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My first Poetry Reading and Courage:The “C” In The Creative Personality

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Anxiety And The Creative Personality:The Good, Bad And The Ugly

Overcoming Anxiety

My very first poetry reading was at Saint Mark’s Church in N.Y.C I was nervous but it went alright.
As I continued to do readings my fear grew. At times it was overwhelming,and make me a total wreck. I began drinking port and smoking post. That didn’t help!
Even if the audience was receptive or I had a sell out, nothing helped. The reviews was always good-no one noticed what I was going through!
my worst poetry reading was at The Green Mill Tavern in Chicago. (Capone’s hangout) I had been invited, paid $100 and flyers were handed out. Little did I know it was an evening of “performance” poetry, and I am definitely not that kind of poet.
I got up on stage and started to read, there was silence then “boos” that got louder and louder. I stopped, looking out into the audience and yelled “FUCK YOU ALL”. My husband who was out there somewhere clapped louder and louder. He grabbed my hand and lead me off the stage. We left. He told me how proud he was of me. Suddenly my anger was gone, and I laughed till I cried.
This fear of the audience remained with me throughout my poetry career. I never overcame it.
After 3 tours of the U.S. and Europe, many of the readings  went very well, I was well received. I had a sell-out crowd in “Carla’s” in my hometown of New Hope PA.** and no one noticed my shaking knees! but I felt my pounding heart and it was coming out of my chest, Not good!
I switched to radio shows, taping and doing internet shows with Dave-I  was fine without an audience.  The only times I read my poetry from that time on was when Dave and I had poetry parties, I felt at ease with my friends,  the pressure was gone. I was so glad not to be in front of an audience. What a relief!.
**At Carla’s I read a poem about a vigilante cop that walked up and down Main Street, the news got to him. The next day Dave an I had 7 Allentown State police with guns drawn pounding at our door. They pushed their way in with a search warrant for pot. They threw Dave own on the floor and searched him, all they found was a small quantity of marijuana. The cops ignored a film canister containing acid in the front of the freezer. It was apparent they were not there for drugs, Then they proceeded to videotape the posters on our wall,go through our documents, and take personal photos. They questioned us as to why we were living in New Hope,what was our purpose etc etc. We answered that New Hope was an artist’s town and had been since the 40’s. Abbie Hoffman had hid out from the cops on a local chicken farm. This town had it’s share of controversy. We were members of the poetry underground,publishing poetry and books. We were involved in “the small press” The big bad cops stayed for 3 hours after tearing our place apart. Then they left warning us not to tell anyone! What a farce,but a terrifying time anyway!
Courage:The “C” In The Creative Personality

creative personality

Henri Matisse’s simple statement on the creative personality is powerful and complex. It does take courage living with uncertainties and hoping for possibilities. We spend our days sharpening skills taking classes, training, staying in loop, and getting ready for the moment lady luck knocks at our door. Yes true grit, selecting a career where worth and professional success are based upon  others’ opinions who may or may not have more skill and talent.
Don’t we sound GREAT?

Creative Characteristics`

We’re what dreams are made of!
Here comes the “but”….

Characteristics of a Creative Mind: Anxiety and Stress

Living a creative life sounds exhilarating and it is; when is good it’s great when it’s bad well…you’ve read the stories of troubled artists and the depths of their depression. Theanxiety, stress and phobias stem from of the creative process can bring the most successful to their knees unable to cope or manage the smallest bump in the road.The stakes are high in creative fields, your uniqueness, individuality your entire self is defined by what and how much you create. It’s one thing to be the “that funny entering friend” and another thing to be the “nailed the audition, got the job, can pay the rent guy” and the more you have vested in  a situations outcome the higher the anxiety. Performing artists’ live in a nameless field of the unknown, with no guarantees of success; yet success is only an audition or connection away. Worrying feeling edgy, preoccupied with the future are all part of the creative process.

100 Coping Skills for Anxiety

My mission at Haartfelt.com is to teach performing artists’ that who they are and what they do matters, not only to them but the world. However being influential requires new learning for most of you creative types. You’ll have to learn to live by a new paradigm, surrendering the fear of feeling uncomfortable; stopping all the resistance to feeling” bad”. By surrendering the fear of feeling “uncomfortable”, you can begin accepting all feelings as unique ingredients making up the creative personality.

Welcome To Haartfelt!

Pamela

HIWAY AMERICA -THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD, BROOKLYN N.Y.

