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The Counterculture

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The Counterculture

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Counterculture is a term describing the values and norms of a cultural group that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day.

 LEARNING OBJECTIVE

  • Apply the concept of counterculture to the rise and collapse of the US Hippie movement

KEY POINTS

  • Examples of countercultures in the U.S. could include the hippie movement of the 1960s, the green movement, polygamists, and feminist groups.
  • A counterculture is a subculture with the addition that some of its beliefs, values, or norms challenge or even contradict those of the main culture of which it is part.
  • Countercultures run counter to dominant cultures and the social mainstream of the day.

TERMS

  • culture

    The beliefs, values, behavior, and material objects that constitute a people’s way of life.

  • mainstream

    Purchased, used, or accepted broadly rather than by a tiny fraction of a population or market; common, usual, or conventional.

  • counterculture
  • images (10)
  • Any culture whose values and lifestyles are opposed to those of the established mainstream culture, especially to western culture.


EXAMPLES

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  • Modern American Marxist political groups are examples of countercultures — they promote a worldview and set of norms and values that are contrary to the dominant American system.

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FULL TEXT

Counterculture is a sociological term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. Counterculture can also describe a group whose behavior deviates from the societal norm.

In the United States, the counterculture of the 1960s became identified with the rejection of conventional social norms of the 1950s. Counterculture youth rejected the cultural standards of their parents, especially with respect to racial segregation and initial widespread support for the Vietnam War.

As the 1960s progressed, widespread tensions developed in American society that tended to flow along generational lines regarding the war in Vietnam, race relations, sexual mores, women’s rights, traditional modes of authority, and a materialisticinterpretation of the American Dream. Hippies became the largest countercultural group in the United States. The counterculture also had access to a media eager to present their concerns to a wider public. Demonstrations for social justice created far-reaching changes affecting many aspects of society .

Hippies at an Anti-Vietnam Demonstration, 1967

Hippies at an Anti-Vietnam Demonstration, 1967

A female demonstrator offers a flower to military police on guard at the Pentagon during an anti-Vietnam demonstration.

The counterculture in the United States lasted from roughly 1964 to 1973 — coinciding with America’s involvement in Vietnam — and reached its peak in 1967, the “Summer of Love. ” The movement divided the country: to some Americans, these attributes reflected American ideals of free speech, equality, world peace, and the pursuit of happiness; to others, the same attributes reflected a self-indulgent, pointlessly rebellious, unpatriotic, and destructive assault on America’s traditional moral order.

The counterculture collapsed circa 1973, and many have attributed its collapse to two major reasons: First, the most popular of its political goals — civil rights, civil liberties, gender equality, environmentalism, and the end of the Vietnam War — were accomplished. Second, a decline of idealism and hedonism occurred as many notable counterculture figures died, the rest settled into mainstream society and started their own families, and the “magic economy” of the 1960s gave way to the stagflation of the 1970s.

Source: Boundless. “Countercultures.” Boundless Sociology. Boundless, 03 Jul. 2014. Retrieved 29 Nov. 2014 from https://www.boundless.com/sociology/textbooks/boundless-sociology-textbook/culture-and-socialization-3/culture-worlds-32/countercultures-204-8929/

WHAT DOES BEING SQUARE MEAN?

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Hip to be square?

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If you’ve ever heard of someone being called a square, you probably realize it has nothing to do with having four corners. So what does being square mean? The term, most frequently used during the 1940s through the 1960s, has a long history of use.

What is being square?

Beginning with the jazz-loving hipsters of the 1940s, and used by the counterculture movements of almost every generation since, the act of being square refers to thinking inside the box and conforming to societal norms. The term was used by beatniks, hippies, yippies and other cultural movements to oppose more conservative and conventional world views.

To call someone a square usually has negative connotations, and it is generally the same as saying the person is no fun, a Goody Two-shoes or a party pooper.

Hip to be square

Interestingly, there are some positive connotations to the term “square.” It is sometimes used to refer to something being good and honest, such as in “fair and square” or “a square deal.’

The Freemasons use the square as one of their major symbols, calling it an emblem of virtue in which they must “square their actions by the square of virtue with all mankind.’ This is another case of square referring to something being fair and upstanding.

In the 1980s, many of those who had opposed mainstream society as hippies in the 1960s found themselves fitting into the roles they previously despised and becoming a comfortable part of the middle class. This change is reflected in the song “Hip to Be Square,’ by Huey Lewis and the News, in which the band declares “Now I’m playing it real straight, and yes I cut my hair’ and points out that many of those who were the most antiauthority went on to become the most square and how that was nothing to be ashamed of.

Examples of use

The term “square” has had many well-known uses in music and popular culture.

In “Jailhouse Rock,’ Elvis Presley sings: “The warden said, Hey buddy, don’t you be no square / If you can’t find a partner, use a wooden chair.’

