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The Hippie Culture 1960’s

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Hippie Culture

Hallie Israel and Molly Clark

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Overview
Hippies represent the counterculture of the 1960’s. Their lifestyle is usually associated with rock music, hallucinogenic drugs, and long, flowy hair and clothing. They were seen by some as disrespectful and dirty and a disgrace to society, but to many they are a reminder of a more peaceful, carefree part of America’s history. Hippies were strongly against violence and supported liberal policies and freedom of personal expression, their lifestyles centering around the concepts of peace, freedom, and harmony for all people.

Generally, counterculture is used to describe the culture of a group of people whose morals, values, core ideals, and lifestyle differs, contradicts, or is polar to those of mainstream society at the time. Culturally, it is often described as a social equivalent to extremely liberal politics and radicalism.
Who
The hippies of the 1960’s were the teenagers of the baby boom generation, so they were found in large numbers. They were generally Caucasian, middle-class, white teenagers between the ages of 15-25 who were tired of the restrictions put on them by society and their conservative parents. Most lived in urban areas or came from an urban background. They were tired of conforming and began to express themselves in a radical way. Hippies didn’t care about money and worked as little as possible. Instead, many of them shared what they had and lived together in large communes, while others simply lived in poverty by choice. They had very liberal political views and strongly protested the government and the war. The lifestyle of a hippie centered around non-conformity, because hippie culture is all about embracing who you really are and rejecting the need to conform to their society or authorities. Some of the main external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdDJjB3t0ePnLaH4oj-aySwHvv-XP-d_rPMgZkh61Nzhbu6E5vIQideas of hippie culture are listed below:
-Do not conform to society.
-Materialism is wrong.
-Technology is unnecessary and oftentimes dehumanizing.
-Be your own person, not who anyone else wants you to be.
Although each hippie embraced his or her own ideals as a part of their new culture, the stereotypical hippie:
-Used hallucinogenic drugs.
-Practiced or were interested in Eastern Religions
-Had very liberal political views.
-Peace and love instead of hate and war.
-Expressed extreme tolerance and on the subject of sexuality and sex.
-Live life to the fullest
-Embrace the peace and love expressed by music, as well as the unification it creates among people, usually rock and roll.

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What
The culture of hippies was unlike anything the people of the United States had ever seen before. They focused their lives around the ideas of peace, love, freedom, and living life to the fullest. To heighten their experiences spiritually and physically, many hippies used hallucinogenic drugs, like LSD. They listened to rock music and encouraged artistic expression in all different mediums. They lived peaceful lives and believed that living together in harmony was possible and necessary. Because of this, they strongly opposed violence, in particular, the Vietnam War. They believed that the government was the root of this and many other evils in society at the time. Due to this belief in particular, many officials and authorities at the time felt threatened by the prescence and radical ideas expressed by hippie culture and saw them as a danger to society, instead of a peaceful force who disagreed with their way of life. Still however, many authorities at the time felt threatened by the presence and radical ideas expressed by hippie culture.
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The hippie movement originated in the United States and was seen throughout the country, later spreading through other parts of the world. The main epicenters of it, however, were in the Haight Ashbury district of San Francisco and in the East Village of New York City, which were home to two of the largest hippie communities that ever existed. As the 1960’s progressed, the trend spread to Canada and eventually to many large cities in Western Europe, especially London, Amsterdam, Paris, Berlin and Rome.Although counterculture was often found in urban areas and large cities because of its ability to spread quickly through these densely-populated areas, many also argue that the hippie movement began on college campuses, with liberal students who rejected the social privilege they had been born with because they didn’t agree with the conservative values and political ideals which accompanied it. The hippie movement also spread through cafes and bars, which increasingly became centers of social gathering at the time.

When
The hippie movement first became popular in the 1960’s, with a recognizable decline in the hippie counterculture movement occurring in the late 1970’s due to the aging of the hippie population as well as the end of the Vietnam War.

