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HIWAY AMERICA -The World’s Fair in Queens, New York


The World’s Fair in Queens, New YorkWORLDS FAIR





The 1939/1940 and the 1964/1965 World’s Fairs
Towers from 1964-65 World's Fair at Flushing Meadows Park - Photo by John Roleke
Towers from 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows Park.  Photo by John Roleke

The World’s Fair was held twice in the New York City borough of Queens, once in 1939/1940 and again in 1964/1965 at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. These are the only World’s Fairs ever to be held over two seasons.

New York was also host to a World’s Fair in 1853, the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations held in Manhattan at what is now Bryant Park.

1939/1940 World’s Fair

This fair was the second largest ever held in the United States, second only to the St. Louis’s Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. Master planner Robert Moses used the fair as an opportunity to build Flushing Meadows Park, draining swampland and cleaning up the immense ash pile at the site known as Mount Corona. However, due to financial shortfalls, the park envisioned by Moses was not completed until the 1964/1965 fair.

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1964/1965 World’s Fair

The 1964/1965 World’s Fair was one of the high points of New York City history in the 1960s. It was a time of optimism before the travails of the Vietnam War and protest era. The fair attracted national and international attention and showcased the city that never sleeps and the dawn of the American Space Age.

Some 51 million visitors attended the fair. A generation of New Yorkers were touched by their visits to the fair. Strike up a conversation with New York Baby Boomers — anyone who was a child, teen, or young adult in the mid-1960s — and you’re bound to hear stories of the fair.

Legacy – Structures from the World’s Fairs

Some structures remains and have been repurposed at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, including:

  • 250-foot Towers of the New York State Pavilion (which still stand, somewhat precariously)
  • Unisphere
  • New York Hall of Science (a science museum which had been the Hall of Science)
  • The fair’s former Helipad is now the Terrace on the Park catering hall
  • World’s Fair Building/Churchill Tribute became the aviary at the Queens Zoo

The Queens Museum of Art is housed today in the former New York City pavilion from the 1939/1940 fair. The museum’s attractions include the Panorama, a scale-model of New York City built for the 1964/1965 fair, as well as exhibits and memorabilia of both fairs.

Street Artists Transformed This Abandoned Factory Into An Art Gallery


Street Artists Transformed This Abandoned Factory Into An Art Gallery

Street Artists Transformed This Abandoned Factory Into An Art Gallery

On the 9th of August 2015, an abandoned factory was reopened in a small town in central Bosnia and Herzegovina. The reopening, after decades of being forgotten, happened thanks to the work of 3 young guys. Artist collective HAD opened their…

You Can Buy An Old Menu From The Actual Titanic For Just $50,000


You Can Buy An Old Menu From The Actual Titanic For Just $50,000

100-year-old corned beef and dumplings, anyone?

Archive Holdings Inc. via Getty ImagesShare on Pinterest

NEW YORK (AP) — The Titanic’s last lunch menu — saved by a passenger who climbed aboard the so-called “Money Boat” before the ocean liner went down — is going to auction, where it’s estimated it will bring $50,000 to $70,000.

The online New York auctioneer Lion Heart Autographs is offering the menu and two other previously unknown artifacts from Lifeboat 1 on Sept. 30. The auction marks the 30th anniversary of the wreckage’s discovery at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

Abraham Lincoln Salomon was one of a handful of first-class passengers who boarded the lifeboat — dubbed the “Money Boat” or “Millionaire’s Boat” by the press because of unfounded rumors one of them bribed seven crew members to quickly row the boat away from the sinking ship rather than rescue others.

The menu, which listed corned beef, dumplings and other savory items, is signed on the back in pencil by another first-class passenger, Isaac Gerald Frauenthal, who escaped on another lifeboat. It’s believed the two men lunched together that fateful day in 1912.

Salomon also took away a printed ticket from the Titanic’s opulent Turkish baths, which recorded a person’s weight when seated in a specially designed upholstered lounge chair. It bears the names of three of the five other first-class passengers with him on Lifeboat 1. One of four weighing-chair tickets known to exist, it’s estimated it will bring $7,500 to $10,000.

Credit: Lion Heart Autographs/APShare on Pinterest

The third artifact is a letter written by Mabel Francatelli to Salomon on New York’s Plaza Hotel stationery six months after the disaster. She had climbed into the No. 1 lifeboat with her employer, aristocratic fashion designer Lucy Duff-Gordon and her Scottish husband Lord Cosmo Duff-Gordon, who it was alleged bribed the crew to row them to safety in the boat that had a capacity of 40.

The Duff-Gordons, who were the only passengers to testify about the disaster, were cleared by the British Wreck Commissioner’s inquiry, which determined that they did not deter the crew from attempting to rescue other people but that others might have been saved if the boat had turned around.

A letter by Lady Duff-Gordon grumbling about the “disgraceful” treatment they received from the press and public upon their return to England sold at an auction in Boston earlier this year for nearly $12,000.

“We do hope you have now quite recovered from the terrible experience,” Francatelli wrote to Salomon. “I am afraid our nerves are still bad, as we had such trouble & anxiety added to our already awful experience by the very unjust inquiry when we arrived in London.” It’s estimated it will sell for $4,000 to $6,000.

Lion Heart Autographs says the seller is the son of a man who was given the items by a direct descendent of one of the survivors of Lifeboat 1.

Credit: Lion Heart Autographs/APShare on Pinterest
Credit: Lion Heart Autographs/APShare on Pinterest
Credit: Lion Heart Autographs/AP

‘All Things Must Pass’, An Upcoming Film Documenting the Momentous Rise and Heartbreaking Fall of Tower Records


‘All Things Must Pass’, An Upcoming Film Documenting the Momentous Rise and Heartbreaking Fall of Tower Records

All Things Must Pass, an upcoming film by actor/director Colin Hanks, documents the momentous global rise of the legendary music store from its Sacramento, California roots in 1960 to its heartbreakingly inevitable downfall in 1996.

Established in 1960, Tower Records was once a retail powerhouse with two hundred stores, in thirty countries, on five continents. From humble beginnings in a small-town drugstore, Tower Records eventually became the heart and soul of the music world, and a powerful force in the music industry. In 1999, Tower Records made $1 billion. In 2006, the company filed for bankruptcy. What went wrong? Everyone thinks they know what killed Tower Records: The Internet. But thats not the story. All Things Must Pass is a feature documentary film examining this iconic company’s explosive trajectory, tragic demise, and legacy forged by its rebellious founder, Russ Solomon.

All Things Must Pass makes its debut in theaters on October 16, 2015.



All Things Must Pass

Tower Records

Its a Global Thing

No Music No Life

images via All Things Must Pass

the best hippie songs of all time


the best hippie songs of all time

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hey that’s Putin riding a Ritz cracker!!

the best hippie songs of all times part 2