Tag Archives: hippies

BEATNIK HIWAY – HAIGHT ASHBURY IN THE 60’S-A VIBRANT HIPPIE HISTORY- AND TODAY’S KIDS

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BEATNIK HIWAY – HAIGHT ASHBURY IN THE 60’S-A VIBRANT HIPPIE HISTORY- AND TODAY’S KIDS

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“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was written and released in June 1967 to promote the Monterey Pop Festival

http://youtu.be/bch1_Ep5M1s

ERIC BURDON & THE ANIMALS-“SAN FRANCISCAN NIGHTS”

 http://youtu.be/g2JwiusEyPQ

“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was written and released in June 1967 to promote the Monterey Pop Festival.

http://youtu.be/bch1_Ep5M1s

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dave and myself in San Francisco

Posted: 10/15/2012 2:20 pm EDT Updated: 10/16/2012 2:21 pm EDT
HAIGHT ASHBURY 1960S
  A stroll down Haight Street today will undoubtedly evoke a certain 1960s nostalgia.

Live guitar music still warbles from street corners, tie-dyed t-shirts are hawked by the handful, the smell of pot permanently wafts, colorful peace signs adorn windows of businesses like the Red Victorian Bed & Breakfast — institutions better suited to an earlier time.

(SCROLL DOWN FOR PHOTOS)

But said nostalgia is often overshadowed by the sad realities of a neighborhood that has long since evolved from the remnants of a revolution: the wayward teenagers, the tourist traps, the vagabonds, the $6 corporate ice cream cones sold at precisely San Francisco’s most famous intersection.

During its heyday, which culminated in 1967’s infamous Summer of Love, young dreamers converged in the Haight by the thousands. Historians deem the neighborhood the birthplace of the hippie movement, marked by peaceful protests and psychedelic experimentation. The era’s greatest luminaries, from Jerry Garcia to Allen Ginsberg to Jimi Hendrix, all lived nearby.

Then the movement waned, and the area began to decay along with it. “By the fall of 1967, Haight-Ashbury was nearly abandoned, trashed, and laden with drugs and homeless people,” blogger Jon Newman wrote in his essay Death of the Hippie Subculture. “With the Haight in ruins and most of its residents gone, it was simply unable to operate as a hub for music, poetry and art.”

Of course, the Haight still has a certain appeal. There’s no better jazz-and-pizza combo in the city than at Club Deluxe, Amoeba Music offers a truly epic collection, a parklet just popped up in front of Haight Street Market and the 12-piece band that assembles in front of American Apparel on Sunday mornings always move crowds to dance in the street.

Yet we can’t help but heave a sigh while pushing past gaggles of gawking tourists or stepping over the man sleeping on the sidewalk at noon. While a stroll down Haight Street today certainly evokes nostalgia, it also makes us yearn for a place that was once the epicenter of peace and love and youth in revolt, a place we never had the chance to experience ourselves but will be forever engrained in San Francisco’s complex, progressive history.

A History Of Hippies

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 This collection is part of a new HuffPost SF partnership with the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center, “Tales From The City,” which features various images from throughout the city’s past. Visit the San Francisco History Center in person to view original photographic prints and negatives as well as tour other relics from SF’s earlier days.

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This is a short documentary about the Haight Street kids living in San Francisco.

http://youtu.be/sIHa8QyU2Ok

Come To London! (1966)

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Come To London! (1966)

Come To London! (1966)

http://youtu.be/trzBySAzddw

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An original 1966 British Pathe video about some of London’s quirks and the reason people are attracted to the city. Initially called “London” the title has been changed to differentiate it from other clips in the archive. [Edited – 07/06/2012]

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A look at various attractions in the Capital – more historical than swinging!

Panning shot down busy market in Berwick St. M/S of a salesman selling china to a crowd in Gravesend Market with cheeky cockney banter (synchronised sound).

High angled shot of Trafalgar Square. M/S of a man and woman feeding pigeons in the Square. C/U of the girl with pigeons landing on her hand. High angled shot of a barge going up a canal, pan to busy London street nearby. Panning shot of smartly dressed people riding through Hyde Park. Two deer are seen feeding from the hand of a fisherman by pond.

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M/S of a calm lake, pan to a red double decker riding past. The bus is seen passing the National Gallery with St. Martin’s in the Fields in the background. Low angled shot of St. Martin’s spire. Various shots of Church spires and towers around London. L/S of the exterior of the Law Courts.

Low angled shot of a scaffolding covered dome of St. Paul’s. Various shots of different parts of the cathedral, workmen are seen chipping and sanding off thick crusts of soot from St. Paul’s. Panning shot follows a young couple in an M.G. car driving into the Barbican. Various shots of workmen on scaffolding cleaning old buildings, good views of the Capital from the scaffolding.

M/S of men in Cavalier and Roundhead costumes marching in the Lord Mayor’s show. Low angled shot of children in the crowd waving Union Jacks. M/S of the famous gold carriage passing a platform of dignitaries. M/S of vintage cars passing in the procession.

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M/S of the car themed, ‘Two Hoots’ restaurant in Bishopsgate. The couple (seen in the M.G.) are seated at a table, a waiter in driving goggles shows them the menu. Various shots of car related artefacts on the walls. Various shots of diners being served. More shots of the cockney market salesman entertaining the crowd with his banter. Various shots of a Pan American airliner landing at an airport. Passengers are seen coming down aeroplane steps, other planes are seen taking off.

M/S of the M.G. coming under Admiralty arch, point view shot from inside the car as it drives down the Mall. Various shots of Household Cavalry riding into their barracks. M/S of a horse and cart riding by the Thames. M/S of the couple looking over the Thames at the Houses of Parliament. Some shots of a water scooter on the Thames (see note in record c). The couple get back into their M.G. and drive past Parliament.

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M/S of an Evening Standard van parking. M/S of press photographers. Various shots of a chef icing a giant cake. Britt Ekland is escorted into shot, she climbs a ladder and cuts into the cake. As she cuts, Peter Sellers bursts out of the cake driving a Mini (her present). More shots of the press, Brit and Peter lean on the car posing for photographs. M/S of Frank Ifield in a pub in Fleet St., he is being interviewed by Pat Doncaster. M/S of journalists around a pub table, pan to Frank’s table. George Casey, sports journalist, eating a pub sandwich. C/U of the back to front sign for the ‘Gentlemen’s’ – a printer’s joke! Various shots of theatrical and historical artefacts on the pub walls.

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Various shots of a Sherlock Holmes theme pub in Baker Street that looks like the detective’s study, the landlord wears a deerstalker. Various shots of a pub in Covent Garden where Barrow boys from the market mix with “baritones of the Opera House”. Some shots of vegetable deliveries at Covent Garden.

More shots of the cheeky cockney barrow boy selling china to an eager crowd – he throws a pile of china in the air and catches them. Several ‘plants’ in the audience start the bidding – very ‘Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels’!

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Note: this story is a bit of an odd mixture – it appears to use material from other Colour Pictorials: the water scooter is in AMPHIBIOUS WATER SCOOTER in CP 574, it also revisits places previously featured – the Sherlock Holmes pub is in SHERLOCK HOLMES PUB in CP 162. Other sequences may also have been reused or revisited.

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MUSIC OF THE 60’S

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The 1960’s were a time of upheaval in society, fashion, attitudes and especially music. Before 1963, the music of the sixties still reflected the sound, style and beliefs of the previous decade and many of the hit records were by artists who had found mainstream success in the 1950s, like Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Dion, and The Everly Brothers. In 1963 and the years to follow, a number of social influences changed what popular music was and gave birth to the diversity that we experience with music today. The assassination of President Kennedy, the escalation of the war in Vietnam and the forward-progress of the Civil Rights Movement all greatly impacted the mood of American culture and the music began to reflect that change. The “British Invasion” also began around 1963 with the arrival of The Beatles on the music scene and the type of rabid fandom that followed them would change the way people would view and interact with music and musicians forever. In this section we will cover the history of the “British Invasion”, Motown and R&B, Folk and Protest music, and the large amount of variation that emerged in Rock music throughout the sixties.

Popular Music Genres of the 1960’s
British Invasion
Motown/R&B
Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock
Roots Rock and Hard Rock
Folk Rock and Protest Music
Acappella
The Beatles, The Who, The Rolling Stones, Cream, The Yardbirds, Donovan, Manfred Mann, The Kinks, Herman’s Hermits, Tom Jones, Dusty Springfield, The Animals The Marvelettes, The Supremes, Marvin Gaye, The Four Tops, The Drifters, The Temptations, The Miracles, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight & the Pips, The Spinners, Aretha Franklin The Beach Boys, The Ventures, The Champs, The Doors, The Grateful Dead, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Jefferson Airplane, Jan and Dean, The Kingsmen, The Trashmen Janis Joplin, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Steppenwolf, Roy Orbison, Procol Harum, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Animals, The Band, The Troggs Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, The Mamas & the Papas, Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills & Nash, The Lovin’ Spoonful, The Byrds, The Turtles, Gordon Lightfoot, Peter, Paul and Mary The Persuasions & The Heartaches & The Concepts & The Five Jades & The Notations & The Chessmen & The Five Sharks & The Royal Counts & The Zircons & The Five Fashions & The Del Capris & The Shells
British Invasion

The “British Invasion” is the name given to the period of time in the early to mid-1960’s, during which many British rock bands and pop artists found mainstream success in the United States and worldwide. Many of these bands first started by covering American songs and showcasing an American Rock ‘n’ Roll and R&B influence in their sounds. As these bands gained popularity, many of them ventured into new music territory and created their own unique styles. The one band that comes to mind when speaking of the British Invasion is The Beatles, who first broke into the US music scene in 1963, but really became popular in 1964 after appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show. The Beatles dominated worldwide charts from that point in time until they broke up in 1970. The phenomenon that surrounded them was known as Beatlemania and many up and coming music acts emulated their “Liverpool Sound”. The band holds many musical records to this day reflecting album sales and number one singles and they’re music remains some of the most popular of all time. They can be easily described as the most influential group of the 1960’s. Some other notable British Invasion acts include The Rolling Stones, The Animals, The Who, Herman’s Hermits, Tom Jones, and Donovan, some of whom reached comparable success levels to the Beatles but had different influences on music all together.

The Very Best of Herman’s Hermits The Rolling Stones: Hot Rocks 1964 – 1971 The Best of The Animals The Very Best of the Yardbirds
Motown And R&B

The “Motown Sound” and popular R&B music had a major significance in terms of the Civil Rights movement and integration in American society during the sixties. Motown started as a Detroit-based record label in the late fifties and early sixties, but it quickly turned into much more as the acts gained popularity worldwide. Motown records consisted mainly of African-American groups, singers, songwriters and management and their musical and business success proved in breaking down the barriers of segregation and granted African-American performers and musicians a chances to reappropriate much of the success that had been credited to white rock ‘n’ rollers and pop artists who had success in singing “black music” during the previous decade. Two of the most influential groups to come out of the Motown sound were Smokey Robinson and the Miracles and Diana Ross and the Supremes, both of which had as much chart success as any of the rock groups that dominated the airwaves during the sixties. The success of Motown also paved the way for R&B singers and groups who were not necessarily a part of the movement to also enjoy mainstream success. Some other popular Motown and 60’s R&B artists include The Temptations, The Marvelettes, The Four Tops, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, and the Jackson Five.