Why
The hippie counterculture was a social movement caused by many issues and changes going on in the United States during the 1960’s. One important cause was the Vietnam War. These young men and women had friends and brothers being drafted and killed in Vietnam and were looking to make their anti-war views heard, hoping that they could bring peace and harmony to the world in a time of such great violence and atrocity. Another factor influencing hippie counterculture was the increasing popularity of rock and roll music. Rock and roll was a groundbreaking new type of art that encouraged peaceful expression, while also bringing people together and uniting them. The unity of rock music connected many hippies and allowed them to identify and relate with one another through a means that they could all relate to, share, and understand. Many hippies shared their culture through musical concerts and gathering, the most famous of which are Woodstock and the Summer of Love. Also influencing the liberal ideas of hippie culture was a greater access to birth control, which allowed for a women to control whether or not she wanted to get pregnant. This freedom contributed to the liberal sexual ideas of the time, because it eliminated a major consequence of sex and enabled women to attain greater control over their lives without necessarily embracing the safety of conservative values.
Additionally, hippies also had access to mind-altering drugs (hallucinogens) at the time, which greatly contributed to their lifestyle as use of the drugs became more accepted and a part of mainstream culture. Underground newspapers, new types of art (such as op art), rock music, and movies helped to define hippie counterculture and communicate the ideas of these non-conforming liberals.
In the 1960’s hippie counterculture began as the natural reaction for liberals who opposed the culture and conservative society of the 1950’s, the principles of the Cold War, and the violence of the Vietnam War. This rebelliousness of older, conservative lifestyles and values led to the hippie movement in the 60’s as people tried to oppose societal restrictions and ideals forced onto them by the previous generation. Hippie counterculture was a way for these liberals to express their views for peace, freedom, and non-conformity, creating a new culture of own in order to live life by their own ideals and have their voices heard and opinions respected as a group.

see the video below

 http://youtu.be/TC3LryTjYqw

Later in the 60’s factors influencing counterculture were tensions between the average citizen and all symbols of authority. There were also many tensions on key issues such as civil rights, womens’ rights, abortion, gay rights, and more. An issue which affected hippie culture was also the atrocities of the Vietnam War, which hippies strongly opposed. Hippies especially opposed the draft into the Vietnam War, believing that the war was wrong and that innocent Americans shouldn’t be forced to fight if doing so was against their moral principles. The liberal work of activists such as Martin Luther King Junior also spurred the hippie movement because it inspired people to stand up for what they believed in and be free to speak their mind and be themselves. Additionally, many also say that the hippie movement was influenced by the assassination of John F. Kennedy, a popular president whose tragic death fueled the political and social unrest of the time.

Legacy
The hippie movement and counterculture began to decline in the late 70’s, especially after the hippie generation grew older and US involvement in the Vietnam War ended, as well as the draft. However, the spirit of hippie culture has largely influenced the world and society today, because of the new ideas it brought to the world and the freedoms it encouraged.

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Works CitedTina Loo “hippies” The Oxford Companion to Canadian History. Ed. Gerald Hallowell. Oxford University Press, 2004. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. Infohio – NOACSC. 16 May 2011″youth movement (1960s).” American History. ABC-CLIO, 2011. Web. 13 May 2011.”Hippies and the Counterculture, 1960-1969 (Overview).” American History.
ABC-CLIO, 2011. Web. 13 May 2011.”Hippies and the Counterculture, 1960-1969 (Activity).” American History.
ABC-CLIO, 2011. Web. 13 May 2011.Goodwin, Susan and Becky Bradley . “1960-1969.” American Cultural History. Lone Star
College-Kingwood Library, 1999. Web. 7 Feb. 2011Redmond, Derek. Two Hippies at the Woodstock Festival. Aug. 1969. Wikipedia.
N.p., 31 July 2005. Web. 18 May 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
File:Woodstock_redmond_hair.JPG>.Hippie couple. N.d. Worldwide Hippies. N.p., 18 Jan. 2010. Web. 19 May 2011.
<http://www.worldwidehippies.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/hippies1.jpg>.Epinosa, Eden. Hippie Life. YouTube.com. N.p., 2009. Web. 19 May 2011.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TC3LryTjYqw>. Published to the web by
the YouTube user lovechild909.

a California farmer has the pumpkin for you

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If buying a pumpkin, cutting it open and carving it into a jack o’lantern is too much work — or if your best efforts are scary for all the wrong reasons — then a California farmer has the pumpkin for you.

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Pumpkinstein is already the perfect Halloween pumpkin because you don’t have to do a thing to it. Each one is grown in a mold to take the shape of Frankenstein’s head.

 

People never believe it’s real the first time they see it; they all want to touch it to make sure,” Tony Dighera of Cinagro Farms in Fillmore, Calif., told The New York Times.

Dighera told the Tri-Valley Dispatch that it took four years and $500,000 to develop the technique and find the perfect pumpkin for the job.

“When you try something for four years of your life, people really start to think you’re wacko,” he told the Times.

What some people may find “wacko,” however, is the price. Dighera is selling Pumpkinsteins for about $75 wholesale, with retailers marking them up to $100 and even $125.

For a pumpkin. A very cool pumpkin that looks like Frankenstein, but still a pumpkin.

