Tag Archives: actor

COOL PEOPLE – Bill Murray on Gilda Radner

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oldloves:Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:<br /><br />
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”<br /><br />
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live</p><br />
<p>So much love for this story, Gilda and Bill Murray for telling it. xo Maya

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

“Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know.

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

– from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

So much love for this story, Gilda and Bill Murray for telling it. xo Maya

COOL PEOPLE – LEONARDO DICAPRIO

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LEONARDO DICAPRIO

The life and times of Leonardo DiCaprio

http://youtu.be/_UHqYoe3r8M

16-Year-Old Leonardo DiCaprio FIRST Interview!

http://youtu.be/RnycvPjB7Y0

Leonardo DiCaprio: ‘The Master of the Freak-Out’

http://youtu.be/p53CZtamFsU

BIOGRAPHY

Leonardo DiCaprio is one of Hollywood’s biggest stars and a keen environmentalist.

Leonardo-DiCaprio-leonardo-dicaprio-28581909-2560-2530 Leonardo-DiCaprio-Pictures-His-40th-Birthdaywilliam-shakespeare-s-romeo-juliet-style shutter-island j-edgar-movie-leonardo-dicaprio-original-poster-print the-great-gatsby-leonardo-dicaprio-carey-mulligan-tobey-maguire-movie-poster 

 Born in Hollywood on November 11th 1974, Leonardo was an only child whose parents divorced when he was a baby. His mother signed her young son up with a talent agent and, aged five, Leonardo made his debut on a popular children’s television show before being removed for being too disruptive!

DiCaprio attended the John Marshall High School and the Centre for Enriched Studies but was, by his own admission, never destined for a career in academia (he is, however, fluent in German -DiCaprio spent a part of his childhood there with his maternal grandparents).

When he was 14 he signed to an agency and popped-up in a Matchbox cars commercial before landing acting roles in a few short-lived TV shows, most notably ‘Parenthood’ where he met Tobey Maguire and nominated for the ‘Young Artist Award for Best Young Actor.’

DiCaprio made his movie debut in 1991 with direct-to-video horror ‘Critters 3’ which indirectly led to a regular role in TV’s ‘Growing Pains’. Stardom beckoned when he was picked by Robert de Niro to play the lead in ‘This Boy’s Life’ (1993).

In the same year DiCaprio teamed up with Johnny Depp to play a teenager with learning difficulties in ‘What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?’ The film was a huge success and earned DiCaprio an Academy Award nomination.1995’s ‘The Quick and the Dead’ wasn’t met with such favour, DiCaprio was a controversial choice from the off as Sony weren’t convinced by his suitability for the role so co-star Sharon Stone paid the young actor out of her own pocket.

In the same year DiCaprio starred in the relatively successful ‘Total Eclipse’ playing poet Arthur Rimbaud opposite David Thewlis’ Paul Verlaine. A fictionalised, at times, graphic account of their homosexual relationship DiCaprio was lucky to get the part having been brought in to replace River Phoenix who’d died during pre-production.

Also in 1995 was Jim Carroll biopic ‘The Basketball Diaries’ and ‘Don’s Plum’ which wasn’t released until 2001 after DiCaprio and co-star Toby Maguire attempted to get the film blocked by court order. Also starring Kevin Connolly, ‘Don’s Plum’ is a largely improvised movie that, DiCaprio and Maguire claim, was a project for/by an aspiring film director and not intended for theatrical release. Ironically, its DiCaprio’s most critically acclaimed effort of that year.

 In 1996, DiCaprio starred in Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of ‘Romeo and Juliet’. Notable for retaining the ‘original’ Shakespearean dialogue the movie was a huge hit but financially eclipsed by 1997 blockbuster ‘Titanic’ which was, until 2010, the highest grossing film ever made, even if DiCaprio wasn’t happy about his character, Jack Dawson.

DiCaprio was now a bonafide star.

In 1998 he had a cameo role in Woody Allen’s ‘Celebrity’ (1998) and starred in ‘The Man with the Iron Mask’ that, despite negative criticism, was a box-office success. In 2000 he took the lead in ‘The Beach’, another critical flop but enormously successful at theatres worldwide.

In 2002, a change of fortune. DiCaprio starred in two critically acclaimed movies, Stephen Spielberg’s ‘Catch me if you Can’ (co-starring Tom Hanks, Martin Sheen and Christopher Walken) is based on the life of a confidence trickster who made a fortune in the 1960’s and Martin Scorsese’s ‘Gangs of New York’, a historically based feature set in NYC in the mid 1800’s. DiCaprio went on to work with Scorsese again in 2004 with the critically acclaimed ‘The Aviator’ and won a Golden Globe and an Academy Award nomination for his troubles.

