Tag Archives: cool

Charles “Hank” Bukowski

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Charles “Hank” Bukowski
1920-1989

 

The Secret

don’t worry, nobody has the
beautiful lady, not really, and

nobody has the strange and
hidden power, nobody is
exceptional or wonderful or
magic, they only seem to be
it’s all a trick, an in, a con,
don’t buy it, don’t believe it.
the world is packed with
billions of people whose lives
and deaths are useless and
when one of these jumps up
and the light of history shines
upon them, forget it, it’s not
what it seems, it’s just
another act to fool the fools
again.

there are no strong men, there
are no beautiful women.
at least, you can die knowing
this
and you will have
the only possible
victory.

 

For a few years in the 1960s, London was the world capital of cool

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TO SET THE MOOD MUSIC -THE BRITISH INVASION

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ENGLAND IN THE 60’S ARTICLE 1

Ancient elegance and new opulence are all tangled up in a dazzling blur of op and pop.

Piri Halasz writing in Time magazine, April 1966

For a few years in the 1960s, London was the world capital of cool. When Time magazine dedicated its 15 April 1966 issue to London: the Swinging City, it cemented the association between London and all things hip and fashionable that had been growing in the popular imagination throughout the decade.

ENGLAND IN THE 60’S ARTICLE 2

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London’s remarkable metamorphosis from a gloomy, grimy post-War capital into a bright, shining epicentre of style was largely down to two factors: youth and money. The baby boom of the 1950s meant that the urban population was younger than it had been since Roman times. By the mid-60s, 40% of the population at large was under 25. With the abolition of National Service for men in 1960, these young people had more freedom and fewer responsibilities than their parents’ generation. They rebelled against the limitations and restrictions of post-War society. In short, they wanted to shake things up…

Added to this, Londoners had more disposable income than ever before – and were looking for ways to spend it. Nationally, weekly earnings in the ‘60s outstripped the cost of living by a staggering 183%: in London, where earnings were generally higher than the national average, the figure was probably even greater.

This heady combination of affluence and youth led to a flourishing of music, fashion, design and anything else that would banish the post-War gloom. Fashion boutiques sprang up willy-nilly. Men flocked to Carnaby St, near Soho, for the latest ‘Mod’ fashions. While women were lured to the King’s Rd, where Mary Quant’s radical mini skirts flew off the rails of her iconic store, Bazaar.

Even the most shocking or downright barmy fashions were popularised by models who, for the first time, became superstars. Jean Shrimpton was considered the symbol of Swinging London, while Twiggy was named The Face of 1966. Mary Quant herself was the undisputed queen of the group known as The Chelsea Set, a hard-partying, socially eclectic mix of largely idle ‘toffs’ and talented working-class movers and shakers.

Music was also a huge part of London’s swing. While Liverpool had the Beatles, the London sound was a mix of bands who went on to worldwide success, including The Who, The Kinks, The Small Faces and The Rolling Stones. Their music was the mainstay of pirate radio stations like Radio Caroline and Radio Swinging England. Creative types of all kinds gravitated to the capital, from artists and writers to magazine publishers, photographers, advertisers, film-makers and product designers.

But not everything in London’s garden was rosy. Immigration was a political hot potato: by 1961, there were over 100,000 West Indians in London, and not everyone welcomed them with open arms. The biggest problem of all was a huge shortage of housing to replace bombed buildings and unfit slums and cope with a booming urban population. The badly-conceived solution – huge estates of tower blocks – and the social problems they created, changed the face of London for ever. By the 1970s, with industry declining and unemployment rising, Swinging London seemed a very dim and distant memory.

 

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Introduction by Dominic Sandbrook

In October 1965, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, officially opened London’s new Post Office Tower. A gleaming cylinder of metal and glass, the tower could hardly have been a more fitting symbol of the scientific optimism of a self-consciously ‘go-ahead’ decade. It was a monument not just to the white heat of the technological revolution, but to the sheer self-confidence of a society basking in unprecedented prosperity. From the new tower blocks springing up in cities across the country to the radios in teenagers’ bedrooms, from Beatles hits and Bond films to comprehensive schools and nuclear power stations, Sixties Britain seemed – superficially at least – to be a country reborn in the crucible of affluence.

