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Beale Street’s Colorful History: Entertainment, Entrepreneurs, Murder & Blues

beale collage




Memphis Music History


Fats Waller & Alberta Hunter Beale Street Blues (1927)


Beale Street Mama (Bessie Smith, 1923) Jazz Legend


Memphis Tennessee – Beale Street, Rock’N’Roll, Blues & Soul Music – BIG USA DOKU # 13


January 30

This week, tens of thousands of blues musicians and fans will descend upon Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee for the Blues Foundation’s International Blues Challenge — a competition where representatives from blues associations across the world compete for the top spot in a four day battle of the bands.  The winner receives great accolades, as well as guaranteed headliner positions on numerous blues festivals across the country. The IBC’s host, Beale Street, is one of the most famous musical streets in the world, and boasts a long and storied history.

For over 150 years, Beale has hosted Blues music, entertainment, drinking, gambling, and even murder. Beale played a pivotal role in branding Memphis as one of the most musically rich cities in the world, and was prominent in hosting some of the first Black business owners in the south. In between, the sometimes-infamous street was host to the birth of Blues music,  the civil rights movement, Rock n’ Roll, and countless beers, racks of ribs, and bands.

The Beginning of Beale

Beale Street was first created as a part of South Memphis by city planner Robertson Topp. Though the origins of how Beale was given it’s name are murky, the official story is that it was named for a long-forgotten war hero. During the early days of Beale, the area became home to a great number of freed slaves and free African-Americans, many from the Mississippi Delta, as well as Irish and Italian immigrants, living peacefully among Memphis’ residents, with reportedly few racial tensions.

Much of the lack of violence that was so destructive in the Jim Crow south was attributed to the occupation of Memphis by Union troops. During Union occupation, many black men were recruited and commissioned as soldiers. Once the war was over, however, the troops left and racial tensions quickly came to a boil, resulting in the Memphis Riots in 1866, where a number of black churches and homes were burned, and over forty African Americans lost their lives.

The horrors committed against the black community during the riots led to the rapid ratification of the 14th Amendment, stating that every person should have equal protection under the law. This would be the backbone of civil rights cases that, 100 long years later, would break longstanding Jim Crow policies, stir peaceful protests in the same neighborhood — and on Beale Street, and tragically end the life of one of the greatest American heroes, and the most powerful civil rights champion, just blocks away.

Beale continued for decades to act as a relatively safe haven for racial minorities in the city — a place where people could enjoy themselves free from fear of malice, where African Americans could own businesses, largely without the concern of oppression or terrorism from the government or racist sects. Politicians in the area were well aware of the power in numbers within the community, especially in the strong voting power of the black minority, and as a result, continued to ensure a largely peaceful co-existence of the neighborhood around Beale.

Gambling, Murder, Blues, and the Birth of Rock on Beale

The Monarch - The infamous "Castle of Missing Men"

By the turn of the 20th century,  Beale Street had become something of a self-contained microcosm, with churches, a pharmacy, grocery, public housing, and entertainment. Beale had also become a place with a dark underbelly —  where murder in it’s rough-and-tumble gambling halls was a regular occurrence. Many men spoke about the infamous Monarch, on 340 Beale. In Paul Oliver’s Conversation with the Blues, a number of former Beale residents spoke with candor about the building that was known as “The Castle of Missing Men”, where many gamblers and drinkers went in but never came out. Behind the Monarch was a funeral home, and it was reported that men who were killed in the bar room for cheating, arguing, or some other perceived injustice, would be quickly and quietly carried to the crematorium through the alley.

The famous gangster Machine Gun Kelly sold bootleg liquor on Beale during the prohibition, as the area took on what has been described as a “carnival” atmosphere, where ambulances waited in rows for the next victim to stumble out of a gambling hall, bluesmen played on corners and in door frames, traveling shows pushed alcohol labeled as “medicines”, and iconic figures like Bessie Smith played the Old Daisy,  (which still stands and will be hosting a number of blues acts during IBC).

W.C. Handy was probably Beale’s most famous resident prior to Elvis Presley, and his presence continues to be felt through his giant statue, a museum on Beale dedicated to his life in his original house, and numerous other accolades showered upon the man known as the “Father of the Blues”. A mayoral candidate in the early 1900s, in an effort to win the black vote, hired Handy to create a theme song for his mayoral bid. The resulting tune was “Mr. Crump”, which Handy reworked and released as “memphis blues“, which quickly became one of his most famous numbers. W.C. went on to be a highly successful artist and band leader with numerous hits to his credit, earning his position as arguably the most celebrated of the decades-long list of musicians on Beale. Parks, bars, and streets bear the name of Handy, who’s music is celebrated as an irreplaceable part of Americana music.

