Tag Archives: hippies

COOL PEOPLE – Ben and Jerry


  • * The 1970’s*


    Humble Beginnings

    With a $5 correspondence course in ice cream-making from Penn State and  a $12,000 investment ($4,000 of it borrowed), Ben and Jerry open their first  ice cream scoop shop in a renovated gas station in Burlington, Vermont.



    Next Step…

    Ben and Jerry celebrate the shop’s one-year anniversary – and the customers who made it possible – by holding the first-ever Free Cone Day: free scoops for all, all day long. The annual ice cream give-away continues today in scoop shops around the world.

Hippies in Morocco



BSD – Hippies in Morocco

French hippies Antony Lille and Luc Legrand sailed to North Africa and headed off the beaten track in search of some weird and wonderful spots.

Filmed and edited by Antoine Sabourin.




Amazing Photographs of Life at a #Hippie Tree House Village in Hawaii in the 1970s


Amazing Photographs of Life at a Hippie Tree House Village in Hawaii in the 1970s

Taylor Camp was born in the spring of 1969 when Howard Taylor (brother of actress Elizabeth) bailed out thirteen hippies seeking refuge from the ongoing campus riots in America and police brutality. The camp formed on the idea offree living, settled in this tree house village on the beautiful shore of Kauai. Clothing-optional, pot-friendly, rent free, and no politics made this village utopia in paradise.These nostalgic photos were taken by John Wehrheim who was a Taylor Camp resident. Such magical images he captured of this village which many look back as the “happiest days of their lives”. Sadly the community was torched and put to an end in 1977 to make room for a state park.

The Taylor Camp book is also available to buy here.




TO SET THE MOOD -Bryan Adams – Summer Of 69 Live



Amazing Photographs Of The Summer Of 1969 In New York

Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick

David McCabe, Andy Warhol & Edie Sedgwick with Empire State Building New York, 1964. C-print. 47.5 x 33.5 cm.


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That ’60s show: What American high school students dressed like in 1969


When students (and teachers) turned on, tuned in, and dropped classes

by Chris Wild

Woodside High, California.


The latest rule in girls’ high school
fashion is that there isn’t any.

Left to right: Pam Pepin, Pat Auvenshine and Kim Robertson, at Corona del Mar High School in California.


Rooted in the the early 1960s “Beat Generation,” hippies were about freedom — of expression, of living and, of course, of love.

When it came to style, this meant individuality and customization over mass production: long hair for men, little makeup for women, bras optional. By 1967, a raft of publications and handbooks explained exactly how to dress like a hippie. Ruth Bronsteen’s “The Hippy’s Handbook” even included graphics on how to rock the look.

But in 1969, the year of these photographs, hippie fashion was evolving from counter culture to, well, culture. And young people were informing the change. Most of the students you see here are wearing off-the-shelf fashions — still recognizably hippie, but more homogenized.

Being a hippy was safe, but somehow not as free.

A Southern California high school student walks toward her classmates while wearing the “Mini Jupe” skirt.


Guess what, I might be the first hippie pinup girl.

High schooler Lenore Reday stops traffic while wearing a bell-bottomed jumpsuit, in Newport Beach, California.


Beverly High School classmates.


Southern California high school students wear hippie fashion, in California.


Southern California high school student wear Bermuda overalls.


Students of Woodside High wearing hippie fashion, such as ponchos, boots and sandals, in California.


High Schooler Nina Nalhaus wears wool pants and a homemade jacket at high school, in Denver, Colorado.


Beverly Hills high school student Erica Farber wears a checker and tiered outfit as she walks with a young man.


High school student band, in California.


High school student wears hippie fashion consisting of bell bottoms and boots.


High school student Rosemary Shoong.


Southern California high schooler wearing a buckskin vest.


High school student wearing an old-fashioned tapestry skirt and wool shawl.


High School teacher Sandy Brockman wearing a bold print hippie-style dress, in Denver, Colorado.


  • Research:Amanda Uren
  • Text andcuration:Chris Wild

The Counterculture

The Counterculture

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Counterculture is a term describing the values and norms of a cultural group that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day.