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New York Navy Yard, colloquially known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard, is located on Wallabout Basin, Brooklyn, less than two miles north of the Battery. It is accessed by the East River, which separates Manhattan and Brooklyn. The channel is 40 feet deep to the south and 35 feet to the north. Access from the south requires passing under the Brooklyn Bridge, which has a vertical clearance of 127 feet, and the Manhattan Bridge.Following the British occupation of New York during the American Revolution, Wallabout Bay was the mooring site for prison hulks, aboard which thousands of American prisoners were incarcerated and died.In 1801, the United States government established a navy yard, which continued in operation for 160 years. Important vessels built here ranged from Robert Fulton’s steam frigate Fulton(1815) to World War II-era battleships North Carolina, Iowa and Missouri and aircraft carriers Bennington,Bon Homme Richard, Kearsarge, Oriskany and Franklin D. Roosevelt. With so much other activity, the yard built only two destroyers,Farragut-class Hull and Dale but was a key base where many others fitted out.After closing in 1966, the yard was converted to private manufacturing and commercial activity. Today, the site has over 200 tenants, including a major motion picture and television studio complex completed in 2004, and is managed by the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation.

COOL PEOPLE – JOHNNY CASH A TRUE OUTLAW

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Johnny Cash was one of country music’s first “outlaws,” but the music industry was still surprised in 1957 when he played a concert at Huntsville State Prison in Texas. Over the next decade, Cash performed over 30 prison shows and recorded albums during at least three of them. (The shows at California’s Folsom Prison and San Quentin became the most famous). Here are ten little-known facts about the Man in Black’s prison concerts.

1. Columbia Records repeatedly rejected Cash’s requests to record a prison concert.
Cash started playing at prisons in response to fan mail from inmates who identified with his songs (especially “Folsom Prison Blues”). Soon he discovered that “prisoners are the greatest audience that an entertainer can perform for. We bring them a ray of sunshine into their dungeon, and they’re not ashamed to respond and show their appreciation.” He suspected that their excitement and gratitude combined with the thrill of performing in a dangerous venue would create the perfect setting for an album. His record company disagreed -they thought the concerts would kill Cash’s career and hurt the label’s image. But when Columbia brought on producer Bob Johnston -known for being a bit wild himself and for bucking authority (as well as producing for Bob Dylan)- that stance changed. Johnston readily approved the country star’s idea.

Columbia remained tight-lipped about the performance and the release of Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison in 1968, still believing the album would never sell. But it did… an incredible 500,000 copies in one year. Sales were boosted by Cash’s tough guy image (he wore solid black clothing, used profane language, had a gravelly voice, and fought an on-again-off-again addiction to drugs). To help the cause along, Columbia released exaggerated ads claiming Cash was no stranger to prison. Which brings us to…

2. Cash never served time at Folsom, or any other prison.
He did seven short stints in jail, though, for drug- and alcohol-related charges. his song “Folsom Prison Blues” was instead inspired by the 1951 movie Inside the Walls of Folsom Prison. According to biographer Michael Streissguth, another influence was Gordon Jenkins’s song “Crescent City Blues,” from which Cash “borrowed” so heavily that when his version was recorded on the Folsomalbum, the original artists demanded -and received- royalties.

3. Cash inspired future country music star Merle Haggard.
Haggard was serving three years at San Quentin Prison for armed robbery and escaping from jail when Johnny Cash took the stage there in 1958. When Haggard later told Cash that he’d been at that concert, Cash said he didn’t remember Haggard performing that day; Haggard replied, “I was in the audience, Johnny.” In fact, he was sitting in the front row and was mesmerized by Cash. He and his fellow inmates identified with Cash’s lyrics about loss and imprisonment.

Haggard reminisced, “This was somebody singing a song about your personal life. Even the people who weren’t fans of Johnny cash -it was a mixture of people, all races were fans by the end of the show.” Haggard also soon realized that he shared Cash’s talent for making music and for speaking to the struggles of the working class. He joined the prison’s country band shortly after Cash’s concert and penned songs about being locked up. After his release in 1960, Haggard sang at clubs until he eventually became a country superstar himself.

4. The Live “Folsom Prison Blues” was too grisly for radio play.

Cash’s declaration “I shot a man in Reno/Just to watch him die,” followed by an inmate’s shriek of joy, was edited by radio stations. But the hollering wasn’t real. It had been dubbed in by Columbia Records since the prisoners had been too enthralled by Cash’s performance to whoop it up during songs.

5. Cash’s band smuggled a gun into Folsom.
Johnny Cash and his bassist, Marshall Grant, often performed a comedy skit with an antique cap-and-ball gun that make smoke. It was a prop -but it was a real gun. Grant accidentally brought the weapon inside his bass guitar case to the 1968 show. A prison guard spotted it and politely took it away to the warden for safekeeping until the concert ended.