In some ways, the cliches of the 1960s ring absolutely true. With the economy buoyant, unemployment almost non-existent and wages steadily rising, millions of families bought their first cars, washing machines, fridges and televisions. Millions of teenagers, too, were transfixed by the sound of Radio Caroline and the look of Mary Quant — although, then as now, Carnaby Street catered more for tourists and day-trippers than the tiny handful at the cutting edge of fashion. Television transformed the imaginative landscape of almost every household in the country, not merely through pictures of faraway places, but through satirical programmes such as That Was the Week That Was. Even the nation’s diet was changing, transformed not just by the arrival of foreign imports from chicken tikka masala to spaghetti bolognese, but by the relentless advance of the supermarket.

Beneath the glamorous veneer of swinging London, however, Britain under Harold Macmillan, Sir Alec Douglas-Home and Harold Wilson remained a remarkably conservative, even anxious society. Intellectuals worried that affluence and mass communications were undermining traditional working-class culture; in the Pilkington Report, published in 1962, it was hard to miss the disdain for commercial television. Meanwhile, despite the much-discussed stereotype of the ‘permissive society’, popular attitudes to moral and sexual issues remained strikingly slow to change. For all the excitement surrounding the landmark Lady Chatterley’s Lover trial in 1960, or the liberalisation of the divorce, abortion and homosexuality laws later in the decade, most people held similar attitudes to their parents; in this respect, the generation gap was a media invention.

And although students marched on the US embassy in protest at the Vietnam War, or staged sit-ins at universities such as the London School of Economics, it is easy to forget that only one in ten young people became students. Polls showed that like their elders, most young people still supported the death penalty and were uneasy about large-scale Commonwealth immigration; by the end of the decade, it is probably no exaggeration to say that the Conservative maverick Enoch Powell, who was kicked off his party’s front bench after his notorious ‘rivers of blood’ speech, was the most popular politician in the country. Even Mary Whitehouse, a ferocious critic of televised obscenity, especially on the BBC, commanded the instinctive support of tens, perhaps even hundreds of thousands of people.

By the end of the 1960s, the contradictions at the heart of the affluent society were becoming increasingly apparent. Despite Harold Wilson’s promises of endless growth thanks to his National Plan, the economy was running into serious trouble. The Aberfan catastrophe in 1966, the devaluation of the pound a year later and the Ronan Point disaster a year after that all hinted at the political and social traumas that would blight the following decade. Perhaps most ominously, Wilson’s last stab at modernisation, the trade union reforms outlined in the White Paper In Place of Strife, fell apart completely in 1969. A year later, the public punished the Labour government for its perceived under-achievement. A new and much unhappier era was at hand.

Dominic Sandbrook is the author of ‘White Heat: A History of Britain in the Swinging Sixties’.

A brief recollection-doll006

In 1965 My best friend Linda and I were walking barefoot along Tower Bridge when we came face to face with Harold WIlson, he smiled and walked on. We giggled, flabbergasted that he would acknowledge a couple of hippies.

A WALK ACROSS TOWER BRIDGE

 

 

“WHEN IN DOUBT DRINK TEA”   Ana Christy

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COOL PEOPLE-GARY BUSEY

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COOL PEOPLE-GARY BUSEY

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GAREY BUSEY’S CONTROVERSIAL INTERVIEW WITH HOWARD STERN

GARY BUSEY MUSIC VIDEO “ALL THESE YEARS”

GAREY BUSEY -HOW TO INTERVIEW BY HUNTERS.THOMPSON ON FILM

 

GREATEST MOMENT OF GARY BUSEY ON FILM

 