  • Apply the concept of counterculture to the rise and collapse of the US Hippie movement


  • Examples of countercultures in the U.S. could include the hippie movement of the 1960s, the green movement, polygamists, and feminist groups.
  • A counterculture is a subculture with the addition that some of its beliefs, values, or norms challenge or even contradict those of the main culture of which it is part.
  • Countercultures run counter to dominant cultures and the social mainstream of the day.


  • culture

    The beliefs, values, behavior, and material objects that constitute a people’s way of life.

  • mainstream

    Purchased, used, or accepted broadly rather than by a tiny fraction of a population or market; common, usual, or conventional.

  • counterculture
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  • Any culture whose values and lifestyles are opposed to those of the established mainstream culture, especially to western culture.


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  • Modern American Marxist political groups are examples of countercultures — they promote a worldview and set of norms and values that are contrary to the dominant American system.

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Counterculture is a sociological term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. Counterculture can also describe a group whose behavior deviates from the societal norm.

In the United States, the counterculture of the 1960s became identified with the rejection of conventional social norms of the 1950s. Counterculture youth rejected the cultural standards of their parents, especially with respect to racial segregation and initial widespread support for the Vietnam War.

As the 1960s progressed, widespread tensions developed in American society that tended to flow along generational lines regarding the war in Vietnam, race relations, sexual mores, women’s rights, traditional modes of authority, and a materialisticinterpretation of the American Dream. Hippies became the largest countercultural group in the United States. The counterculture also had access to a media eager to present their concerns to a wider public. Demonstrations for social justice created far-reaching changes affecting many aspects of society .

Hippies at an Anti-Vietnam Demonstration, 1967

Hippies at an Anti-Vietnam Demonstration, 1967
A female demonstrator offers a flower to military police on guard at the Pentagon during an anti-Vietnam demonstration.

The counterculture in the United States lasted from roughly 1964 to 1973 — coinciding with America’s involvement in Vietnam — and reached its peak in 1967, the “Summer of Love. ” The movement divided the country: to some Americans, these attributes reflected American ideals of free speech, equality, world peace, and the pursuit of happiness; to others, the same attributes reflected a self-indulgent, pointlessly rebellious, unpatriotic, and destructive assault on America’s traditional moral order.

The counterculture collapsed circa 1973, and many have attributed its collapse to two major reasons: First, the most popular of its political goals — civil rights, civil liberties, gender equality, environmentalism, and the end of the Vietnam War — were accomplished. Second, a decline of idealism and hedonism occurred as many notable counterculture figures died, the rest settled into mainstream society and started their own families, and the “magic economy” of the 1960s gave way to the stagflation of the 1970s.

Source: Boundless. “Countercultures.” Boundless Sociology. Boundless, 03 Jul. 2014. Retrieved 29 Nov. 2014 from https://www.boundless.com/sociology/textbooks/boundless-sociology-textbook/culture-and-socialization-3/culture-worlds-32/countercultures-204-8929/




“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was written and released in June 1967 to promote the Monterey Pop Festival




“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was written and released in June 1967 to promote the Monterey Pop Festival.


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dave and myself in San Francisco

Posted: 10/15/2012 2:20 pm EDT Updated: 10/16/2012 2:21 pm EDT
  A stroll down Haight Street today will undoubtedly evoke a certain 1960s nostalgia.

Live guitar music still warbles from street corners, tie-dyed t-shirts are hawked by the handful, the smell of pot permanently wafts, colorful peace signs adorn windows of businesses like the Red Victorian Bed & Breakfast — institutions better suited to an earlier time.


But said nostalgia is often overshadowed by the sad realities of a neighborhood that has long since evolved from the remnants of a revolution: the wayward teenagers, the tourist traps, the vagabonds, the $6 corporate ice cream cones sold at precisely San Francisco’s most famous intersection.

During its heyday, which culminated in 1967’s infamous Summer of Love, young dreamers converged in the Haight by the thousands. Historians deem the neighborhood the birthplace of the hippie movement, marked by peaceful protests and psychedelic experimentation. The era’s greatest luminaries, from Jerry Garcia to Allen Ginsberg to Jimi Hendrix, all lived nearby.

Then the movement waned, and the area began to decay along with it. “By the fall of 1967, Haight-Ashbury was nearly abandoned, trashed, and laden with drugs and homeless people,” blogger Jon Newman wrote in his essay Death of the Hippie Subculture. “With the Haight in ruins and most of its residents gone, it was simply unable to operate as a hub for music, poetry and art.”