6. Folsom Prison inmate Glen Sherley wrote the song “Greystone Chapel” and credited Cash with changing his life.
Glen Sherley was in Folsom Prison for armed robbery, but he also loved music. Before Cash arrived for the 1968 show, Sherley recorded the song “Greystone Chapel” at the prison chapel. Appropriately, it was about a man whose body was imprisoned but his soul is freed by religion. Cash’s pastor, who also counseled inmates, smuggled the tape out to Cash, who learned to play the song the night before the show. After seeing Cash perform his song, Sherley vowed to make a mark with the musician. Once he was released from Folsom, he went to work for Johnny Cash’s publishing company, House of Cash. Sherley later remarked, “I was a three-time loser when John reached out his hand to me in 1968, and since then I sincerely believe that I have become a worthwhile person and can contribute to society.”

7. Cash’s concert at Folsom landed him his own musical variety show: The Johnny Cash Show.

FOLSOM PRISON BLUES

Cash noted, “I’ve always thought it ironic that it was a prison concert, with me and the convicts getting along just as fellow rebels, outsiders, and miscreants should, that pumped up my marketability to the point where ABC thought I was respectable enough to have a weekly network TV show.”

8. When Johnny Cash recorded At San Quentin in 1969, he didn’t know the lyrics to one of his most famous songs.
I was the first time cash had performed “A Boy Named Sue,” written by poet Shel Silverstein, so he had to read the lyrics from a sheet he’d stained with coffee. And before playing “Starkville City Jail,” cash explained that he was thrown in the slammer for picking daisies and dandelions at two in the morning. (By other accounts, he was breaking curfew, drunk in public, and trespassing.)

9. Cash brushed up on his Swedish for a show overseas.
In 1972 Cash went to Stockholm, Sweden, where he recorded the album Pa Osteraker at a Swedish prison. Between songs, he impressed and thrilled the inmates by introducing some of his songs in their language.

10. At the 1969 show, Cash’s song “San Quentin” nearly incited a riot there.
He’d just written the song the night before, and its inflammatory lyrics like, “San Quentin, may you rot and burn in hell,” clearly struck a chord with the audience. The prisoners clamored and stomped until he repeated the song. Shrieking and jumping up on tabletops, they were so close to rioting that the guards drew and cocked their guns and the camera crew backed untoward the exit doors. According to producer Bob Johnston, Cash later said of the hair-raising moment, “I knew that if I wanted to let those people go, all I had to do was say, ‘the time is now’ And all of those prisoners would have broken…I was tempted.” (But of course, he didn’t.)

COOL PEOPLE -GEORGE HARRISON AND BHAKTIVEDANTA MANOR’S GEORGE HARRISON MEMORIAL GARDEN OPENS IN ALDENHAM

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CONCERT FOR BANGLADESH

http://youtu.be/AV9P3GZ71hM

GEORGE HARRISON-INTERVIEW WITH DICK CAVETT 1971

http://youtu.be/bTsoXqAeQ7M

HERE COMES THE SUN

http://youtu.be/1Y1wSvfrfYw

GEORGE HARRISON BIO

George Harrison

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Known first as “The Quiet Beatle,” George Harrison was a great songwriter who had the misfortune to be surrounded by two stone cold geniuses whose work often obscured his talents. Yet Harrison compositions such as “Something” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” are as good as anything the Beatles ever recorded. And with his solo debut All Things Must Pass, he stepped completely out of the shadows of his Beatle band mates to reveal himself a powerfully spiritual songwriter with an expansive sense of melody. Harrison was also a gifted, fluid guitarist and hugely influential in introducing the Beatles — and, by extension, the entire Sixties generation – to Eastern religion and musical influences. His devotion to Hinduism was expressed publicly through rock and roll’s first massive charity event, the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh.

Before all that, Harrison was a teen guitarist in thrall to Britain’s 1950s skiffle revival — a working class kid with a band called the Rebels. It was Paul McCartney, a schoolmate one year ahead of Harrison, who invited the 15-year-old to jam with the Quarrymen, a group led John Lennon. (Harrison had come three years behind Lennon at his previous school.) This band would become the Beatles — and Harrison would himself become, like Lennon and McCartney, one of his generation’s great seekers. His response to fame, however, was to direct that search inside of himself.