Gary Busey

Birth Name: Gary Busey
Born: 06/29/1944
Birth Place: Goose Creek, Texas, USA

Gary Busey was born in the east coast Texas town of Goose Creek (now Baytown) on June 29, 1944 and grew up in Tulsa, OK, where his father worked in construction. A born entertainer, Busey’s first outlet was music, and he constructed a drum set out of oatmeal canisters before driving his family truly crazy with a set of Ludwigs. He also sang at the Christian camp where he spent summers and broadened his interests to include acting after he was mesmerized by a matinee of Cecil B. DeMille’s “Samson and Delilah” (1949). As a teen, Busey cultivated an athletic build while working on local ranches and excelled at football, landing an athletic scholarship to Pittsburg State University in Kansas. When a serious knee injury sidelined his sports aspirations, Busey turned his attention to drama, eventually joining the theater department at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. While a student there in 1966, Busey co-founded a bluesy rock band called Carp. After several years of playing local parties and biker bars, they headed to Hollywood in search of a record deal, landing one with Epic and releasing a self-titled album in 1969. When Carp failed to generate much commercial success, most of the band’s members went on to become studio musicians, while Busey took advantage of his new locale to revive his earlier acting efforts.

Busey landed his first small screen role in a 1970 episode of the Western “The High Chaparral” (NBC, 1967-1971) and the following year made his big screen debut as a hippie in the low budget Roger Corman biker flick “Angels Hard as They Come” (1971). In 1972, he returned to Tulsa, where he became a regular performer on a local sketch comedy show and appeared in the locally filmed “Dirty Little Billy” (1972) before snaring a high profile role alongside Jeff Bridges in “The Last American Hero” (1973), about NASCAR racer Elroy Jackson, Jr. That same year he earned the unusual pop culture distinction of being the last character ever to die on “Bonanza” (NBC, 1959-1973). Busey joined the fine supporting cast (including Bridges, again) of Michael Cimino’s feature directing debut “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974) before enjoying a brief stint as series regular Truckie Wheeler of “The Texas Wheelers” (ABC, 1974-75). Busey returned to the music business in 1975 touring as drummer for Oklahoma songwriter Leon Russell, who had first become a fan of Busey through his popular Tulsa TV character Teddy Jack Eddy. Busey also played drums on Russell’s classic album Will o’ the Wisp that year, in addition to recording with The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Kinky Friedman, and contributing the song “Since You’ve Gone Away” to Robert Altman’s epic film “Nashville” (1975).

Busey’s music background proved key to truly igniting his film career. His turn as the road manager who keeps Kris Kristofferson in line in “A Star Is Born” (1976) brought him his first widespread attention, though his title role in “The Buddy Holly Story” (1978) made him a star. Busey had always felt a special spiritual kinship with the iconic Texas songwriter-guitarist who died tragically young in an icy plane crash, and his spot-on portrayal of the man and his music earned Busey a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his efforts. Despite his highly acclaimed leading role, Busey’s ensuing career consisted mainly of charismatic supporting roles, his potential possibly compromised by a new cocaine addiction that he would battle for decades. He was convincing as a small time carnival hustler in the atmospheric road movie “Carny” (1980) and provided able country boy-support as the protégé of a legendary outlaw (Willie Nelson) in the well-received “Barbarosa” (1982). In one of his rare appearances in a comedy Busey played one of a crew of misfit taxi drivers in “D.C. Cab” (1983) and also contributed the song, “Why Baby Why” to the soundtrack.

His sports prowess and ability to crank up the high-drama masculine energy made for strong performances as Alabama State football coach Paul Bryant in “The Bear” (1984), and as a baseball playing icon in “Insignificance” (1985), Nicolas Roeg’s gloriously cinematic examination of fame in America. But Busey’s highest profile role of the era was as a nasty drug dealing Vietnam vet in “Lethal Weapon” (1988). His Mr. Joshua had ice in his veins, and though the ruthless albino killer was the actor’s first screen villain, it would certainly not be his last. Busey would go on to make a name for himself with supporting characters that were truly terrifying. His career was interrupted, however, by a motorcycle accident in 1988 that fractured his skull. The actor received a lot of press during his recovery for defending his choice not to wear a helmet and for his claim of a roadside, near-death experience. Doctors feared Busey had suffered brain damage, and his increasingly strange ramblings and pseudo-philosophy while making public appearances seemed to support that theory.