Of course, the Haight still has a certain appeal. There’s no better jazz-and-pizza combo in the city than at Club Deluxe, Amoeba Music offers a truly epic collection, a parklet just popped up in front of Haight Street Market and the 12-piece band that assembles in front of American Apparel on Sunday mornings always move crowds to dance in the street.

Yet we can’t help but heave a sigh while pushing past gaggles of gawking tourists or stepping over the man sleeping on the sidewalk at noon. While a stroll down Haight Street today certainly evokes nostalgia, it also makes us yearn for a place that was once the epicenter of peace and love and youth in revolt, a place we never had the chance to experience ourselves but will be forever engrained in San Francisco’s complex, progressive history.

A History Of Hippies

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 This collection is part of a new HuffPost SF partnership with the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center, “Tales From The City,” which features various images from throughout the city’s past. Visit the San Francisco History Center in person to view original photographic prints and negatives as well as tour other relics from SF’s earlier days.


This is a short documentary about the Haight Street kids living in San Francisco.


Come To London! (1966)

Come To London! (1966)

Come To London! (1966)




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An original 1966 British Pathe video about some of London’s quirks and the reason people are attracted to the city. Initially called “London” the title has been changed to differentiate it from other clips in the archive. [Edited – 07/06/2012]


A look at various attractions in the Capital – more historical than swinging!

Panning shot down busy market in Berwick St. M/S of a salesman selling china to a crowd in Gravesend Market with cheeky cockney banter (synchronised sound).

High angled shot of Trafalgar Square. M/S of a man and woman feeding pigeons in the Square. C/U of the girl with pigeons landing on her hand. High angled shot of a barge going up a canal, pan to busy London street nearby. Panning shot of smartly dressed people riding through Hyde Park. Two deer are seen feeding from the hand of a fisherman by pond.

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M/S of a calm lake, pan to a red double decker riding past. The bus is seen passing the National Gallery with St. Martin’s in the Fields in the background. Low angled shot of St. Martin’s spire. Various shots of Church spires and towers around London. L/S of the exterior of the Law Courts.

Low angled shot of a scaffolding covered dome of St. Paul’s. Various shots of different parts of the cathedral, workmen are seen chipping and sanding off thick crusts of soot from St. Paul’s. Panning shot follows a young couple in an M.G. car driving into the Barbican. Various shots of workmen on scaffolding cleaning old buildings, good views of the Capital from the scaffolding.

M/S of men in Cavalier and Roundhead costumes marching in the Lord Mayor’s show. Low angled shot of children in the crowd waving Union Jacks. M/S of the famous gold carriage passing a platform of dignitaries. M/S of vintage cars passing in the procession.


M/S of the car themed, ‘Two Hoots’ restaurant in Bishopsgate. The couple (seen in the M.G.) are seated at a table, a waiter in driving goggles shows them the menu. Various shots of car related artefacts on the walls. Various shots of diners being served. More shots of the cockney market salesman entertaining the crowd with his banter. Various shots of a Pan American airliner landing at an airport. Passengers are seen coming down aeroplane steps, other planes are seen taking off.

M/S of the M.G. coming under Admiralty arch, point view shot from inside the car as it drives down the Mall. Various shots of Household Cavalry riding into their barracks. M/S of a horse and cart riding by the Thames. M/S of the couple looking over the Thames at the Houses of Parliament. Some shots of a water scooter on the Thames (see note in record c). The couple get back into their M.G. and drive past Parliament.

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M/S of an Evening Standard van parking. M/S of press photographers. Various shots of a chef icing a giant cake. Britt Ekland is escorted into shot, she climbs a ladder and cuts into the cake. As she cuts, Peter Sellers bursts out of the cake driving a Mini (her present). More shots of the press, Brit and Peter lean on the car posing for photographs. M/S of Frank Ifield in a pub in Fleet St., he is being interviewed by Pat Doncaster. M/S of journalists around a pub table, pan to Frank’s table. George Casey, sports journalist, eating a pub sandwich. C/U of the back to front sign for the ‘Gentlemen’s’ – a printer’s joke! Various shots of theatrical and historical artefacts on the pub walls.


