Tag Archives: Arts

THE BEAT PAPERS OF Al ARONOWITZ

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101COMPILED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF YVONNE DEGROOT

INDEX OF

THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ


PREFACE

THE INVISIBLE LINK



PART 1: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
Introduction: Allen Ginsberg, One of My Giants



PART 1: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER ONE: BEAT



PART 2: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TWO: ST. JACK (ANNOTATED BY JACK KEROUAC)



PART 3: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER THREE: DEAN MORIARTY (ANNOTATED BY JACK KEROUAC)



PART 4: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER FOUR: A CERTAIN PARTY



PART 5: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER FIVE: THE PROPHET



PART 6: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER 
SIX: THE SAN FRANCISCO RENAISSANCE



PART 7: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER SEVEN: CITY LIGHTS



PART 8: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER EIGHT:
SAN FRANCISCO SCENES



PART 9: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER NINE: LETTER TO THE ALLEN GINSBERG MEMORIAL COMMITTEE



PART 10: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TEN: THE BEAT CORPORATION



PART 11: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER ELEVEN: MURDER CAN BE BEAUTIFUL



PART 12: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TWELVE: THE UNVEILING


PART 12: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER THIRTEEN: THE DHARMA BUM



PART 13: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER FOURTEEN: THE YEN FOR ZEN



PART 14: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER FIFTEEN: JACKS A KING AND I’M THE INVISIBLE MAN



PART 14: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER SIXTEEN: RETROPOP SCENE—END OF A DECADE



PART 15: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: THE BEATS INVADE THE CAMPUS



PART 16: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER 
EIGHTEEN: THE SEERS



PART 17: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER 
NINETEEN:
THE MISSION


PART 18: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TWENTY:
THE SACRED SCROLL




PART 19: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: RAY BREMSER


PART 20: THE BEAT PAPERS
OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO:
JACK KEROUAC’S NEPHEW PRESSES LAWSUIT THAT ALLEGES HIS GRANDMA’S WILL WAS A FORGERY



PART 21: THE BEAT PAPERS OF AL ARONOWITZ
CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE: TED JOANS, 1928-2003,
A MAJOR BEAT POET



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The Blacklisted Journalist can be contacted at P.O.Box 964, Elizabeth, NJ 07208-0964
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info@blacklistedjournalist.com
 

“AND THE HIPPOS WERE BOILED IN THEIR TANKS” THE KEROUAC AND BURROUGHS NOVEL ,RESURFACES

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http://thephoenix.com/Boston/Arts/70366-Back-Beat/Image

A GREAT BIG DISCUSSION ABOUT “NAKED LUNCH”

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naked_lunch“Naked Lunch” is one of my fav. movies, my husband Dave and I used to take acid and watch it in complete oblivion!

http://www.everything2.com/title/Naked+Lunch

ALLEN GINSBERG’S BEAT MEMORES

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htPicture from Ipad Camera Roll 075tp://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2010/04/26/allen-ginsberg-s-beat-memories.html

 

REALLY COOL ANDY WARHOL QUOTES

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Hiway America – Bishop’s Castle Pueblo Colorado

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1. BISHOP’S CASTLE – PUEBLO, COLORADO

Bishop\'s Castle

They say that no one man can build a house on his own, but that’s exactly what Jim Bishop did when he built his castle. The 130-foot tower has taken over 30 years to build and it still isn’t finished, but it’s considered the largest single-man construction project in the country!

Keep your eyes peeled, no matter where you go. Strange, odd, and just plain wacky landmarks are littered across the entire country. You might be surprised at what you find!

 

DEGENERATES ARE OFTEN BOHEMIANS

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“Degenerates are not always criminals, anarchists, and pronounced lunatics; They are often authors and artists.”

-Max Nordan, Degeneration

Using revolutionary Paris as their backdrop, bohemians challenged the status quo by rejecting mainstream values and mocking the bourgeoisie.

However, Bohemia remains difficult to define. Participants, including writers, artists, students and youth, all contributed to the feelings and ideas of bohemia in different ways; the one attribute they shared was their rejection of the bourgeoisie.

The image above, Octave Tassaert’s The Studio, was painted in 1845, almost synonomously with the birth of bohemian Paris. This image is a wonderful representation of bohemia, with the young artist working intently in his messy, unfurnished apartment. Despite his long hair and ragged clothes, he is content to be working on the art that he loves.

This is the true essence of bohemia.