The Definitive Collection: Smokey Robinson and The Miracles The Supremes Gold The Essentials: The Drifters The Very Best of Aretha Franklin: The 60’s

Rock And Its Subgenres

While rock ‘n’ roll music entered the popular music spectrum in the 1950s, rock music really came into its own in the 1960s. Rock music dominated the popular music scene during the decade and as the genre grew and changed, many diverse and new subgenres emerged, all tied to original rock but each with their own unique style and purpose. These specific subgenres also had varying levels of popularity throughout the decade and many are still popular today. Quite a few rock bands and musicians oscillated between these genres depending on what was popular at the time and used it as a way to experiment with finding their own true sound. Some of the rock subgenres that we will touch upon are surf, psychedelic, roots, and hard rock. It is important to remember that the specific artists we discuss in these various sections often fall into more than one category and it is up for debate amongst their fans what genre they best represent. We have tried our best to categorize these artists and realize there was much cross-over during the decade.

Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock

Surf rock began in Southern California as a type of dance music that was mostly instrumental and it became quite popular in the early to mid sixties, until the British Invasion took over the music scene. The subject matter for surf rock was quite literally surfing, however, that expanded as the genre grew in popularity to songs about girls, cars and general teenage antics. The most influential and popular group to come out of the genre were The Beach Boys, whose vocal harmonies and well-crafted compositions came to define the genre. The Beach Boys were one of the only bands to come out of the genre and sustain their success. Some other important surf rock acts include Jan and Dean, The Ventures and The Champs.

The Beach Boys Greatest Hits Volume 1 The Essential Jefferson Airplane Experience Hendrix: The Best of Jimi Hendrix The Best of The Kingsmen

Psychedelic rock was popular during the latter half of the 1960s and reached its peak at the end of the decade. Psychedelic music was associated with the hippie counter-culture and hallucinogenic drug use and it was created with the intention of “enhancing” the experience of listeners who were using LSD or other mind-altering substances. The lyrics were often strange and made reference to drugs and bands would often use instruments that were not usual, like the sitar, tabla, harpsichord and organ. There was much experimentation in the sound and much of it was influenced by Eastern and Indian music. Psychedelic rock along with Folk rock became two of the most recognizable sounds associated with 1967’s “Summer of Love” phenomenon. Many popular rock bands experimented with this genre, including The Beatles, The Doors, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Jefferson Airplane, Cream, Pink Floyd, and The Yardbirds.

Roots Rock and Hard Rock

Roots rock emerged in the mid to late 1960s as a combination of several genres and subgenres of rock music that were popular at the time. Roots rock combined elements of folk music, blues, country and rock ‘n’ roll. And, the genre was exemplified by its “back to basics” sound. Bob Dylan is thought to have pioneered the genre with the release of his 1966 album Blonde on Blonde that demonstrated what roots rock was to become. Many of the most popular bands of the time joined the “roots revival” and crafted albums of their own that featured and experimented with a roots sound. Some of the bands that created music in the style of this broad genre included The Rolling Stones, The Doors, The Beatles, The Band, and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

The Essential Janis Joplin The Very Best of The Doors The Who: Greatest Hits The Best of The Troggs
Hard rock took the elements of rock ‘n’ roll and made them heavier as the genre formed in the middle of the decade. The sound is characterized by more aggressive tones and delivery. Hard rock vocalists are identified by their higher range and distinct and often raspy voices. The music was influenced heavily by blues rock, garage rock, and rhythm and blues. This style became associated with rebellious youth and an anti-authority demeanor, with a few acts even destroying their own instruments on stage (like The Who). Due to their hard-partying lifestyles, many musicians that were a part of the hard rock scene developed drug and alcohol problems. As a result of these problems, quite a few influential musicians died at a young age from substance abuse or accidents related to substance abuse like Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix. Notable hard rock bands form the 1960s include The Who, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and Steppenwolf.

Folk Rock And Protest Music

Folk rock came onto the scene as a popular genre in the mid-sixties and much of it grew out of the protest movements that were active during those turbulent times. Much of the folk rock and protest movement was born out of the emerging group of singer-songwriters that were influenced by the folk musicians of the 1930s. Bob Dylan became one of the most prominent songwriters of the decade with many popular groups such as The Byrds and Peter, Paul and Mary covering his songs successfully. Dylan even saw success as a solo performer and was recognized by his unusual voice. This genre was characterized by its melodic sound and did not necessarily have to connect to the protest movements at the time, although lyrically a lot of the folk rock contained protest messages.

The Essential Simon and Garfunkel Retrospective The Best of Buffalo Springfield The Essential Bob Dylan The Best of The Mamas and the Papas

Protest music was distinctly different in that it always had a message and was not confined to the sound and style of folk rock. This music was often a reaction to social injustice, cultural changes, and news events. And, in many cases, it brought awareness to the younger generation who would then join the protest, therefore growing the movements. This genre was not necessarily specific to certain artists either, as many mainstream musicians decided to contribute to the cannon with their own feelings. For example, R&B and Soul singer Same Cooke wrote and recorded “A Change Is Gonna Come” in 1963, a song that became an anthem for the Civil Rights movement in America, along with others like Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” and James Brown’s “Say It Loud – I’m Black and I’m Proud” from 1963 and 1968 respectively. Another issue that protest music was used to address was the war in Vietnam and its escalation during the decade. As more and more American troops were being sent to Vietnam with virtually no progress being made, an anti-war movement began to gain steam in the mid-sixties and protest music accompanied it. Some examples of anti-Vietnam songs were Pete Seeger’s “Waist Deep in the Big Muddy from 1967, The Door’s “The Unknown Soldier” from 1968, and Bob Dylan’s “Masters of War” from 1963. Both folk music and protest music were connected to the “hippie” movement at the time and greatly influenced and were influenced by the feelings of freedom, love and peace that characterized the hippies. Some examples of folk rock and protest musicians from the 1960s include Peter, Paul and Mary, Cat Stevens, Buffalo Springfield, Simon and Garfunkel, and Pete Seeger.

Acappella

The Golden Age of Acappella 1963-1973 exploded in urban America along the acappella corridor that stretched from Boston to Philadelphia; a regional sound that captured the heart and minds of young people in the inner cities. The birth of Acappella as a new urban music genre began in New York City in a small record shop called Times Square Records run and operated by Irving “Slim” Rose. The term Acappella was the word that Slim Rose came up with to promote music that was made without music. Recordings made without music was played on the radio by vocal groups, vinyl acappella records were sold in record stores and Acappella Shows drew hundreds of teenagers throughout New Jersey and New York. Thus a new urban sound created a niche in the music industry competing with Motown, British Invasion, folk and many other musical genres. Acappella became the starting point and catalyst for oldies radio programing, reissues of records of the late 40’s and 50’s and the preservation and promotion of rhythm and blues vocal groups. Amid the social and cultural revolution taking place during the 1960’s acappella as a whole rose above ethnic and racial barriers and became a dynamic musical movement in American history. I would like to thank Abraham Santiago who wrote the paragraph about Acappella Music for us If you would like to find out much more about the subject please visit http://www.ricocreative.com/harmonyreview.htm

The Chessmen Album Cover The Heartaches Album Cover Poster For 1st Acappella Review Show in New York

Music Festivals And Their Influence

The sixties was a decade in which music festivals flourished, especially at the end of the decade. The Monterey Pop Festival took place in 1967, and featured some of the most popular rock musicians of the time and was one of the first heavily attended rock festivals. Many of the most popular acts of the decade had their first major American appearance at this festival like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and The Who. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair of 1969 represents one of the most iconic events of the sixties and is thought of as the culmination of the social revolution that took place during those times. It was a free concert that lasted for three days and showcased some of the most iconic musicians of the time. It is thought to have exemplified the popularity of the hippie counter-culture with an estimated 500,000 attendees reveling in free love, peace and rock music.

Top Songs Of The 1960s

Popular songs from the Sixties Decade, arranged by year but in no particular order. Do you remember listening to these songs on the radio?

1960 1961
The Twist- Chubby Checker
It’s Now or Never – Elvis Presley
Georgia On My Mind – Ray Charles
Teen Angel – Mark Dinning
Save the Last Dance For Me – The Drifters
Cathy’s Clown – The Everly Brothers
Walk, Don’t Run – The Ventures
Stand By Me – Ben E. King
Blue Moon – The Marcels
Please Mr. Postman – The Marvelettes
The Wanderer – Dion
Calendar Girl – Neil Sedaka
At Last – Etta James
The Lion Sleeps Tonight – The Tokens
1962 1963
Surfin’ Safari – The Beach Boys
Sherry – The Four Seasons
Return to Sender – Elvis Presley
You’ve Really Got a Hold On Me – The Miracles
Love Me Do – The Beatles
Green Onions – Booker T. & the M.G.s
I Can’t Stop Loving You – Ray Charles
She Loves You – The Beatles
Louie Louie – The Kingsmen
Surfin’ USA – The Beach Boys
It’s My Party – Lesley Gore
Be My Baby – The Ronettes
Hey Paula – Paul & Paula
Ring of Fire – Johnny Cash
1964 1965
Twist and Shout – The Beatles
House of the Rising Sun – The Animals
I Want to Hold Your Hand – The Beatles
Oh, Pretty Woman – Roy Orbison
Where Did Our Love Go? – The Supremes
The Way You Do the Things You Do – The Temptations
You Really Got Me – The Kinks
Like A Rolling Stone – Bob Dylan
(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction – The Rolling Stones
My Generation – The Who
My Girl – The Temptations
The Sound of Silence – Simon & Garfunkel
Mr. Tambourine Man – The Byrds
Help! – The Beatles
1966 1967
Good Vibrations – The Beach Boys
Yellow Submarine/Eleanor Rigby – The Beatles
When A Man Loves A Woman – Percy Sledge
Wild Thing – The Troggs
Uptight (Everything’s Alright) – Stevie Wonder
Monday, Monday – The Mamas and the Papas
These Boots Are Made for Walkin’ – Nancy Sinatra
A Whiter Shade of Pale – Procol Harum
For What It’s Worth – Buffalo Springfield
I’m A Believer – The Monkees
Light My Fire – The Doors
All You Need Is Love – The Beatles
Happy Together – The Turtles
Somebody to Love – Jefferson Airplane
1968 1969
All Along the Watchtower – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay – Otis Redding
Chain of Fools – Aretha Franklin
What A Wonderful World – Louis Armstrong
Piece of My Heart – Big Brother & The Holding Company (Janis Joplin)
Hey Jude – The Beatles
White Room – Cream
Sugar, Sugar – The Archies
In The Year 2525 – Zager and Evans
Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In – The Fifth Dimension
My Way – Frank Sinatra
Whole Lotta Love – Led Zeppelin
Space Oddity – David Bowie
Bad Moon Rising – Creedence Clearwater Revival
Some hits from the 60’s

Apache The Shadows 1960
The Lion Sleeps Tonight The Tokens 1961
Please Mr. Postman The Marvelettes 1961
Return To Sender Elvis Presley 1962
She Loves You The Beatles 1963
I Want To Hold Your Hand The Beatles 1963
Baby Love – The Supremes 1964
The House Of The Rising Sun – The Animals 1964
I’m Into Something Good – Herman’s Hermits 1964
I Got You Babe Sonny & Cher 1965
Wild Thing The Troggs 1966.
Good Vibrations The Beach Boys 1966
These Boots Are Made For Walkin Nancy Sinatra 1966
A Whiter Shade Of Pale Procol Harum 1967
Lily The Pink Scaffold 1968
I Heard It Through The Grapevine Marvin Gaye 1969
Honky Tonk Women The Rolling Stones 1969
Something In The Air Thunderclap Newman 1969
In The Year 2525 Zager & Evans 1969
Bad Moon Rising Creedence Clearwater Revival 1969

The Counterculture

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The Counterculture

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photo Janis Joplin and Big Brother and The Holding Company, Lagunitas, California, 1967. Joplin’s gritty, full-throttle blues-rock style offered a new, liberating image for women in the world of rock music.