In 1946, a young man named Riley B. King trekked to Beale to seek out his Cousin, musician Bukka White. While King had cut his teeth playing on Church Street in his adopted hometown of Indianola, Beale was a much larger platform, and King “got his licks” busking the famous street. He landed a job as a disc jockey for WDIA radio station in Memphis by making an on-the-spot jingle. It was there that he picked up the handle of the Beale Street Blues Boy, which was later shortened to Blues Boy, and finally, B.B. 45 years later, the celebrated blues club bearing his name was opened with great fanfare on the corner of Second and Beale. Just a single block away, Gibson Guitar’s famous factory produces B.B. King’s signature ES-355 Semi-Hollow body, and boasts a two-story likeness of King’s famous “Lucille” in the reception area.

At the same time as B.B. was earning what would become international widespread fame, another young man was daily found roaming the streets of Beale in search of the blues. A shy and wiry Elvis Presley couldn’t stay away from the blues music that moved him.  “When I was in Memphis with my band, he used to stand in the wings and watch us perform,” B.B King said to Sepia of the future fellow “King”. Not long after, the young man wandered into Sun studio to make a single record “for his mother’s birthday.” Owner Sam Phillips called him back some months later, and on the weekend of July 4th, Presley cut “That’s All Right Mama”, a blues number by Arthur Crudup. Elvis was an instant hit, becoming a driving force in the creation of what Jerry Wexler would soon call Rock n’ Roll. But through his international accolades and unprecedented worldwide fame, Presley always called Memphis home. Purchasing a tract of land and large house south of town, he called the estate Graceland.

Memphis fights for Civil Rights, and Beale Dies and is Revived

A peaceful protest march past Beale Street. The building on the left is now home to B.B. King's Blues Club.

by the mid-1960s, The Civil Rights movement was in full swing. Brown v. Board of Education, using the 14th Amendment (created in the wake of the 1866 Memphis Riots), had finally cracked the “Separate but Equal” laws which were masquerading as equality, but ultimately, were used to continue to enable widespread segregation. Peaceful protest marches and demonstrations began across the south as African Americans struggled for equality.

Memphis became a hotbed of activity in the movement, home to many key civil rights events such as the 1968 sanitation strike. On April 3rd, Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. returned to Memphis, as he had a great number of times, to make a stirring, compelling, and ultimately prophetic speech, known by many as “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop”. On April 4th, 1968, only 6 blocks from Beale, an assassin gunned Dr. King down as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, now known as the National Civil Rights Museum.

King’s murder changed Memphis. Racial tensions again boiled as riots broke into the streets, most starting on Beale. As Beale Black & Blue: Life and Music on Black America’s Main Street stated, “The riots and looting rampages left shops with broken windows and ransacked counters. Stores closed, buildings emptied.”  For decades, the street had been something of a safe haven; where African Americans could own businesses and enjoy themselves, largely without fear of racism and persecution, but  the area began to descend into ruin. The Memphis housing Authority bulldozed some of the landmarks that had fallen into disrepair as many businesses had closed up shop. By the 1970s, Beale had eroded into a virtual ghost town, despite an act of Congress officially declaring the iconic street the Home of the Blues in 1977. As one of the great epicenters of the Blues had all but died, a renaissance of blues music, the first of many, was brewing across the world. According to Beale Black & Blue,

Rubble of a demolished building, across from The Daisy Theater

There was yet another irony to add to the contradictions that figured so prominently into the mile-long maelstrom. As Beale lay dying, the blues that had helped bring it fame sprang to life again. Elvis Presley’s blue suede blues branched out into amplified hard rock, rock and soul, and progressive country rock; the Beatles acknowledged their debt to blues old timers like Lightnin Hopkins; the Rolling Stones took their name from a Muddy Waters song; and there was born a new interest of  what Beale Streeter Willie Blackwell called the “true blues — the old time, natural blues.”

