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HIGHWAY AMERICA- COLORADO CATTLE RANCHERS -Timeless Photographs Capture ‘The Simple Life’ of Colorado Cattle Ranchers

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Timeless Photographs Capture ‘The Simple Life’ of Colorado Cattle Ranchers

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Timelessness is a quality we all strive for in our images. It’s a quality earned, not given, through the time and effort put into conceptualizing, visualizing and capturing an image.

And when it is earned, the results are phenomenal… oftentimes winding back the clock or making time seem almost irrelevant to the image. Such is the case for the work of #Michael Crouser, a Minnesota-based photographer who has spent the past eight years documenting cattle ranching families in Colorado.

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The photographs Crouser captures leave us guessing at when they were taken and what gear was used. #Monochrome, filled with distinct tones and dramatic contrast, the images seem to almost pop off the screen.

Speaking with the #Huffington Post, Crouser was asked about the lifestyles and work of the cattle ranching families he’s spent just shy of a decade documenting.

His reply, as you might expect, was that the work these families do is not for the faint of heart; however, for generations it’s all they’ve done, and therefore all they know. They will continue to live “the simple life” for as long as they can until developers begin taking the land away piece by piece.

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On that note, Crouser goes on to point out that such a lifestyle probably isn’t going to be one that his subjects’ children and grandchildren will have.

“As the land in this region of Colorado becomes more valuable and practical for development than for growing hay and grazing cattle, ranching will disappear,” he tells Huff Po. “Along with these families, their operations and traditional ways of working.”

Below is a collection of images Crouser has been kind enough to share with us:

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To see more of Crouser’s #Mountain Ranch series, or if you’d like to browse through the rest of his portfolio, head on over to his website or give him a follow on Facebook and Tumblr.

‘Psylodelic’ Museum Unearths Hippie Artifacts From Woodstock Era

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‘Psylodelic’ Museum Unearths Hippie Artifacts From Woodstock Era

Ex-Jefferson Airplane guitarist Jorma Kaukonen opens trippy destination at his Ohio ranch

Jorma Kaukonen
Scotty Hall
APRIL 9, 2013 1:15 PM ET

A Haight-Ashbury Museum of Psychedelic Art and History is in development in San Francisco, but former Jefferson Airplane guitarist Jorma Kaukonen has beaten them to the idea. In June, Kaukonen will officially open the Psylodelic Museum, a collection of Haight-connected artifacts, at his Fur Peace Ranch in southeast Ohio.

“It’s a window of the time,” Kaukonen says. “To use a mixed-metaphor song title, it’s about the way we were.”

Housed in an old silo on the grounds of the ranch (hence the punny name), the museum currently includes donations from Kaukonen and longtime San Francisco-related friends. From his own personal collection, Kaukonen contributed concert posters from the Fillmore and Winterland (featuring LoveMuddy Waters and Moby Grape) as well as a rug from the famed Jefferson Airplane house. His old friend Wavy Gravy donated the sleeping bag he used at Woodstock. Jack Casady, Kaukonen’s former Airplane bandmate and ongoing partner in Hot Tuna, donated a custom-made tunic he wore at Woodstock and some of his old eyeglasses.

Amazing Apps: Woodstock Lives Again on Your Tablet PC

“You look at this stuff and think, ‘What were we thinking?'” Kaukonen says with a chuckle. “Jack had some of these unbelievably large glasses – like Elton John’s but without the jewelry.”

 

guitarneck side walk, Jorma
Scotty Hall

 

Casady credits his late wife, Diana, who recently passed away from cancer, with helping him salvage his vintage wardrobe. “I would say to her, ‘I’ll just rid of these clothes,’ and she would say, ‘No, we’ll find a place for them,'” he says. “So years ago I had them all dry-cleaned and hung and stuck in a closet. The clothes went along with the whole scene back then. It wasn’t about your image. It was just a hoot getting involved in designing your own clothes and guitar straps.”

In a sign of how far the musicians pushed the fashion envelope at the time, Casady remembers once trying to wear an outfit made from furniture upholstery: “The material was fantastic, but it was too hot to play in, so it was almost unusable.”

