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HIWAY AMERICA -AND COOL PEOPLE, THE LIFE OF RODGER MILLER AND THE RODGER MILLER MUSEUM, ROUTE 66 ERICK OKLAHOMA

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RODGER MILLER AND HIS BIG HIT -KING OF THE ROAD

http://youtu.be/OmOe27SJ3Yc

RODGER MILLER AND JOHNNY CASH  1971

http://youtu.be/74uv5FmWu0w

RODGER MILLER SINGS BOBBY MAGEE

The Life of Roger Miller (1936-1992) Laudene and Jean Miller (L to R) Wendell, Duane, Roger Elmer, Armelia, & Roger Miller Songwriter, singer, guitarist, fiddler, drummer, TV star, humorist, honky-tonk man, Broadway composer, and perhaps above all else, an awesome wit- Roger Miller was all of these and more. Roger Dean Miller was born January 2, 1936, in Fort Worth, Texas, the youngest of three boys. His father, Jean Miller, died at the age of 26 from spinal meningitis. Roger was only a year old. It was during the depression and Roger’s mother, Laudene Holt Miller, was in her early 20′s. She was just not able to provide for the boys. So each of Jean’s three brothers came and took one of the boys to live with them. Roger moved in with Armelia and Elmer Miller on a farm outside Erick, Oklahoma. Roger later joked, “It was so dull you could watch the colors run,” and, “the town was so small the town drunk had to take turns.” Roger had a difficult childhood. Most days were spent in the cotton fields picking cotton or working the land. He never really accepted the separation of his family. He was lonely and unhappy, but his mind took him to places he could only dream about. Walking three miles to his one-room school each day, he started composing songs, the first of which allegedly went a little something like this: “There’s a picture on the wall, It’s the dearest of them all, Mother” Roger, of course, painted a somewhat more humorous and inventive picture of his school days. “The school I went to had 37 students,” he once said, “me and 36 Indians. One time we had a school dance and it rained for 36 days straight. During recess we used to play cowboy and Indians and things got pretty wild from my standpoint. Nevertheless, Roger, who also liked to tell people that he “even flunked school bus,” did let his humorous guard down now and then to comment on the insecure loner he truly seems to have been as a child. “We were dirt poor,” he once explained. “What I’d do is sit around and get warm by crawling inside myself and make up stuff… I was one of those kids that never had much to say and when I did it was wrong. I always wanted attention, always was reaching and grabbing for attention.” Roger in grade school – bottom row, 3rd from left Roger was a dreamer and his heart was never in pickin’ cotton. He said, “We used to raise cotton ankle high.” Most days his daddy would catch him daydreaming. “It’s really a good thing that he made it in the music business ’cause he would have starved to death as a farmer,” says entertainer Sheb Wooley (1921-2003), an Erick native who married Roger’s cousin, Melva Laure Miller. Sheb Wooley & Melva Laure Miller Fifteen years older than Roger, Wooley’s career would lead him to Hollywood and the movies. One of Wooley’s biggest hits was “The Purple People Eater.” In those days, Wooley and little Roger would ride out “fixin fence, chasing steers and talking about stardom,” Wooley recalls. The two would listen to the Grand Ole Opry on Saturday nights and the Light Crust Doughboys on Fort Worth radio by day. Miller came to idolize Bob Wills and Hank Williams, but it was Wooley who taught Roger his first chords on guitar, bought him his first fiddle, and who represented the very real world of show business that Roger wanted so much for himself. Eager to follow in Wooley’s long tall footsteps while he was still in high school, Roger started running away, knocking around from town to town through Texas and Oklahoma. He took whatever work he could find by day and haunted the honky-tonks by night. His drifting came to an abrupt halt when he stole a guitar in Texas and crossed the state line back into Oklahoma. He had so desperately wanted a guitar to write songs on and this seemed the only way to get one, since pulling bowles would never earn him the kind of money he needed for a guitar. Roger in the Army – c. 1952 Roger in the Army – c. 1954 Roger turned himself in the next day and rather than put him in jail they offered to let him join the Army. Although he was only 17, he chose to go into the service. He was eager to be going someplace else and before long he was shipped to Korea, where he drove a jeep and earned one of his favorite one-liners, “My education was Korea, Clash of 52.” Roger was terribly homesick, but his world was growing larger. Towards the end of his tour with the Army, he was sent to Fort McPherson in Atlanta. Assigned to Special Services, he played fiddle in the Circle A Wranglers, a well known service outfit previously started by PFC Faron Young. After Roger’s discharge from the Army, he headed directly for Nashville to see Chet Atkins. He told Chet he was a songwriter and Chet asked him to play something. Seeing that Roger didn’t have a guitar, Chet offered his to him. Roger just couldn’t believe he was sitting in front of Chet Atkins and playing his guitar. He said, “I was so nervous, people thought I was wavin’.” Roger proceeded to sing in one key and play in another. Chet was kind about it but suggested he work on his songs a little more and come back. Roger used to say, “I was everywhere at once.” He had an energy that was new to Nashville. Needing to work while he pursued his dream, Roger took a job as a bellhop at the Andrew Jackson Hotel. “It had more dignity than washing dishes,” he later said. Situated right in the thick of Nashville’s downtown music district, the Andrew Jackson gave him proximity to the small but vibrant Country scene. Roger soon became known as the “Singing Bellhop.” He would sing a song to anyone who would listen on the way up or down the elevator.   continued on page 2:

RODGER MILLER AND JOHNNY CASH GOOFING OFF AND KING OF THE ROAD http://youtu.be/PVdi-JO0Q5I

HITCHHIKER -RODGER MILLER http://youtu.be/1mxZE0Ef5Tw

INVITATION citation TO THE BLUES LIVE 1989  RODGER MILLER http://youtu.be/SKuxJz5oiiE

Roger Miller Museum 101 E Roger Miller Blvd Erick, OK 73645 Phone: 580-526-3889 580-515-1540 Fax: 580-526-3331 E-mailWeb Site View all Photos Description Located in Erick at the corner of Sheb Wooley Ave and Roger Miller Blvd, a renamed section of Route 66, the Roger Miller Museum gives travelers and visitors a one-of-a-kind glimpse into the life and times of Roger Miller, one of Oklahoma’s and Erick’s favorite sons. The newly renovated museum features exhibits, memorabilia and personal effects celebrating the life and accomplishments of this unique songwriter and entertainer. Among the items on display are music, photographs, videos, instruments, clothing, Roger’s high school FFA jacket and essay, handwritten lyrics, Roger’s army shirt from Korea and even the motorcycle he was riding when he met Elvis. In addition, visitors can watch DVD footage on the big screen TV in the audio/video room of past performances by Miller, plus many tributes made by his colleagues. Come and share the wit and wisdom of Roger Miller. He was a true original, whose dreams and talent led him to be considered one of the most influential country artists of the 20th Century. The museum also includes a gift shop with music CDs performed by Miller, King of the Road caps, t-shirts and more, along with other unique items relating to western Oklahoma.

WOODSTOCK- 40TH ANNIVERSARY

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Woodstock

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Woodstock

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was an event held at Max Yasgur’s 600 acre (2.4 km²) dairy farm in the rural town of Bethel, New York from August 15 to August 18, 1969. For many, it exemplified the counterculture of the 1960s and the “hippie era.” Many of the best-known musicians of the time appeared during the rainy weekend, captured in a successful 1970 movie, Woodstock. Joni Mitchell’s song “Woodstock,” which memorialized the event, became a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Though attempts have been made over the years to recreate the festival, the original Woodstock festival of 1969 has proven to be unique and legendary.

Woodstock has been idealized in the American popular culture as the culmination of the hippie movement. – What started as a paid event ended being free with over 500,000 attendees or flower children.  Although the festival was remarkably peaceful given the number of people and conditions involved, the reality was less than perfect. Woodstock did have some crime and other misbehavior, as well as a fatality from a drug overdose, an accidental death caused by an occupied sleeping bag being run over by a tractor and one participant died from falling off a scaffold. There were also three miscarriages and two births recorded at the event and colossal logistical headaches. Furthermore, because Woodstock was not intended for such a large crowd, there were not enough resources such as portable toilets and first-aid tents. As a matter of fact the original plan for holding the festival in Wallkill, NY was scrapped because the town officially banned it on the grounds that the planned portable toilets wouldn’t meet town code. Maybe they would have preferred full bathroom suites.

There was some profiteering in the sale of “electric Kool-Aid.”