Unconventional appearance, music, drugs, communitarian experiments, and sexual liberation were hallmarks of the sixties counterculture, most of whose members were white, middle-class young Americans. To some Americans, these attributes reflected American ideals of free speech, equality, and pursuit of happiness. Other people saw the counterculture as self-indulgent, pointlessly rebellious, unpatriotic, and destructive of America’s moral order.

Authorities banned the psychedelic drug LSD, restricted political gatherings, and tried to enforce bans on what they considered obscenity in books, music, theater, and other media. Parents argued with their children and worried about their safety. Some adults accepted elements of the counterculture, while others became estranged from sons and daughters.

In 1967 Lisa and Tom Law moved to San Francisco, joining thousands of young people flocking to the Haight-Ashbury district. The counterculture lifestyle integrated many of the ideals and indulgences of the time: peace, love, harmony, music, mysticism, and religions outside the Judeo-Christian tradition. Meditation, yoga, and psychedelic drugs were embraced as routes to expanding one’s consciousness.


 

photo The “Freak-Out” show, Los Angeles, 1965. Rock music, colorful light shows, performance artists, and mind-altering drugs characterized the psychedelic dance parties of the sixties held in large halls in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

 

photo A concert in the Panhandle, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo The Haight-Ashbury section of San Francisco, 1967. Students, hippies, musicians, and artists gravitated toward the community’s inexpensive housing and festive atmosphere.

 

 

photo Hell’s Angels motorcycle club members, the Panhandle in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 1967. While some people admired the Hell’s Angels’ audacious style, its members had an uneven and sometimes violent relationship with people in the counterculture.

 

photo Musician in the Panhandle, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo “Summer of Love,” the Panhandle, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo San Francisco, 1967

 

photo Easter Sunday Love-In, Malibu Canyon, California, 1968. This was a celebration of the counterculture movement.

 

photo Suzuki-Roshi, a Buddhist teacher, at the Human Be-In, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, January 14, 1967. Also known as “A Gathering of the Tribes,” the Human Be-In was an effort to promote positive interactions among different groups in society.

 

photo Poet Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In festival, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 1967. Ginsberg, known for his poem Howl, lived and symbolized the bohemian ideals of the Beat Generation of the 1950s and embraced the counterculture of the sixties.

 

It [the counterculture] was an attempt to rebel against the values our parents had pushed on us. We were trying to get back to touching and relating and living.

-Lisa Law, 1985

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photo Monterey International Pop Festival, Monterey, California, 1967. Monterey Pop was one of the first large outdoor rock festivals in the 1960s. Lisa and Tom Law sheltered people who were having difficult psychedelic drug experiences in their “Trip Tent.”

 

photo Timothy Leary, the Harvard-trained psychologist who coined the phrase “Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out,” at the Human Be-In, San Francisco, 1967

Social Activism and the Counterculture

photo Musician Judy Collins performing at anti-Vietnam War rally, Kezar Stadium, San Francisco, 1967

In the 1960s, Lisa Law and thousands of other Americans were moved by the Vietnam War, racial injustice, fear of nuclear annihilation, and the rampant materialism of capitalist society. Many were inspired by leaders such as John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. Small groups staged sit-ins at schools, local lunch counters, and other public facilities. Masses gathered in the nation’s cities to protest what they saw as America’s shortcomings.

Many members of the counterculture saw their own lives as ways to express political and social beliefs. Personal appearance, song lyrics, and the arts were some of the methods used to make both individual and communal statements. Though the specifics of the debates were new, arguments for personal freedom, free speech, and political reform go back to the foundations of American society and the arguments of 19th-century social reformers and founders of new communities.


photo Artist Liberation Front meeting, San Francisco, 1967. This group of artists presented alternatives to “official” art in the form of street fairs that featured live music, mimes, puppet shows, and participatory painting.

 

photo Victor Maymudes, Bob Dylan’s road manager, with a mandala, a symbol of life, Monterey International Pop Festival, 1967. Maymudes carried this mandala made from burnt doll parts to protest the U.S. dropping of napalm in Vietnam.

 

photo Coretta Scott King, anti-Vietnam War rally, Kezar Stadium, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo Paul Krassner (center), editor of the underground publication The Realist, and Harvey Kornspan (far right), a member of the Diggers, the Panhandle, San Francisco, 1967. The Diggers were political activists and performers who distributed free food and clothing and staged theatrical events in the streets of San Francisco.

 

photo Tony Price playing the atomic gongs, El Rancho, New Mexico, 1970. Price made musical instruments out of materials salvaged from the U.S. atomic bomb research facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico.

 

photo Black Panthers, anti-Vietnam War rally, Kezar Stadium, San Francisco, 1967. The newly formed Black Panther Party, frustrated with the status quo, called attention to the purportedly disproportionate numbers of black men bearing the burden of combat in the Vietnam War.

 

photo “General Hershey Bar,” San Francisco, 1967. Antiwar demonstrators used street theater and satire to make political commentary. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey headed the Selective Service (Draft Board) in the Vietnam era.

 

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Communal Living

photo New Buffalo Commune, Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, 1967

 


Some children of the sixties counterculture dropped out and left the cities for the countryside to experiment with utopian lifestyles. Away from urban problems and suburban sameness, they built new lives structured around shared political goals, organic farming, community service, and the longing to live simply with one’s peers.

The Laws lived in several groups of poets, musicians, artists, and idealists. These communities experimented with redefining family structure, the relationship between work and leisure, and the role of their community in the world. Their degrees of success varied, however. Many men and women struggled to balance personal and political freedom with individual responsibilities and commitments, and to develop the farming and building skills needed to sustain the community.


 

photo Caravan, including Lisa and Tom Law’s bus “Silver,” en route to Love-In protest at Los Alamos atomic proving grounds, New Mexico, 1968

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photo Horse trainer Tommy Masters teaching Prince to harness, Truchas, New Mexico, 1970

 

photo Building the communal house at the New Buffalo Commune, Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, 1968. The Laws traveled to New Mexico to have their first child at a facility that practiced natural childbirth. They helped build the New Buffalo commune and decided to move to New Mexico to live among a group of friends.

 

photo Rick Klein and Steve, Jenna, and Carol Hinton, New Buffalo Commune, 1967. Rick Klein and other benefactors sometimes bought the land and founded communes, enabling members to implement their ideals.

 

photo Ben Marcus and Little Joe Gomez of the Peyote Church, Taos Pueblo, New Mexico, 1967. New Buffalo Commune members interpreted the ways of nearby American Indians to model a new life of self-sufficiency and tribal community.

 

photo Lisa Law writing birth announcements and breast-feeding newborn daughter Dhana Pilar, Embudo, New Mexico, 1967. Lisa Law and Steve Hinton made the cradleboard. Photograph by Tom Law

 

photo Miles Hinton, New Buffalo Commune, 1967

 

photo Hog Farm Commune members and friends, Spence Hot Springs, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, 1967

 

photo Musician, New Buffalo Commune, Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, 1967

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photo Ken Kesey, aboard his bus “Further,” Aspen Meadows, New Mexico, 1969. Author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Kesey and his troupe, the Merry Pranksters, celebrated both spontaneous street theater to engage a mainstream audience and the use of psychedelic drugs.

 

photo Indian Sikh Yogi Bhajan teaching Kundalini yoga class, summer solstice, Tesuque Reservation, New Mexico, 1969. As part of a spiritual reawakening, some members of the counterculture rejected drug use in favor of mind and spiritual expansion through yoga, meditation, and chanting.

 

We stopped smoking marijuana and started getting high on breathing. Enough of being potheads. Now we could be healthy, happy and holy.

-Lisa Law, 1987

 

photo Hog Farm leader Wavy Gravy, Llano, New Mexico, 1969. Spontaneity, playfulness, and openness were cherished elements of commune life.

 

photo Commune members Laura and Paul Foster’s wedding at the Hog Farm’s summer solstice celebration, Aspen Meadows, New Mexico, 1968

 

photo Barry, Patty, and Ever McGuire with Don and Cindy Gallard watching the sunset, New Mexico, 1967. Barry McGuire, formerly of the New Christy Minstrels, recorded the hit protest song “Eve of Destruction.”

 

photo Pilar Law and yoga altar at New Buffalo Commune, 1969

 

Fifteen of us lived together, one room per family, and a kitchen and a communal room. I can’t say that I enjoyed that kind of living. It always seemed that women ended up doing a lot more chores than the men. The men played music, smoked the herb, chopped wood and repaired vehicles. The lack of privacy was a test.

-Lisa Law, 1987

 

photo Lisa and Tom Law with children Solar Sat and Dhana Pilar on Law farm, Truchas, New Mexico, 1970. Seeking more independence and privacy, the Laws moved into their own house, farmed, and raised animals.

 

photo Planting first garden on Law farm, Truchas, New Mexico, 1970

 

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Organizing Woodstock

photo Hog Farm members in free kitchen, Woodstock, 1969

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair made history. It was, depending on one’s point of view, four days of generosity, peace, great music, liberation, and expanding consciousness, or four days of self-indulgence, noise, promiscuity, and illegal drug use.

In 1969, Lisa Law and eighty-five experienced commune organizers were asked to assist with the medical tents, security, food services, stage activities, and information booths at a music festival near Woodstock, a little town in upstate New York. Seven months pregnant, with a toddler in hand, Law managed to take photographs of the festival, help run a free kitchen, and film an hour of home movies. She captured images of an event that remains one of the most powerful symbols of the decade.

Woodstock enabled thousands of middle-class young people to experience the communal spirit. For the first time, these young people felt empowered by their numbers. Politicians and manufacturers in the music and clothing industries took note of the potential of a growing youth market.


photo Hog Farmers arrival at John F. Kennedy Airport en route to the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, Woodstock, New York, 1969. The Laws and others in the counterculture saw music festivals as “purveyors of consciousness and peace.”

 

photo The musical group Quill on stage, Woodstock, 1969

 

photo Woodstock Music and Art Fair, Woodstock, New York, 1969

Afterword

photo Dennis Hopper, director and co-star of the film Easy Rider, New Mexico, 1970. The New Buffalo Commune served as a model for Hollywood depictions of communal living.

 


Just as increasing numbers of people were coming to the communes looking for answers, the Laws’ final back-to-the-land experiment at Truchas, New Mexico, was faltering. In 1976, Lisa Law moved to Santa Fe, where she eventually made her living as a photographer.