Busey returned to the screen to co-star with Danny Glover in the minor sc-fi hit “Predator 2″ (1990) and the absurd but blockbusting caper/extreme sports hybrid “Point Break” (1991) starring Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves. He was a little too good as the disturbed former psychiatric patient in the routine thriller “Hider in the House” (1991) and continued his villainous run as the evil thug plotting to steal nuclear weapons in Steven Seagal’s mega-hit actioner “Under Siege” (1992). Busey enjoyed a supporting role as a private investigator in the legal thriller “The Firm” (1993) before returning to the sports genre with a co-starring role as an aging pro baseball player in the light “Rookie of the Year” (1993). Busey’s role as a former DEA agent in John Badham’s 1994 actioner “Drop Zone” was ironic, as the actor was shortly thereafter arrested for drug possession, suffered a drug overdose, and spent time in rehab at the Betty Ford Center. Newly sober, Busey became an enthusiastic born-again Christian and ordained minister active with the Promise Keepers men’s group. But just as the unpredictable actor seemed to be gaining a new lease on life, he averted disaster yet again when he was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor in his sinus cavity.

After recuperating from surgery and radiation treatment, Busey seemed poised to resume his improved Hollywood standing, landing in a remake of the TV series “Hawaii Five-O” (CBS, 1968-1980), but the show’s pilot was reportedly a disaster and the project never moved forward. Busey rebounded with a starring role in the well-received Spanish-American war miniseries “Rough Riders” (TNT, 1997) and enjoyed cameos in art house flicks “Lost Highway” (1997) and “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” (1998) before a pair of arrests for domestic violence charges filed by ex-wife Tiani Warden and a string of dismal low-budget films reduced Busey’s name to a pop culture curiosity, known more for the mug shot seen ’round the world than for the promise he had once shown as an actor. Embracing his new reputation, Busey began to appear as an oddball artifact on “The Man Show” (Comedy Central, 1999-2004) and Howard Stern’s radio show before cementing his tarnished image as the center of Comedy Central’s “I’m with Busey” reality show (2003). Over 13 uncomfortable episodes, Busey shared his off-kilter wisdom of the world with alleged fan and buddy Adam de la Pena. It was unclear whether Busey’s bizarre philosophical outbursts and explosive behavior were due to a mental unraveling or whether he was amping up the crazy factor for audience benefit.

The show did not paint a flattering portrait of the star but it raised his profile enough to land a recurring role (as himself) on HBO’s hot Hollywood drama “Entourage” (HBO, 2004- ). Busey’s personal life was back in the headlines in 2004 when he was taken to court for failing to pay rent on his rented Malibu home and arrested for not showing up at a hearing related to alleged millions owed his ex-wife. In 2005, Busey claimed his prayers for a fitness opportunity were answered when he was asked to join the cast of the VH1 weight loss chronicle “Celebrity Fit Club 2,” during which he allegedly lost 50 pounds. Busey’s film career was busier than ever regardless of his reputation, with the actor headlining over 20 low-budget and direct-to-DVD titles from 2004-06. He made gossip column headlines in February of 2008 for a red carpet appearance at the Academy Awards that sent nervous stars including Jennifer Garner – whose neck he appeared to either bite or kiss – and E! host Ryan Seacrest looking for the exit. Busey next appeared on the second season of “Celebrity Rehab” (VH1, 2008- ). He claimed to appear on the show not as an addict, but as an inspirational figure for the other patients, which initially confused the show’s star, Dr. Drew Pinsky, Busey nonetheless went through an enormously successful transformation. Following a cameo appearance in the hit comedy “Grown Ups” (2009), starring Adam Sandler, David Spade and Chris Rock, Busey joined the season four cast of the celebrity version of “The Apprentice” (NBC, 2004- ), playing for charity against the likes of model Niki Taylor, former “Survivor” winner Richard Hatch, and rap star Lil Jon.

http://beatnikhiway.wordpress.com/wp-admin/paid-upgrades.php

GAREY BUSEY FILMOGRAPHYd

http://www.aceshowbiz.com/celebrity/gary_busey/filmography.html

the San Francisco Oracle

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Underground News

San Francisco Oracle

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Cover of the sixth issue, February 1967

The Oracle of the City of San Francisco, also known as the San Francisco Oracle, was an underground newspaper published in 12 issues from September 20, 1966, to February 1968 in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of that city.[1] Allen Cohen (1940–2004), the editor during the paper’s most vibrant period, and Michael Bowen, the art director, were among the founders of the publication. The Oracle was an early member of the Underground Press Syndicate.