As a songwriter, Harrison was continually out-gunned by Lennon-McCartney. The intense trio of songs he contributed to Revolver — “Taxman,” “I Want to Tell You,” and “Love You To” — would be his most significant contribution to a single Beatles album. He had other classics to his credit, including “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something,” his first Beatles A-side, a track which would top the charts in America. (Both came off 1969’s Abbey Road) But Harrison also funneled his creativity into the guitar, a suitably introspective pursuit. From his raw, early rock-and-roll influences he extrapolated a wide-ranging and poetic style. In the late sixties, he helped introduce the slide guitar to prominence; he also popularized the 12-string Rickenbacker guitar and its ultra-distinctive sound on 1964’s A Hard Day’s Night.

Harrison introduced the Byrds to the Rickenbacker; they, in turn, led him to what would become a calling card: the sitar. With the Indian composer Ravi Shankar as his teacher, the guitarist introduced the instrument (which dates to the middle ages) into the Beatles, and rock music, with “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown,” off 1965’s Rubber Soul. Two years later, Harrison’s unique, and principal, contribution to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band would be “Within You Without You,” a centerpiece for sitar. It was his experimental sliver of that experimental album, but it also a declaration of his independence. In 1966, the band gave up performing live (which suited the shy, perfectionist Harrison). In 1969, during filming of recording sessions for The Beatles, Harrison quit the band. He returned 12 days later, after negotiations, but he was the first splinter in the band as it finally broke apart in 1970.

Meanwhile, Harrison lived his life increasingly under the guidance of Hinduism. Shankar, who he’d made world famous, had become a close friend, and would remain so for life. He married Pattie Boyd, who he’d met on the set for the Hard Days Night movie, in 1966; in 1969, he bought a private estate in Henley-on-Thames called Friar Park. Creatively, he’d clearly built a head of steam. His Wonderwall Music soundtrack (Wonderwall Music, 1968) was the first solo effort from a Beatle, and as a ramshackle mix of traditional Indian music and rock, hardly one for the screaming fans. For Electronic Music (1969), he partnered with composers like Bernie Krause for an exercise in Moog synthesizer noodling.

Throat cleared, he then released All Things Must Pass, a three-record, Number One album of songs he’d originally written for the Beatles. It would become his masterwork. Produced by Phil Spector and featuring guests Eric Clapton and Traffic’s Dave Mason, the record produced “My Sweet Lord,” his biggest solo hit. That this achingly tender evocation of his religious beliefs was eventually shown, in civil court, to have its melody taken from a sixties hit by Chiffons (“He’s So Fine”) did little to dull its resonance. (It was determined that Harrison “unknowingly” plagiarized the song. In 1976 he would have a hit with Thirty Three & 1/3‘s “This Song,” a kidding take on the lawsuit featuring vocals by Eric Idle of Monty Python.)

Harrison followed this statement of faith with another, even larger-scale gesture, putting together with Ravi Shankhar a massive 1971 benefit for Bangladeshi refuges. Performers at the two Madison Square Garden concerts included Bob Dylan — who alone gave a historic show — Eric Clapton, and Ringo Starr. The shows and resulting documentary and three-record album (both called Concert for Bangladesh) provided a minor hit for Harrison, “Bangla Desh,” and millions for the intended beneficiaries. (Another asterisk: the majority of this money was held up for 10 years while Apple records was audited by the IRS.)

Picking up where “My Sweet Lord” left off — and capturing the easy-going uplift of the times, lacing it with his slide guitar — Harrison picked up another Number One single with 1973’s “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth),” off Living in the Material World. The next year he released Dark Horse on his own label of the same name, but despite the title track’s climb to Number 15, the mellow times seemed to evaporate. Harrison and Pattie Boyd would not officially divorce until 1977, but Boyd had already taken up with Eric Clapton, whom she would later marry. In a bizarre move, Harrison had the two cover “Bye Bye Love,” an Everly Brothers hit, with him. Worse yet, on his big U.S. tour with Pandit Ravi Shankar & Friends, Harrison’s voice, never strong, seem to fail him. A backlash reared up. And with that, he shrunk from one major spotlight: Those were his last shows in the United States.

Between 1975 and 1979, Harrison kept plugging away, to unspectacular commercial and critical results. Extra Texture (Read All About It) (1975) and 33 1?3 (1977) were more the work of a (still talented) journeyman than a seeker, although the latter album produced a stalwart fan favorite in “Crackerbox Palace.” (Critic Robert Christgau, never a Harrison fan, wrote that the song was “the best thing he’s written since ‘Here Comes the Sun.'”) The slick George Harrison (1979) didn’t juice his mojo, either. But he had other things going for him: Besides his passion for Formula 1 racing (celebrated in Harrison‘s “Faster”), there was his 1978 marriage to Olivia Arias, mother to his son Dhani, who he would spend the rest of his life with. In 1979, he self-published a loose memoir, I Me Mine, and began executive producing Monty Python films. Still, his next album, Somewhere in England, encountered trouble even before it was released. Warner Bros. (parent to Harrison’s Dark Horse) demanded the replacement of four songs.