One of the earliest popular uses of the term is in Harry Gibson’s 1946 song “What’s His Story?” which includes the lyrics “Saint Peter said, You square, your place is right down there / and the square said, What’s his story?’

In the film Pulp Fiction, the character Mia Wallace draws a box in the air with her finger and calls Vincent Vega a square after he refuses to go along with her plans.

Whether you think it’s hip to be square or you would rather think outside the box, the term “square” has a colorful history, and it has slightly different meanings to different people. Its use has declined over recent years, but why not try to organize a revival by using the term with your family and friends?

If you’ve ever heard of someone being called a square, you probably realize it has nothing to do with having four corners. So what does being square mean? The term, most frequently used during the #1940s through the #1960s, has a long history of use.

What is being square?

Beginning with the jazz-loving hipsters of the 1940s, and used by the counterculture movements of almost every generation since, the act of being square refers to thinking inside the box and conforming to societal norms. The term was used by beatniks, hippies, yippies and other cultural movements to oppose more conservative and conventional world views.

To call someone a square usually has negative connotations, and it is generally the same as saying the person is no fun, a Goody Two-shoes or a party pooper.

Hip to be square

200 (41)

Interestingly, there are some positive connotations to the term “square.” It is sometimes used to refer to something being good and honest, such as in “fair and #square” or “a square deal.’

The #Freemasons use the square as one of their major symbols, calling it an emblem of virtue in which they must “square their actions by the square of virtue with all mankind.’ This is another case of square referring to something being fair and upstanding.

In the 1980s, many of those who had opposed mainstream society as hippies in the 1960s found themselves fitting into the roles they previously despised and becoming a comfortable part of the middle class. This change is reflected in the song “Hip to Be Square,’ by Huey Lewis and the News, in which the band declares “Now I’m playing it real straight, and yes I cut my hair’ and points out that many of those who were the most antiauthority went on to become the most square and how that was nothing to be ashamed of.

Examples of use

The term “square” has had many well-known uses in music and popular culture.

In “Jailhouse Rock,’ Elvis Presley sings: “The warden said, Hey buddy, don’t you be no square / If you can’t find a partner, use a wooden chair.’

One of the earliest popular uses of the term is in Harry Gibson’s 1946 song “What’s His Story?” which includes the lyrics “Saint Peter said, You square, your place is right down there / and the square said, What’s his story?’

In the film Pulp Fiction, the character Mia Wallace draws a box in the air with her finger and calls Vincent Vega a square after he refuses to go along with her plans.

Whether you think it’s hip to be square or you would rather think outside the box, the term “square” has a colorful history, and it has slightly different meanings to different people. Its use has declined over recent years, but why not try to organize a revival by using the term with your family and friends?