Woodstock began as a profit-making venture; it only became a free festival after it became obvious that the concert was drawing hundreds of thousands more people than the organizers had prepared for, and that the fence had been torn down by eager, unticketed arrivals. Tickets for the event (sold in 1969) cost US $18 to buy a ticket in advance (which would be US$95.58 in 2005 with inflation factored in) and $24 to buy a ticket at the gate for all three days. Ticket sales were limited to record stores in the greater New York City area, or by mail via a Post Office Box at the Radio City Station Post Office located in Midtown Manhattan.

Yet, in tune with the idealistic hopes of the 1960s, Woodstock satisfied most attendees. Especially memorable were the sense of social harmony, the quality of music, and the overwhelming mass of people, many sporting bohemian dress, behavior, and attitudes

Woodstock Peace, Love, Music

Click Here For More Woodstock Photos

Performers and Schedule of Events

Friday, August 15
The first day, which officially began at 5:08 p.m. with Richie Havens, featured folk artists.

Richie Havens (opened the festival – performed 7 encores)
High Flyin’ Bird
I Can’t Make It Anymore
With A Little Help w/ me
Strawberry Fields Forever
Hey Jude
I Had A Woman
Handsome Johnny
Freedom/Motherless Child
Swami Satchidananda – gave the invocation for the festival

Country Joe McDonald, played separate set from his band, The Fish
I Find Myself Missing You
Rockin All Around The World
Flyin’ High All Over the World
Seen A Rocket flyin
The “Fish” Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag

John Sebastian
How Have You Been
Rainbows Over Your Blues
I Had A Dream
Younger Generation
Sweetwater
What’s Wrong
Motherless Child
Look Out
For Pete’s Sake
Day Song
Crystal Spider
Two Worlds
Why Oh Why
Incredible String Band
Invocation
The Letter
This Moment
When You Find Out Who You Are
Bert Sommer
Jennifer
The Road To Travel
I Wondered Where You Be
She’s Gone
Things Are Going my Way
And When It’s Over
Jeanette
America
A Note That Read
Smile

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Tim Hardin, an hour-long set
If I Were A Carpenter
Misty Roses
Ravi Shankar, with a 5-song set, played through the rain
Raga Puriya-Dhanashri/Gat In Sawarital
Tabla Solo In Jhaptal
Raga Manj Kmahaj
Iap Jor
Dhun In Kaharwa Tal
Melanie
Beautiful People
Birthday of The Sun

Arlo Guthrie
Coming Into Los Angeles
Walking Down The Line
Amazing Grace

Joan Baez
Oh Happy Day
The Last Thing On My Mind
I Shall Be Released
Joe Hill
Sweet Sir Galahad
Hickory Wind
Drug Store Truck Driving Man
(I Live) One Day at a Time
Sweet Sunny South
Warm and Tender Love
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
We Shall Overcome
Baez Source: Arthur Levy, annotator of the expanded editions of the 12 Joan Baez CDs on Vanguard

Saturday, August 16
The day opened at 12:15 pm, and featured some of the event’s biggest psychedelic and guitar rock headliners.

Quill, forty minute set of four songs
They Live the Life
BBY
Waitin’ For You
Jam

Keef Hartley Band
Spanish Fly
Believe In You
Rock Me Baby
Medley
Leavin’ fuct
Halfbreed
Just To Cry
Sinnin’ For You
Santana
Waiting
You Just Don’t Care
Savior
Jingo
Persuasion
Soul Sacrifice
Fried Neckbones

Canned Heat
A Change Is Gonna Come/Leaving This Town
Going Up The Country
Let’s Work Together
Woodstock Boogie

Mountain, hour-long set including Jack Bruce’s “Theme For An Imaginary Western”
Blood of the Sun
Stormy Monday
Long Red
Who Am I But You And The Sun
Beside The Sea
For Yasgur’s Farm (then untitled)
You and Me
Theme For An Imaginary Western
Waiting To Take You Away
Dreams of Milk and Honey
Blind Man
Blue Suede Shoes
Southbound Train

Janis Joplin (Performed 2 encores; Piece of My Heart and Ball and Chain).
Raise Your Hand
As Good As You’ve Been To This World
To Love Somebody
Summertime
Try (Just A Little Bit Harder)
Kosmic Blues
Can’t Turn you Loose
Work Me Lord
Piece of My Heart
Ball and Chain