The counterculture movement, greeted with enormous publicity and popular interest, contributed to changes in American culture. A willingness to challenge authority, greater social tolerance, the sense that politics is personal, environmental awareness, and changes in attitudes about gender roles, marriage, and child rearing are legacies of the era.

Today Lisa Law lives by the Rio Grande in northern New Mexico in a solar-powered house. Her tepee is pitched beside her organic garden. Law continues to use her camera to document social issues, including efforts to end nuclear arms testing, the struggles of the young and elderly of New Mexico, and issues of Native American sovereignty.


 

photo Janis Joplin and Tommy Masters at Law farm, Truchas, New Mexico, 1970. In 1970, Joplin and fellow musician Jimi Hendrix died of drug and alcohol abuse.

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The Hippie Culture 1960’s

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Hippie Culture

Hallie Israel and Molly Clark

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Overview
Hippies represent the counterculture of the 1960’s. Their lifestyle is usually associated with rock music, hallucinogenic drugs, and long, flowy hair and clothing. They were seen by some as disrespectful and dirty and a disgrace to society, but to many they are a reminder of a more peaceful, carefree part of America’s history. Hippies were strongly against violence and supported liberal policies and freedom of personal expression, their lifestyles centering around the concepts of peace, freedom, and harmony for all people.

Generally, counterculture is used to describe the culture of a group of people whose morals, values, core ideals, and lifestyle differs, contradicts, or is polar to those of mainstream society at the time. Culturally, it is often described as a social equivalent to extremely liberal politics and radicalism.
Who
The hippies of the 1960’s were the teenagers of the baby boom generation, so they were found in large numbers. They were generally Caucasian, middle-class, white teenagers between the ages of 15-25 who were tired of the restrictions put on them by society and their conservative parents. Most lived in urban areas or came from an urban background. They were tired of conforming and began to express themselves in a radical way. Hippies didn’t care about money and worked as little as possible. Instead, many of them shared what they had and lived together in large communes, while others simply lived in poverty by choice. They had very liberal political views and strongly protested the government and the war. The lifestyle of a hippie centered around non-conformity, because hippie culture is all about embracing who you really are and rejecting the need to conform to their society or authorities. Some of the main external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdDJjB3t0ePnLaH4oj-aySwHvv-XP-d_rPMgZkh61Nzhbu6E5vIQideas of hippie culture are listed below:
-Do not conform to society.
-Materialism is wrong.
-Technology is unnecessary and oftentimes dehumanizing.
-Be your own person, not who anyone else wants you to be.
Although each hippie embraced his or her own ideals as a part of their new culture, the stereotypical hippie:
-Used hallucinogenic drugs.
-Practiced or were interested in Eastern Religions
-Had very liberal political views.
-Peace and love instead of hate and war.
-Expressed extreme tolerance and on the subject of sexuality and sex.
-Live life to the fullest
-Embrace the peace and love expressed by music, as well as the unification it creates among people, usually rock and roll.

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What
The culture of hippies was unlike anything the people of the United States had ever seen before. They focused their lives around the ideas of peace, love, freedom, and living life to the fullest. To heighten their experiences spiritually and physically, many hippies used hallucinogenic drugs, like LSD. They listened to rock music and encouraged artistic expression in all different mediums. They lived peaceful lives and believed that living together in harmony was possible and necessary. Because of this, they strongly opposed violence, in particular, the Vietnam War. They believed that the government was the root of this and many other evils in society at the time. Due to this belief in particular, many officials and authorities at the time felt threatened by the prescence and radical ideas expressed by hippie culture and saw them as a danger to society, instead of a peaceful force who disagreed with their way of life. Still however, many authorities at the time felt threatened by the presence and radical ideas expressed by hippie culture.
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The hippie movement originated in the United States and was seen throughout the country, later spreading through other parts of the world. The main epicenters of it, however, were in the Haight Ashbury district of San Francisco and in the East Village of New York City, which were home to two of the largest hippie communities that ever existed. As the 1960’s progressed, the trend spread to Canada and eventually to many large cities in Western Europe, especially London, Amsterdam, Paris, Berlin and Rome.Although counterculture was often found in urban areas and large cities because of its ability to spread quickly through these densely-populated areas, many also argue that the hippie movement began on college campuses, with liberal students who rejected the social privilege they had been born with because they didn’t agree with the conservative values and political ideals which accompanied it. The hippie movement also spread through cafes and bars, which increasingly became centers of social gathering at the time.

When
The hippie movement first became popular in the 1960’s, with a recognizable decline in the hippie counterculture movement occurring in the late 1970’s due to the aging of the hippie population as well as the end of the Vietnam War.

Why
The hippie counterculture was a social movement caused by many issues and changes going on in the United States during the 1960’s. One important cause was the Vietnam War. These young men and women had friends and brothers being drafted and killed in Vietnam and were looking to make their anti-war views heard, hoping that they could bring peace and harmony to the world in a time of such great violence and atrocity. Another factor influencing hippie counterculture was the increasing popularity of rock and roll music. Rock and roll was a groundbreaking new type of art that encouraged peaceful expression, while also bringing people together and uniting them. The unity of rock music connected many hippies and allowed them to identify and relate with one another through a means that they could all relate to, share, and understand. Many hippies shared their culture through musical concerts and gathering, the most famous of which are Woodstock and the Summer of Love. Also influencing the liberal ideas of hippie culture was a greater access to birth control, which allowed for a women to control whether or not she wanted to get pregnant. This freedom contributed to the liberal sexual ideas of the time, because it eliminated a major consequence of sex and enabled women to attain greater control over their lives without necessarily embracing the safety of conservative values.
Additionally, hippies also had access to mind-altering drugs (hallucinogens) at the time, which greatly contributed to their lifestyle as use of the drugs became more accepted and a part of mainstream culture. Underground newspapers, new types of art (such as op art), rock music, and movies helped to define hippie counterculture and communicate the ideas of these non-conforming liberals.
In the 1960’s hippie counterculture began as the natural reaction for liberals who opposed the culture and conservative society of the 1950’s, the principles of the Cold War, and the violence of the Vietnam War. This rebelliousness of older, conservative lifestyles and values led to the hippie movement in the 60’s as people tried to oppose societal restrictions and ideals forced onto them by the previous generation. Hippie counterculture was a way for these liberals to express their views for peace, freedom, and non-conformity, creating a new culture of own in order to live life by their own ideals and have their voices heard and opinions respected as a group.

see the video below

 http://youtu.be/TC3LryTjYqw

Later in the 60’s factors influencing counterculture were tensions between the average citizen and all symbols of authority. There were also many tensions on key issues such as civil rights, womens’ rights, abortion, gay rights, and more. An issue which affected hippie culture was also the atrocities of the Vietnam War, which hippies strongly opposed. Hippies especially opposed the draft into the Vietnam War, believing that the war was wrong and that innocent Americans shouldn’t be forced to fight if doing so was against their moral principles. The liberal work of activists such as Martin Luther King Junior also spurred the hippie movement because it inspired people to stand up for what they believed in and be free to speak their mind and be themselves. Additionally, many also say that the hippie movement was influenced by the assassination of John F. Kennedy, a popular president whose tragic death fueled the political and social unrest of the time.

Legacy
The hippie movement and counterculture began to decline in the late 70’s, especially after the hippie generation grew older and US involvement in the Vietnam War ended, as well as the draft. However, the spirit of hippie culture has largely influenced the world and society today, because of the new ideas it brought to the world and the freedoms it encouraged.

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Works CitedTina Loo “hippies” The Oxford Companion to Canadian History. Ed. Gerald Hallowell. Oxford University Press, 2004. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. Infohio – NOACSC. 16 May 2011″youth movement (1960s).” American History. ABC-CLIO, 2011. Web. 13 May 2011.”Hippies and the Counterculture, 1960-1969 (Overview).” American History.
ABC-CLIO, 2011. Web. 13 May 2011.”Hippies and the Counterculture, 1960-1969 (Activity).” American History.
ABC-CLIO, 2011. Web. 13 May 2011.Goodwin, Susan and Becky Bradley . “1960-1969.” American Cultural History. Lone Star
College-Kingwood Library, 1999. Web. 7 Feb. 2011Redmond, Derek. Two Hippies at the Woodstock Festival. Aug. 1969. Wikipedia.
N.p., 31 July 2005. Web. 18 May 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
File:Woodstock_redmond_hair.JPG>.Hippie couple. N.d. Worldwide Hippies. N.p., 18 Jan. 2010. Web. 19 May 2011.
<http://www.worldwidehippies.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/hippies1.jpg>.Epinosa, Eden. Hippie Life. YouTube.com. N.p., 2009. Web. 19 May 2011.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TC3LryTjYqw>. Published to the web by
the YouTube user lovechild909.

The suburb that changed the world

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The suburb that changed the world

In the 1980s, Silicon Valley was populated by lefties and hippies who dreamed of a computer revoluti

 

In Sofia Coppola’s 2006 film of the life of Marie Antoinette, there is a scene where an entourage of palace jeunes filles sweeps through a ball at which the set and costumes are period, but the music and manners are straight out of a modern dance club. The proposition seems to be that an elite few were able to put a toe into the future to experience what is ordinary today.

Something like that went on in the Silicon Valley I knew in the 1980s. The debates and dilemmas that occupy a generation today appeared in miniature before there was an internet. We took our anticipation of the internet deadly seriously, to the point where it seemed already real. Thus I have experienced the internet age twice.

Experiencing the internet in reality is different – and even bizarre, because although it seemed reasonable to expect the thing to come about, it is still uncanny that the reasoning was right. It feels as though we got away with something we shouldn’t have done.

The internet arrived from two directions, one top-down and the other bottom-up. Initially computers and computer networking were both developed in military and government labs. The way you experienced computation from the 1960s often reflected this point of origin, with early computer companies such as IBM exuding a grey, regimented stoniness in order to appear seductive to their patrons.

In the 1970s, a small market emerged for hobbyist computers. You could build your own little box with blinking lights that you could program by flipping lines of switches on the front panel. That’s all you could do at first, but oh, the ecstasy to be able to touch your own computer, if you had an inkling of where it all could lead.

A culture grew up around these hobbyist machines centred in Silicon Valley, and spawned the personal computer market – with Microsoft launching in 1975 and Apple in 1976. The centre of gravity split: the stony grey opposite delirious hippies and faux revolutionaries.

The turbulent confluence between top-down and bottom-up continues to this day. Internet start-ups sprout like garage bands. Most die, but a few explode into national-scale empires, as in the case of Facebook. Dreary top-down institutions such as wireless carriers maintain their lofty entitlements, though occasionally they drain away, like the old music business. I used to be partisan, favouring the bottom-up approach, but now I appreciate the balance of tides, because all kinds of power should be checked.

My first encounter with Silicon Valley was at the end of my teens, which was also the end of the 1970s. The world seemed carved into zones according to the degree of magic available. The highest magic was found in nexuses of hippie exuberance such as the beach town of Santa Cruz, California, where pearlescent rainbows covered everything and even the most mediocre musicians could effortlessly invent melodies superior to almost anything heard since. Young, creative people with any sense of ambition tended to be drawn to these places like weight to gravity, but by the time I arrived the magic was receding.