best movies of the 60’s

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best movies of the 60’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  1. Lawrence of Arabia – (1962, David Lean) (Peter O’Toole, Alec Guinness)
  2. Psycho – (1960, Alfred Hitchcock) (Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh)
  3. Dr. Strangelove… – (1964, Stanley Kubrick) (Peter Sellers, George C. Scott)
  4. 8 1/2 – (1963, Federico Fellini) (Marcello Mastroianni, Claudia Cardinale)
  5. 2001: A Space Odyssey – (1968, Stanley Kubrick) (Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood)
  6. Once Upon a Time in the West – (1968, Sergio Leone) (Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson)
  7. To Kill a Mockingbird – (1962, Robert Mulligan) (Gregory Peck, Mary Badham)
  8. Midnight Cowboy – (1969, John Schlesinger) (Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight)
  9. Bonnie and Clyde – (1967, Arthur Penn) (Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway)
  10. La Dolce Vita – (1960, Federico Fellini) (Marcello Mastroianni, Anouk Aimee)
  11. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly – (1966, Sergio Leone) (Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, Eli Wallach)
  12. The Graduate – (1967, Mike Nichols) (Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross)
  13. Breathless – (1960, Jean-Luc Godard) (Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jean Seberg)
  14. The Yojimbo – (1961, Akira Kurosawa) (Toshiro Mifune, Tatsuya Nakadai)
  15. Wild Bunch – (1969, Sam Peckinpah) (William Holden, Ernest Borgnine)
  16. Persona – (1966, Ingmar Bergman) (Liv Ullmann, Bibi Andersson)
  17. The Leopard – (1963, Luchino Visconti) (Burt Lancaster, Claudia Cardinale)
  18. L’Avventura – (1960, Michelangelo Antonioni) (Gabriele Ferzetti, Monica Vitti)
  19. The Apartment – (1960, Billy Wilder) (Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine)
  20. The Manchurian Candidate – (1962, John Frankenheimer) (Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey)
  21. Easy Rider – (1969, Dennis Hopper) (Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson)
  22. Last Years at Marienbad – (1961, Alain Resnais) (Delphine Seyrig, Giorgio Albertazzi)
  23. West Side Story – (1961, Jerome Robbins, Robert Wise) (Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer)
  24. Cool Hand Luke – (1967, Stuart Rosenberg) (Paul Newman, George Kennedy, Strother Martin)
  25. The Battle of Algiers – (1966, Gillo Pontecorvo) (Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin)
  26. Doctor Zhivago – (1965, David Lean) (Omar Sharif, Julie Christie)
  27. A Hard Day’s Night – (1964, Richard Lester) (The Beatles, Wilfrid Brambell, Norman Rossington)
  28. Alphaville – (1965, Jean-Luc Godard) (Eddie Constantine, Anna Karina)
  29. The Music Man – (1962, Morton DaCosta) (Robert Preston, Shirley Jones, Buddy Hackett)
  30. Spartacus – (1960, Stanley Kubrick) (Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons)
  31. Peeping Tom – (1960, Michael Powell) (Karlheinz Bühm, Moira Shearer)
  32. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg – (1964, Jacques Demy) (Catherine Deneuve, Nino Castelnuovo)
  33. The Sound of Music – (1965, Robert Wise) (Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer)
  34. Medium Cool – (1969, Haskell Wexler) (Christine Bergstrom, Harold Blankenship)
  35. The Producers – (1968, Mel Brooks) (Zero Mostel, Gene Wilder)
  36. Planet of the Apes – (1968, Franklin J. Schaffner) (Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowell)
  37. In the Heat of the Night – (1967, Norman Jewison) (Sidney Poitier, Rod Steiger, Warren Oates)
  38. Marat/Sade – (1966, Peter Brook) (Patrick Magee, Ian Richardson, Glenda Jackson)
  39. Belle de jour – (1967, Luis Buñuel) (Catherine Deneuve, Jean Sorel)
  40. Andrei Rublev – (1966, Andrei Tarkovsky) (Anatoli Solonitsyn, Ivan Lapikov)
  41. Blow-Up – (1966, Michelangelo Antonioni) (David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles)
  42. The Birds – (1963, Alfred Hitchcock) (Rod Taylor, Tippi Hedren, Jessica Tandy)
  43. Tom Jones – (1963, Tony Richardson) (Albert Finney, Susannah York, Hugh Griffith)
  44. Night of the Living Dead – (1968, George A. Romero) (Duane Jones, Judith O’Dea)
  45. The Hustler – (1961, Robert Rossen) (Paul Newman, Jackie Gleason, George C. Scott)
  46. My Fair Lady – (1964, George Cukor) (Audrey Hepburn, Rex Harrison, Wilfrid Hyde-White)
  47. Goldfinger – (1964, Guy Hamilton) (Sean Connery, Gert Fröbe, Honor Blackman)
  48. Woman in the Dunes – (1964, Hiroshi Teshigahara) (Eiji Okada, Kyôko Kishida)
  49. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance – (1962, John Ford) (John Wayne, James Stewart, Vera Miles)
  50. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid – (1969, George Roy Hill) (Paul Newman, Robert Redford)
  51. Rosemary’s Baby – (1968, Roman Polanski) (Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon)