Various shots of a Sherlock Holmes theme pub in Baker Street that looks like the detective’s study, the landlord wears a deerstalker. Various shots of a pub in Covent Garden where Barrow boys from the market mix with “baritones of the Opera House”. Some shots of vegetable deliveries at Covent Garden.

More shots of the cheeky cockney barrow boy selling china to an eager crowd – he throws a pile of china in the air and catches them. Several ‘plants’ in the audience start the bidding – very ‘Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels’!


Note: this story is a bit of an odd mixture – it appears to use material from other Colour Pictorials: the water scooter is in AMPHIBIOUS WATER SCOOTER in CP 574, it also revisits places previously featured – the Sherlock Holmes pub is in SHERLOCK HOLMES PUB in CP 162. Other sequences may also have been reused or revisited.





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The 1960’s were a time of upheaval in society, fashion, attitudes and especially music. Before 1963, the music of the sixties still reflected the sound, style and beliefs of the previous decade and many of the hit records were by artists who had found mainstream success in the 1950s, like Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Dion, and The Everly Brothers. In 1963 and the years to follow, a number of social influences changed what popular music was and gave birth to the diversity that we experience with music today. The assassination of President Kennedy, the escalation of the war in Vietnam and the forward-progress of the Civil Rights Movement all greatly impacted the mood of American culture and the music began to reflect that change. The “British Invasion” also began around 1963 with the arrival of The Beatles on the music scene and the type of rabid fandom that followed them would change the way people would view and interact with music and musicians forever. In this section we will cover the history of the “British Invasion”, Motown and R&B, Folk and Protest music, and the large amount of variation that emerged in Rock music throughout the sixties.

Popular Music Genres of the 1960’s
British Invasion
Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock
Roots Rock and Hard Rock
Folk Rock and Protest Music
The Beatles, The Who, The Rolling Stones, Cream, The Yardbirds, Donovan, Manfred Mann, The Kinks, Herman’s Hermits, Tom Jones, Dusty Springfield, The Animals The Marvelettes, The Supremes, Marvin Gaye, The Four Tops, The Drifters, The Temptations, The Miracles, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight & the Pips, The Spinners, Aretha Franklin The Beach Boys, The Ventures, The Champs, The Doors, The Grateful Dead, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Jefferson Airplane, Jan and Dean, The Kingsmen, The Trashmen Janis Joplin, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Steppenwolf, Roy Orbison, Procol Harum, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Animals, The Band, The Troggs Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, The Mamas & the Papas, Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills & Nash, The Lovin’ Spoonful, The Byrds, The Turtles, Gordon Lightfoot, Peter, Paul and Mary The Persuasions & The Heartaches & The Concepts & The Five Jades & The Notations & The Chessmen & The Five Sharks & The Royal Counts & The Zircons & The Five Fashions & The Del Capris & The Shells
British Invasion

The “British Invasion” is the name given to the period of time in the early to mid-1960’s, during which many British rock bands and pop artists found mainstream success in the United States and worldwide. Many of these bands first started by covering American songs and showcasing an American Rock ‘n’ Roll and R&B influence in their sounds. As these bands gained popularity, many of them ventured into new music territory and created their own unique styles. The one band that comes to mind when speaking of the British Invasion is The Beatles, who first broke into the US music scene in 1963, but really became popular in 1964 after appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show. The Beatles dominated worldwide charts from that point in time until they broke up in 1970. The phenomenon that surrounded them was known as Beatlemania and many up and coming music acts emulated their “Liverpool Sound”. The band holds many musical records to this day reflecting album sales and number one singles and they’re music remains some of the most popular of all time. They can be easily described as the most influential group of the 1960’s. Some other notable British Invasion acts include The Rolling Stones, The Animals, The Who, Herman’s Hermits, Tom Jones, and Donovan, some of whom reached comparable success levels to the Beatles but had different influences on music all together.