At least it’s organic.

 

Dighera is not finished with his pumpkin tinkering. He told the Los Angeles Daily News that next year, the pumpkins will be grown with eyeballs made of marbles. He’s also developing a second type of pumpkin grown to look like a skull.

The father of our country, George Washington, who is rumored to have said “I cannot tell a lie,” was a proud supporter of the hemp seed

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Hemp Bio-fuel

Hemp Bio-fuel

The father of our country, George Washington, who is rumored to have said “I cannot tell a lie,” was a proud supporter of the hemp seed. Of course, the only thing more suppressed in this country than an honest politician is hemp, which is often mistakenly for marijuana and therefore unfairly maligned. Governmental roadblocks, meanwhile, prevent hemp from becoming the leader in extracting ethanol, allowing environmentally damaging sources like corn to take over the ethanol industry. Despite the fact that it requires fewer chemicals, less water and less processing to do the same job, hemp has never caught on. Experts also lay the blame at the feet of (who else?) Presidential candidates, who kiss up to Iowa corn growers for votes.

Detailed Portrait of Charles Bukowski Made with Only Text are Produced Using a Typewriter

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At first glance, you might not realize just how Brazilian graphic designer Álvaro Franca creates his stylized portraits. A closer look reveals that his subjects’ faces, hair, and clothing are all comprised of letterforms that are impressively produced on a vintage typewriter. Aptly titled Typewritten Portraits, text is grouped together and gives five of Franca’s favorite authors a sense of form and shading.

To craft these works, Franca created reference images on his computer. It gave him an idea of where the dark and light parts are on a face, and he used this as a guide when pecking away on his typewriter. Certain letterforms seem to be perfect for conveying a sense of realism in the portraits. The “m,” when placed together, creates a dense, shaded area, and we can see that the designer also layered text to further enhance this…

Marty the Marijuana Mouse

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Marty the Marijuana Mouse

Marty the Mouse became famous in 1974 after he made a home for himself in a box of marijuana stored in the evidence room of the San Jose, CA police station. Police were only able to lure him out by baiting a trap with marijuana seeds. (He ignored bacon, peanut butter, cheese, and a female mouse called Mata Hairy.) He became known as Marty the Marijuana Mouse.

But instead of killing him, he was first sent to UCLA to aid in studies of marijuana. Then he was returned to San Jose where he became a police mascot. When he died in Nov 1975, the nation mourned.

Posted By: Alex | Date: Sun Sep

50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

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50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

6 time Golden Globe winner Paul Newman boating in Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

Source: reddit.com

Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

A young Harrison Ford

Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

Source: twitter.com

Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip at the horse races (1968)

Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

Jimi Hendrix backstage at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

323kPeople Sharing
Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

6 time Golden Globe winner Paul Newman boating in Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

Source: reddit.com

Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

Cosmos host and astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson at a college wrestling match

Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

Source: twitter.com

Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip at the horse races (1968)

Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

Jimi Hendrix backstage at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

BEATNIK HIWAY- THE SPAM MUSEUM, AUSTIN TEXAS

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A Brief History of Spam, an American Meat Icon

 For a six-ingredient food product, it’s taken on a life of its own. Spam — the square-shaped mash-up of pork, water, salt, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrate — recently celebrated its 77th anniversary of being alternately maligned, celebrated, musicalized, or the subject of urban legend (one particularly pervasive myth insists that its name is actually an acronym for “Scientifically Processed Animal Matter”). And despite today’s more locavore approach to food and some unkind memories from soldiers who were served Spam during WWII, Spam has entered its third quarter-century on the rise. More than eight billion cans have been sold since the Hormel Corporation unleashed the product in 1937; it’s currently available in 44 countries throughout the world.

For a six-ingredient food product, it’s taken on a life of its own. Spam — the square-shaped mash-up of pork, water, salt, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrate — recently celebrated its 77th anniversary of being alternately maligned, celebrated, musicalized, or the subject of urban legend (one particularly pervasive myth insists that its name is actually an acronym for “Scientifically Processed Animal Matter”). And despite today’s more locavore approach to food and some unkind memories from soldiers who were served Spam during WWII, Spam has entered its third quarter-century on the rise. More than eight billion cans have been sold since the Hormel Corporation unleashed the product in 1937; it’s currently available in 44 countries throughout the world.

