Tag Archives: funny

This #Exam Is FINAL


This Exam Is FINAL


Two guys were taking Chemistry at the University of Mississippi.  They did pretty well on all of the quizzes and the midterms and labs, such that going into the final they had a solid “A”.  These two friends were so confident going into the final that the weekend before finals week (even though the Chemistry final was on Monday), they decided to go up to the University of Tennessee and party with some friends.

They had a great time, however, with hangovers and everything, they overslept all day Sunday and didn’t make it back to Mississippi until early Monday morning. Rather than taking the final then, they found their professor after the final to explain to him why they missed the final.

They told him that they went up to the University of Tennessee for the weekend, and had planned to come back in time to study, but that they had a flat tire on the way back, and didn’t have a spare, and couldn’t get help for a long time, so they were late in getting back to campus. The professor thought this over and told them they could make up the final on the following day.  The two guys were elated and relieved. They studied that night and went in the next day for the final.

The professor placed them in separate rooms, and handed each of them a test booklet and told them to begin.  They looked at the first problem, which was worth 5 points.  It was something simple about Molarity & Solutions.

“Cool ,” they thought.  “This is going to be easy.”  They did that problem and then turned the page.

They were not prepared, however, for what they saw on this page. It said: (95 Points).  Which tire?

COOL PEOPLE – the original Saturday night live team




In no particular order: Laraine Newman, John Belushi, Jane Curtin, Gilda Radner, Dan Aykroyd, Garrett Morris, Bill Murray and Chevy Chase



‘Saturday Night Live’: All 141 Cast Members Ranked

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/tv/lists/saturday-night-live-all-141-cast-members-ranked-20150211#ixzz3U0XCvTBi
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 40 reasons why ‘Saturday Night Live’ is still awesome in its 40th year

By Todd Leopold, CNN
updated 12:26 PM EDT, Fri September 26, 2014

Source: CNN

  • “Saturday Night Live’s” 40th season premieres Saturday
  • Show has been incredibly influential
  • Cast members have become stars in many media
  • “SNL” has become big leagues of comedy


(CNN) — On October 11, 1975, “Saturday Night Live” was first beamed into living rooms.

It wasn’t called “Saturday Night Live” then. It was “NBC’s Saturday Night,” because there was another “Saturday Night Live,” hosted by Howard Cosell, over on ABC. And its Not Ready for Prime Time Players — seven youthful comic veterans of theatrical and improvisational troupes — were known only to those who may have seen performances of Second City (both its Chicago and Toronto versions) or “National Lampoon’s Lemmings.”

Almost 40 years later, the show is an institution: its players celebrated, its catchphrases ubiquitous, its very name synonymous with the comedy big leagues.

‘Saturday Night Live’s’ 5 best skits

As the show prepares for the premiere of its 40th season on Saturday, we celebrate “SNL’s” landmark contributions to pop culture.


From the beginning, “SNL” was both cutting-edge comedy and a throwback to TV’s golden era. The show aired live: no retakes, no second chances. Though there’s plenty of taped material — and an occasional delay in case of profanity — it still airs live today.

Rockefeller Center
The show has originated from New York’s Rockefeller Center since the beginning.
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“From New York”

Also like those golden age shows, it airs from New York. When “SNL” started, the Big Apple was a TV backwater, home of soap operas, news operations and little else. Today, a number of network shows shoot in Gotham, and even talk shows have come back to town.

“It’s Saturday Night!”

Before “Saturday Night Live,” late Saturday night was home to old movies, reruns and local programming. The show not only made the slot a network profit center, it helped bring in a youthful audience, which it still does today.

Studio 8H, 30 Rockefeller Center

When it was built in the early ’30s, 8H was the largest studio in the world, home to Arturo Toscanini’s orchestral radio broadcasts. The NBC studio has been the home of “SNL” since the beginning.