The Very Best of Herman’s Hermits The Rolling Stones: Hot Rocks 1964 – 1971 The Best of The Animals The Very Best of the Yardbirds
Motown And R&B

The “Motown Sound” and popular R&B music had a major significance in terms of the Civil Rights movement and integration in American society during the sixties. Motown started as a Detroit-based record label in the late fifties and early sixties, but it quickly turned into much more as the acts gained popularity worldwide. Motown records consisted mainly of African-American groups, singers, songwriters and management and their musical and business success proved in breaking down the barriers of segregation and granted African-American performers and musicians a chances to reappropriate much of the success that had been credited to white rock ‘n’ rollers and pop artists who had success in singing “black music” during the previous decade. Two of the most influential groups to come out of the Motown sound were Smokey Robinson and the Miracles and Diana Ross and the Supremes, both of which had as much chart success as any of the rock groups that dominated the airwaves during the sixties. The success of Motown also paved the way for R&B singers and groups who were not necessarily a part of the movement to also enjoy mainstream success. Some other popular Motown and 60’s R&B artists include The Temptations, The Marvelettes, The Four Tops, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, and the Jackson Five.

The Definitive Collection: Smokey Robinson and The Miracles The Supremes Gold The Essentials: The Drifters The Very Best of Aretha Franklin: The 60’s

Rock And Its Subgenres

While rock ‘n’ roll music entered the popular music spectrum in the 1950s, rock music really came into its own in the 1960s. Rock music dominated the popular music scene during the decade and as the genre grew and changed, many diverse and new subgenres emerged, all tied to original rock but each with their own unique style and purpose. These specific subgenres also had varying levels of popularity throughout the decade and many are still popular today. Quite a few rock bands and musicians oscillated between these genres depending on what was popular at the time and used it as a way to experiment with finding their own true sound. Some of the rock subgenres that we will touch upon are surf, psychedelic, roots, and hard rock. It is important to remember that the specific artists we discuss in these various sections often fall into more than one category and it is up for debate amongst their fans what genre they best represent. We have tried our best to categorize these artists and realize there was much cross-over during the decade.

Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock

Surf rock began in Southern California as a type of dance music that was mostly instrumental and it became quite popular in the early to mid sixties, until the British Invasion took over the music scene. The subject matter for surf rock was quite literally surfing, however, that expanded as the genre grew in popularity to songs about girls, cars and general teenage antics. The most influential and popular group to come out of the genre were The Beach Boys, whose vocal harmonies and well-crafted compositions came to define the genre. The Beach Boys were one of the only bands to come out of the genre and sustain their success. Some other important surf rock acts include Jan and Dean, The Ventures and The Champs.

The Beach Boys Greatest Hits Volume 1 The Essential Jefferson Airplane Experience Hendrix: The Best of Jimi Hendrix The Best of The Kingsmen

Psychedelic rock was popular during the latter half of the 1960s and reached its peak at the end of the decade. Psychedelic music was associated with the hippie counter-culture and hallucinogenic drug use and it was created with the intention of “enhancing” the experience of listeners who were using LSD or other mind-altering substances. The lyrics were often strange and made reference to drugs and bands would often use instruments that were not usual, like the sitar, tabla, harpsichord and organ. There was much experimentation in the sound and much of it was influenced by Eastern and Indian music. Psychedelic rock along with Folk rock became two of the most recognizable sounds associated with 1967’s “Summer of Love” phenomenon. Many popular rock bands experimented with this genre, including The Beatles, The Doors, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Jefferson Airplane, Cream, Pink Floyd, and The Yardbirds.

Roots Rock and Hard Rock

Roots rock emerged in the mid to late 1960s as a combination of several genres and subgenres of rock music that were popular at the time. Roots rock combined elements of folk music, blues, country and rock ‘n’ roll. And, the genre was exemplified by its “back to basics” sound. Bob Dylan is thought to have pioneered the genre with the release of his 1966 album Blonde on Blonde that demonstrated what roots rock was to become. Many of the most popular bands of the time joined the “roots revival” and crafted albums of their own that featured and experimented with a roots sound. Some of the bands that created music in the style of this broad genre included The Rolling Stones, The Doors, The Beatles, The Band, and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

The Essential Janis Joplin The Very Best of The Doors The Who: Greatest Hits The Best of The Troggs
Hard rock took the elements of rock ‘n’ roll and made them heavier as the genre formed in the middle of the decade. The sound is characterized by more aggressive tones and delivery. Hard rock vocalists are identified by their higher range and distinct and often raspy voices. The music was influenced heavily by blues rock, garage rock, and rhythm and blues. This style became associated with rebellious youth and an anti-authority demeanor, with a few acts even destroying their own instruments on stage (like The Who). Due to their hard-partying lifestyles, many musicians that were a part of the hard rock scene developed drug and alcohol problems. As a result of these problems, quite a few influential musicians died at a young age from substance abuse or accidents related to substance abuse like Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix. Notable hard rock bands form the 1960s include The Who, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and Steppenwolf.