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52.(1966, Jiri Menzel) (Václav Neckár, Josef Somr)
53. Rocco and His Brothers – (1960, Luchino Visconti) (Alain Delon, Renato Salvatori)
54. Weekend – (1967, Jean-Loc Godard) (Mireille Darc, Jean Yanne)
55. Breakfast at Tiffany’s – (1961, Blake Edwards) (Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard, Patricia Neal)
56. The Longest Day – (1962, Ken Annakin) (Richard Burton, Robert Ryan, Henry Fonda)
57. Point Blank – (1967, John Boorman) (Lee Marvin, Angie Dickinson, Keenan Wynn)
58. Oliver! – (1968, Carol Reed) (Mark Lester, Ron Moody, Jack Wild, Oliver Reed)
59. Judgment at Nuremberg – (1961, Stanley Kramer) (Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster)
60. The Dirty Dozen – (1967, Robert Aldrich) (Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Charles Bronson)
61. Dog Star Man – (1964, Stan Brakhage) (Jane Brakhage, Stan Brakhage)
62. Bullitt – (1968, Peter Yates) (Steve McQueen, Jacqueline Bisset, Robert Vaughn)
63. Pierrot Le Fou – (1965, Jean-Loc Godard) (Jean-Paul Belmondo, Anna Karina)
64. Mary Poppins – (1964, Robert Stevenson) (Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke)
65. A Raisin in the Sun – (1961, Daniel Petrie) (Sidney Poitier, Claudia McNeil, Louis Gossett Jr.)
66. Romeo and Juliet – (1968, Franco Zeffirelli) (Leonard Whiting, Olivia Hussey)
67. The Shop On Main Street – (1965, Jan Kadar, Elmar Klos) (Ida Kaminska, Jozef Króner)
68. Funny Girl – (1968, William Wyler) (Barbra Streisand, Omar Sharif)
69. Hud – (1963, Martin Ritt) (Paul Newman, Melvyn Douglas, Patricia Neal)
70. In Cold Blood – (1967, Richard Brooks) (Robert Blake, Scott Wilson, John Forsythe)
71. Lolita – (1962, Stanley Kubrick) (Sue Lyon, Shelley Winters, Gary Cockrell)
72. The Pawnbroker – (1964, Sidney Lumet) (Rod Steiger, Geraldine Fitzgerald)
73. The Innocents – (1961, Jack Clayton) (Deborah Kerr, Peter Wyngarde, Michael Redgrave)
74. My Night at Maud’s – (1969, Eric Rohmer) (Jean-Louis Trintignant, Françoise Fabian)
75. Jules and Jim – (1962, Francois Truffaut) (Jeanne Moreau, Oskar Werner)
76. The Great Escape – (1963, John Sturges) (Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough)
77. Yellow Submarine – (1968, George Dunning) (Animation)
78. Repulsion – (1965, Roman Polanski) (Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry)
79. From Russia With Love – (1963, Terence Young) (Sean Connery, Robert Shaw, Daniela Bianchi)
80. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – (1966, Mike Nichols) (Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton)
81. One Hundred and One Dalmatians – (1961, Clyde Geronimi) (Animation)
82. Elmer Gantry – (1960, Richard Brooks) (Burt Lancaster, Jean Simmons, Arthur Kennedy)
83. The Exterminating Angel – (1962, Luis Buñuel) (Silvia Pinal, Enrique Rambal)
84. Lilies of the Field – (1963, Ralph Nelson) (Sidney Poitier, Lilia Skala, Lisa Mann)
85. A Man for All Seasons – (1966, Fred Zinnemann) (Paul Scofield, Leo McKern, Robert Shaw)
86. Long Day’s Journey into Night – (1962, Sidney Lumet) (Katharine Hepburn, Ralph Richardson)
87. Ride the High Country – (1962, Sam Peckinpah) (Randolph Scott, Joel McCrea, Edgar Buchanan)
88. A Thousand Clowns – (1965, Fred Coe) (Jason Robards, Barbara Harris, Martin Balsam)
89. Le Trou – (1960, Jacques Becker) (Michel Constantin, Jean Keraudy)
90. Z – (1969, Costa-Gavras) (Yves Montand, Irene Papas, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Jacques Perrin)

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  1. The Pink Panther – (1964, Blake Edwards) (Peter Sellers, David Niven, Robert Wagner)
  2. Inherit the Wind – (1960, Stanley Kramer) (Spencer Tracy, Fredric March, Harry Morgan)
  3. The Haunting – (1963, Robert Wise) (Julie Harris, Claire Bloom, Richard Johnson)
  4. Shoot the Piano Player – (1960, Francois Truffaut) (Charles Aznavour, Marie Dubois)
  5. Cape Fear – (1962, J. Lee Thompson) (Robert Mitchum, Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen)
  6. Contempt – (1963, Jean-Luc Godard) (Brigitte Bardot, Michel Piccoli, Jack Palance)
  7. Red Desert – (1964, Michelangelo Antonioni) (Monica Vitti, Richard Harris)
  8. Georgy Girl – (1966, Silvio Narizzano) (James Mason, Lynn Redgrave, Alan Bates)
  9. Juliet of the Spirits – (1965, Federico Fellini) (Giulietta Masina, Sandra Milo)
  10. Darling – (1965, John Schlesinger) (Laurence Harvey, Julie Christie, Dirk Bogarde)