The Not Ready for Prime Time Players

The show’s first cast: Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi, Chevy Chase, Jane Curtin, Garrett Morris, Laraine Newman and Gilda Radner. The show has had more than 130 performers in the years since.

Lorne Michaels
Lorne Michaels created “SNL” and has run it for most of its 39 seasons.
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Lorne Michaels

Except for five seasons in the early ’80s, the show’s creator and executive producer, a Canadian native and former “Laugh-In” writer, has been in charge for all of the show’s soon-to-be 40 seasons.

Dave Wilson

“SNL’s” original director for most of its first 20 seasons. He set the tone for the show and was game enough to take part in the occasional sketch.

Don Pardo

The longtime NBC announcer introduced the first cast — and pretty much every one after that. All told, Pardo announced for 38 of the show’s first 39 seasons. He died in August at 96. Darrell Hammond, “SNL’s” longest-serving cast member, is taking his place.

Don Pardo
Don Pardo was “SNL’s” announcer for most of its run.
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Eugene Lee, Franne Lee and Akira Yoshimura

The Lees and Yoshimura created the show’s look; in fact, Eugene Lee, who’s also won several Tonys, has been “SNL’s” production designer for the entire run. For his part, Yoshimura has connections to several other NBC shows, including “Today,” “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” and “Star Trek.” Well, at least the “SNL” parodies, in which he played Sulu.

“Weekend Update”

The show’s midnight hour begins with a recap of the news. It’s been hosted by everybody from Chevy Chase to Cecily Strong and Colin Jost, with notable turns from Dennis Miller, Norm Macdonald and Tina Fey. It hasn’t always been called “Weekend Update”: for a time in the ’80s, the news segment was called “SNL Newsbreak” and “Saturday Night News.”

Alec Baldwin

The “30 Rock” actor leads the way among “SNL’s” most popular guest hosts with 16 appearances. Steve Martin has 15. Other frequent guest hosts include Buck Henry, John Goodman and Tom Hanks.

Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin has hosted “SNL” the most times.
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Miskel Spillman

But to prove that “Anyone Can Host” “SNL,” the show had a contest in 1977 to show just that. The winner was Spillman, a New Orleans octogenarian who did just fine with the program’s drug-fueled humor. Today she’d probably get her own show.

Mr. Bill

TV’s most famous Play-Doh accident victim was created by Walter Williams as the subject of a Super 8 film. Soon, his adventures with Spot, Sluggo and Mr. Hands were regular features on the program. He later did commercials, game shows and even became Peter Scolari for a real-life TV program.

Banned hosts

Not every host was so welcome. Louise Lasser locked herself in her dressing room. She was never asked back. Milton Berle hammed it up. Never again. Steven Seagal, Martin Lawrence and Adrien Brody are also persona non grata.

Paul Simon in a turkey suit

“SNL” is not above making stars look foolish. On the 1976 Thanksgiving show, Simon came out wearing a turkey suit and started singing “Still Crazy After All These Years.” Dolly Parton went along with a skit called “Planet of the Enormous Hooters,” originally written for Raquel Welch. Timberlake put his d**k in a box. You get the idea.

Your musical guest

“SNL” has hosted some of the biggest names in music, often giving them their first taste of the big time. The Rolling Stones played “SNL” — and so did Devo and Fear. Justin Timberlake has taken the stage — and so did Lana Del Rey and Ashlee Simpson. You could set aside a portion of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (or Hall of Shame) for “SNL’s” music.

The Beatles
“SNL” landed some big acts, but never the Beatles — though not from lack of trying.
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The Beatles

But “SNL” never landed the biggest of them all, the Beatles. (Not that anyone else did, either, after 1969.) It wasn’t for lack of trying, though. After a $50 million reunion offer was made to the Fab Four in 1976, Michaels responded by countering with $3,000. The ploy almost worked: a week later, Paul McCartney was visiting John Lennon in New York and the two almost headed down to the studio from Lennon’s Dakota residence. McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr all have appeared solo over the years.