Folk Rock And Protest Music

Folk rock came onto the scene as a popular genre in the mid-sixties and much of it grew out of the protest movements that were active during those turbulent times. Much of the folk rock and protest movement was born out of the emerging group of singer-songwriters that were influenced by the folk musicians of the 1930s. Bob Dylan became one of the most prominent songwriters of the decade with many popular groups such as The Byrds and Peter, Paul and Mary covering his songs successfully. Dylan even saw success as a solo performer and was recognized by his unusual voice. This genre was characterized by its melodic sound and did not necessarily have to connect to the protest movements at the time, although lyrically a lot of the folk rock contained protest messages.

The Essential Simon and Garfunkel Retrospective The Best of Buffalo Springfield The Essential Bob Dylan The Best of The Mamas and the Papas

Protest music was distinctly different in that it always had a message and was not confined to the sound and style of folk rock. This music was often a reaction to social injustice, cultural changes, and news events. And, in many cases, it brought awareness to the younger generation who would then join the protest, therefore growing the movements. This genre was not necessarily specific to certain artists either, as many mainstream musicians decided to contribute to the cannon with their own feelings. For example, R&B and Soul singer Same Cooke wrote and recorded “A Change Is Gonna Come” in 1963, a song that became an anthem for the Civil Rights movement in America, along with others like Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” and James Brown’s “Say It Loud – I’m Black and I’m Proud” from 1963 and 1968 respectively. Another issue that protest music was used to address was the war in Vietnam and its escalation during the decade. As more and more American troops were being sent to Vietnam with virtually no progress being made, an anti-war movement began to gain steam in the mid-sixties and protest music accompanied it. Some examples of anti-Vietnam songs were Pete Seeger’s “Waist Deep in the Big Muddy from 1967, The Door’s “The Unknown Soldier” from 1968, and Bob Dylan’s “Masters of War” from 1963. Both folk music and protest music were connected to the “hippie” movement at the time and greatly influenced and were influenced by the feelings of freedom, love and peace that characterized the hippies. Some examples of folk rock and protest musicians from the 1960s include Peter, Paul and Mary, Cat Stevens, Buffalo Springfield, Simon and Garfunkel, and Pete Seeger.


The Golden Age of Acappella 1963-1973 exploded in urban America along the acappella corridor that stretched from Boston to Philadelphia; a regional sound that captured the heart and minds of young people in the inner cities. The birth of Acappella as a new urban music genre began in New York City in a small record shop called Times Square Records run and operated by Irving “Slim” Rose. The term Acappella was the word that Slim Rose came up with to promote music that was made without music. Recordings made without music was played on the radio by vocal groups, vinyl acappella records were sold in record stores and Acappella Shows drew hundreds of teenagers throughout New Jersey and New York. Thus a new urban sound created a niche in the music industry competing with Motown, British Invasion, folk and many other musical genres. Acappella became the starting point and catalyst for oldies radio programing, reissues of records of the late 40’s and 50’s and the preservation and promotion of rhythm and blues vocal groups. Amid the social and cultural revolution taking place during the 1960’s acappella as a whole rose above ethnic and racial barriers and became a dynamic musical movement in American history. I would like to thank Abraham Santiago who wrote the paragraph about Acappella Music for us If you would like to find out much more about the subject please visit http://www.ricocreative.com/harmonyreview.htm

The Chessmen Album Cover The Heartaches Album Cover Poster For 1st Acappella Review Show in New York

Music Festivals And Their Influence

The sixties was a decade in which music festivals flourished, especially at the end of the decade. The Monterey Pop Festival took place in 1967, and featured some of the most popular rock musicians of the time and was one of the first heavily attended rock festivals. Many of the most popular acts of the decade had their first major American appearance at this festival like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and The Who. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair of 1969 represents one of the most iconic events of the sixties and is thought of as the culmination of the social revolution that took place during those times. It was a free concert that lasted for three days and showcased some of the most iconic musicians of the time. It is thought to have exemplified the popularity of the hippie counter-culture with an estimated 500,000 attendees reveling in free love, peace and rock music.