Spam’s ability to straddle highbrow and lowbrow is apparently in its DNA: Since its early days, even Jay Hormel, the man who Spam made rich, had a vexed relationship with the lunchmeat. In a 1945 “Talk of the Town” profile published in The New Yorker, Hormel met writer Brendan Gill over noontime drinks, during which Gill “got the distinct impression that being responsible for Spam might be too great a burden on any one man.” The piece sees Hormel waffling on his brand’s association with Spam, spending equal time distancing himself from it (“Sometimes I wonder if we shouldn’t have…”) and defending it (“Damn it, we eat it in our own home”).

Spam’s ability to straddle highbrow and lowbrow is apparently in its DNA.

The budget-friendly meat has enjoyed a recent upswing on the American mainland in part thanks to rising meat costs and a floundering economy: When the recession hit in early 2008, Spam saw its sales jump 10 percent compared to the previous year. ACBS News report noted that the increased numbers were seemingly accompanied by a cultural shift: Even consumers who continued to purchase expensive organic vegetables were adding cans of Spam to their pantries. The meat, once relegated as a quirk of Hawaiian or Asian cuisine, started appearing on haute restaurant menus as a nod to that highbrow/lowbrow mash-up, or perhaps to the chef’s feelings of nostalgia for the ingredient. (A quick search of Spam recipes from the ’60s reveals dishes like Spam upside-down pie; and Spam sandwiches topped with baked beans.)

Today, its sometimes-kitsch factor is a point of pride, for both Hormel and Spam fans: You can show your affection for Spam with everything from Hormel-authorized T-shirts (reading “I think, therefore I Spam”) to crocheted, cat-shaped Spam musubi (available for purchase, naturally, on Etsy). Here’s a look back at how Spam first got canned, why it’s currently beloved in Hawaii and South Korea, and why Spam remains on many restaurant menus today.

SPAM-MONTY PYTHON

http://youtu.be/anwy2MPT5RE

THE SPAM MUSEUM

SEE WHAT SPAM CAN DO

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#BreakTheMonotony Rally Cry

http://youtu.be/XVC-l9z2HSg

I WALKED AROUND IN A BURQA ALL DAY (AND I’M NOT MUSLIM)

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I WALKED AROUND IN A BURQA ALL DAY (AND I’M NOT

MUSLIM)

By Annette Lamothe-Ramos


Photos by Ben Ritter

I was recently asked by our global editor to track down a burqa for a music video we were planning to shoot, I guess because I’m the fashion editor. I didn’t know a thing about Islamic clothing—or that you can’t just go to the burqa shop and get one. Turns out it’s a giant pain in the ass. But I did find the one I wanted, eventually.

As I scrolled through countless websites looking for hijabs, niqabs, khimars, abayas, jilbabs, and other religious-tinged garments, I began to notice that no one has anything positive to say about any of them. Nearly every news story I’ve ever read with the word burqa in it labels the garments as oppressive to women, and the only articles I found by females who’d actually worn them had been written about their experiences walking the streets of Muslim countries.

After watching 74 YouTube videos and parsing 108 Google search pages, I couldn’t find one article or video explaining if burqas were comfortable or how Americans reacted to seeing someone resembling the Grim Reaper float by them in line at Starbucks. I figured that the only way I’d really know what life was like for women who have been consigned to wear the least-revealing piece of clothing of all time was to dress up as one of them.

My little fashion-cum-social experiment started when Ben Ritter arrived to photograph me as I figured out how to assemble my burqa. There were a number of different types available online from various countries, and for whatever reason I decided to go with the Saudi Arabian variant. Saudi burqas consist of five pieces and seemed in much more in line with my idea of a “proper” burqa than the Afghan version with bedazzled “fashion sleeves.”

My dog Bowie was really confused by my outfit. The only other time I’d seen her this freaked out by me was when I dressed up as a pregnant nun on Halloween.

The final look. We hadn’t left my house but I was already bitching about how hot it was. I wanted to go naked under the abaya but since burqas are supposed to be outwear, I wore it over a crop top and the shortest shorts I could find in my closet.

Walking around the East Village or Brooklyn surrounded by people we knew seemed like a waste of time, so we hopped on a train uptown to pretend we were tourists. No one really paid much attention to me except the woman on the bench behind me who was sitting with her children. She dragged them to the other end of the platform when she saw me step onto the train. What a bitch!

Oh you know, just hanging out with Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones (and Allah) on the subway platform.

When we got out of the subway it started to rain really hard. Lucky for me, I didn’t need an umbrella—one of the few pluses of wearing a burqa. I’m a native New Yorker, which means I had never been to the Empire State Building. So we went there. I didn’t realize the significance of visiting one of the tallest buildings in New York dressed in Islamic garb until we reached the entrance. I felt like a jerk.