The overwhelming explanation we held of our time and place was that we had been born too late to experience the one true orgasm of meaning, the 1960s. Young people who felt jilted by life because of a slight error in timing found solace in a twisted calculus of punk humour. An alternative to the Santa Cruz-type El Dorados of bohemia were the zones of brazen, barren reality: remote and violent desert towns, impoverished villages in Mexico, or tenements in New York City.

The most deficient places – condemned by hippies and punks alike – were the suburbs, the places of the conventional parent: an artificial world ruled by Disney and McDonald’s.

I did not arrive at this suspect ontology naturally, having grown up in a way that was both gritty and bohemian. My father and I couldn’t afford a home at one point, when I was 11, so we lived in tents on cheap land while building a crazed, geometric, spaceship-like house in a rough corner of southern New Mexico. I adapted to the flight from the suburbs because this seemed the ticket into the social world of my peers in that era. I well remember how my heart sank when I later realised that eco­nomic circumstances left me no choice but to force my old jalopy over the mountain pass that insulated dewy, arousing Santa Cruz from soul-killing, blandifying Silicon Valley, which was situated in, of all places, a suburb.

The mountain ridge that separates Silicon Valley and the town of Palo Alto from the ocean keeps out the famed fog of northern California in the summer. This has always made it an elite getaway from San Francisco, but to me Silicon Valley’s light looked incomplete and made me feel remote and depressed – so close to the ocean, but without its full light.

I despaired at the time that I had failed to earn enough to be able to remain at the fulcrum of hippie truth, but I was to learn, slowly, that I was moving from one narcissistic category war to another. Instead of hippies v suburbs, I enlisted in the turf war between nerds and – well, the opposite doesn’t have a name. A sort of muggle: the fool who doesn’t realise that he lives in a cocoon and serves only as a battery to power the action; a person who fails to understand that the world is an information system, and that life is programming.

Having moved from one kind of nonsense to another eventually helped me learn to be sceptical of both.

Palo Alto was nicknamed “Shallow Alto” by the hippie hackers, who felt that living there was a sell-out, a sign of failure. And yet, one by one, we gave in and entered an alternate, infinitely better-funded elite club. The place was much more than a suburb, naturally. A little more than a century earlier, there had been a Native American culture there, but it was murdered and erased, so little more can be said. Layers of mutually indifferent histories were then overlaid on to this, awaiting the final washout by Silicon Valley culture.

A trace of the Spanish colonial period remained in the odd old adobe mansion; evidence of black immigration from earlier in the 20th century lay in the shocking, violent twin to Palo Alto, East Palo Alto; fruit orchards swept to the horizon in some directions and utilitarian grids of simple wooden buildings testified to the well-ordered conception of railroad towns and military bases.

But the hackers would take over. What a strange society nerds make. In 1996 Oliver Sacks published a book called The Island of the Colour-blind, about a place where so many people cannot see colour that it becomes the norm. In the same way, the society of computer nerds is nerdy not in comparison to a centre, but as a centre. Our nerdy world, which from an outsider’s perspective might seem slightly askew, even tilted a touch into Asperger’s syndrome, was and is our centre. The rest of the world seemed hysterical, irrational and confused by the surface aesthetics of things, somehow failing to grasp the numerical, causal, core truth underpinning events and the problem-solving purpose of reality.

I kept my concerns about the light of Palo Alto to myself and “passed”, which was, happily, not hard for me. Certain kinds of math and programming come on strongest when you’re young, and I could program the hell out of a computer in those days. Then and now, technical credibility is the ultimate membership card in Silicon Valley, and it is one of the reasons I still love the place. The billionaire company starters – and I won’t name names because it’s all of them – still get a little insecure and feel a need to preen when they’re around top hackers.

The overlap between the late stages of hippie bohemia and the early incarnations of Silicon Valley was often endearing. There was a sense of justice in the way that males who had been at the bottom of the social ladder in high school were on track to run the world. Greasy cottages with futons on the floor, with dustings of pot and cookie crumbles rubbed into cheap oriental rugs, a carnage of forgotten dirty clothes in the corner, empty refrigerators and tangles of thick grey cables leading to the huge computer monitors and the hot metal cabinets where the silicon chips crunched. Asymmetrical, patchy beards, shirts part tucked, prescriptions for glasses powerful enough to find life on a distant planet. This was the new model of hippie nerd, supplanting the ascetic fellow with the pocket protector.

There were precious few girl nerds at the time. There was one who programmed a hit arcade game called Centipede for the first video game company, Atari, and a few others. There were, however, extraordinary female figures who served as the impresarios of social networking before there was an internet. It still seems wrong to name them, because it isn’t clear if I would be talking about their private lives or their public contributions: I don’t know how to draw a line.

These irresistible creatures would sometimes date alpha nerds, but mostly brought the act of socialising into a society where it probably would not have occurred otherwise. A handful of them had an extraordinary, often unpaid degree of influence over what research was done, which companies came to be, who worked at them and what products were developed.

That they are usually undescribed in histories of Silicon Valley is just another instance of what a fiction history can be. The advent of social networking software and oceans of digital memories of bits exchanged between people has only shifted the type of fiction we accept, not the degree of infidelity.

In retrospect, I cringe to think how naive and messianic the tech scene became amid all the post-1960s idealism. The two poles of San Francisco Bay Area 1960s culture – psychedelic hippies and leftist revolutionaries – became the poles of early computer culture.

In 1974, the philosopher Ted Nelson, the first person to propose and describe the programming of something like the web, published a large-format book composed of montages of nearly indecipherable small-print snippets flung in all directions, called Computer Lib/Dream Machines. If you turned the book one way, it was what Che Guevara would have been reading in the jungle if he had been a computer nerd. Flip it upside down, and you had a hippie-wow book with visions of crazy, far-out computation.

In fact, the very first description of the internet in any detail was probably E M Forster’s The Machine Stops from 1909, decades before computers existed: “People never touched one another. The custom had become obsolete, owing to the Machine.” It might still be the most accurate description. How Forster did it remains a mystery. Later, in the 1940s, the engineer Vannevar Bush wrote “As We May Think”, an essay imagining a utilitarian experience with a computer and internet of the future. Bush’s essay is often cited as a point of origin, and he even delved a little into how it might work, using such pre-digital components as microfilm.

But Ted Nelson was the first person, to my knowledge, to describe how you could implement new kinds of media in digital form, share them and collaborate. Ted was working so early – from 1960 onwards – that he couldn’t invoke basic notions such as storing images, and not just text, because computer graphics had not been described yet. (The computer scientist Ivan Sutherland saw to that shortly.)

Ted was a talker, a character, a Kerouac. He was more writer than hacker, and didn’t always fit into the nerd milieu. Thin, lanky, with a sharp chin and always a smile, he looked good. He came from Hollywood parents and was determined to be an outsider because, in the ethics of the times, only the outsiders were “where it’s at”. He succeeded tragically, in that he is not as well known as he ought to be, and it’s a great shame he was not better able to influence digital architecture directly. He lives today on a houseboat in Sausalito, California, one of the other luminous, numinous nodes of Bay Area geo-mythology.

The hippest thing in the late 1970s and early 1980s was to form a commune, or even a cult. I remember one around the Haight-Ashbury neighbourhood of San Francisco which fashioned itself as the Free Print Shop. Members printed lovely posters for “movement” events in the spectral, inebriated, neo-Victorian visual style of the time. (How strange it was to hear someone recommended as “part of the movement”. This honorary title meant nothing beyond aesthetic sympathy, but there was an infantile gravity to the word “movement”, as though our conspiracies were consequential. They never were, except when computers were involved, in which case they were more consequential than almost any others in history.)

The Free Print Shop made money doing odd jobs, it included women and it enacted a formal process for members to request sex with one another through intermediaries. This was the sort of thing that seemed the way of the future and beckoned to computer nerds: an algorithm leading reliably to sex! I remember how reverently dignitaries from the Free Print Shop were welcomed at a meeting of the Homebrew Club at Stanford and other such venues where computer hobbyists shared their creations.

Ted had a band of followers or collaborators; it would have been uncool to specify what they were. They sometimes lived in a house here or there, or vagabonded about. They broke up and reconciled repeatedly, and were perpetually on the verge of presenting the ultimate software project, Xanadu, in some formulation that would have been remembered as the first implementation of the internet. Xanadu was a manifesto that never quite manifested.

If my tone has not been consistently reverent, please know that I am not cynical when it comes to my praise of Ted Nelson’s ideas. As the first person on the scene, he benefited from an uncluttered view. Our huge collective task in finding the best future for the internet will probably turn out to be like finding our way back to where Ted was at the start.

In his conception, each person would be a free agent in a universal online market. Instead of separate stores of the kind run by Apple or Amazon, there would be one universal store, and everyone would be a first-class citizen, both buyer and seller. You wouldn’t have to keep separate passwords or accounts for different online stores. That’s a pain, and it guarantees that there can’t be too many stores, thereby re-creating the kind of centralisation that shouldn’t be inherited from physical reality.

This is an example of how thinking in terms of a network can strain intuition. It might seem as though having only one store would reduce diversity, yet it would increase it. When culture is privatised, as has happened recently online, you end up with a few giant players – the Googles and Amazons. It’s better to put up with the rancour and pain of a single community, of some form of democracy, than to live in a world overseen by a few forces you hope will be benevolent. The stress of accommodation opens cracks from which brilliance emerges.

Ah, there it is – my idealism, still in your face after all these years. Silicon Valley remains idealistic, if sometimes narcissistic. We refer to uprisings in the Middle East as “Facebook revolutions” as if it’s all about us. And yet, look. We code and scheme through the night, and then genuinely change the whole world within a few short years, over and over again. What other bunch of oddballs can say that?

Much has changed. Silicon Valley now belongs to the world. In a typical nerd cabal you will find recently arrived Indians, Chinese, Brits, Israelis and Russians. What is strangest in the recent waves of young arrivals in Silicon Valley is that they tend no longer to be downtrodden geniuses rejected in the playing of social status games, but sterling alpha males. Legions of perfect specimens seem to have grown up in manicured childhoods, nothing scrappy about them. When children started to be raised perfectly in the 1990s, chauffeured from one play date to the next, I wondered what world they would want as adults. Socialism? Facebook and similar designs seem to me continuations of the artificial order we gave children during the boom years.

Now we are entering a period of diminishing middle classes and economic dimming. What will Silicon make of this? Poorly conceived computer networks played central roles in many of our more recent troubles, particularly the 2008 financial crisis. Such tactics as high-frequency trading just pluck money out of the system using pure computation and without giving anything back.

Can we adjust the world, make it happier, merely by reprogramming computers? Perhaps. We continue to twiddle with human patterns from our weird suburb. Maybe, if we are able to echo the ancient idealism of those early days, we will do some good as the software grows.

Jaron Lanier is the author of “You Are Not a Gadget: a Manifesto” (Penguin, £9.99)

WHAT DOES BEING SQUARE MEAN?

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Hip to be square?

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If you’ve ever heard of someone being called a square, you probably realize it has nothing to do with having four corners. So what does being square mean? The term, most frequently used during the 1940s through the 1960s, has a long history of use.

What is being square?