Howard Shore and Paul Shaffer

For musical inspiration, the show has also relied on Shore and Shaffer. Shore was music director for the first five seasons. He’s gone on to really big things since, including composing the music for the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, which won him three Oscars. Shaffer, who could play music impresario Don Kirshner in a pinch, has been David Letterman’s bandleader for more than 30 years.

G.E. Smith

Another of “SNL’s” music directors was once married to Gilda Radner and the guitarist in Hall & Oates’ band. Smith led the “SNL” group from 1985 to 1995.

Game show parodies

What would “SNL” be without game shows? The program has taken numerous shots at “Jeopardy” and “Family Feud” and frequently made up its own contests, including “Jackie Rogers Jr.’s $100,000 Jackpot Wad” and one in which Phil Hartman played God. He did very well.

Short films

“SNL” has regularly gone to tape to air some short films. Some of the best include Eddie Murphy’s investigation, “White Like Me,” Harry Shearer and Martin Short as synchronized swimmers and the cartoons of Robert Smigel’s “TV Funhouse.”

Not Ready for Prime Time Players
The originals (L-R): Gilda Radner, Jane Curtin, Chevy Chase, Laraine Newman, Garrett Morris, John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd.
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“SNL prime time

The show hasn’t always stayed in late night. There have been a number of prime-time specials over the years, from the ridiculous — a messy Mardi Gras program in 1977 — to the sublime: 2008’s “Presidential Bash,” which gave Tina Fey another opportunity to play Sarah Palin.

Recurring characters

John Belushi was a samurai. Phil Hartman was Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer. Adam Sandler was Opera Man. In fact, some of these characters were so popular they got their own movies.

“SNL movies

Your local theater has featured movies based on “SNL” characters almost as long as there’s been a “Saturday Night Live.” “The Blues Brothers” went from a strange skit to a hit album and popular movie; “Wayne’s World” was a huge success. Even Julia Sweeney’s androgynous Pat got a movie — “It’s Pat” — though most folks probably want to forget it.

Wayne's World
Dana Carvey and Mike Myers in “Wayne’s World,” one of the most successful of “SNL”-related movies.
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“SNL movie stars

The list of “SNL” performers who have gone on to big-screen stardom is long and influential: John Belushi, Bill Murray, Eddie Murphy, Mike Myers, Adam Sandler, Tina Fey, Kristen Wiig and Will Ferrell, just for starters. Even Robert Downey Jr. spent a year in the “SNL” cast when he was best known for playing a jerk in “Weird Science.”

Those who have left us

A handful of “SNL” cast members have left the stage entirely. They include John Belushi, Gilda Radner, Phil Hartman, Chris Farley, Danitra Vance and Charles Rocket, as well as writers Tom Davis and Michael “Mr. Mike” O’Donoghue.

Fake ads

The parody commercial has long been an “SNL” stock in trade, whether it’s Dan Aykroyd’s Ron Popeil-like pitchman for Bass-o-Matic (“Mmm, that’s good bass!”) to Chris Farley and Adam Sandler in an ad for “Schmitt’s Gay, the beer for homosexuals.” Don’t take “Colon Blow” or you may find yourself in need of “Ooops, I Crapped My Pants!”

John Belushi
John Belushi, one of the original cast members, died in 1982.
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Pushing the limits

“SNL” has battled NBC’s censors over the years, so it’s surprising what did make it on the air. How about “Sofa King,” the New Jersey furniture store? Or the music video “D**k in a Box”? The show was once even sponsored by “Pussy Whip, the first dessert topping for cats.”


Over the years, “SNL’s” parodies of celebrities have become better known than the celebrity’s own persona. Dan Aykroyd nailed talk-show host Tom Snyder and Phil Hartman was a wicked Frank Sinatra (“I’ve got chunks of guys like you in my stool!”). The show’s been on long enough that its own stars have since been parodied — witness Jay Pharoah’s take on Eddie Murphy.