DiCaprio’s third collaboration with Martin Scorsese was 2006 thriller, ‘The Departed’ with Matt Damon. The movie became one of the most acclaimed of the year but it was ‘Blood Diamond’ that earned DiCaprio his third Academy Award nomination playing a diamond smuggler opposite co-stars Jennifer Connelly and Djimon Hounsou.

Ridley Scott’s ‘Body of Lies’ (2008) visually aped the style and flavour of 1970s political films but received mixed reviews. In the same year he teamed up again with Kate Winslet in ‘Revolutionary Road’, directed by Winslet’s then husband Sam Mendes. The film is set in the 1950s and tells the story of a couple as their marriage collapses earning DiCaprio another Golden Globe nomination.

Scorsese and DiCaprio collaborated a third time for the hugely successful ‘Shutter Island’ in 2010 in which DiCaprio plays an unstable US Marshal investigating a psychiatric facility. The same year he played Dom Codd in Christopher Nolan’s sci-fi thriller ‘Inception’ and, again, the movie was received favourably by critics and public alike.

 Not quite as successful was Clint Eastwood’s biopic of J Edgar Hoover, ‘J Hoover’. Starring alongside Naomi Watts and Armie Hammer, DiCaprio’s role was well received but the critics turned on the finished article claiming the film lacked cohesion. The following year, 2012, DiCaprio received yet another Golden Globe nomination for his villainous role in Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Dango Unchained’.

In 2013 he worked again with Baz Lurhrmann for a big-screen adaptation of ‘The Great Gatsby’. As with ‘J Hoover’, the film had mixed reviews while DiCaprio was given the thumbs up by critics. That year he also starred in another Scorsese picture, ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’, based on the life of a stockbroker who was arrested in the late 1990’s for fraud. Another Golden Globe to add to his collection, a fourth Academy Award nomination and with other projects in the pipeline, it seems we’ve not heard the last of Leonardo DiCaprio just yet.

In addition to random acts of philanthropy, DiCaprio is a committed environmentalist and has been nominated for awards in his efforts to raise awareness of man’s impact on the planet. In January 2013 he announced he was going to take break from acting and ‘fly around the world doing good for the environment.’

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COOL PEOPLE- ONE LINERS FROM GROUCHO MARX

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Groucho Marx – 30 great one-liners

Groucho Marx in 1933

Groucho Marx (1890-1977):

‘I never forget a face, but in your case I’d be glad to make an exception.’

French actor Gerard Depardieu, 65, admits to drinking 14 bottles of wine a day – despite having a quintuple heart bypass

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French actor Gerard Depardieu, 65, admits to drinking 14 bottles of wine

a day – despite having a quintuple heart bypass

  • Actor told a French film magazine: ‘I can’t drink like a normal person’
  • He also enjoys beer, pastis, champagne, vodka and whiskey during the day
  • 65-year-old says that he ‘never gets drunk’ despite voluminous intake

By SAM WEBB FOR MAILONLINE

Gerard Depardieu, the titan of French cinema and renowned bon vivant, claims he sometimes drinks up to 14 bottles of wine a day.

Even a quintuple heart bypass operation 14 years ago does not seem to have tempered the actor’s drinking, nor a serious motorcycle crash while over the legal limit.

The 65-year-old Frenchman’s fondness for wine is such that he runs his own award-winning vineyard in the Medoc.

He told French magazine So Film: ‘I can’t drink like a normal person. I can absorb 12, 13, 14 bottles per day.

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Mon Dieu! Gerard Depardieu recently told a French film magazine: 'I can¿t drink like a normal person. I can absorb 12, 13, 14 bottles per day'

Mon Dieu! Gerard Depardieu recently told a French film magazine: ‘I can’t drink like a normal person. I can absorb 12, 13, 14 bottles per day’

‘In the morning, it starts at home with champagne or red wine before 10am, then again champagne.’

Gerard said he breaks up the wine intake with a little aniseed liqueur pastis.

He added: ‘Then food, accompanied by two bottles of wine.

‘In the afternoon, champagne, beer and more pastis at around 5pm, to finish off the bottle.

‘Later on, vodka and/or whisky. But I’m never totally drunk, just a little p*****d.

‘All you need is a 10-minute nap and voila, a slurp of rose wine and I feel as fresh as a daisy.

‘Anyway, I’m not going to die. Not now. I still have energy.’

Wine lover: Gerard Depardieu during a visit to the 'Vinexpo' international wine fair in Bordeaux, south-western France in 2005. He runs his own award-winning vineyard in the Medoc

Wine lover: Gerard Depardieu during a visit to the ‘Vinexpo’ international wine fair in Bordeaux, south-western France in 2005. He runs his own award-winning vineyard in the Medoc

However, his behaviour was condemned by French mental health expert Professor Michel Lejoyeux, who blasted French attitudes to the heavy consumption of alcohol, and the media’s admiration of his alcohol intake.