The Oracle combined poetry, spirituality, and multicultural interests with psychedelic design, reflecting and shaping the countercultural community as it developed in the Haight-Ashbury. It was arguably the outstanding example of psychedelia within the countercultural “underground” press, noted for experimental multicolored design. Oracle contributors included many significant San Francisco–area artists of the time, including Bruce Conner and Rick Griffin. It featured such beat writers as Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Michael McClure.

Psychedelic graphic from the Oracle newspaper. Psychedelic graphic from the Oracle newspaper. Psychedelic graphic from the Oracle newspaper. Psychedelic graphic from the Oracle newspaper.

Every movement creates its own primary sources, and the hippies of 1967 San Francisco had a psychedelic one: The San Francisco Oracle. Published in 12 fantastic issues from 1966 to 1968, the Oracle is a fascinating artifact of the times.

With theme issues like “Youth Quake,” “The Aquarian Age,” “Psychedelics, Flowers, and War,” and “The Politics of Ecstasy,” the newspaper spoke directly to young people’s imaginations and concerns. Whimsical, hand-drawn ads touted bookstores, concerts, health food stores, coffeehouses, shops selling hippie fashions, and music sellers. And the publication’s wild page layouts, drawings, photo-collages and other graphics became icons of hippie culture.

Hippies sold the Oracle on Bay Area streets to support themselves, and the newspaper made its way around the world by subscription. Print runs grew to nearly 125,000 by issue #7. The editors estimated their circulation topped half a million when taking into account the number of people who shared each copy.

The Oracle’s articles, interviews, letters, commentary, and poems explored hippie consciousness in a variety of ways. For example, in issue #6, Tom Law wrote a piece called “The Community of the Tribe” that obliquely referred to Fifties consumer culture, the Cold War and the war in Vietnam, contexts in which hippie attitudes had emerged:

“We are all — squares and the psychedelically enlightened alike — involved in our world of now. To take up the call, to respond to the cosmic forces, we must be the hard-working, harmonious, respectful, honest, diligent, co-operative family of man. Our words are inspired. Our feeling is deep and complete. Our devotion is strong. The precious revelations which have come through us with increasing magnitude must be fathomed until we are one with each other and can extend our awareness beyond the tribe to our entire planet.

What is the natural karmic duty of a generation whose brothers, neighbors, and childhood friends now promote hate by killing innocent human beings around the world? It is to balance their jive and immature actions with the light of intelligent goodness; fearlessly to deal with the money-mad machine in order to release its hold on our bowels — the bowels of mankind.

Practically, this means that all excess profit is turned back into the community. That means all money, material things, food, etc., which are beyond the basic necessities of a happy, healthy, human existence…”


Read this reminiscience by Oracle co-founder Allen Cohen about how he first imagined a “rainbow newspaper,” or go to Regent Press to learn more about the Oracle (both links are to pages not on PBS.org).

Many thanks to Regent Press for the use of some of the original Oracle graphics on this Web site. Others provided by Ana Christy.

Aside

BEST SCENES AND QUOTES OF NICOLAS CAGE

50 Nicolas Cage Facts for the 50th Birthday of This National Treasure

Everything you need to know about the actor who has eaten a live cockroach, gotten teeth pulled, and been “waterboarded”––all to get into character.

On Jan. 7, 1964, Academy Award-winning actor Nicolas Cage was born. In light of his 50th birthday, NewsFeed has rounded up 50 facts you maybe didn’t know about the movie star.

• He was born Nicolas Coppola and told The Huffington Post in 2012 that he decided to change his last name after actors on the set of his first movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) resented him because his uncle is the renowned director Francis Ford Coppola (and his aunt is actress Talia Shire). (Most of his role in that film ended up getting cut.) (The Huffington Post)

• To stand out from his famous relatives, he chose “Cage,” inspired by the African-American comic book superhero Luke Cage. (New York Times)

• A native of Long Beach, California, he dropped out of Beverly Hills High School after passing the GED, which boasts star alums Rob Reiner, Lenny Kravitz, and Betty White, to name a few. (Current Biography)