Although the posters and milieu bring to mind the heyday of the Airplane and theGrateful Dead, Kaukonen says tie-dye will be in short supply at the museum (which has so far raised just over $25,000 on Kickstarter); “A lot of people think of hippies as tie-dyed, but my memory of what I consider to be hippies is the people who dressed in Edwardian clothes or things from the American West,” he says. In that vein, Kaukonen donated some of the Native American-based jewelry he bought at the time, including a necklace that unintentionally resembled the Nazi symbol. “I wore it for a number of years,” he says. “Obviously, many people saw the Hakenkreuz [the Nazi party symbol], not the spiritual item I saw.”

 

Psychodelic Gallery design by Kevin Morgan | Wavy Gravey Woodstock Sleeping Bag

 

Many items from the era didn’t survive those heady times. Kaukonen says his own patch-covered bell bottoms are long gone (“mercifully,” he says), as are Casady’s legendary headbands. The bassist’s own set of Fillmore concert posters also bit the dust.  “When I shared a flat with Marty Balin in the Panhandle in San Francisco, I had every poster pinned to the wall,” Casady recalls. “So when it was time for me to get a house of my own, I just left them all on the wall. And there you have it.”

For future exhibits, Kaukonen is hoping to reach out to old musical friends like David Crosby and Paul Kantner, as well as Grace Slick, who retired from music years ago and now concentrates on painting. “She doesn’t do email,” he says, “so when I called her last year and got her answering machine, her outgoing message is her blowing a huge raspberry. Grace is still so funny.”

Founded in 1989, Fur Peace Ranch hosts guitar workshops and concerts (Steve Earlerecently played there), and Kaukonen admits that pulling in additional tourist revenue is another goal of the museum. “Even though we’re non-profit, we’re only non-profit by accident,” he says with another laugh. “My wife, Vanessa, thought we should have something of interest, like roadside America. All I know is that it’s going to be more interesting than the world’s largest ball of twine in Kansas.”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/psylodelic-museum-unearths-hippie-artifacts-from-woodstock-era-20130409#ixzz363c36tNx
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Where the Ocean Meets the Mountains

Librado Romero/The New York Times
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“Storm King Wavefield” Maya Lin’s new work at the Storm King Art Center, occupies a former gravel pit. More Photos »

MOUNTAINVILLE, N.Y. — When the painter Winslow Homer left New York City for this Hudson Valley hamlet in the summer of 1878, he was reported to be “a little under the weather.” He was probably suffering a nervous breakdown. Whether the cause was a failed romance or despair at seeing the Gilded Age shatter around him, we don’t know. But he felt unmoored and clung to the natural world. The dozens of watercolors he did that summer were landscape-filled, with sloping pastures and wall-like mountains dwarfing human figures, idylls so perfect that they look unreal.

The New York State Thruway buzzes through that landscape now. Most of the pastures are gone, but the mountains are still here: Schunnemunk, behind a series of ridges; Storm King, running high and long before dropping into the Hudson. And recently, some new additions, baby mountains, have appeared: seven undulating, grass-covered ranges of them.

These mini-Catskills were conceived and built — molded is really the word — by the artist Maya Lin as a permanent installation at the Storm King Art Center, the 500-acre sculpture park that for almost half a century has been devoted to the display of outdoor works either designed for the location or too large or strange to fit comfortably elsewhere.

Ms. Lin’s ambitious piece, “Storm King Wavefield,” was commissioned by the center, and installation of it, under the supervision of David R. Collens, an artist and Storm King’s director, began two years ago. Set in a shallow, amphitheaterlike depression, once a gravel pit supplying material for the Thruway, it covers 11 acres. Its seven parallel rows of rolling, swelling peaks were inspired by the forms of midocean waves but echo the mountains and hills around them.

Marine references make sense in a part of the world carved and smoothed by glaciers, and terrestrial themes have been central to Ms. Lin’s art. “My affinity has always been toward sculpting the earth,” she wrote in her autobiographical book “Boundaries” (2000). “This impulse has shaped my entire body of work.”