Fueled by the interest in blues, rock & roll, B.B. King, and Elvis Presley, a strong investment was made into the street in the 1980s, fueling re-establishment of new businesses, and revitalization of old ones. Tourists made their way back to the Home of the Blues, slowly at first, then quickly, as the live music poured into the streets. By 2009, Beale Street alone was reporting nearly $32 Million in gross sales. With the revitalization and tourism that has come with the street in the past two decades, there has been some criticism that the street has become a sort of caricature of it’s former self. Regardless, the music has a nearly unprecedented opportunity to bring new exposure to the millions that walk the streets of Beale during their trips and vacations — undoubtedly the first time many new visitors are even willing to hear the blues.

International Blues Challenge

As thousands of bands, fans, major blues players, entertainers, and reporters (including American Blues Scene) descend on Beale, the street once again takes a party atmosphere as only the blues can provide, colliding a searing helping of original Memphis soul with dozens of different styles, takes, and interpretations of hundreds of artist’s blues music and dedication. Most of the buildings that exist on Beale are the same buildings that have been frequented by the great many music lovers and great musicians that came in the 100 years before, providing a proprietary sense of history to the legendary street.

In 1890, Beale Street underwent a classy renovation with the addition of the Grand Opera House, later known as the Orpheum. The Orpheum, originally built in the late 1800s and rebuilt in grand fashion in 1928 after a fire, was a place for vaudeville, nationally touring shows, and early movies. Sparing no expense, the theater was built to be larger than life — a Memphis jewel. During the International Blues Challenge, the best-of-the-best will adorn the stage at the Orpheum, and a 2012 winner will be crowned!

American Blues Scene will be covering the event, as we do every year, and will be bringing you up-to-the-minute happenings. Stay tuned to the American Blues Scene to be at the event without leaving your screen.



Johnny Cash Biography




He’s the Man in Black. Join WatchMojo.com as we count down our picks for the top 10 Johnny Cash songs. Special thanks to our users Sam Ricketts, ramondo elderli, Charlie Rainger, happychaosofthenorth, Philip Folta, Charlie Rainger, Justin Kennon, Al Bebak and Jack Morris for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.com/suggest!

Johnny Cash’s last interview final ‘I Expect My Life To End Soon’


Guitarist, Songwriter, Singer (1932–2003)



Johnny Cash, the Man in Black, was a singer, guitarist and songwriter whose music innovatively mixed country, rock, blues and gospel influences.


Born on February 26, 1932, in Kingsland, Arkansas, Johnny Cash joined the Air Force in 1950 and trained in Texas where he met his first wife. After his service and discharge, he formed a band and landed a record deal. By the early 1960s, he was a musical superstar, known for his innovative hit songs with gospel undertones, such as with hit songs like. In 1967, he married June Carter. He recorded his last track of his final album a week before his death in 2003.

Early Life

Singer and songwriter Johnny Cash was born John R. Cash on February 26, 1932, in Kingsland, Arkansas. The son of poor Southern Baptist sharecroppers, Cash, one of seven children born to Ray and Carrie Rivers Cash, moved with his family at the age of 3 to Dyess, Arkansas, so that his father could take advantage of the New Deal farming programs instituted by President Roosevelt. There, the Cash clan lived in a five-room house and farmed 20 acres of cotton and other seasonal crops.

John, or J.R. as he was known to those close to him, spent the bulk of the next 15 years out in the fields, working alongside his parents and brothers and sisters. It wasn’t always an easy life, Cash would later recall. At the age of 10 he was hauling water for a road gang and at 12 years old he moving large sacks of cotton.

“The entire family, my parents, two brothers and two sisters spent the first night in the truck under a tarpaulin” Cash once said about his family’s move to Dyess. “The last thing I remember before going to sleep was my mother beating time on the old Sears-Roebuck guitar, singing ‘What Would You Give In Exchange For Your Soul.”

Music was indeed one of the ways the Cash family found escape from some of the hardship. Songs surrounded the young Johnny Cash, be it his mother’s folk and hymn ballads, or the working music people sang out in the fields.

From an early age Cash, who first picked up the guitar at the age of 12, showed a love for the music that enveloped his life. Perhaps sensing that her boy had a gift for song, Carrie Rivers Cash scraped together enough money so that Johnny could take singing lessons. Cash was only in his early teens and didn’t have much in the way of formal musical training, but after just three lessons his teacher, enthralled with Cash’s already unique singing style, told him to stop taking lessons and to never deviate from his natural voice.