On December 8, 1980, John Lennon was assassinated by Mark Chapman. Harrison hadn’t reconciled with Lennon after the breakup of the Beatles. I Me Mine didn’t even mention Lennon, and when Lennon reached out to Harrison after discovering this, Harrison did not respond. His public statement offered a reserved, if not especially profound or feeling, conclusion: “To rob life is the ultimate robbery in life.” Harrison reframed “All Those Years Ago,” a song originally about Ringo Starr, to honor Lennon, and added it to the reworkedSomewhere in England. The song went to Number Two.

Harrison hit musical bottom with the 1982 bomb Gone Troppo, and retreated from the studio and stage for years. He made an uncharacteristically brash return in 1987 withCloud Nine, which featured George in mirrored shades on its cover. The record went platinum and delivered a sticky Number One hit “Got My Mind Set on You,” a song derived from an obscure sixties number by Rudy Clark. Whatever the state of Harrison’s inner focus, it wasn’t probed here. But producer Jeff Lynne (of Electric Light Orchestra) helped Harrison lay on a fine sheen, and kept him to a tidy 11 tracks.

Late Eighties rock was, briefly, very good to George Harrison. Before long he and Lynne hooked up with Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, and Roy Orbison to record a song for Harrison — which led to the Traveling Wilburys, the last word on the rock super group. Their two albums — the irrepressible Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1 (1988) and scattershot Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3 (1990) — goosed the careers of all involved, and led to Harrison’s 1991 tour of Japan with Eric Clapton, which in turn led to the solid Live in Japan.

After this, Harrison returned to quietude. In 1995, he, Paul McCartney, and Ringo Starr produced two “new” Beatles songs “Free as a Bird” and “Real Love” for The Beatles Anthology documentary and albums. In 1998, at Linda McCartney’s funeral, the three appeared in public together for the first time in 30 years. Also in 1998, Harrison revealed he had been treated for throat cancer, and he was soon beset by more difficulty: On December 30, 1999, a mentally unstable man named Michael Abram broke into the Friar Park estate, lured Harrison out of his bedroom, and stabbed him repeatedly. The attack finally ended when Abram collapsed from injuries sustained when Olivia Harrison fought him off with a fireplace poker.

Harrison continued to suffer from cancer, an on November 29, 2001, at only 58 years old, Harrison died of the disease. He was memorialized around the world. On the first anniversary of his death, McCartney, Starr and many of Harrison’s other friends gathered for the Concert for George, which benefited the Material World Charitable Foundation. McCartney and Starr collaborated on “For You Blue,” Eric Clapton and Jeff Lynne performed “Here Comes the Sun,” and all artists at the concert gathered for several Harrison classics, including “Something” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.”Brainwashed, which Harrison had been working on with his son Dhani just before his death, was released in 2002 to warm critical reception. In 2004 Harrison was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist (the Beatles were inducted in 1988), and in 2009 EMI released Let it Roll: Songs by George Harrison, a career-spanning compilation.

Shortly after his death, Harrison’s family issued a statement that summed up his legacy: “He left this world as he lived in it, conscious of God, fearless of death and at peace, surrounded by family and friends. He often said, ‘Everything else can wait but the search for God cannot wait, and love one another.'”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/george-harrison/biography#ixzz38JofwEGv
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Bhaktivedanta Manor’s George Harrison memorial garden opens in Aldenham

Watford Observer: Hare Krishna Temple's George Harrison memorial garden opens

Hare Krishna Temple’s George Harrison memorial garden opens

  • Watford Observer: Hare Krishna Temple's George Harrison memorial garden opens
  • Watford Observer: Hare Krishna Temple's George Harrison memorial garden opens

A special memorial garden in honour of George Harrison was officially opened at Aldenham’s Hare Krishna Temple.

The George Harrison Memorial Garden was officially opened at the Bhaktivedanta Manor, in Hilfield lane, last month.

When the former Beatles guitarist passed away on November 29, 2001, Bhaktivedanta Manor resolved to create a quiet garden in his memory.

His widow, Olivia Harrison, was joined by television presenters Monty Don and Peter Owen-Jones at the garden’s opening on Saturday, May 25.

Clinton’s Marijuana Usage

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Clinton’s Marijuana Usage -she was a hippie after all!