Once we reached the roof things got really uncomfortable. I could tell all the foreigners were talking shit about me in their native tongues. The group behind me also followed us around, presumably because we were taking so many photos.

While I posed for pictures we noticed that one of the security guards was following us around. I guess he was trying to figure out if we were pulling some stupid stunt (we were) or casing the joint (we were not).

We ended up taking one of those cheesy green screen photos before we left. The girl in charge of the booth said we didn’t have to have our picture taken if we didn’t want to. This annoyed me, so we jumped right in and made her snap one. Doesn’t Ben look like he just married a virgin?

When scaring tourists got boring, we decided to walk further uptown to Central Park in an attempt to bother some locals. The burqa was dragging through puddles so I ended up having to hold the front with both hands. Although completely inconvenient, it wasn’t all that bad and I found myself pretending I was a dainty princess in an elegant gown.

A big gust of wind nearly blew me down the block. I caught my reflection in a doorway and thought I looked like Batman, so I made Ben take a picture. All of the cold air blowing through the sleeves of the khimar felt really good.

I had to keep taking breaks to rest. The rain had stopped and it was so humid I was starting to sweat in places I’d never sweat before. If I had to wear something like this in the desert I would most likely die…

I wanted to fulfill a life-long fantasy of running through Sheep Meadow, but it was closed so we decided to shoot by the pond instead. It was such a pity because all of the layers I was wearing made me feel like Kate Bush; we could have gotten some amazing burqa-dance photos.

The most important thing I learned during the day was how to smile with my eyes. I hate smiling but assumed no one wanted to see an angry bitch in a burqa, so I put in the extra effort. Nice, huh?

Eventually I had to give up on the smiling because I started breathing like Johnny Depp’s mom inWhat’s Eating Gilbert Grape. The fact that the park smelled like wet horseshit didn’t help.

“I’m. Over. This.”

I was starving and couldn’t eat a hot dog, so I made the horrible choice of trying to eat an ice-cream bar. It was a stressful experience for me, but passing park-goers were happy to watch me struggle as I lifted the mouth flap ever so shyly to shove ice cream in my face. I didn’t want to give any of those creeps the satisfaction of snapping a photo so I ate it as fast as I could and got ice cream all over the inside of the niqab. It was disgusting.

Six hours later, after a number of complications, I finally ripped the goddamn thing off. I’ve never been so happy to go home.

At the end of the day I was proud of what I’d accomplished. Not only did I face up to some of my own fears by putting myself on display, I’d also learned to be more conscious of the way I treat people on the street, no matter how they’re dressed or what they look like.

Eight out of ten people that I came in contact with while wearing a burqa acted as if I didn’t even exist, which actually made feel worse than the looks I received from busybodies who were offended by my presence. I have a newfound respect for the women who chose to wear these kinds of garments, but I will never do anything like this ever again because it suckkkkked.

UPDATE: A Response to the Detractors of Our Burqa-for-a-day Article (Spoiler: We’re not sorry.)

HIWAY AMERICA- THE PEZ MUSEUM, BURLINGHAM CA.

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THE PEZ MUSEUM

An integral part of the American scene for approximately 50 years, PEZ Candy has been

enjoyed by generations of Americans.

PEZ was first marketed as a compressed peppermint candy over 83 years ago in Vienna, Austria. The name PEZ was derived from the German word for peppermint… PfeffErminZ. Today, over 3 billion PEZ Candies are consumed annually in the U.S.A. alone.

With great tasting flavors and collectable dispensers, PEZ is more than just a candy… it’s the pioneer of “interactive candy” that is both enjoyable to eat and fun to play with. PEZ Dispensers are a hot collectable for adults and children alike as well as being a staple and part of American pop culture. New character dispensers are introduced regularly to reflect current trends.

PEZ Candy is manufactured in Orange, Connecticut by PEZ CANDY, INC. and marketed through supermarkets, mass merchandisers, variety stores, drug stores, convenience stores, toy chains and gift stores throughout the U.S. and Canada. Available around the world in more than 80 countries, PEZ Candy and Dispensers truly have universal appeal.

THE PEZ MUSEUM

PEZ MUSEUM STORE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

For a more detailed view, click on the Pez in the picture or search the lists below.

whats new pez store home
PEZ MUSEUM STORE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 search
pez exhibit
For a more detailed view, click on the Pez in the picture or search the lists below.

simpsons elvisfull iceebear09 monsteruniv body2006  pres2big kiss-mini-wobblersjuliuspezbigyellowg1startrektngbig

weird museums

http://youtu.be/HDXKR2U3ty0