20 More Movies Worth Mentioning

  1. The Jungle Book – (1967, Wolfgang Reitherman) (Voices of: Phil Harris, Sebastian Cabot, Louis Prima)
  2. Faces – (1968, John Cassavetes) (John Marley, Gena Rowlands, Lynn Carlin)
  3. Playtime – 1967, Jacques Tati) (Jacques Tati, Barbara Dennek, Rita Maiden)
  4. Viridiana – (1961, Luis Bunuel) (Silvia Pinal, Francisco Rabal, Fernando Rey)
  5. Le Samouraï – 1967, Jean-Pierre Melville) (Alain Delon, François Périer, Nathalie Delon)
  6. If – (1968, Lindsay Anderson) (Malcolm McDowell, David Wood, Richard Warwick)
  7. Shock Corridor – (1963, Samuel Fuller) (Peter Breck, Constance Towers, Gene Evans)
  8. Through a Glass Darkly – (1961, Ingmar Bergman) (Gunnar Björnstrand, Harriet Andersson)
  9. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? – (1962, Robert Aldrich) (Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Victor Buono)
  10. My Life To Live – (1962, Jean-Luc Godard) (Anna Karina, Sady Rebbot, André S. Labarthe)
  11. Knife In The Water – (1962, Roman Polanski) (Leon Niemczyk, Jolanta Umecka)
  12. The Nutty Professor – (1963, Jerry Lewis) (Jerry Lewis, Stella Stevens, Del Moore)
  13. The Miracle Worker – (1962, Arthur Penn) (Patty Duke, Anne Bancroft, Victor Jory)
  14. Dr. No – (1962, Terence Young) (Sean Connery, Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman)
  15. War and Peace – (1968, Sergei Bondarchuk) (Lyudmila Savelyeva, Vyacheslav Tikhonov, Gennadi Ivanov)
  16. They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? – (1969, Sydney Pollack) (Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Susannah York)
  17. Memories of Underdevelopment – (1968, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea) (Sergio Corrieri, Daisy Granados)
  18. True Grit – (1969, Henry Hathaway) (John Wayne, Glen Campbell, Kim Darby)
  19. The Misfits – (1961, John Hutson) (Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, Montgomery Clift)
  20. High School – (1968, Frederick Wiseman) (Documentary)

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Beat Quotes

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Beat Quotes

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Beat Quotes

This is a good sized list of quotes by or pertaining to a beat author. Some of them are very deep, some of them all funny, and some make no sense whatsoever. Enjoy.


“There is no line between the ‘real world’ and ‘world of myth and symbol.’ Objects, sensations, hit with the impact of hallucination.”
-William Burroughs

“I’m running out of everything now. Out of veins, out of money.”
-William Burroughs

“Strip your psyche to the bare bones of spontaneous process, and you give yourself one chance in a thousand to make the Pass.”
-William Burroughs

“The charging restless mute unvoiced road keening in a seizure of tarpaulin power.”
-Jack Kerouac’s favorite line from On The Road

“Rather, I think one should write, as nearly as possible, as if he were the first person on earth and was humbly and sincerly putting on paper that which he saw and experienced and loved and lost; what his passing thoughts were and his sorrows and desires.”
-Neal Cassady to Jack Kerouac

“Americans should know the universe itself as a road, as many roads, as roads for traveling souls.”
-Walt Whitman

“Neal, we’ll be real heroes now in a war between our cocks and time: let’s be the angels of the world’s desire and take the world to bed with us before we die.”
-Allen Ginsberg to Cassady on their sexual relation…lines from the poem The Green Automobile

“If you have a choice of two things and can’t decide, take both.” -Gregory Corso “The stone world came to me, and said Flesh gives you an hour’s life.”
-Gregory Corso

“If you believe you’re a poet, then you’re saved.”
-Gregory Corso

“In such places as Greenwich Village, a menage-a-trois was completed- the bohemian and the juvenile delinquent came face-to-face with the Negro, and the hipster was a fact in American life.”
-Norman Mailer

“Madness is confusion of levels of fact…Madness is not seeing visions but confusing levels.”
-William Burroughs

“I really believe, or want to believe, really I am nuts, otherwise I’ll never be sane.”
-Allen Ginsberg to Jack Kerouac

“Sure I’m old, and I’m evil, and I’m ugly, and I’m tired. But that isn’t it. I’ve been this way for ten years, and I’m all down the main line.”
-Herbert Huncke to Allen GInsberg

“Neal will leave you in the cold anytime it’s in his interest.”
-LuAnne Cassady (the 15 year old bride of Neal Cassady)

“Oh, smell the people!’ yelled Dean with his face out the window, sniffling. ‘Ah, God! Life!'”
-Jack Kerouac, On The Road

“Obviously the ‘purpose’ of the trip is carefully selected to symbolize the basic fact of purposelessness. Neal is, of course, the very soul of the voyage into pure, abstract meaningless motion. He is The Mover, compulsive, dedicated, ready to sacrifice family, friends, even his very car itself to the necessity of moving from one place to another.”
-William Burroughs to Allen Ginsberg on Neal and his skeptical views of the man and voyage which spurred On The Road

“Love is all.’
-Jack Kerouac

“I went with him for no reason.”
-Jack Kerouac on Neal Cassady

“What’s your road, man? -holyboy road, madman road, rainbow road, guppy road, any road. It’s an anywhere road for anybody anyhow.”
-Neal Cassady as Dean Moriarty in On The Road

“Who are all these strange ghosts rooted to the silly little adventure of earth with me?”
-Jack Kerouac, on the final gathering/Snyders going away party

“The omlet fell apart, as with such eggs it must.”
-Wilifrid Sheed, on the San Francisco Renaissance Poets