Politicians and presidents

But when it comes to impersonations, politicians deserve their own slot. Gerald Ford may have been our most athletic president — the guy almost went into the NFL — but when Chevy Chase started falling down, it was all over. Will Ferrell was a master George W. Bush, while Dana Carvey cornered the market for W.’s father. And could Tina Fey have helped decide the 2008 election with her version of Sarah Palin? 1980 independent John Anderson is lucky he showed up in person.

Will Ferrell as George W. Bush
Darrell Hammond as Dick Cheney and Will Ferrell as George W. Bush in 2009.
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Where you want to start? “Cheeseboogie, cheeseboogie, cheeseboogie”? “Schwing!” “Well, isn’t that special?” “Da Bearss!” A good chunk of the pop culture phrasebook wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for “Saturday Night Live.”


“Saturday Night Live” is, by definition, live, so occasionally the show shocks even the cast. Sinead O’Connor ripped up a photo of Pope John Paul II while saying “Fight the real enemy.” Elvis Costello abruptly stopped “Less Than Zero” to play the anti-industry “Radio, Radio.” Charles Rocket let the F-word fly. For all of the planning and preparation, sometimes stuff happens.


Sometimes the shock is on us — especially when there are unexpected guests. Janet Reno dropped by “Janet Reno’s Dance Party,” and the real Sarah Palin showed up next to Fey’s version. Perhaps the most ingenious was Barbra Streisand guesting on “Coffee Talk,” delighting Streisand worshipper Linda Richman (Mike Myers).


Viewers naturally focus on the cast, but without “SNL’s” writers, the show would be a lot of dead air. So let’s pay some tribute to Anne Beatts and Marilyn Suzanne Miller, Al Franken and Tom Davis, Jim Downey and Alan Zweibel, Andy Breckman and Carol Leifer, Bonnie and Terry Turner, Jack Handey and Robert Smigel, Bob Odenkirk and Ian Maxtone-Graham, Adam McKay and Max Brooks, Mindy Kaling and Simon Rich, and the dozens of others who have written all that material.

Tina Fey, Sarah Palin
Tina Fey’s resemblance to Sarah Palin paid comedic dividends.
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“Saturday Night Live” opened the door for several other edgy sketch shows. An early competitor was “Fridays” on ABC, which gave us Michael Richards and Larry David. Later came “MADtv,” “Mr. Show” and “Exit 57.” If the old-fashioned variety show is no more, it’s because of “SNL” and its imitators.


“Saturday Night Live” may seem as American as apple pie, but like the Band, there’s a portion that’s as Canadian as a maple syrup-covered moose. Among the show’s north-of-the-border notables: Dan Aykroyd, Mike Myers, Martin Short, Norm Macdonald, musicians Howard Shore and Paul Shaffer, and creator Lorne Michaels.


The show has also used some improv groups as pipelines. More than two dozen of the cast members have come from Second City’s outposts in Chicago and Toronto, and at least 15 have learned the trade with Los Angeles’ Groundlings comedy troupe.

Going viral

In recent years, word of mouth — “Did you see that sketch?” — has been replaced by viral video and social media. The show quickly adapted to new technology, particularly thanks to Andy Samberg and the Lonely Island troupe, whose “Lazy Sunday” became a Web sensation in 2005.


According to the Internet Movie Database, “SNL” has won 45 Primetime Emmys over the years. It won four its first year — including outstanding comedy-variety series — and, just last month, picked up five more.

Tina Fey, Lorne Michaels (center) and Dennis McNicholas pose with Emmys in 2002.
Tina Fey, Lorne Michaels (center) and Dennis McNicholas pose with Emmys in 2002.
Getty Images

“Good night!”

The first show of the 2014-15 season will be “SNL’s” 767th, and it’s long since become the longest-running variety series in U.S. history. To put it another way, both the season premiere host, Chris Pratt, and musical guest, Ariana Grande, were born after “SNL” first went on the air. So here’s to another 40 years — except, this time, let’s use more cowbell.