He said: ‘We smile about heavy users, calling them “bon vivants”, while non-consumption is not allowed. In society, it is the one who does not drink who will feel guilty.

‘A consumption of 14 bottles a day is beyond all data, all thresholds and health references of the World Health Organization.

‘This is proof of the positive vision we have of alcohol poisoning.’

Comrades: Depardieu, seen her with Vladimir Putin, took Russian citizenship in January 2013 as a protest against France's 75 per cent tax on the rich

Comrades: Depardieu, seen her with Vladimir Putin, took Russian citizenship in January 2013 as a protest against France’s 75 per cent tax on the rich

Gerard Depardieu stars in new Russian-filmed movie Viktor

Previously Depardieu made headlines after he was banned from an Air France flight for urinating in the aisle as it prepared to take off, forcing the plane to turn back to its parking spot.

A passenger on the flight said Depardieu appeared to be drunk and insisted he be allowed to use the bathroom during takeoff, when passengers must remain seated.

Depardieu, who took Russian citizenship in January 2013 as a protest against France’s 75 per cent tax on the rich, recently came under fire for suggesting Ukraine was part of Russia.

He was asked in an interview at the Baltic Pearl film festival in Latvia about the Ukraine situation and declared he ‘loves both Russia, and Ukraine, which is part of Russia’.

The actor was presented with his Russian passport by President Vladimir Putin himself and he launched a luxury watch line under the banner ‘Proud To Be Russian’.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2758988/French-actor-Gerard-Depardieu-65-admits-drinking-14-bottles-wine-day-despite-having-quintuple-heart-bypass.html#ixzz3E8pZhARJ
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Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74. The man of giantesque stature was best known for his iconic role of Jaws in the Bond movies.

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Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74. The man of giantesque stature was best known for his iconic role of Jaws in the Bond movies.

Richard Kiel, with his wife Diane and children Richard and Jennifer

Despite his remarkable height, colleagues dubbed Kiel “a gentle giant”. The actor had four children with his second wife, Diane, pictured here at the Cannes Film Festival in 1978 with son Richard and baby daughter Jennifer.

Richard Kiel, as Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me

Kiel’s iconic turn as Jaws in the 1977 Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me secured his place in the pantheon of movies’ most memorable villains. In fact, producers were so impressed by his performance that they altered the screenplay so Jaws survived and was able to return two years later in Moonraker.

Richard Kiel as Jaws, in the film Moonraker

Kiel reprised the role of Jaws in the 1979 film Moonraker. The film culminated with Jaws changing sides and joining forces with Bond to save the world. It also saw romance blossom between Jaws and Dolly, a small, pig-tailed blonde with braces, comically played by Blanch Ravalec.

(l-r) Christopher Lee, Kiel, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens

Kiel joined fellow Bond baddies, Sir Christopher Lee, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens, at a Bafta tribute to the Bond films in 2002. He reportedly said: “It is always more fun to play a bad guy than to be yourself as you can create a character unlike your own and be someone you are not for a change.”

Richard Kiel,  May 2000

Kiel had been in frail health for some years, following a serious car accident in the early nineties which affected his balance. He regularly used a walking stick or a mobility scooter, but retained an upbeat disposition.

(l-r) Britt Ekland, Tania Mallet, Richard Kiel and Eunice Gayson

Richard Kiel was reunited with former Bond girls Britt Ekland (The Man with the Golden Gun), Tania Mallet (Goldfinger) and Eunice Gayson (From Russia With Love) in London for the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Bond franchise in 2012.

Richard Kiel and Roger Moore

Sir Roger Moore and Kiel were last together just a week ago, when they recorded the BBC Radio 4 show The Reunion, with Britt Ekland. Sir Roger said he was “totally distraught to learn of my dear friend Richard Kiel’s passing”. The pair will forever be linked in the minds of 1970s film-goers – with Moore’s Bond squaring up to Kiel’s steel-toothed villain.

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COOL PEOPLE – DON KNOTTS, FUNNY MAN

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KNOTTS DON K DON DON KNOTTS

COOL PEOPLE – Bill Murray Has Inspired 200 Fans To Dedicate An Entire Art Exhibit To Him In San Francisco

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Bill Murray Has Inspired 200 Fans To Dedicate An Entire Art Exhibit To Him In San

Francisco

Pinar

Creatives from all around the world have submitted work inspired by Bill Murray for an

art tribute show called The Murray Affair, to celebrate the famous 63-year-old actor and

his legendary filmography.

Curated by Ezra Croft, The Murray Affair: A Bill Murray Art Show is scheduled to open on August 8th at SF Public Works. Check out the exhibit’s website for more info.