Abdullah Saeed's avatar image By Abdullah Saeed  17 minutes ago

A New Book Makes a Bold Claim About Hillary Clinton’s Marijuana Usage
Image Credit: AP

The news: A new book claims that potential presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was an “enthusiastic pot user,” according to a quote from a former law school classmate.

Clinton recently denied ever having tried weed in an interview while promoting her book, claiming, “I didn’t do it when I was young. I’m not going to start now.”

However, after being against decriminalization during her 2008 presidential bid and calling for more research into its medical benefits, this time around, Clinton has recently said, “I think for people who are in extreme medical conditions and who have anecdotal evidence that it works, there should be availability under appropriate circumstances.”

It’s a somewhat noncommittal kind of support, but it is worlds away from her previous opposition to decriminalizing.

With the status quo. If Clinton was an “enthusiastic pot user” in college, she’s not much different from nearly half of the population. According to a 2013 Pew Research poll, 48% of Americans have tried cannabis at some point. Clinton’s political views on the topic are also shifting with the national trend, with amajority of the country in favor of legalization. Her statements signal favorable leadership for the pro-legalization majority.

Insult turned to favor. The book making the claim, Clinton, Inc.: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine, is essentially a takedown of both Bill and Hillary Clinton’s political careers. Its timing suggests that it hopes to detract from Clinton’s anticipated 2016 presidential run. However, considering popular public support for marijuana legalization, accusations of pot use may simply make her seem more relatable. All in all, it could mean a higher IQ rating for Clinton and a better chance that we might have a cannabis-supportive president come 2016.

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Meet the cops who give Doritos to potheads!

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After Washington voters legalized pot in November, Seattle’s PD

wants to be “cool,” and connect with the weed crowd

TOPICS: POLICESEATTLEMARIJUANAWASHINGTON STATEMARIJUANA LEGALIZATIONPOLICE BRUTALITY,EDITOR’S PICKS

Meet the cops who give Doritos to potheads!Seattle Police Department Detectives hand out bags of Doritos during the Hempfest rally in Seattle, August 17, 2013. (Credit: Reuters/Matt Mcknight)

“Never in my career did I guess that I’d be passing out delicious snacks at Hempfest,” Sean Whitcomb told Salon. “But that happened.” Hempfest goers seemed equally surprised to find Whitcomb, a sergeant in the Seattle Police Department, handing out bags of Doritos and not court summonses among the bong vendors and joint smokers at the city’s annual outdoor pot festival.

They’re typically arch-nemeses, potheads and police officers, but the munchies were a big hit and both sides seemed to relish the irony, with the bags now selling on eBay for as much as much as $50 a pop.

Whitcomb and his fellow officers are trying to make positive interactions like this between two groups historically skeptical of each other more commonplace after voters in the Evergreen State legalized pot in November. They’re trying to educate — the Doritos bags came with information about the new law — but beyond that, they’re trying to make a connection.

Like parents who look the other way as their kids drink a few beers with friends (but confiscate everyone’s keys), the Seattle cops also seem almost desperate to be liked. They return confiscated stasheswrite funny blog posts and use their official Twitter account to announce that the chief of police pulled over a truck adorned with fake pot leaves — in order to give the driver directions to Hempfest. And so what if there’s nothing less cool that someone trying really hard to be cool — can you really blame them?

“Absurd marijuana prohibition laws have long fueled contempt for law enforcement officials, and this type of outreach can help patch up that relationship between police and the public,” said Mason Tvert of the Marijuana Policy Project, a pro-legalization group based in Washington, D.C. “It is great to see … The Seattle Police Department appears to be moving forward with the voters, as opposed to resisting the changes demanded by voters, which is unfortunately still the case in far too many communities that have embraced reform.”

COOL PEOPLE – See Paul McCartney Jam With Johnny Depp in ‘Early Days’ – Premiere

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Sir Paul shares the story behind the black-and-white clip for his “memory song” about growing up with John Lennon
JULY 7, 2014 10:00 AM

“Early Days” is one of the highlights of Paul McCartney’s most recent album, 2013’s New, but its music video — which you can watch exclusively here — might never have happened if it was left up to McCartney. “When I’ve got a song, I don’t think about the video,” the singer says. “I’m sure some people do, but I don’t. I just think about the song, first writing it, then recording it.”

Behind Beatlemania: Intimate Photos of Paul McCartney

Earlier this year, though, director Vincent Haycock sent over a video treatment for “Early Days” that caught his eye. “It’s a memory song for me, about me and John in the early days,” McCartney says. “But Vince came up with this great idea: Instead of having young lookalikes of me and John walking the streets of Liverpool, guitars slung over our backs, and literally acting out the song, what if it was any two aspiring musicians? I thought that was such a cool idea.”