That impulse was little remarked upon at the beginning of her career, when she was known mostly as a creator of urban commemorative sculptures, the first and most famous being her Vietnam Veterans Memorial for the Mall in Washington. Designed when she was still a graduate student in architecture at Yale, this long, low chevron of buffed black granite inscribed with names of the war dead was as much a monument to healing and humility as to heroics, and it became a flashpoint for American feelings about a divisive war and a disorienting era.

A few years later she completed the Civil Rights Memorial for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Ala., again using black stone, this time a circular, tablelike slab of it incised with a historical timeline and rinsed by fountain water. In 1993 she returned to that format for her “Women’s Table” at Yale. Dedicated to the many women who had been underacknowledged presences at the university since the 19th century, the stone was carved with an open-ended spiral of numbers, each marking the enrollment of women in the university in a given year, with 1969 footnoted: “Yale admitted women into the undergraduate college.”

Initially, the political content of these works defined them. Now it is possible to step back and reassess them in light of Ms. Lin’s subsequent career, which took her out of the memorial business and in the more directly earth-sculpturing direction, a direction that, it turns out, she had been following all along.

Ms. Lin’s originating image for the Vietnam memorial, with its plain, straight slant like a Hudson Valley hillside, was of a blade slicing into and wounding the earth. The Civil Rights Memorial and “Women’s Table” were both based on a single natural process: the slow but certain shaping of earth, in the form of stone, by water. All three pieces were meant to interact organically, even sensually, with their viewers, inviting them to run their hands over stone, feel and hear the trickle of water.

In short, Ms. Lin was making a species of “earth art” from the start. And she has done so unequivocally since, most strikingly in a small series of “wave” pieces formed from piled and packed soil.

The first, “Wave Field,” installed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1995, is a 10,000-square-foot grouping of earthen mounds, the highest six feet, their shapes based on those of scientifically measured ocean waves. The second piece, “Flutter,” covers 30,000 square feet of a plot near the Federal Courthouse in Miami; the undulant shapes, child-size at three to four feet high, were inspired by the textures made in sand by the action of waves.

Small working models for these works are on view, along with several indoors pieces, in the exhibition “Maya Lin: Bodies of Water” in the Storm King Art Center Museum.

The “Storm King Wavefield” is the third and last of the series and by far the largest at 240,000 square feet, with heights of 15 feet. Like its predecessors, it is made of natural materials: dirt and grass. Like any landscape, it is a work in progress. Vegetation is still coming in, drainage issues are in testing mode, and there are unruly variables: woodchucks have begun converting one wave into an apartment complex.

But the piece is already a classic. It has the gravity of Ms. Lin’s commemorative sculptures and the sociability of the earlier “wave” pieces, which lent themselves to picnics, play and privacy. And, more immediately than almost any of her other outdoor projects, it is inextricable from nature, which is where, as I say, all her art starts.

Born in 1959, Ms. Lin was raised in rural Ohio, and as a child visited the great Serpent Mound and other American Indian earthworks in the Midwest. Through her father, a ceramicist who grew up in a Japanese-style house in China, she developed an affinity for the nature-saturated, but also nature-framing, aesthetic embodied in the Zen rock-and-sand garden, and in the Chinese ink-and-brush landscape, with its misted and surreally scaled vistas.

As a distillation of nature, the Zen garden is highly controlled: you view it from a fixed point and from a distance; you don’t physically enter it. In that sense, it is an image rather than an environment. By contrast, the “Storm King Wavefield” is embracingly environmental.

Seen from a slight elevation, it complements its hilly setting but interrupts it. (There is, after all, something a little freakish about these slinky, reptilian swellings in the ground.) Because the work does both, it sharpens your eye to existing harmonies and asymmetries otherwise overlooked.

When you descend into the troughs between the lines of waves, you may experience an entirely different set of sensations. You lose sight of all the other waves and of the larger prospects beyond them. Now you are down in the earth; it is rising over you, not you over it. You’re suddenly smaller, but also protected. Outside sounds are muffled, large-scale distractions reduced. The grand vision of hills upon hills, recession upon recession, drops away.

With it gone, you’re encouraged to concentrate on the details of what’s around you. That’s what, I suspect, all of Ms. Lin’s outdoor work is asking you to do: touch the stone, feel the water, smell the air, see how that patch of grass is different from another.