Beginning with the jazz-loving hipsters of the 1940s, and used by the counterculture movements of almost every generation since, the act of being square refers to thinking inside the box and conforming to societal norms. The term was used by beatniks, hippies, yippies and other cultural movements to oppose more conservative and conventional world views.

To call someone a square usually has negative connotations, and it is generally the same as saying the person is no fun, a Goody Two-shoes or a party pooper.

Hip to be square

Interestingly, there are some positive connotations to the term “square.” It is sometimes used to refer to something being good and honest, such as in “fair and square” or “a square deal.’

The Freemasons use the square as one of their major symbols, calling it an emblem of virtue in which they must “square their actions by the square of virtue with all mankind.’ This is another case of square referring to something being fair and upstanding.

In the 1980s, many of those who had opposed mainstream society as hippies in the 1960s found themselves fitting into the roles they previously despised and becoming a comfortable part of the middle class. This change is reflected in the song “Hip to Be Square,’ by Huey Lewis and the News, in which the band declares “Now I’m playing it real straight, and yes I cut my hair’ and points out that many of those who were the most antiauthority went on to become the most square and how that was nothing to be ashamed of.

Examples of use

The term “square” has had many well-known uses in music and popular culture.

In “Jailhouse Rock,’ Elvis Presley sings: “The warden said, Hey buddy, don’t you be no square / If you can’t find a partner, use a wooden chair.’

One of the earliest popular uses of the term is in Harry Gibson’s 1946 song “What’s His Story?” which includes the lyrics “Saint Peter said, You square, your place is right down there / and the square said, What’s his story?’

In the film Pulp Fiction, the character Mia Wallace draws a box in the air with her finger and calls Vincent Vega a square after he refuses to go along with her plans.

Whether you think it’s hip to be square or you would rather think outside the box, the term “square” has a colorful history, and it has slightly different meanings to different people. Its use has declined over recent years, but why not try to organize a revival by using the term with your family and friends?

If you’ve ever heard of someone being called a square, you probably realize it has nothing to do with having four corners. So what does being square mean? The term, most frequently used during the #1940s through the #1960s, has a long history of use.

What is being square?

Beginning with the jazz-loving hipsters of the 1940s, and used by the counterculture movements of almost every generation since, the act of being square refers to thinking inside the box and conforming to societal norms. The term was used by beatniks, hippies, yippies and other cultural movements to oppose more conservative and conventional world views.

To call someone a square usually has negative connotations, and it is generally the same as saying the person is no fun, a Goody Two-shoes or a party pooper.

Hip to be square

200 (41)

Interestingly, there are some positive connotations to the term “square.” It is sometimes used to refer to something being good and honest, such as in “fair and #square” or “a square deal.’

The #Freemasons use the square as one of their major symbols, calling it an emblem of virtue in which they must “square their actions by the square of virtue with all mankind.’ This is another case of square referring to something being fair and upstanding.

In the 1980s, many of those who had opposed mainstream society as hippies in the 1960s found themselves fitting into the roles they previously despised and becoming a comfortable part of the middle class. This change is reflected in the song “Hip to Be Square,’ by Huey Lewis and the News, in which the band declares “Now I’m playing it real straight, and yes I cut my hair’ and points out that many of those who were the most antiauthority went on to become the most square and how that was nothing to be ashamed of.

Examples of use

The term “square” has had many well-known uses in music and popular culture.

In “Jailhouse Rock,’ Elvis Presley sings: “The warden said, Hey buddy, don’t you be no square / If you can’t find a partner, use a wooden chair.’

One of the earliest popular uses of the term is in Harry Gibson’s 1946 song “What’s His Story?” which includes the lyrics “Saint Peter said, You square, your place is right down there / and the square said, What’s his story?’

In the film Pulp Fiction, the character Mia Wallace draws a box in the air with her finger and calls Vincent Vega a square after he refuses to go along with her plans.

Whether you think it’s hip to be square or you would rather think outside the box, the term “square” has a colorful history, and it has slightly different meanings to different people. Its use has declined over recent years, but why not try to organize a revival by using the term with your family and friends?

BEATNIK HIWAY – Hippie Hill San Francisco Ca.

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#Hippie Hill

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 #the Hippie Hill annual pot festival April 20th 2014

Published on Apr 22, 2014

Every year on April 20th, THOUSANDS gather at Golden Gate Park for the Hippie Hill 4/20 event. If you have never attended, this is a minute glimpse of what you can expect!

 

From the rhythmic beat of hand drummers to the questionable smoke signal swirls, you truly have no idea what you’ll discover on Hippie Hill. Depending on whose lens you choose to view the atmosphere of the infamous meadow and sloping hill that notoriously received its name from being a gathering spot during the 1960s, it’s a fascinating fixture in Golden Gate Park. When the field isn’t ultra- packed, Hippie Hill is an interesting place to enjoy the sights and sounds of a sunny day at the park.

Things to Do

Sprawled out with a book across the spacious open field, catching the rejuvenating rays of the sun, or enjoying a toss of the Frisbee, the colorful cast of characters at Hippie Hill is never-ending. People-watching is definitely a favorite pastime of Hippie Hill visitors. For some, there is something somewhat magical about visiting a place that at one time attracted the likes of Janis Joplin and the Grateful Dead.

Adults enjoy bringing lawn chairs, blankets, picnic lunches, canopies, and other accessories that helps usher in a lazy day. On the weekends, drum circles are commonplace. Perhaps you can teach an old or new dog a few tricks, as many visitors bring their faithful companion along to the Hill. However, keep in mind that this is probably not the best place for an outing with the youngsters.

Location

Hippie Hill is found on the eastern end of Golden Gate Park. Head for the hill located in between the Conservatory of Flowers and Haight Street.

#Marijuana and Cannabis News

Hippie Hill, Golden Gate Park, 4/20: Toke Was There [Photos]
By Steve Elliott ~alapoet~ in Culture
Monday, April 23, 2012 at 10:02 pm
All photos by Jack Rikess for Toke of the Town
The climactic moment: 4:20 p.m. on Hippie Hill in Golden Gate Park, April 20, 2012

By Jack Rikess

Toke of the Town
Northern California Correspondent
Maybe there’s no greater metaphor for what’s going on with marijuana in 2012 than the proceedings that took place with Friday’s 4/20 celebration in Golden Gate Park. To recognize marijuana or not, that is my question.
Last Wednesday I called the director of Golden Gate Park, wishing to speak to him about the annual 4/20 festivities and if the Park plans to do anything different on that day, e.g. add more trashcans, porta-potties, security, etc…
I wasn’t allowed to speak to the director because all media questions are to be routed through the Park’s media person. When I asked if they were prepared for this Friday’s yearly gathering she explained that because there weren’t any permits or paperwork submitted, she didn’t know anything about the event.
I was thinking, is this the new “don’t ask, don’t tell?”

I didn’t want to push the subject, be accused of single-handedly ruining the day for everyone else by making the City acknowledge that every April 20, a large portion of our state descends upon Golden Gate Park for the purpose of getting as high as possible.
I didn’t know if I wanted to see that proclamation put forth. Maybe it is better that 4/20 is kept unofficial and hasn’t been forced to go the corporate route that is ruining the Burning Man vision.
So, what I did is celebrate April 20th the best I could…
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Golden Gate Park at 6:30 a.m.: I have the brilliant idea of doing before and after shots of the park before the herds of heads roll out their blankets and bongs
 