“I am getting so far out one day I won’t come back at all.”
-William Burroughs

“Ginsby boy, he’s all over Oregon like horseshit howling his dirty pome.”
-Jack Kerouac on Allen Ginsberg

“I am beginning to think he is a great saint, a great saint concealed in a veneer of daemonism.”
-Jack Kerouac on Allen Ginsberg

“We are all trying to get the exact style of ouuselves.”
-Michael McClure on the San Francisco Renaissance

“To rebel! That is the immediate objective of poets! We can not wait and will not be held back…The “poetic marvelous” and the unconscious are the true inspirers of rebels and poets.”
-Philip Lamantia

“Around Jack there circulated a palpable aura of fame and death.”
-Gary Snyder on Jack Kerouac

“I want to create wilderness out of empire.”
-Gary Snyder

“I’m beat to the square, and square to the beat, and that’s my vocation.”
-William Everson aka Brother Antoninus

“We had gone beyond a point of no return- and we were ready for it, for a point of no return…We wanted voice and we wanted vision.”
-Michael McClure

“A reading is a kind of communion. The poet articulates the semi-known for the tribe.
-Gary Snyder

“I want your lingual SPONTINEITY or nothing else.”
-Jack Kerouac to Allen Ginsberg after reading Howl

“An army is an army against love.”
-Peter Orlovsky

“At that instant we looked into eachother’s eyes and there was a kind of celestial cold fire that crept over us and blazed up and illuminated the entire cafeteria and made it an eternal place.”
-Allen Ginsberg to William Burroughs on his new lover Peter Orlovsky

“I’ve been getting silly drunk again lately in Remo and discusting myself a la Subterraneans.”
-Jack Kerouac to William Burroughs

Jack Kerouac’s Translations of Buddhist Terms
Dharma: “truth law”
Nirvana: “blown-out-ness”
Tathata: “that which everything is”
Tathagata: “attainer to that which everything is”
Bodhisattva-Manasattvas: “beings of great wisdom”

“Kerouac’s version of Buddha is a dimestore incense burner, glowing and glowering sinisterly in the dark corner of a Beatnik pad and just thrilling the wits out of bad little girls.”
-Kenneth Rexroth

“I miss you so much your absence causes me, at times, accute pain. I don’t mean sexually. I mean in connection with my writing.”
-William Burroughs to Allen Ginsberg

“I did no think I was hooked on him like this. The withdrawl symptoms are worse than the Marker habit. Tell Allen I plead guilty to vampirism and other crimes against life. But I love him and nothing else cancels love.”
-William Burroughs to Jack Kerouac on Ginsberg

“I have a strange feeling here of being outside any social context.”
-William Burroughs in Tangiers

“Not that Irwin wasn’t worthy of him but how on earth could they consumate this great romantic love with vaseline and K.Y.?”
-Jack Kerouac on Ginsberg and Burroughs relationship

“Between incomprehensible and incoherent sits the madhouse. I am not in the madhouse.”
-Jack Kerouac to Carl Solomon.

“I think all writers write for an audience. There is no such thing as writing for yourself.”
-William Burroughs to Allen Ginsberg

“Usually he selected someone who could not reciprocate so that he was able-cautiously, like one who tests uncertain ice, though in this case the danger was not that the ice give way but that it might hold his weight-to shift the burden of not loving, of being unable to love, onto the partner.”
-Willam Burroughs on himself

“Avoid the world, it’s just a lot of dust and drag and means nothing in the end.”
-Jack Kerouac

“Al, I am a fucking saint, that is I been fucked by the Holy Ghost and knocked up with Immaculate Woid…I’m the third coming, me, and don’t know if I can do it again….so stand by for the Revelation.”
-William Burroughs to Allen Ginsberg

“Suffice to say I just eat every 12 hours, sleep every 20 hours, masturbate every 8 hours and otherwise just sit on the train and stare ahead without a thought…”
-Neal Cassady

“Wherever I go I see myself in a mirror- it used to be my own selfblood, now it is god’s.”
-Allen Ginsberg

“Never deny the voice- no, never forget it, don’t get lost mentally wandering in other spirit worlds or American or job worlds or advertising worlds or earth worlds.”
-Allen Ginsberg’s vow to himself

“I want to be a saint, a real saint while I am young, for there is so much work to do.”
-Allen Ginsberg to Mark Van Doren

“The apparition of an evil, sick unconscious wild city rose before me in visible semblance, and about the dead buildings in the barren air, the bodies of the soul that built the wonderland shuffled and stalked and stalked and lurched in attitudes of immemorial nightmare all around.”
-Allen Ginsberg (his visions after reading Blake)

“I was so sick that I found myself worrying about the future of man’s soul, my own in paticular.”
-Allen Ginsberg

“Just a little boy who wants to be a novelist.”
-Alan Ansen’s description of Jack Kerouac