I suspect that the search for a similar kind of focus, and the relief from boundlessness it brings, is what Homer was after in Mountainville that summer. Whether he found it, I don’t know. He ended his life in a very different landscape, on the coast of Maine, where he produced painting after painting of waves crashing on rocks, water demolishing land, ceaseless natural destruction frozen in time.

In its own way, some of Ms. Lin’s most recent work has a similarly adamant, end-time character. I refer to the long-planned, multipart project she calls “The Last Memorial,” with which, over decades, she plans to monitor globally the corruption and demise of the natural environment that has been her subject and source.

What forms she will call on remain to be seen. But “Storm King Wavefield” is a different kind of work. Neither fatalistic nor utopian, commemorative nor history-free, natural nor artificial, unstable nor fixed, it is a puzzle to ponder but also — first things last — a soul-soothing place of retreat.

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“Storm King Wavefield” is on permanent view at Storm King Art Center, Old Pleasant Hill Road, Mountainville, N.Y.; (845) 534-3115, stormking.org. “Maya Lin: Bodies of Water” remains on view at the Storm King Art Center Museum through Nov. 15. A traveling survey of Ms. Lin’s work, “Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes,” organized by the Henry Art Gallery of the University of Washington, Seattle, is on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, through July 12.

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This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: May 9, 2009

 

An art review and headlines on Friday about a new installation by Maya Lin at the Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, N.Y., misidentified the region of New York State where the center is. It is in the Hudson Valley, not the Catskills.

BEATNIK HIWAY -Where the Ocean Meets the Mountains, N.Y. State

21 Creative Geniuses Doing What They Love In Life

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21 Creative Geniuses Doing What They Love In Life

21 Creative Geniuses Doing What They Love In Life

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These artists were all masters of their craft. While their road was never easy, you can see they had a special passion and determination in their element. It’s inspiring to see people do what they seem to have been born to do.

19. John Lennon leads The Quarry Men . Paul Mccartney watches from the crowd on the day they would meet. [July 6, 1957]

John Lennon leads <em>The Quarry Men </em>. Paul Mccartney watches from the crowd on the day they would meet.  [July 6, 1957]&amp;lt;img src=”http://www.distractify.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads//2014/03//2325.jpg&#8221; alt=”John Lennon leads &amp;amp;lt;em&amp;amp;gt;The Quarry Men &amp;amp;lt;/em&amp;amp;gt;. Paul Mccartney watches from the crowd on the day they would meet. [July 6, 1957]” title=”John Lennon leads &amp;amp;lt;em&amp;amp;gt;The Quarry Men &amp;amp;lt;/em&amp;amp;gt;. Paul Mccartney watches from the crowd on the day they would meet. [July 6, 1957]” width=”1200″ height=”896″&amp;gt;

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20. U.S. chess prodigy, Bobby Fisher, plays 50 opponents simultaneously at a Hollywood hotel. He won 47, lost 1, and drew 2. [April 12, 1964]

U.S. chess prodigy, Bobby Fisher, plays 50 opponents simultaneously at a Hollywood hotel. He won 47, lost 1, and drew 2. [April 12, 1964]&amp;lt;img src=”http://www.distractify.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads//2014/03//2422.jpg&#8221; alt=”U.S. chess prodigy, Bobby Fisher, plays 50 opponents simultaneously at a Hollywood hotel. He won 47, lost 1, and drew 2. [April 12, 1964]” title=”U.S. chess prodigy, Bobby Fisher, plays 50 opponents simultaneously at a Hollywood hotel. He won 47, lost 1, and drew 2. [April 12, 1964]” width=”1200″ height=”862″&amp;gt;

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Andy Warhol’s lost computer art found 30 years later

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Andy Warhol’s lost computer art found 30 years later

Andy Warhol’s lost computer art found 30 years later
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By Dana Ford, CNN

updated 11:25 AM EDT, Sun April 27, 2014

The Andy Warhol Museum released images that were recently recovered from an Amiga computer. Warhol created the images as part of a commission by the Commodore computer company, which made the Amiga, to demonstrate the computer’s graphic arts capabilities. The images had been trapped on floppy discs in an obsolete format. One of the images released is this self-portrait titled “Andy2.” The Andy Warhol Museum released images that were recently recovered from an Amiga computer. Warhol created the images as part of a commission by the Commodore computer company, which made the Amiga, to demonstrate the computer’s graphic arts capabilities. The images had been trapped on floppy discs in an obsolete format. One of the images released is this self-portrait titled “Andy2.”