6:30 am: I have the brilliant idea of doing before and after shots of Golden Gate Park before the herds of heads roll out their blankets and bongs. I know that for the past week, travelers from all over the world have been sleeping in the park, waiting for the Stoner’s Holiday to commence. With that said, I wasn’t expecting the 100 or so people, already gathered on Hippie Hill cleaning their pipes, internally and externally, to be getting prepared so early in the morning.
After a week of clouds and shadows, the fog never had a chance against the early morning blazing sun; the Weather Gods once more shining down upon the hippies they love. It could be a beautiful day.
Weird Note: Usually on April 20th, from all directions of the compass, folks of all stripes and garb typically are heading to Golden Gate Park for the big pot party. There is hardly anyone making their way on the sidewalks and beaten paths that head to the park. Foot traffic is thin. Could this mean a low attendance? Like the dream is over?
Attendance at this point: 200-300 people.
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10:30 a.m.: The unofficial vendors start to arrive; a small village is being formed
10:30 am: The unofficial vendors start to arrive. First up are blankets full of munchies. Not the exotic or flamboyant, more like your Snickers and Doritos’s, with small bottles of Tropicana. I ask the ladies setting up if they did their research and if they determined that this is the food that pot heads love? “Absolutely, they’re people here bar-b-queuing hot dogs and hamburgers, but this is the easiest and this is what people want,” the woman smiles like a true marketing head.
I run into two pure 4/20 characters. One is offering a raffle for home-made decoupage pot-friendly hats. The raffle tickets are going for 2 bucks a piece. The gentleman encourages me to buy a ticket early before they sell out. He starts to argue with me that for a two dollar ticket, I can get a hat worth a $100.00. I say maybe I’ll come back. The problem is, he has a junk-yard megaphone and is berating me loudly as I walk away for not purchasing his ticket. I can hear his logic continue about the value of the lottery system and how this country was built on such a system as I slowly move away.
As I try not to listen to my short-comings as a non-consumer, another fellow shows me a laminated ticket from the original Woodstock in 1969. He says that he’ll be giving the ticket away today. To me, this is much more interesting than the Dr. Seuss pot leaf hat from the raffle guy.
I ask him how much would he take for the ticket now? “No, man, I can’t sell Woodstock, or the memories. This needs to be given away.”
I inquire, “How are you going to give it away?”
“I’m not sure man. But it’s going to be stupendous!”
It’s a little after eleven a.m. and there’s no army of heads trotting like lemmings to the park like year’s past. I’m starting to get skeptical. Has the world changed this much because of the Federal busts of this past year?  Tents and make-shift shelters are being erected around the crown of Hippie Hill and out on the grounds. A small village is being formed.
Attendance at this point: 300-400 people
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1 p.m.: The streams of people are starting to follow the tentative blue smoke beginning to rise fromn the park
1 pm: Okay, this is more like it. The streams of people are starting to follow the tentative blue smoke beginning to rise from the park like Yogi Bear to Huckleberry pie. Drums circles are magnetically attracting other drummers. Guitars are being played. And the surest sign that this gorgeous sunny day is beginning to transform to its core value: Young hippie chicks in halters and long, cotton dresses are twirling as the natural rhythms and beats of the day begin to overtake one of the country’s most famous parks.
If the unofficial vendors had a meeting and brainstormed on what would sell the best on 4/20, I believe the answer to that question had to be edibles. By early afternoon, the pathway to Hippie Hill is strewn with pans and sheets and shoe-boxes filled with anything that could be infused with marijuana. Of course brownies and Rice-Crispy treats are the best sellers but the teas and the grilled-cheese sammys are major crowd pleasers. There has to be over hundred people selling edibles throughout the grounds.
Attendance at this point: 500-600 people.
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3 p.m.: It is now wall-to-wall stoners
3 pm: I left the park briefly and returned. It is now wall to wall stoners. The cops have set up a gauntlet at the main entrance to the park. Anyone with glass bottles, coolers, sound systems, cabanas, porters carrying luggage, and being outright uncool, is being pulled from the oncoming herd. This is new. Usually the police form a perimeter around the hippie show and sit back and chill, unless needed. Today, they’re showing that they’ve stepped up their presence.
The only problem with this is that there are like a million ways to get into the park. So they’re really only stopping the few who aren’t smart enough to approach the park from the north and south entrances.
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3 p.m.: The cops have set up a gauntlet at the main entrance to the park
I think back to my conversation with the park spokesperson. The park isn’t doing anything different, yet the police are aware that 4/20 exists. Huh?
There has to be over 5,000 red-eyed, pot-loving kinfolk floating around the park by this time. I caught up with Andrew and Jeff from New Jersey. They’ve been sleeping in the park for the last couple of weeks. I ask if they’re here for the 4/20 celebration? “Naw, we’re trying to get into a school out here. We’d be smoking here regardless what day it was.”
Teresa and Wendell from Texas describe themselves as “Old Hippies.” They didn’t know about SF’s 4/20 preoccupation. “It is so cool that you can smoke here. Does the city allow it?” Teresa asks. I say, “Yeah.” “It’s too bad we don’t have anything to smoke,” Teresa replies.
Then to show the out-of-towners the true 4/20 spirit, I quietly ask the good people that are near us if anyone has an extra joint for some visitors?
T and W walked away with two nice sized bombers.
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I begin to notice how many people are from outside San Francisco, from across the bay and other nearby locales. It’s like the true San Franciscans are partying elsewhere.
Rebecca, Turtle and Burdman made the pilgrimage from Marin County. It is their second 4/20 for Rebecca and Burdman. They love the vibes and people. “Everyone getting together is so beautiful,” Rebecca says. “What is sad is, some people don’t know today is a holiday. There’s some that don’t even know what 4/20 means,” Rebecca says despondently.
Turtle had recently moved from Cincinnati and is blown away with the spectacle that’s parading before him. He sums it up best by saying, “This is so cool. This could never happen in my town.”
More and more people are arriving by the minute, presumably to find a location in preparation for the magic clock strike of 4:20 pm.
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4:15 p.m.: More and more people are arriving by the minute, presumably to find a location in preparation for 4:20 p.m.
I’m not good at counting heads, but I know tokers. I would say conservatively by 4:15 pm at Golden Gate Park, there are at least 10,000 people, if not more.
It soon feels like pagans preparing for war. Faces are being painted. There is an escalation of voices and music, dovetailing and bombarding off the throngs of people. Drum beats are getting faster as the anticipation of twenty after four approaches. Young men hit the ground in unabashed excitement, unable to control their exhilaration. The hippie girls twirl faster. More people get naked.
Then the countdown begins.
At 4:20 pm, San Francisco time, the park is ablaze. Forget contact high; this is subdermal. I am bathed in blue smoke. The sun was shining and people are happy. These really tough looking big Hispanic guys are maybe some of the nicest folks I meet. They shared their pre-rolls and huge smiles broke out from these guys, reminding me not to judge.
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4:20 p.m.: The park is ablaze. Forget contact high; this is subdermal.
And that’s an important point: I don’t know how many people attended 4/20 in the park, but most everyone was mellow and full of love. The saying of the day was, “Hey, its 4/20, be nice to someone today.”
People shared what they had. I did hear that some of the edibles were just that, only edible, no cannabis added. You know, some things can’t be helped.
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People shared what they had.
A few young ladies are seen doing the old, “Timber!” as they fell to the wayside. I asked the medical people if there were any problems. “Only dehydration for the most part. Nobody hurt so far.”
An hour later, motorcycle cops begin motoring on the park paths in order to clear people out or at least give the stoners the message, “We’re here and we’re in control.”
The only problem or outburst that garnered attention from the crowd is when a three-person Jesus Squad shows up to try to dissuade the revelers from partaking in their herbs. A circle surrounds the man on the evangelistic bullhorn as he swore we all are going to Hell. The police enter the circle; I think to protect the street preacher from the kids in tie-die and hemp. It is actually good theatre.  Then a member of the hippie crowd complains that the police are always on the side of religion and it’s not fair which turns into a shouting match. I think that was the most aggressive the day got.
4/20 is crazy. The liquor stores, grocery stores and other businesses next to Golden Gate Park that cater to concert-goers did great. I talked to other merchants, they hate 4/20.
The owner of one of the many coffee shops that line Haight Street said, “Today is a huge hassle for us. Kids want water, to use the bathrooms. There’s puke all over the place. People can’t move or park.”
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It was true. Haight Street looked like a parking lot. Cars moved to a slow crawl. Then I realized that the reason for this was most of the people attending were from outside of the city. 4/20 brings a multitude of stoners to the city for the day. Why? Because they can’t do in their town, like we can here in San Francisco.
Like Rebecca said, “It is sad that some people don’t know today’s a holiday.”
For so many people and locations, to smoke a joint in public is a quick way to take a ride with Barney Fife. In SF, we’re lucky.
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But how much should we push our luck? The bureaucrats that run Golden Gate Park do not recognize a gathering that has been happening for the 20 years that I’ve been attending. On the other hand, the cops call in off-duty officers and put in for overtime.
Four to five bathrooms are there to service the umpteen masses that attend. Garbage cans the same. So people piss and throw garbage everywhere.
What to do? Beyond the medicinal and the recreational, will there ever come a time when we can say this is who we are and for one day a year we want to recognize a plant that does so much for us? We don’t care if you agree; we just want more bathrooms. Y’know, like the ones you put out for St. Patrick’s Day, Columbus Day and for Super Bowl parties.
Should 4/20 be an official Golden Gate Park event? If that was to happen, there would have to be rules and regulations.
Isn’t that what we want on some level? Or don’t we?
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Jack Rikess
Toke of the Town correspondent Jack Rikess blogs from the Haight in San Francisco
Jack Rikess, a former stand-up comic, writes a regular column most directly found at jackrikess.com.
 
Jack delivers real-time coverage following the cannabis community, focusing on politics and culture.
 
His beat includes San Francisco, the Bay Area and Mendocino-Humboldt counties.
 
He has been quoted by the national media and is known for his unique view with thoughtful, insightful perspective.
 

WOODSTOCK- 40TH ANNIVERSARY

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Woodstock

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Woodstock

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was an event held at Max Yasgur’s 600 acre (2.4 km²) dairy farm in the rural town of Bethel, New York from August 15 to August 18, 1969. For many, it exemplified the counterculture of the 1960s and the “hippie era.” Many of the best-known musicians of the time appeared during the rainy weekend, captured in a successful 1970 movie, Woodstock. Joni Mitchell’s song “Woodstock,” which memorialized the event, became a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Though attempts have been made over the years to recreate the festival, the original Woodstock festival of 1969 has proven to be unique and legendary.

Woodstock has been idealized in the American popular culture as the culmination of the hippie movement. – What started as a paid event ended being free with over 500,000 attendees or flower children.  Although the festival was remarkably peaceful given the number of people and conditions involved, the reality was less than perfect. Woodstock did have some crime and other misbehavior, as well as a fatality from a drug overdose, an accidental death caused by an occupied sleeping bag being run over by a tractor and one participant died from falling off a scaffold. There were also three miscarriages and two births recorded at the event and colossal logistical headaches. Furthermore, because Woodstock was not intended for such a large crowd, there were not enough resources such as portable toilets and first-aid tents. As a matter of fact the original plan for holding the festival in Wallkill, NY was scrapped because the town officially banned it on the grounds that the planned portable toilets wouldn’t meet town code. Maybe they would have preferred full bathroom suites.

There was some profiteering in the sale of “electric Kool-Aid.”

Woodstock began as a profit-making venture; it only became a free festival after it became obvious that the concert was drawing hundreds of thousands more people than the organizers had prepared for, and that the fence had been torn down by eager, unticketed arrivals. Tickets for the event (sold in 1969) cost US $18 to buy a ticket in advance (which would be US$95.58 in 2005 with inflation factored in) and $24 to buy a ticket at the gate for all three days. Ticket sales were limited to record stores in the greater New York City area, or by mail via a Post Office Box at the Radio City Station Post Office located in Midtown Manhattan.

Yet, in tune with the idealistic hopes of the 1960s, Woodstock satisfied most attendees. Especially memorable were the sense of social harmony, the quality of music, and the overwhelming mass of people, many sporting bohemian dress, behavior, and attitudes

Woodstock Peace, Love, Music

Click Here For More Woodstock Photos

Performers and Schedule of Events

Friday, August 15
The first day, which officially began at 5:08 p.m. with Richie Havens, featured folk artists.

Richie Havens (opened the festival – performed 7 encores)
High Flyin’ Bird
I Can’t Make It Anymore
With A Little Help w/ me
Strawberry Fields Forever
Hey Jude
I Had A Woman
Handsome Johnny
Freedom/Motherless Child
Swami Satchidananda – gave the invocation for the festival

Country Joe McDonald, played separate set from his band, The Fish
I Find Myself Missing You
Rockin All Around The World
Flyin’ High All Over the World
Seen A Rocket flyin
The “Fish” Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag

John Sebastian
How Have You Been
Rainbows Over Your Blues
I Had A Dream
Younger Generation
Sweetwater
What’s Wrong
Motherless Child
Look Out
For Pete’s Sake
Day Song
Crystal Spider
Two Worlds
Why Oh Why
Incredible String Band
Invocation
The Letter
This Moment
When You Find Out Who You Are
Bert Sommer
Jennifer
The Road To Travel
I Wondered Where You Be
She’s Gone
Things Are Going my Way
And When It’s Over
Jeanette
America
A Note That Read
Smile

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Tim Hardin, an hour-long set
If I Were A Carpenter
Misty Roses
Ravi Shankar, with a 5-song set, played through the rain
Raga Puriya-Dhanashri/Gat In Sawarital
Tabla Solo In Jhaptal
Raga Manj Kmahaj
Iap Jor
Dhun In Kaharwa Tal
Melanie
Beautiful People
Birthday of The Sun

Arlo Guthrie
Coming Into Los Angeles
Walking Down The Line
Amazing Grace

Joan Baez
Oh Happy Day
The Last Thing On My Mind
I Shall Be Released
Joe Hill
Sweet Sir Galahad
Hickory Wind
Drug Store Truck Driving Man
(I Live) One Day at a Time
Sweet Sunny South
Warm and Tender Love
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
We Shall Overcome
Baez Source: Arthur Levy, annotator of the expanded editions of the 12 Joan Baez CDs on Vanguard

Saturday, August 16
The day opened at 12:15 pm, and featured some of the event’s biggest psychedelic and guitar rock headliners.