Religion, too, had a strong impact on Cash’s childhood. His mother was a devout member of the Pentacostal Church of God, and his older brother Jack seemed committed to joining the priesthood. Chances are John’s own faith would have always exerted itself to some degree on his own life, but Jack’s tragic death in 1944 at the age of 14 in a farming accident solidified Cash’s own faith in God.

These things, his farming life and his family’s religion, were never strayed too far from in Cash’s career. The evidence of this can be seen in songs like “Pickin’ Time” and “Five Feet High,” a film he made about his visit to Israel and his close relationship with evangelist Billy Graham.

Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two

In 1950, Cash graduated high school and left Arkansas for Pontiac, Michigan, where he found work sweeping floors at an auto plant. The employment and Cash’s time in Michigan were short lived, however, and about a month after taking the job, he bolted for the U.S. Air Force. As a military man, Cash did his basic training in Texas, where met Vivian Liberto, whom he’d eventually marry and father four daughters with. For the bulk of his four years in the Air Force, Cash was stationed in Landsberg, West Germany, where he worked as a radio intercept officer, eavesdropping on Soviet radio traffic.

It was also in Germany that Cash began to turn more of his attention toward music. With a few of his Air Force buddies he formed the Landsberg Barbarians, giving Johnny a chance to play live shows, teach himself more of the guitar, and also take a shot at songwriting. “We were terrible,” he said later, “but that Lowenbrau beer will make you feel like you’re great. We’d take our instruments to these honky-tonks and play until they threw us out or a fight started. I wrote ‘Folsom Prison Blues’ in Germany in 1953.”

After his discharge in 1954, Cash settled in Memphis, Tennessee, where he married Vivian and worked, as best he could, as an appliance salesman. Pursuing music on the side, Cash teamed up with a couple of mechanics, Marshall Grant and Luther Perkins, who worked with Johnny’s older brother Roy. The young musicians soon formed a tight bond, with the crew and their wives often heading over to Luther’s house on Friday nights to play music, much of it gospel.

Cash, who banged away on an old $5 guitar he’d purchased in Germany, was the front-man for what became known as Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two. Their sound was a synthesis of blues and country-and-western music, which was coined “rockabilly” by those in the record industry. (In 1960, with the addition of drummer W.S. Holland, the group was later named Tennessee Three.) “He was a decent singer, not a great one,” wrote Marshall Grant, in his 2006 autobiography, I Was There When it Happened: My Life with Johnny Cash. “But there was power and presence in his voice.”

The Million Dollar Quartet

In July 1954, another Memphis musician, Elvis Presley, cut his first record, sparking a wave of not only Elvis-mania but an interest in the local producer, Sun Records owner Sam Phillips, who had issued the record. Later that same year Cash, Grant and Perkins made an unannounced visit to Sun to ask Phillips for an audition. The Sun Records owner gave in and Cash and the boys returned to Sun in late 1954. At the audition Phillips liked their sound but not their gospel driven song choices, which he felt would have a limited market.

Phillips was looking for new material and encouraged the group to return with an original song. In early 1955, Cash and his group did just that, recording the song “Hey Porter,” which Cash wrote just a week after that first Sun session. While met with mediocre reviews, Cash’s second release, “Cry, Cry, Cry” later that year peaked at No. 14 on the Billboard charts. Other hits soon followed, including a pair of Top 10 singles in “So Doggone Lonesome” and “Folsom Prison Blues.” But true fame arrived in 1956, when Cash wrote and released “I Walk The Line,” which catapulted to No. 1 and sold 2 million copies.

The success and his association with Phillips allowed Cash to join an elite group of artists that included Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, and Jerry Lee Lewis—they were known as “The Million Dollar Quartet.” In 1957 Cash, now the father of two young daughters (Roseanne and Kathy) released his debut album, Johnny Cash with His Hot & Blue Guitar.

Drugs and Divorce

By the early 1960s, Johnny Cash, who had relocated his family to Ventura, California, and left Sun for Columbia Records in 1958, was a musical superstar. With an unrelenting tour schedule, Cash was on the road 300 nights a year, barnstorming the country with a barrage of popular hits including Ring of Fire (1963) and Understand Your Man (1964). He also appeared regularly on the Louisiana Hayride and Grand Ole Opry radio broadcasts.

But the schedule and the pressures that faced him took a toll on his personal life. Drugs and alcohol were frequent tour companions while Vivian, left home to take care of their young family, which now included Cindy (b. 1959) and Tara (b. 1961) grew increasingly frustrated with her husband’s absence.