Warhol used the Amiga to create this version of a Campbell’s soup can.
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Warhol created his vision of “Venus” with three eyes.

The Commodore Amiga computer, software and other equipment used by Warhol.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
The works, created on an Amiga computer, were trapped on floppy disks
They include doodles and experiments with the pop artist’s iconic images
Archivist: “We can only wonder how he would explore and exploit” today’s technologies

(CNN) — The soup can looks familiar in an unfamiliar way, but the name at the bottom of the image is unmistakable: Andy Warhol.

The Andy Warhol Museum announced Thursday the discovery of new works by the pop artist, works which had been trapped on floppy disks for close to 30 years.

They were made on an Amiga computer in 1985 and were unlocked by the Carnegie Mellon University Computer Club and its Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, according to a statement from the museum.

“Warhol saw no limits to his art practice. These computer-generated images underscore his spirit of experimentation and his willingness to embrace new media — qualities which, in many ways, defined his practice from the early 1960s onwards,” said Eric Shiner, The Warhol’s director.

The works were commissioned by the now-defunct Commodore International to showcase the computer’s capabilities. They include doodles and experiments with Warhol’s iconic images, like the Campbell’s soup can.

The works might have been lost forever if it had not been for Cory Arcangel, an artist who watched a YouTube clip showing Warhol promoting the release of the Amiga 1000 in 1985.

He started to poke around, eventually approaching the museum’s chief archivist to talk about the possibility of searching for the files amid The Warhol’s archives collection.

“In the images, we see a mature artist who had spent about 50 years developing a specific hand-to-eye coordination now suddenly grappling with the bizarre new sensation of a mouse in his palm held several inches from the screen,” said Matt Wrbican, the archivist.

The works have since been extracted and backed up so they can be saved, even if the floppy disks fail.

“We can only wonder how he would explore and exploit the technologies that are so ubiquitous today,” Wrbican said about Warhol.

Warhol painting sold for $105.4 million

A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach. And When You Zoom Out And See It…

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A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach. And When You Zoom Out And See It…

A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach. And When You Zoom Out And See It…

 If you live in San Francisco, California, then you may be lucky enough to come across the art of Andres Amador. He doesn’t paint or sculpt. He prefers a medium that is temporary but absolutely beautiful: a sandy beach at low tide. He uses a rake to create works of art that can be bigger than 100,000 sq. ft.

He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever.

For Andres, his art is “more about the process and less about the result.”

If you live in San Francisco, California, then you may be lucky enough to come across the art of Andres Amador. He doesn’t paint or sculpt. He prefers a medium that is temporary but absolutely beautiful: a sandy beach at low tide. He uses a rake to create works of art that can be bigger than 100,000 sq. ft.

He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever.

For Andres, his art is “more about the process and less about the result.”

HIWAY AMERICA -screw mountains-here are 10 things we think Colorado should be famous for instead

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HIWAY AMERICA -screw mountains-here are 10 things we think Colorado should be famous for instead

http://www.therooster.com/blog/screw-mountains-here-are-10-things-we-think-colorado-should-be-famous-instead/ImageImageImageImage

 

We’re not talking about weed, although we’ll get to that later. Colorado is full of other high shit, like  the highest city (Leadville, at 10,430 feet), paved road (1-70 up to Mt. Evans at 14,258 feet), auto tunnel (Eisenhower Tunnel, at 11,000 feet), suspension bridge (1,053 feet), sand dune (the Great Sand Dunes) and mean altitude in the country.  Oh, and speaking of being high, Colorado has the highest rate of cocaine use in the country, which is definitely something to pat ourselves on the back about, really hard, with freakishly strong blow-induced force. – See more at: http://www.therooster.com/blog/screw-mountains-here-are-10-things-we-think-colorado-should-be-famous-instead#sthash.iguuzgUi.dpuf

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