Quill, forty minute set of four songs
They Live the Life
BBY
Waitin’ For You
Jam

Keef Hartley Band
Spanish Fly
Believe In You
Rock Me Baby
Medley
Leavin’ fuct
Halfbreed
Just To Cry
Sinnin’ For You
Santana
Waiting
You Just Don’t Care
Savior
Jingo
Persuasion
Soul Sacrifice
Fried Neckbones

Canned Heat
A Change Is Gonna Come/Leaving This Town
Going Up The Country
Let’s Work Together
Woodstock Boogie

Mountain, hour-long set including Jack Bruce’s “Theme For An Imaginary Western”
Blood of the Sun
Stormy Monday
Long Red
Who Am I But You And The Sun
Beside The Sea
For Yasgur’s Farm (then untitled)
You and Me
Theme For An Imaginary Western
Waiting To Take You Away
Dreams of Milk and Honey
Blind Man
Blue Suede Shoes
Southbound Train

Janis Joplin (Performed 2 encores; Piece of My Heart and Ball and Chain).
Raise Your Hand
As Good As You’ve Been To This World
To Love Somebody
Summertime
Try (Just A Little Bit Harder)
Kosmic Blues
Can’t Turn you Loose
Work Me Lord
Piece of My Heart
Ball and Chain

Sly & the Family Stone started at 1:30 am
M’Lady
Sing A Simple Song
You Can Make It If You Try
Everyday People
Dance To The Music
I Want To Take You Higher
Love City
Stand!
Grateful Dead
St. Stephen
Mama Tried
Dark Star/High Time
Turn On Your Love Light

Creedence Clearwater Revival
Born on the Bayou
Green River
Ninety-Nine and a Half (Won’t Do)
Commotion
Bootleg
Bad Moon Rising
Proud Mary
I Put A Spell On You
Night Time is the Right Time
Keep On Chooglin’
Suzy Q

The Who began at 3 AM, kicking off a 24-song set including Tommy
Heaven and Hell
I Can’t Explain
It’s a Boy
1921
Amazing Journey
Sparks
Eyesight to the Blind
Christmas
Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Acid Queen
Pinball Wizard
Fiddle About
There’s a Doctor
Go to the Mirror
Smash the Mirror
I’m Free
Tommy’s Holiday Camp
We’re Not Gonna Take It
See Me, Feel Me
Summertime Blues
Shakin’ All Over
My Generation
Naked Eye

Jefferson Airplane began at 8 a.m. with an eight-song set, capping off the overnight marathon.
Volunteers
Somebody To Love
The Other Side of This Life
Plastic Fantastic Lover
Won’t You Try/Saturday Afternoon
Eskimo Blue Day
Uncle Sam’s Blues
White Rabbit

Sunday, August 17 to Monday, August 18

Joe Cocker was the first act on the last officially booked day (Sunday); he opened up for the day’s booked acts at 2 PM. The day’s events ultimately drove the schedule nine hours late. By dawn, the concert was continuing in spite of attendees’ having left, returning to the workweek and their other normal obligations.

  • Joe Cocker
    1. Delta Lady
    2. Some Things Goin’ On
    3. Let’s Go Get Stoned
    4. I Shall Be Released
    5. With a Little Help from My Friends
  • After Joe Cocker’s set, a storm disrupted the events for several hours.
  • Country Joe and the Fish resumed the concert around 6 p.m.
    1. Rock and Soul Music
    2. Thing Called Love
    3. Love Machine
    4. The “Fish” Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag
  • Ten Years After
    1. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
    2. I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes
    3. I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always
    4. Hear Me Calling
    5. I’m Going Home
  • The Band – Set list confirmed via Levon Helm’s book “This Wheel’s On Fire”
    1. Chest Fever
    2. Tears of Rage
    3. We Can Talk
    4. Don’t You Tell Henry
    5. Don’t Do It
    6. Ain’t No More Cane
    7. Long Black Veil
    8. This Wheel’s On Fire
    9. I Shall Be Released
    10. The Weight
    11. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever
  • Blood, Sweat and Tears ushered in the midnight hour with five songs.
    1. More and More
    2. I Love You Baby More Than You Ever Know
    3. Spinning Wheel
    4. I Stand Accused
    5. Something Coming On
  • Johnny Winter featuring Edgar Winter, his brother, on two songs.
    1. Mama, Talk to Your Daughter
    2. To Tell the Truth
    3. Johnny B. Goode
    4. Six Feet In the Ground
    5. Leland Mississippi Blues/Rock Me Baby
    6. Mean Mistreater
    7. I Can’t Stand It (With Edgar Winter)
    8. Tobacco Road (With Edgar Winter)
    9. Mean Town Blues
  • Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young began around 3 a.m. with separate acoustic and electric sets.
    • Acoustic Set
    1. Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
    2. Blackbird
    3. Helplessly Hoping
    4. Guinnevere
    5. Marrakesh Express
    6. 4 + 20
    7. Mr. Soul
    8. Wonderin’
    9. You Don’t Have To Cry
    • Electric Set
    1. Pre-Road Downs
    2. Long Time Gone
    3. Bluebird
    4. Sea of Madness
    5. Wooden Ships
    6. Find the Cost of Freedom
    7. 49 Bye-Byes
  • Paul Butterfield Blues Band
    1. Everything’s Gonna Be Alright
    2. Driftin’
    3. Born Under A Bad Sign
    4. Morning Sunrise
    5. Love March
  • Sha-Na-Na
    1. Na Na Theme
    2. Yakety Yak
    3. Teen Angel
    4. Jailhouse Rock
    5. Wipe Out
    6. (Who Wrote) The Book of Love
    7. Duke of Earl
    8. At the Hop
    9. Na Na Theme
  • Jimi Hendrix had insisted on being the final performer of the festival and was scheduled to perform at midnight. Due to various delays, he did not take the stage until nine o’clock on Monday morning. The crowd, estimated at over 400,000 at its peak, is reported to have been no larger than 80,000 when his performance began. His set lasted two hours — the longest of his career — and featured 17 songs, concluding with “Hey Joe”; but it played to a relatively empty field. The full list of Hendrix’s Woodstock performance repertoire follows:
    1. Message to Love
    2. Hear My Train A Comin’
    3. Spanish Castle Magic
    4. Red House
    5. Mastermind
    6. Lover Man
    7. Foxy Lady
    8. Jam Back At The House
    9. Izabella
    10. Gypsy Woman
    11. Fire
    12. Voodoo Child (Slight Return)/Stepping Stone
    13. Star Spangled Banner
    14. Purple Haze
    15. Woodstock Improvisation
    16. Villanova Junction
    17. Hey Joe

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Cancelled appearances

The Jeff Beck Group was scheduled to perform at Woodstock, but failed to make an appearance due to the band’s break-up the week before.

Iron Butterfly was stuck at an airport, and their manager demanded helicopters and special arrangements just for them. They were wired back and told, as impolitely as Western Union would allow, “to get lost”, but in other ‘words’.
Neil Young joined Crosby, Stills & Nash, but refused to be filmed; by his own report, Young felt the filming was distracting both performers and audience from the music. Young’s “Sea of Madness,” heard on the album, was actually recorded a month after the festival at the Fillmore East dance hall.

Joni Mitchell was slated to perform but her agent informed her that it was more important that she appear on “The Dick Cavett Show” on Monday, with its national audience, rather than “sit around in a field with 500 people.” Ironically, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and Jefferson Airplane (who both performed at the festival) also made it to the show. She wrote and recorded the song “Woodstock” that was also a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and was recorded by Richie Havens on his 2004 album Grace of the Sun.


Ethan Brown was a solo guitarist highly admired by the ‘hippie’ youth, but he was arrested three days before the festival on LSD related charges. He is known best for his earlier childhood friendship with The Doors piano player, Ray Manzarek.

Canadian band Lighthouse was originally scheduled to play at Woodstock, but in the end they decided not to, fearing that it would be a bad scene. Later, several members of the group would say that they regretted the decision.

Mind Garage declined for various reasons but one of the primary reasons is that the band had agreed to a paid gig in Cleveland. Had they known that many of their friends were playing at this concert they would have attended. Read the entire story by clicking here.

Refused Invitations

The promoters contacted John Lennon, requesting for The Beatles to perform. Lennon said that he couldn’t get the Beatles, but offered to play with his Plastic Ono Band. The promoters turned this down.

The Doors were considered as a potential performing band, but cancelled at the last moment. Contrary to popular belief that this was related in some fashion to lead singer Jim Morrison’s arrest for indecent exposure while performing earlier that year, the cancellation was most likely due to Morrison’s known and vocal distaste for performing in large outdoor venues.[2] There also was a widely spread legend that Morrison, in a fit of paranoia, was fearful that someone would take a shot at him while he was onstage Drummer John Densmore attended and can be seen on the side of the stage during Joe Cocker’s set.

Led Zeppelin were asked to perform, their manager Peter Grant stating “We were asked to do Woodstock and Atlantic were very keen, and so was our US promoter, Frank Barcelona. I said no because at Woodstock we’d have just been another band on the bill.” “Led Zeppelin: The Concert Files”, Lewis & Pallett, 1997, Omnibus Press, ISBN 0.7119.5307.4

Jethro Tull refused to perform, claiming that it wouldn’t be a big deal.

The Moody Blues for unknown reasons declined to perform. They later regretted not performing. They were however promoted as being a performer on the third day on early posters that stated the site being Wallkill.

Tommy James and the Shondells declined an invitation to perform at Woodstock, which they later regretted. Lead singer Tommy James stated later, “We could have just kicked ourselves. We were in Hawaii, and my secretary called and said, ‘Yeah, listen, there’s this pig farmer in upstate New York that wants you to play in his field.’ That’s how it was put to me. So we passed, and we realized what we’d missed a couple of days later.”

The Clarence White-era Byrds were given an opportunity to play, but refused to do so after a melee during their performance at the Atlanta Pop Festival earlier that summer.

Paul Revere & The Raiders declined to perform. They later regretted.

Bob Dylan was in negotiations to play, however he had to pull out as his son was taken ill. He also was unhappy about the number of the hippies piling up outside his house near the originally planned site. He would go on to perform at the Isle of Wight Festival two weeks later.

Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention Quote: “A lot of mud at Woodstock. We were invited to play there, we turned it down” – FZ. Citation: “Class of the 20th Century,” U.S. network television special in serial format, circa 1995.

Woodstock Trivia

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Jimi Hendrix’s E-string broke when he was playing Red House and played the rest of the song with five strings, which was a remarkable feat.

John Sebastian wasn’t originally scheduled to perform. He was enlisted to perform when several of the acts were late in arriving due to the traffic going to the festival.

Richie Havens’s song “Freedom” was totally improvised. He was called back for so many encores that he ran out of songs to sing, so he just picked up his guitar and started singing “Freedom.” The song includes lyrics from the Negro spiritual, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.”

Country Joe McDonald wasn’t scheduled to perform the first day. He was forced into it because many of the acts that were scheduled to perform that day hadn’t arrived yet. He also performed on Day Three with the rest of The Fish.

A 20-year-old man named Stephen Victor Tallarico (later known as Steven Tyler of Aerosmith) attended the festival.

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Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young almost didn’t perform at the festival. The helicopter that Graham Nash and the group’s drummer Dallas Taylor were on was less than 25 feet off the ground when the tail rotor failed and it began to spin. The helicopter almost crashed and Nash and Taylor were almost killed.

Michael Lang once said that his original idea was to have Roy Rogers close the festival by singing “Happy Trails.”

The character named “Woodstock” from Peanuts was named for the festival

 

Ny Times Article

NY Times Article

Woodstock Monument

In Memory of Woodstock ” A Birth of a Generation”

Did you attend the “Original” Woodstock concert? If so I would like to hear from you and your experience while attending. Write to me atwebmaster@the60sofficialsite.com