“Death hovers over my pencil…”
-Jack Kerouac

Pinned to Jack Kerouac’s wall to inspire his writing: “Art is the highest task and the proper metaphysical activity of this life.”
-Nietzsche

“I am going to marry my novels and have little short stories for children.”
-Jack Kerouac

“The fact was I had the vision…I think everyone has…what we lack is the method.”
-Jack Kerouac to Allen Ginsberg

“I detest limitations of any kind, and intend to establish my ass some place where I am a virgin on the police blotter.”
-William Burroughs to Allen Ginsberg

“Naturally, I thought the guy was just kiddin.”
-Herbert Huncke, on Burrough’s request for a Viennese waltz

“Shooting is my principal pastime.”
-William Burroughs

“My fault, my failure, is not in the passions I have, but in my lack of control of them.”
-Jack Kerouac to Neal Cassady

“Two piercing eyes glancing into two piercing eyes- the holy con-man with the shining mind, and the sorrowful poetic con-man with the dark mind.”
-Kerouac on the night Ginsberg and Cassady met

“I really dont know how much I can be be satisfied to love you, I mean bodily, you know, I somehow dislike pricks & men & before you, had conciously forced myself to be homosexual…I dont want to be unconsciously insincere by passing over my non-queerness to please you.”
-Neal Cassady to Allen Ginsberg on their sexual relationship

“Dont you remember how you made me stop trembling in shame and drew me to you? Don’t you know what I felt then, as if you were a saint…?”
-Allen Ginsberg to Neal Cassady

“Neal is awareness, mine is conciousness. The conciousness is shallow, awareness is all embracing.”
-Allen Ginsberg on Neal Cassady

“He came to the door stark naked and it might have been the President knocking for all he cared. He received the world in the raw.”
-Jack Kerouac on Neal Cassady

“I have thought of Neal as being a psychopath for quite some time. To me he is nothing more than a series of incidents.”
-John Clellon Holmes to Ginsberg

“I see no greatness in my self…I’m a simple-minded, child-like, insipid sort of moronic and kind of akward feeling adolescent.”
-Neal Cassady on himself

“I became the unnatural son of a few score of beaten men.”
-Neal Cassady

“For Neal sex was the one and only holy and important thing in life.”
-Jack Kerouac on Neal Cassady

“Cassady was sexually initiated at the age of nine. He accompanied his father to the home of a drinking buddy, whose oldest son led his brother and Neal in sexual intercourse with as many sisters as they could hold down. All boundaries of sexual decorum evaporated. Neal “sneak shared” women with his father, he slept with grandmothers and prepubescent girls in abandoned buildings, barns, and public toilets.”
-Steven Watson, Birth of the Beat Generation

“I alone, as the sharer of their way of life, presented a replica of childhood.”
-Neal Cassady

Email: haesuse@aol.com

Aside

SUMMER OF LOVE 1967
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Video Title: Summer of Love 1967
Posted by: Anonymous [More from this user]
Description: This video features images from the Summer of Love in San Francisco accompanied by techno music (why? isn’t there enough good music from the period?)

THE SUMMER OF LOVE

http://youtu.be/qI-Ji4gtBPM

The Year of the Hippie

In the mid-1960s, young people who embraced a non-traditional lifestyle began moving into the Haight neighborhood of San Francisco. As had earlier groups like Beatniks and Hipsters, they rejected mainstream society, but their taste for rock music and wild colors was new.  Some tagged this group as junior-grade Hipsters — “hippies” for short. An underground newspaper, The San Francisco Oracle, chronicled the movement, often with psychedelic flair.

In October 1966, a group of San Francisco hippies staged a Love Pageant. As stories and images of hippies spread, thousands of young Americans flooded the city, wanting to witness or be part of the action.  A year later — after the 1967 “summer of love” — San Francisco hippies performed a rite they called “The Death of the Hippie.”

Select a date to open the video timeline.

October 6,1966 January 14, 1967 April 5, 1967 June 21, 1967 October 6,1967

Love Pageant Human Be-In Council for the Summer of Love Summer Solstice celebration Death of the Hippie

THE SUMMER OF LOVE 1967 VIDEO

top 10 subcultures of modern times

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Top 10: Subcultures of Modern Time

LETUNE NOVEMBER 13, 2009 6

Arms akimbo, defiant in their stance; a group with their own fashion, colloquialisms, music taste, and ideology.

Each group eventually becomes so popular that it collapses under the weight of their own anti-popular popularity, and assimilates into the very thing they opposed: The majority, the conventional, the ordinary. However, in their (often brief) existence, they thrive on being the social underdogs and each subsequent subculture seems to be both a protest and a tribute to the previous subcultures, resulting in an interesting mix of very different groups with somewhat similar ideals.