Haycock spent a month scouting locations in Natchez, Mississipi, and Faraday, Louisiana, and casting local actors for the video’s main storyline, set in the American South in the 1950s. He also traveled to Los Angeles to film a jam session between McCartney and some special guests. “I happened to ring Johnny Depp,” McCartney says. “I said, ‘Come along and we’ll sit around and jam with these blues guys.’ He said, ‘Yeah, OK, count me in, man.’ I knew it was an offer he couldn’t refuse.” (Other musicians at the session included Roy Gaines, Al Williams, Dale Atkins, Henree Harris, Motown Maurice, Lil Poochie and Misha Lindes; see an exclusive photo from the video shoot below.)

 

Paul McCartney at Early Days music video shoot in Los Angeles, California.
MJ KIM/MPL Communications

“Early Days” marks the third McCartney video Depp has appeared in, after 2012’s “My Valentine” and 2013’s “Queenie Eye.” “It’s getting to be a running gag,” McCartney says. “He’s like the Alfred Hitchcock of my videos. And he’s good! He used to be a musician before he was an actor, you know. One of his old band mates actually organized getting me that cigar-box guitar that I played with Dave Grohl on ‘Cut Me Some Slack,’ that we ended up getting a Grammy for. So I knew he could play.”

Music and acting, McCartney notes, often go hand in hand. “They’re similar gigs, really. Ringo used to know Peter Sellers very well, and Peter wanted to be a drummer – that was his secret closet ambition. You run into a lot of guys who play who are actors. There a bunch you can think of. Bruce Willis does it. Then there are people who do both, like Jared Leto.”

As for himself, the former Beatle disavows any interest in taking up acting. “No, I don’t think it’s my thing,” he says. “I get self-conscious in front of a movie camera. Off-camera, I can impersonate, I can do this and that, and I’ll think, ‘I could be such a great actor.’ Then they say ‘Action!’ and turn the camera on, and I go uh-uh-uh-uh-uh…I just don’t think I’m a natural.

“But you know what?” he adds with a laugh. “I’ve got enough to do.”

 

 