In 1966 Vivian finally filed for divorce. Cash returned to Memphis, where his life continued to spiral out of control. The following year, after a serious drug binge, Cash was discovered in a near-death state by a policeman in a small village in Georgia. There were other incidents, too, including an arrest for smuggling amphetamines into the US across the Mexican border, and accidently starting a forest fire in Tennessee, which resulted in a near six-figure fine for the singer. “I took all the drugs there are to take, and I drank,” Cash recalled. “Everybody said that Johnny Cash was through ’cause I was walkin’ around town 150 pounds. I looked like walking death.”

June Carter and Rehab

The turning point came in 1967, when he met singer-songwriter June Carter, a member of the founding family of country music. Carter, who first befriended and then, in 1968, married Cash, stepped in and helped him clean up his life. With Carter’s support, Cash kicked his drug habit and became a devout Christian fundamentalist.With his new wife, Cash embarked on a remarkable turn around. In 1969, he began hosting The Johnny Cash Show, a TV variety series that showcased contemporary musicians ranging from Bob Dylan to Louis Armstrong. It also provided a forum for Cash to explore a number of social issues, too, tackling discussions that ranged from the war in Vietnam to prison reform to the rights of Native Americans.

The same year his show debuted, Cash also took home two Grammy Awards for the live album Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison (1968). The album was a critical and commercial success and reached Gold record status by December 1969. Four months later Cash and Carter celebrated the birth of their first and only child, John Carter Cash, in March 1970.

The ensuing decade offered up more success for the artist, with Cash’s music career flourishing with the release of the hit singles “A Thing Called Love” (1972) and “One Piece at a Time” (1976). He crossed over into a new medium in 1972, when he made an acclaimed appearance with Kirk Douglas in the movie, A Gunfight. In addition, he wrote the scores for the feature Little Fauss and Big Halsy (1970) and the TV movie The Pride of Jesse Hallam(1980). In 1975, he published a bestselling autobiography Man in Black.

For the rest of the 1970s and through the 1980s and the early 1990s, while not producing the frequent run of hits that he once had, Cash continued to maintain a busy schedule. In 1980, Cash was accepted as the youngest member of the Country Music Association Hall of Fame.

Increasingly, Cash also teamed up with other musicians. In 1987, Cash banded with former Sun Records’ artists Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis and Roy Orbison to record the widely popular compilation The Class Of ’55. For the album The Highwayman (1985), Cash collaborated with Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, and Waylon Jennings. Billed as the Highwaymen, the quartet consistently toured throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s, releasing two more records, The Highwayman 2 (1990) and The Road Goes on Forever (1995). In the early part of the 1990s, Cash stepped into the studio with U2 to record The Wanderer, a track that would appear on the group’s 1993 release, Zooropa.

Throughout this time, though, Cash’s health problems and his continued battles with addiction, were nearby. In 1983, he underwent abdominal surgery in Nashville to correct the problems caused by his years of amphetamine use. Following the operation, he checked himself into the Betty Ford Clinic. In 1987, Cash again went under the knife, this time for heart surgery following his collapse on tour in Iowa.

But like always Cash pushed on. Not long after his induction into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, the singer took the stage for the Lollapalooza alternative rock tour and then teamed up with music producer Rick Rubin. The latter move proved to be instrumental in forging a Johnny Cash renaissance.

Under Rubin, Cash released American Recordings in 1994, a 13-track acoustic album that mixed traditional ballads with modern compositions. The album earned Cash a new audience and a 1995 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album. Cash’s next compilation was a three-disc set appropriately titled Love, God, Murder (2000).

Final YearsIn 2002 Cash released American IV: The Man Comes Around, a mix of originals and covers including songs from Beatles to Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. The album, recorded in cabin on the singer’s Nashville estate, was the fourth Cash-Rubin compilation. More significantly, it came five years after the singer had announced he’d been diagnosed with a rare nervous-system disorder called Shy-Drager Syndrome.

Over the next year, Cash’s health continued to decline. He rarely made public appearances. Then in May 2003, June Carter died. Cash, though, continued to work. With Rubin at his side, the singer sat down to record what would be known as American V: A Hundred Highways. Just week before his death on September 12, 2003, from complications associated with diabetes, Cash wrapped up his final track. “Once June passed, he had the will to live long enough to record, but that was pretty much all,” Rubin recalled around the album’s release on July 4, 2004. “A day after June passed, he said, ‘I need to have something to do every day. Otherwise, there’s no reason for me to be here.'”