But, in the interest of keeping up a healthy level of competition a Top 10 site must have, we ask the following:

Which subculture was the best? In no particular order as we’ll leave you to decide the best, and thus absolve us of any perceived discrimination.

Punks

Punks

Remember when you and your crazy friends decided to pierce your ears at home with a safety pin and a potato, because you heard Sid Vicious did it? No? You weren’t born then eh? Ok, remember when Green Day came out with that Basket Case song and then suddenly all those dudes that were into Guns N Roses started listening to Rancid? Still too young eh?

OK, how ‘bout this? Remember when you stole that candy bar from the 7-11, were spotted by the dude behind the counter, and then ran out while the guy screamed at you, “Give that back you Punk!”?

Close enough. Probably ranked amongst the most aggressively anti-establishment of all subcultures, specifically on a political level, punks have always carried their beliefs on their sleeves and are never afraid to flaunt their dislike for anything rightwing. However, they are always fiercely loyal and actually generally accepting of all ethnic and cultural backgrounds. You make friends with a punk, he will be your friend for life, and he’ll make sure all the rest of the punks know that you’re on the “don’t bash his head in” list.

Hardcore Punks

Punkertreffen_1984-auschnitt
both photos taken from Wikipedia

For those that thought Mohawks and a general distaste for Queen Elizabeth weren’t enough (probably because you lived in Southern California and it was too hot for Mohawks and the Queen), you could shave your head, steal a guitar, and scream. Because, let’s face it, SoCal sucked back then and you just paid to see a little-known band called Black Flag punched your buddy in the face mid-song. These guys are not to be confused with Nazi skinhead gangs that give counterculture a bad name. Those guys should be set on fire by Henry Rollins… although, I’m sure he has plans to do so already.

Goths

goth2_jpg
photo taken from 4.bp.blogspot.com

The word that describes this subculture the best is probably “misunderstood”. I think everything I can say about Goths has been said better here: GothicSubculture.com. Fascinating read, if you’re into learning more about subcultures.

Oh, right, I can say one thing: I know that there is a drastic rise in skin cancer cases of late, but come on, everyone should have at least one summer holiday in Greece in their lives? No? Am I completely out of line here? You can tell me.

Hippies

Hippies[2]

Everyone knows one or knows someone that was one. Not much to say about this, you know who they are. And, well, they sorta suck (I know this is a best of, but seriously, fuck hippies man). You wanna talk evolution of subcultures? Start here. Look at what hippie-isms have given us!

  1. New Age – astrology-loving, vegan-dabbling, dolphin-sound-listening, sandal-wearing, yoga enthusiasts that live in an age of spiritual enlightenment, but are really bankers by day.
  2. Western Zen Guru assholes –  that think they’ve reached Nirvana because they visited the foothills of the Himalayas and have a ponytail… or worse, dreadlocks.
  3. Eco terrorists - that want to save the whales, but drink bottled water. They claim to be vegetarians, but don’t mind eating fish. They want to save the environment, but still use shampoo… oh, and they ALSO have dreadlocks.
  4. Trustafarians – rich kids that take a year off to go to Goa and claim to love reggae but only really listened to Bob Marley’s Legend album. And yes… dreadlocks. It’s cool on the Marleys, on Franti, on Rastafarians, but not on a blonde chick from the upper middle class suburbs of London.
  5. Dead Heads – These guys are like hippies to the power of 10. Hippies10. Forget all the other things, man, they ONLY like The Grateful Dead. That’s it. Nothing else. Forget free love, forget changing the political landscape, forget freeing your mind… just keep on Truckin’.

I think I’ve been too cruel. The original hippies were actually pretty cool. They had spectacular music, an intellectual ideal for Utopia that was naïve but admirable, and hippie guys and gals are friggin’ hot

Mods

mods2

My mom was a mod. She wore haute couture street fashion: perfectly crafted short hair, white tennis sneakers or boots, short skirts, and Twiggy eyelashes… and rode a Vespa type thing. She looked like she belonged in a Truffaut movie and adored Holly Golightly. She listened to Ska and Soul, read Sartre, and drank espresso.
That might not be entirely “mod”, but hell… my mom was cool damn it!

Ravers

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Gursky Union Rave

Ecstasy, 120 bpm, House, Acid House, Hard House, Ambient House, Hacienda Club, more ecstasy, whistles, neon colored clothes, Ibiza, drum n bass, trance, water bottles, illegal raves in the middle of a field, free love (see, more hippie influence), and just general love for… ecstasy.
Whatever, P.L.U.R. man! (That’s peace, love, unity and respect, for the uninitiated.)

The rest:

  1. Hipster Indie Kids
  2. Beatniks
  3. Grunge
  4. Emo Kids
  5. Geeks

Note! The guy who wrote this listing was probably stoned out of his mind, despite some thoughtful arguments above. As you can see he didn’t bother to finish it entirely. Damn hippie!