70’s snl original cast

Original cast members of NBC’s Saturday Night Live



Tribute to the SNL Original Cast (1975-1980)





M9089images MKLO0images MKI9images MKI90images MKI989 MNKJIimagesBenny Hill – Ernie (The Fastest Milkman In The West)


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The Strange Life of Benny Hill
Miss Cellania • Thursday, October 24, 2013 at 5:0

 Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

Who makes a person laugh is an entirely subjective thing. Like taste in dogs, cars, colors, beautiful women or good-looking men, it is entirely a matter of individual taste. While the Three Stooges will almost always leave me hysterical with laughter, I know of others who view their antics stone-faced. Other will scream with joy at Jonathan Winters or Sid Caesar and neither has ever made me even snicker. With that in mind, I have always considered Benny Hill to be the most underrated comedian of all time.

This brilliant comedic genius was born Alfred Hawthorne Hill on January 24, 1924. After working as a milkman and a drummer, young Alfred drifted into various performing jobs at Masonic dinners and men’s clubs before graduating to night clubs and theaters. He also made several appearance on British radio in the early years. Alfred soon changed his first name to “Benny” in honor of his favorite comedian, Jack Benny.

Hill’s early roles were eclectic, sometimes as a comedian, and sometimes playing a straight man. He started appearing on British television in 1955 with the earliest version of The Benny Hill Show. The show made him famous in Britain, but this early show is like lukewarm tea compared to the wild later version of the show. After viewing (and loving) the famous Benny Hill shows of the 1970s and ’80s, I was very surprised at how mild and tame these earlier shows were.

Benny also had a comedy anthology show Benny Hill (1962-63) in which he played a different role each week. Interestingly, Hill also did some Shakespeare, appearing as Bottom in 1964’s TV version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Hill made a few brief appearances in films, probably most notably in a relatively straight role at the toymaker in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang in 1968. A multi-faceted talent, Benny even had a #1 British single at Christmastime with “Ernie, the Fastest Milkman in the West.”

Benny Hill – Ernie (The Fastest Milkman In The West)



In 1969, Benny’s show switched from the ultra-conservative BBC network that had been carrying his show and made the movie to Thames television. It was this move that really gave birth to the incredible comic genius of Benny Hill. Probably the changing times had a lot to do with Benny and his creative freedom splurging in these classic ’70s and ’80s shows. The loosening of strict codes of morality and censorship enabled Benny to create these mini-masterpieces of comic brilliance.

Hill’s show was chock-full of double entendres, sight gags, cross-dressing, and the scantily-clad beauties “Hill’s Angels” that became his stock-in-trade. He also loved using slow-motion, speeded-up motion, and time-lapse sequences. It was with these classic shows of the ’70s and ’80s that Benny really hit his stride as a comic, and for these shows he will always be remembered.

 El Show de Benny Hill [1955] INTRO


Benny’s show came to America in 1979 and quickly became a popular favorite (like the Three Stooges, his appeal was definitely more to male viewers than female). As The Benny Hill Show was carried in more and more countries, Benny’s fame spread and he quickly became world famous. To this day, the show’s theme song, “Yakety Sax,” is known the world over as “The Benny Hill Theme.”

His fans included Mickey Rooney, Burt Reynolds, Walter Cronkite, Michael Caine, and Bob Hope -in fact, Bob Hope wrote the forward to the 1989 book The Benny Hill Story.

In what may have been the most memorable moment of his life, in the 1970s, Benny was invited to Vevey, Switzerland, by the great Charlie Chaplin. He dined with the immortal Chaplin and was the first person, outside of family, to be invited to the Chaplin’s private study. Once inside, Benny saw a complete collection of Benny Hill videotapes -it seems Chaplin was a huge Benny Hill fan and thought he was hilarious. Benny was touched and always treasured this memory.