Top Songs Of The 1960s

Popular songs from the Sixties Decade, arranged by year but in no particular order. Do you remember listening to these songs on the radio?

1960 1961
The Twist- Chubby Checker
It’s Now or Never – Elvis Presley
Georgia On My Mind – Ray Charles
Teen Angel – Mark Dinning
Save the Last Dance For Me – The Drifters
Cathy’s Clown – The Everly Brothers
Walk, Don’t Run – The Ventures
Stand By Me – Ben E. King
Blue Moon – The Marcels
Please Mr. Postman – The Marvelettes
The Wanderer – Dion
Calendar Girl – Neil Sedaka
At Last – Etta James
The Lion Sleeps Tonight – The Tokens
1962 1963
Surfin’ Safari – The Beach Boys
Sherry – The Four Seasons
Return to Sender – Elvis Presley
You’ve Really Got a Hold On Me – The Miracles
Love Me Do – The Beatles
Green Onions – Booker T. & the M.G.s
I Can’t Stop Loving You – Ray Charles
She Loves You – The Beatles
Louie Louie – The Kingsmen
Surfin’ USA – The Beach Boys
It’s My Party – Lesley Gore
Be My Baby – The Ronettes
Hey Paula – Paul & Paula
Ring of Fire – Johnny Cash
1964 1965
Twist and Shout – The Beatles
House of the Rising Sun – The Animals
I Want to Hold Your Hand – The Beatles
Oh, Pretty Woman – Roy Orbison
Where Did Our Love Go? – The Supremes
The Way You Do the Things You Do – The Temptations
You Really Got Me – The Kinks
Like A Rolling Stone – Bob Dylan
(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction – The Rolling Stones
My Generation – The Who
My Girl – The Temptations
The Sound of Silence – Simon & Garfunkel
Mr. Tambourine Man – The Byrds
Help! – The Beatles
1966 1967
Good Vibrations – The Beach Boys
Yellow Submarine/Eleanor Rigby – The Beatles
When A Man Loves A Woman – Percy Sledge
Wild Thing – The Troggs
Uptight (Everything’s Alright) – Stevie Wonder
Monday, Monday – The Mamas and the Papas
These Boots Are Made for Walkin’ – Nancy Sinatra
A Whiter Shade of Pale – Procol Harum
For What It’s Worth – Buffalo Springfield
I’m A Believer – The Monkees
Light My Fire – The Doors
All You Need Is Love – The Beatles
Happy Together – The Turtles
Somebody to Love – Jefferson Airplane
1968 1969
All Along the Watchtower – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay – Otis Redding
Chain of Fools – Aretha Franklin
What A Wonderful World – Louis Armstrong
Piece of My Heart – Big Brother & The Holding Company (Janis Joplin)
Hey Jude – The Beatles
White Room – Cream
Sugar, Sugar – The Archies
In The Year 2525 – Zager and Evans
Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In – The Fifth Dimension
My Way – Frank Sinatra
Whole Lotta Love – Led Zeppelin
Space Oddity – David Bowie
Bad Moon Rising – Creedence Clearwater Revival
Some hits from the 60’s

Apache The Shadows 1960
The Lion Sleeps Tonight The Tokens 1961
Please Mr. Postman The Marvelettes 1961
Return To Sender Elvis Presley 1962
She Loves You The Beatles 1963
I Want To Hold Your Hand The Beatles 1963
Baby Love – The Supremes 1964
The House Of The Rising Sun – The Animals 1964
I’m Into Something Good – Herman’s Hermits 1964
I Got You Babe Sonny & Cher 1965
Wild Thing The Troggs 1966.
Good Vibrations The Beach Boys 1966
These Boots Are Made For Walkin Nancy Sinatra 1966
A Whiter Shade Of Pale Procol Harum 1967
Lily The Pink Scaffold 1968
I Heard It Through The Grapevine Marvin Gaye 1969
Honky Tonk Women The Rolling Stones 1969
Something In The Air Thunderclap Newman 1969
In The Year 2525 Zager & Evans 1969
Bad Moon Rising Creedence Clearwater Revival 1969