• When Late Show host David Letterman asked Cage whether he drank beer in high school in 2010, the movie star said one time he and his cat devoured “a bag of mushrooms” that had been in his refrigerator. (Gawker)

• When he was four, he would have this recurring dream in which “I was on the toilet and this giant blonde genie woman in a gold bikini would reach into the bathroom window like King Kong and pluck me off of the toilet seat and laugh at me.” (Playboy)

• He met his first wife, Patricia Arquette, at a deli in Los Angeles. During their courtship, she asked him to bring her J.D. Salinger’s signature on something to prove that he really loved her (he did). They divorced in 2001. (Playboy)

• Cage and Michael Jackson were both married to the same woman: Lisa Marie Presley. (TIME)

• Cage and Presley met at a birthday party for rock guitarist Johnny Ramone, and the Ramones star was the best man at their wedding. (Johnny Ramone’s memoir Commando)

• One of his favorite lines to deliver in a movie is ”Vive la fucking France, man!” in Deadfall (2012). (EmpireOnline.com)

• In Birdy (1984), he played a ladies man who was severely wounded in Vietnam, and during production, he decided to get his teeth pulled so that he could “connect with some kind of physical pain.” (Playboy)

• He ate a live cockroach for a scene in Vampire’s Kiss (1989). (Current Biography)

• …which is why his manager got him a birthday cake in the shape of a cockroach. (Playboy)

• The directors of The Croods (2013) essentially “waterboarded” Cage when they were shooting a scene in which the actor had to scream into a large tank of water. (BuzzFeedCollider)

• On July 31, 1998, he was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame. (Hollywood Chamber of Commerce)

• As of Oct. 2013, he is the “Best Global Actor in Motion Pictures” — at least in China, according to the judges of the Huading Awards. (TIME)

• The late renowned movie critic Roger Ebert has praised Cage’s acting, writing in a review of Adaptation (2002): “There are often lists of the great living male movie stars: De Niro, Nicholson and Pacino, usually. How often do you see the name of Nicolas Cage? He should always be up there.” Ebert has also described Cage as having “two speeds, intense and intenser” as well as ”a good actor in good movies, and an almost indispensable actor in bad ones.” (RogerEbert.com)

• Cage has said Jerry Lewis is one of his idols, as well as Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, Cary Grant, and Robert De Niro. (New York TimesPlayboy)

• More recently, he told The Guardian that Anthony Hopkins is his hero at the moment because he is a “marvelous, magnificent classical composer” who delivers dialogue in a “musical” way, according to an interview published July 2013. (The Guardian)

• Cage has said Jim Carrey offered him a role in Dumb and Dumber, but that he turned it down for a part as an alcoholic in Leaving Las Vegas (1995), according to a 2012 interview with The Huffington Post. (The Huffington Post)

• In fact, his performance in that film earned him an Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role in 1996, which includes a memorable, somber scene in which he dances in a liquor store. (Oscars.org)

• Cage helped launch Johnny Depp’s acting career by referring him to an agent, who connected him with his first film role in Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). The two met through Depp’s ex-wife Lori Allison, a makeup artist. (Current Biography)

• Actress Kathleen Turner, who acted with Cage in the movie Peggy Sue Got Married (1986), alleged in her 2008 memoir that he had been arrested for drunk-driving and had stolen a chihuahua. He sued her for libel, and she ended up apologizing, paying his legal fees, and making a donation to charity. (TIME)

• Cage donated $1 million to Hurricane Katrina victims. (People)

• He has served as a UN Goodwill Ambassador for Global Justice since 2010, recently calling for greater efforts to help human trafficking victims in Nov. 2013. (United Nations News Centre)

• And his extensive charity work in general landed him a spot on a Forbes list of the most generous celebrities in Hollywood. (Forbes)

• He is also on Forbes’s 2012 list of “Hollywood’s most overpaid stars.” (Forbes)

• He has reportedly owned castles in Germany and England. (New York Times)

• …and reportedly an island in the Bahamas. (Wall Street Journal)

• In 1997, he reportedly paid nearly $450,000 at auction for a rare 1971 Lamborghini Miura SVJ once owned by the late Shah of Iran — almost double its estimated worth. (Associated Press)

