when it’s a chicken, it’s an omelette?”

“Now, there’s one thing you might have noticed I don’t complain about: politicians. Everybody complains about politicians. Everybody says they suck. Well, where do people think these politicians come from? They don’t fall out of the sky. They don’t pass through a membrane from another reality. They come from American parents and American families, American homes, American schools, American churches, American businesses and American universities, and they are elected by American citizens. This is the best we can do folks. This is what we have to offer. “

“Here’s a bumper sticker I’d like to see: “We are the proud parents of a child who’s self-esteem is sufficient that he doesn’t need us promoting his minor scholastic achievements on the back of our car.”

“People who see life as anything more than pure entertainment are missing the point.”

“Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.”

“Oh Beautiful for smoggy skies, insecticide grain, for strip-mined mountain’s majesty above the asphalt plain. America, America, man sheds his waste on thee, and hides the pines with billboard signs, from sea to oily sea.”

“Everyone smiles in the same language.”

“We are a nation of sheep, and someone else owns the grass.”

“There’s a humorous side to every situation. The challenge is to find it.”

“This is a little prayer dedicated to the separation of church and state. I guess if they are going to force those kids to pray in schools they might as well have a nice prayer like this: Our Father who art in heaven, and to the republic for which it stands, thy kingdom come, one nation indivisible as in heaven, give us this day as we forgive those who so proudly we hail. Crown thy good into temptation but deliver us from the twilight’s last gleaming. Amen and Awomen. ”

Artist- Ted Giffin - Musician

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Adam's Dead Threads

presenting visual art, poetry, other writings & links by Adam Donaldson Powell

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Psychological, thriller, mystery, secrets, betrayal, adoption, romance, poetry, art

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gamer, geek, poet, dad, bi-polar mess at times

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James Radcliffe, Musician. Music, Blog, Pictures, Live, News...

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A little bit of this, a little bit of that

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Funny Photos and Funny Videos - Keep Calm and Chive On

S A V O I A

Curating all the best stories on the web.

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