HIWAY AMERICA -AND COOL PEOPLE, THE LIFE OF RODGER MILLER AND THE RODGER MILLER MUSEUM, ROUTE 66 ERICK OKLAHOMA

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RODGER MILLER AND HIS BIG HIT -KING OF THE ROAD

http://youtu.be/OmOe27SJ3Yc

RODGER MILLER AND JOHNNY CASH  1971

http://youtu.be/74uv5FmWu0w

RODGER MILLER SINGS BOBBY MAGEE

The Life of Roger Miller (1936-1992) Laudene and Jean Miller (L to R) Wendell, Duane, Roger Elmer, Armelia, & Roger Miller Songwriter, singer, guitarist, fiddler, drummer, TV star, humorist, honky-tonk man, Broadway composer, and perhaps above all else, an awesome wit- Roger Miller was all of these and more. Roger Dean Miller was born January 2, 1936, in Fort Worth, Texas, the youngest of three boys. His father, Jean Miller, died at the age of 26 from spinal meningitis. Roger was only a year old. It was during the depression and Roger’s mother, Laudene Holt Miller, was in her early 20’s. She was just not able to provide for the boys. So each of Jean’s three brothers came and took one of the boys to live with them. Roger moved in with Armelia and Elmer Miller on a farm outside Erick, Oklahoma. Roger later joked, “It was so dull you could watch the colors run,” and, “the town was so small the town drunk had to take turns.” Roger had a difficult childhood. Most days were spent in the cotton fields picking cotton or working the land. He never really accepted the separation of his family. He was lonely and unhappy, but his mind took him to places he could only dream about. Walking three miles to his one-room school each day, he started composing songs, the first of which allegedly went a little something like this: “There’s a picture on the wall, It’s the dearest of them all, Mother” Roger, of course, painted a somewhat more humorous and inventive picture of his school days. “The school I went to had 37 students,” he once said, “me and 36 Indians. One time we had a school dance and it rained for 36 days straight. During recess we used to play cowboy and Indians and things got pretty wild from my standpoint. Nevertheless, Roger, who also liked to tell people that he “even flunked school bus,” did let his humorous guard down now and then to comment on the insecure loner he truly seems to have been as a child. “We were dirt poor,” he once explained. “What I’d do is sit around and get warm by crawling inside myself and make up stuff… I was one of those kids that never had much to say and when I did it was wrong. I always wanted attention, always was reaching and grabbing for attention.” Roger in grade school – bottom row, 3rd from left Roger was a dreamer and his heart was never in pickin’ cotton. He said, “We used to raise cotton ankle high.” Most days his daddy would catch him daydreaming. “It’s really a good thing that he made it in the music business ’cause he would have starved to death as a farmer,” says entertainer Sheb Wooley (1921-2003), an Erick native who married Roger’s cousin, Melva Laure Miller. Sheb Wooley & Melva Laure Miller Fifteen years older than Roger, Wooley’s career would lead him to Hollywood and the movies. One of Wooley’s biggest hits was “The Purple People Eater.” In those days, Wooley and little Roger would ride out “fixin fence, chasing steers and talking about stardom,” Wooley recalls. The two would listen to the Grand Ole Opry on Saturday nights and the Light Crust Doughboys on Fort Worth radio by day. Miller came to idolize Bob Wills and Hank Williams, but it was Wooley who taught Roger his first chords on guitar, bought him his first fiddle, and who represented the very real world of show business that Roger wanted so much for himself. Eager to follow in Wooley’s long tall footsteps while he was still in high school, Roger started running away, knocking around from town to town through Texas and Oklahoma. He took whatever work he could find by day and haunted the honky-tonks by night. His drifting came to an abrupt halt when he stole a guitar in Texas and crossed the state line back into Oklahoma. He had so desperately wanted a guitar to write songs on and this seemed the only way to get one, since pulling bowles would never earn him the kind of money he needed for a guitar. Roger in the Army – c. 1952 Roger in the Army – c. 1954 Roger turned himself in the next day and rather than put him in jail they offered to let him join the Army. Although he was only 17, he chose to go into the service. He was eager to be going someplace else and before long he was shipped to Korea, where he drove a jeep and earned one of his favorite one-liners, “My education was Korea, Clash of 52.” Roger was terribly homesick, but his world was growing larger. Towards the end of his tour with the Army, he was sent to Fort McPherson in Atlanta. Assigned to Special Services, he played fiddle in the Circle A Wranglers, a well known service outfit previously started by PFC Faron Young. After Roger’s discharge from the Army, he headed directly for Nashville to see Chet Atkins. He told Chet he was a songwriter and Chet asked him to play something. Seeing that Roger didn’t have a guitar, Chet offered his to him. Roger just couldn’t believe he was sitting in front of Chet Atkins and playing his guitar. He said, “I was so nervous, people thought I was wavin’.” Roger proceeded to sing in one key and play in another. Chet was kind about it but suggested he work on his songs a little more and come back. Roger used to say, “I was everywhere at once.” He had an energy that was new to Nashville. Needing to work while he pursued his dream, Roger took a job as a bellhop at the Andrew Jackson Hotel. “It had more dignity than washing dishes,” he later said. Situated right in the thick of Nashville’s downtown music district, the Andrew Jackson gave him proximity to the small but vibrant Country scene. Roger soon became known as the “Singing Bellhop.” He would sing a song to anyone who would listen on the way up or down the elevator.   continued on page 2:

RODGER MILLER AND JOHNNY CASH GOOFING OFF AND KING OF THE ROAD http://youtu.be/PVdi-JO0Q5I

HITCHHIKER -RODGER MILLER http://youtu.be/1mxZE0Ef5Tw

INVITATION citation TO THE BLUES LIVE 1989  RODGER MILLER http://youtu.be/SKuxJz5oiiE

Roger Miller Museum 101 E Roger Miller Blvd Erick, OK 73645 Phone: 580-526-3889 580-515-1540 Fax: 580-526-3331 E-mailWeb Site View all Photos Description Located in Erick at the corner of Sheb Wooley Ave and Roger Miller Blvd, a renamed section of Route 66, the Roger Miller Museum gives travelers and visitors a one-of-a-kind glimpse into the life and times of Roger Miller, one of Oklahoma’s and Erick’s favorite sons. The newly renovated museum features exhibits, memorabilia and personal effects celebrating the life and accomplishments of this unique songwriter and entertainer. Among the items on display are music, photographs, videos, instruments, clothing, Roger’s high school FFA jacket and essay, handwritten lyrics, Roger’s army shirt from Korea and even the motorcycle he was riding when he met Elvis. In addition, visitors can watch DVD footage on the big screen TV in the audio/video room of past performances by Miller, plus many tributes made by his colleagues. Come and share the wit and wisdom of Roger Miller. He was a true original, whose dreams and talent led him to be considered one of the most influential country artists of the 20th Century. The museum also includes a gift shop with music CDs performed by Miller, King of the Road caps, t-shirts and more, along with other unique items relating to western Oklahoma.