El Show de Benny Hill [1955] INTRO


Contrary to the boisterous, loud character he played on the small screen, Benny was a quiet, private man in real life. He lived in the same large double apartment, most of the time with his mother, for 26 years. When his mother died, he turned the apartment into a shrine, not changing anything. He lived alone in a rented apartment until his death, never owning a house -or a car. Despite his great wealth, Benny never wanted the responsibility of owning a home; he instead had a host of flats he used. Benny liked being by himself. He was one of those people who was “alone, but not lonely.”

Benny was a huge Francophile, enjoying visits to France immensely (usually in Marseilles). Almost up until the ’80s he could go to France and enjoy anonymity, riding local public transport and socializing with beautiful women. Highly intelligent, he was fluent in French and also knew some German, Dutch, and Italian.

Although he was to become world famous as the “dirty old man” who leered and cavorted with young women, in his private life, Hill had much less success with the ladies. He definitely liked women, enjoyed their company, and fell very deeply in love. Sadly, he proposed to three different women in his life and was turned down by all three.

According to a few of the beautiful “Hill’s Angels,” Benny loved taking them out on dates, but never made the first move or even tried to kiss them. Rumors circulated that Benny was gay, which he laughingly denied. The irony of TV’s top woman-chaser being suspected as gay is almost too much to believe.

Who knows? Maybe he was, or maybe not. Maybe he was impotent, or maybe he was just extremely shy. Incredibly, there is a school of thought that Benny Hill may have died a virgin. Whatever secrets he had in the sexual facet of his life, Benny took to the grave with him.

By the 1990s, the hugely popular Benny Hill Show was being politely censored by influence from a new, highly influential nemesis: the feminists. The “femi-nazis” and the newest fad of the time, “political correctness” had raised its horrible, intimidating head. Benny found his once-popular show being canceled in several countries. The hard-hearted feminists couldn’t stand seeing Benny running around with beautiful, young girls in their meager attire.

Baffled and depressed, Benny denied the loud outcry that his show was sexist. He answered the feminists by pointing out that he never actually chased the women on his show, it was always they who chased him. He also pointed out that it was old men on the show who truly looked foolish, not the girls.

“I use a pretty girl the way Henny Youngman used his violin -as a bridge between one laugh and the next,” he said, truthfully. Nonetheless, politics ruled, and The Benny Hill Show began a not-so-gradual disappearing act. To this day, although we live in a world of hundreds of cable choices and selections, one is hard-pressed to find The Benny Hill Show anywhere on TV anymore.

0 AM • 4

A Tribute to The Benny Hill Show

A tribute to the classic British television comedy “The Benny Hill Show”. Scenes from The Benny Hill Show include the beautiful and sexy Hill’s Angels. Music is the theme from The Benny Hill Show(Yakety Sax).


The Benny Hill Show Best Videos – Part 1


Benny was sad and slightly shell-shocked. By the 1990s, his health was rapidly deteriorating. He was gaining weight at a rapid pace. On February 11, 1992, doctors warned him that he was overweight and recommended a heart bypass. Benny refused, and a week later suffered renal failure. Benny lacked confidence in the medical profession as a whole, and in a case of life imitating art, he entrusted his health to a gynecologist who had a pathological obsession for pinching women on their hindquarters.

By mid-April, some of Benny’s neighbors complained about a pungent odor emanating from Benny’s flat. They realized they hadn’t seen the comedian for several days and phoned the police. Their fears were soon realized; Benny Hill had died very much as he had lived his life -alone. In front of his beloved television, he was slumped on the couch, surrounded by cardboard boxes, unwashed crockery, empty glasses, and piles of videotapes. Benny Hill had died of heart failure at the age of 67.

As we all know, none of us ever forgets the ones we loved in our lives. I also believe we never forget the ones who made us laugh. And Benny Hill certainly did that.

Luckily for us, it is easy to find and view the great Benny Hill on DVD and videotape or even on YouTube.