When John Barrymore was on his deathbed in 1942, he received a wire from W.C. Fields.

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When John Barrymore was on his deathbed in 1942, he received a wire from W.C. Fields.

It said YOU CAN’T DO THIS TO ME.

COOL PEOPLE – ROBIN WILLIAMS ONCE BOUGHT CONAN O’BRIEN A BICYCLE

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CONAN O’BRIEN TALKS ABOUT ROBIN WILLIAMS

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Published on Aug 12, 2014

CONAN Highlight: Conan recalls Robin’s incredible generosity and his many hilarious visits to the show.

COOL PEOPLE – LEONARDO DICAPRIO: “I AM A LOT CALMER NOW”

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  • Jeff Vespa/Contour by Getty

LEONARDO DICAPRIO: “I AM A LOT CALMER NOW”

November 9, 2011

Mr. DiCaprio, wouldn’t it be nice to do a shitty romantic comedy every once in a while?

I am completely open for doing a romantic comedy but I will never do something just for the sake of doing a specific genre or because it’s the time or place to do a different type of movie. I think that would be a huge mistake. Ultimately I read a script and I say, “Woah, I am emotionally engaged in this.” I never think about the subject matter, what it will be to popular culture, what it means historically – ultimately all that stuff passes and this movie will come out and it’s either good or it’s not. So that’s the only way I know how to pick films, otherwise I am not connected to it.

How important is it for you to challenge yourself even further with every film that you do?

That really depends on the role. It’s always this grand search in the industry to find good material. Whenever there is good material they all jump on it and it’s like a food fight to get it made. That’s why so many things take years and years to develop because it all shows up on screen. If there are holes in the story structure, if it’s not a compelling, moving narrative, that shows on screen and the movie fails.

You seem to be winning the food fight, considering the material that you get.

It’s been director driven. I have to say that whatever decisions I make, I really do think that movie making is a director’s medium. They are the people that ultimately shape the film and a director can take great material and turn it into garbage if they are not capable of making a good movie. So that is why I have chosen to work with directors that I feel can transport themselves in the audiences mind.

You have worked with Spielberg, Nolan, Eastwood, Mendes, Boyle, Cameron, not to mention you are a regular with Scorsese. Is there anyone left on your list?

There are a lot of directors I’d still love to work with. Paul Thomas Anderson is someone I’d love to work with. I think Alejandro González Iñárritu is very talented. Ang Lee is very talented. I mean, there are a lot of people. There are many great directors out there.

How much of your life involves making movies and thinking about movies?

A lot of it, that is for sure. (Laughs) I can’t say that it isn’t the most dominant thing going on right now. Look, the truth is that I always wanted to be an actor; it was always my dream and now is the time where I am really able to choose my own parts.

You have been able to do that for a while…

Yes, but I know a lot of actors who I grew up with in the industry – growing up in Los Angeles – that don’t get to do that. I just keep imagining myself thirty years from now thinking, “Why didn’t you take advantage of all the opportunities you had? Look at all the people you could have worked with, the roles you could have done. Go for it.” And that’s what I am thinking.

So do you put other things aside?

No, I don’t. Either they fit in in a natural way or they don’t. I never want to force anything but I do know that ultimately this is what I love doing and those other things will find a way to happen.

So you always knew that acting is what you wanted to do?

I really don’t remember. But I do remember loving to imitate my mother’s friends. I’d do little performances imitating them, making fun of them, making her laugh, making my grandparents laugh.

Sounds like you were a handful.

I kind of am an energetic person. It seems calmer now, but you should have seen me when I was younger. Whew! I would have been very difficult to be around, especially before I became a teenager. I don’t know how my mother dealt with me. I was just running, constantly doing things. I am a lot calmer now, but I still have a lot of energy.

Do you ever think you’ll lose that energy and try something else completely?

I could one day. But I happen to love acting, I happen to love doing movies. We are all shaped from these memories we have as young people and those were my earliest memories: wanting to be an actor, pushing my parents to take me out on auditions. I didn’t even know you could get paid for it but I wanted to do it. When I found out you could get paid for it then I said, “Okay, this is what I really want to do.” I am getting to fulfill that so I am not going to do anything, for now anyway, to change that.

Is it strange when you reflect on how completely you’ve achieved your childhood dream?

I sometimes have to look back and say, “Wow, this is amazing what has happened to me. I have been able to fulfill a lot of these dreams that I had when I was very young.” I would have never guessed that I would have gotten to have one tiny role in a Martin Scorsese film and to have done four now, it’s pretty amazing. I have to say it’s a pretty amazing feeling. But at the same time it becomes addictive! So yes, my dreams have been surpassed.