Starkly arranged and sometimes mournful, the songs highlighted Cash’s older and rougher sounding voice, which resonated with a raw honesty. Cash earned a posthumous Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video forGod’s Gonna Cut You Down. He was also posthumously honored at the CMA annual awards in late 2003, winning best album for American IV, best single, and best video.

Not surprisingly, Cash’s life and music continues to resonate. In 2005, the story of his love affair with June Cash was made into a feature film, Walk the Line, starring Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon. In 2006, a two-CD collection of unearthed songs from an obscure recording session Cash did in 1973 was released. And the following year the community of Starkville, Mississippi, paid honor to the performer and his arrest there in 1965 for picking flowers with the Johnny Cash Flower Pickin’ Festival. Cash was also issued an official pardon.

“I think he’ll be remembered for the way he grew as a person and an artist,” wrote Kris Kristofferson in 2004, upon Cash’s selection by Rolling Stonemagazine as the 31st greatest artist of all time. “He went from being this guy who was as wild as Hank Williams to being almost as respected as one of the fathers of our country. He was friends with presidents and with Billy Graham. You felt like he should’ve had his face on Mount Rushmore.”

In December 2013, it was revealed that a new album from Cash had been found. The album, Out Among the Stars, was discovered by John Carter Cash, Johnny Cash’s son. Billy Sherrill produced the album, which was recorded in 1981 and 1984 and was never released by Columbia Records, Cash’s label at the time. The album was stored by Johnny Cash and his wife June Cash. The album received a release date of March 24, 2014.

Johnny Cash - The Man in Black
Johnny Cash – The Man in Black(TV-14; 1:11)

Johnny Cash - Bond with Bob Dylan
Johnny Cash – Bond with Bob Dylan(TV-14; 3:21)

Johnny Cash - Meeting Rick Rubin
Johnny Cash – Meeting Rick Rubin(TV-14; 3:48)

Johnny Cash - Growing Up on the Land
Johnny Cash – Growing Up on the Land(TV-14; 3:23)

Johnny Cash - Hurt
Johnny Cash – Hurt(TV-14; 3:32)

Johnny Cash - The Man in Black
Johnny Cash – The Man in Black(TV-14; 2:52)

Johnny Cash - Folsom Prison Blues
Johnny Cash – Folsom Prison Blues(TV-14; 3:17)

Johnny Cash - Freedom in Memphis
Johnny Cash – Freedom in Memphis(TV-14; 2:52)

Marty Stuart - Johnny Cash's Biggest Fan
Marty Stuart – Johnny Cash’s Biggest Fan(TV-PG; 2:17)

 Johnny Cash – Ghost Riders In The Sky


1/3 of vegetarians eat meat when drunk


Monday, 12 October 2015

Almost three quarters of confessors said they kept their meat meals a secret.Photo / iStock
 A drunken late night stop off at McDonald’s is proving too tempting for a third of vegetarians, according to a survey.

A study has found a third of vegetarians admit to eating meat when on a drunken night out.

One in three admitted to eating meat every time they were under the influence and noted kebabs and burgers as their meat cheat of choice.

Of the 1700 vegetarians surveyed, 27 per cent said they ate bacon, 19 per cent ate fried chicken and 14 per cent went for pork sausages.

Almost three quarters of confessors said they kept their meat meals a secret.

The survey was conducted by a British money saving website, Voucher Codes Pro.

Website founder, George Charles, said he knew of “a few vegetarians who sometimes crave meat, but it seems that a few are giving into their cravings when drunk.

“I think it’s important for friends of these vegetarians to support them when drunk and urge them not to eat meat as I’m sure they regret it the next day.”

– nzherald.co.nz

Stoned Ohio man calls cops because he’s too high, is found groaning on floor surrounded by Doritos, cookies, other snacks


Stoned Ohio man calls cops because he’s too high, is found groaning on floor surrounded by Doritos, cookies, other snacks

200 (13)
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tuesday, October 6, 2015, 3:50 PM A A A

The 22-year-old man called cops after smoking too much pot, telling police he couldn’t feel his hands.
YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio — Police in Ohio say they were called to a house by a man who complained he’d gotten too high smoking marijuana.