• A comic book buff, Cage once owned a copy of the first Superman comic Action Comics No. 1, which he called ”the single best investment I have ever made” in a March 2013 interview with Collider. The collectable was actually stolen in 2000 and reportedly found about a decade later in a storage locker in Southern California. (ColliderABC News)

• He named one of his sons Kal-el, after Superman’s “Kryptonian name.” (TIME)

• The actor and his son Weston Cage also produced a comic book for Virgin Comics called Voodoo Child, which is partly set in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. (USA Today)

• TMZ photographed him wearing two pairs of sunglasses in June 2013 and claimed he was committing a fashion faux pas. (TMZ)

• His favorite sandwich is roast lamb on white bread with “a bit of mayonnaise and arugula,” he revealed in a 2012 web chat with fans on Empire magazine’s website. (EmpireOnline.com)

• He got a “large” back tattoo of a lizard in a top hat and cane to “claim my own body,” adding, “other cultures have initiations into manhood and that’s what the tattoo was for me,” he told reporters for the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1994. (Philly.com)

• He reportedly has had a real lizard, too, an Asian water monitor, that he donated to the Wildlife Discovery Center in Lake Forest, Illinois, according to an interview with the museum’s curator in a May 2013 Pioneer Press article. (Sun-Times Media)

• He still loves reptiles, telling Vanity Fair in Sep. 2013 that he asked to hold a venomous snake to calm his nerves on the set of the movie Joe (2013). (Vanity Fair)

• But the feeling has not always been mutual. On Live With Kelly in March 2012, he said his Cobra “Sheba” hated him, and the way his character in Ghost Rider lunges at victims was inspired by the way the reptile would sway back and forth and leap towards him at home. (Perez Hilton)

• On The Late Show in Feb. 2012, Cage debunked rumors that he is a vampire after an eBay user uploaded a photo of a Tennessee man from the Civil War-era that bore a striking resemblance to the actor. “I don’t drink blood, and the last time I looked in the mirror, I had a reflection,” he told Letterman. (The Hollywood Reporter)

• A Fudgsicle-eating intruder once broke into his family’s home at 2 a.m. when he was living in Orange County, he told reporters at the 2011 Toronto Film Festival, where he was promoting Trespass — incidentally, a movie about thieves who target a mansion. (TIME)

• Note: 2014 also marks the 10th anniversary of the release of National Treasure (2004), the blockbuster adventure flick in which Cage plays a researcher looking for the Declaration of Independence, on the back of which are invisible ink directions to treasure. A sequel came out in 2007. (Rotten Tomatoes)

• In the 2012 Empire web chat, he also told fans that he would love to do a third National Treasure film in South America. (EmpireOnline.com)

• Because of his “service to our country” in National Treasure, at least 3,526 people signed an Apr. 2013 “We The People” petition to give the Declaration of Independence to the actor at one point. While the movement did not receive the 100,000 signatures required for a White House response, its Facebook page is still active. (College Humor)

• Fans of Cage are so devoted that they have turned him into a meme, creating a viral GIF of a scene in The Wicker Man (2006) in which he screams “Not the bees!” as the insects swarm him. (Know Your Meme)

• …and compiled all of his freak-outs in movies into a YouTube super-cut that has been viewed more than 10 million times.

•…and created a website called “Feeling Cagey” that can replace Instagram selfies with a picture of the celebrity. (TIME)

• …and sport a bodysuit covered in photos of the actor. (TIME)

• …or curl up in a fleece blanket bearing his likeness. (Etsy)

• …and worship him on the Reddit thread “One True God.” (Reddit)

• In fact, a 20-year-old woman miraculously landed two job offers after accidentally emailing a photo of the star to a potential employer instead of her résumé. (TIME)

@OBWax

Olivia is a reporter at TIME. She graduated with honors from Columbia Journalism School and Hamilton College.

Read more: Nicolas Cage Turns 50: 50 Facts You Might Not Know About Him | TIME.com http://newsfeed.time.com/2014/01/06/50-nicolas-cage-facts-for-the-50th-birthday-of-this-national-treasure/#ixzz2pk0FMrN8

Nicolas Cage Facts for the 50th Birthday