The Youngstown Vindicator reports that Austintown Township police on Friday found the 22-year-old man curled in a fetal position on the floor, groaning and surrounded by snacks that included Doritos, Goldfish crackers and Chips Ahoy cookies.

The newspaper reports that the man told officers he couldn’t feel his hands.

PreviousNextMmmmmm…..CHIPS! And cookies — so many cookies! Exported.; Enlarge

Officers found a glass jar of marijuana and paraphernalia in the man’s car after he gave them his keys. The man refused medical treatment and so far has not been charged with a crime.

104-Year-Old Street Artist Yarn-Bombs Her Town


104-Year-Old Street Artist Yarn-Bombs Her Town

104-Year-Old Street Artist Yarn-Bombs Her Town

104-year-old great-grandmother Grace Brett just might be the oldest street artist in the world. She yarn-bombed her town with the help of the Souter Stormers, a secretive group of ‘yarnstormers’ that recently yarn-bombed 46 landmarks in the Scottish county of Borders.

HIWAY AMERICA -The World’s Fair in Queens, New York


The World’s Fair in Queens, New YorkWORLDS FAIR





The 1939/1940 and the 1964/1965 World’s Fairs
Towers from 1964-65 World's Fair at Flushing Meadows Park - Photo by John Roleke
Towers from 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows Park.  Photo by John Roleke

The World’s Fair was held twice in the New York City borough of Queens, once in 1939/1940 and again in 1964/1965 at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. These are the only World’s Fairs ever to be held over two seasons.

New York was also host to a World’s Fair in 1853, the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations held in Manhattan at what is now Bryant Park.

1939/1940 World’s Fair

This fair was the second largest ever held in the United States, second only to the St. Louis’s Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. Master planner Robert Moses used the fair as an opportunity to build Flushing Meadows Park, draining swampland and cleaning up the immense ash pile at the site known as Mount Corona. However, due to financial shortfalls, the park envisioned by Moses was not completed until the 1964/1965 fair.

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Tipping Etiquette Around the World

1964/1965 World’s Fair

The 1964/1965 World’s Fair was one of the high points of New York City history in the 1960s. It was a time of optimism before the travails of the Vietnam War and protest era. The fair attracted national and international attention and showcased the city that never sleeps and the dawn of the American Space Age.

Some 51 million visitors attended the fair. A generation of New Yorkers were touched by their visits to the fair. Strike up a conversation with New York Baby Boomers — anyone who was a child, teen, or young adult in the mid-1960s — and you’re bound to hear stories of the fair.

Legacy – Structures from the World’s Fairs

Some structures remains and have been repurposed at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, including:

  • 250-foot Towers of the New York State Pavilion (which still stand, somewhat precariously)
  • Unisphere
  • New York Hall of Science (a science museum which had been the Hall of Science)
  • The fair’s former Helipad is now the Terrace on the Park catering hall
  • World’s Fair Building/Churchill Tribute became the aviary at the Queens Zoo

The Queens Museum of Art is housed today in the former New York City pavilion from the 1939/1940 fair. The museum’s attractions include the Panorama, a scale-model of New York City built for the 1964/1965 fair, as well as exhibits and memorabilia of both fairs.

A TOUCH OF ART – amazing bathroom floors


The theme for these floor designs can be quite versatile, but as you can see from the pictures below, the most common designs include, dolphins, fish, water and sand. If watched from the right angle, these 3D floor designs can look alive to everyone. Even at first glance you can get the feeling of some dolphin or shark swimming right next to your feet. Or maybe the felling of walking by the ocean. Check out the following ideas and see if you will like to have a unique and awesome 3D floor design into your bathroom. Enjoy and stay up to date with us to find more amazing ideas for your home decor!


Street Artists Transformed This Abandoned Factory Into An Art Gallery


Street Artists Transformed This Abandoned Factory Into An Art Gallery

Street Artists Transformed This Abandoned Factory Into An Art Gallery

On the 9th of August 2015, an abandoned factory was reopened in a small town in central Bosnia and Herzegovina. The reopening, after decades of being forgotten, happened thanks to the work of 3 young guys. Artist collective HAD opened their…

17-Year-Old Syrian Refugee Carried His Puppy 500km To Greece


17-Year-Old Syrian Refugee Carried His Puppy 500km To Greece
Aslan, a 17-year-old #Syrian refugee who fled to the Greek island of Lesbos, didn’t complete the 500km (310mi) journey alone – he had his little puppy named Rose for company.