Sly & the Family Stone started at 1:30 am
M’Lady
Sing A Simple Song
You Can Make It If You Try
Everyday People
Dance To The Music
I Want To Take You Higher
Love City
Stand!
Grateful Dead
St. Stephen
Mama Tried
Dark Star/High Time
Turn On Your Love Light

Creedence Clearwater Revival
Born on the Bayou
Green River
Ninety-Nine and a Half (Won’t Do)
Commotion
Bootleg
Bad Moon Rising
Proud Mary
I Put A Spell On You
Night Time is the Right Time
Keep On Chooglin’
Suzy Q

The Who began at 3 AM, kicking off a 24-song set including Tommy
Heaven and Hell
I Can’t Explain
It’s a Boy
1921
Amazing Journey
Sparks
Eyesight to the Blind
Christmas
Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Acid Queen
Pinball Wizard
Fiddle About
There’s a Doctor
Go to the Mirror
Smash the Mirror
I’m Free
Tommy’s Holiday Camp
We’re Not Gonna Take It
See Me, Feel Me
Summertime Blues
Shakin’ All Over
My Generation
Naked Eye

Jefferson Airplane began at 8 a.m. with an eight-song set, capping off the overnight marathon.
Volunteers
Somebody To Love
The Other Side of This Life
Plastic Fantastic Lover
Won’t You Try/Saturday Afternoon
Eskimo Blue Day
Uncle Sam’s Blues
White Rabbit

Sunday, August 17 to Monday, August 18

Joe Cocker was the first act on the last officially booked day (Sunday); he opened up for the day’s booked acts at 2 PM. The day’s events ultimately drove the schedule nine hours late. By dawn, the concert was continuing in spite of attendees’ having left, returning to the workweek and their other normal obligations.

  • Joe Cocker
    1. Delta Lady
    2. Some Things Goin’ On
    3. Let’s Go Get Stoned
    4. I Shall Be Released
    5. With a Little Help from My Friends
  • After Joe Cocker’s set, a storm disrupted the events for several hours.
  • Country Joe and the Fish resumed the concert around 6 p.m.
    1. Rock and Soul Music
    2. Thing Called Love
    3. Love Machine
    4. The “Fish” Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag
  • Ten Years After
    1. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
    2. I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes
    3. I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always
    4. Hear Me Calling
    5. I’m Going Home
  • The Band - Set list confirmed via Levon Helm’s book “This Wheel’s On Fire”
    1. Chest Fever
    2. Tears of Rage
    3. We Can Talk
    4. Don’t You Tell Henry
    5. Don’t Do It
    6. Ain’t No More Cane
    7. Long Black Veil
    8. This Wheel’s On Fire
    9. I Shall Be Released
    10. The Weight
    11. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever
  • Blood, Sweat and Tears ushered in the midnight hour with five songs.
    1. More and More
    2. I Love You Baby More Than You Ever Know
    3. Spinning Wheel
    4. I Stand Accused
    5. Something Coming On
  • Johnny Winter featuring Edgar Winter, his brother, on two songs.
    1. Mama, Talk to Your Daughter
    2. To Tell the Truth
    3. Johnny B. Goode
    4. Six Feet In the Ground
    5. Leland Mississippi Blues/Rock Me Baby
    6. Mean Mistreater
    7. I Can’t Stand It (With Edgar Winter)
    8. Tobacco Road (With Edgar Winter)
    9. Mean Town Blues
  • Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young began around 3 a.m. with separate acoustic and electric sets.
    • Acoustic Set
    1. Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
    2. Blackbird
    3. Helplessly Hoping
    4. Guinnevere
    5. Marrakesh Express
    6. 4 + 20
    7. Mr. Soul
    8. Wonderin’
    9. You Don’t Have To Cry
    • Electric Set
    1. Pre-Road Downs
    2. Long Time Gone
    3. Bluebird
    4. Sea of Madness
    5. Wooden Ships
    6. Find the Cost of Freedom
    7. 49 Bye-Byes
  • Paul Butterfield Blues Band
    1. Everything’s Gonna Be Alright
    2. Driftin’
    3. Born Under A Bad Sign
    4. Morning Sunrise
    5. Love March
  • Sha-Na-Na
    1. Na Na Theme
    2. Yakety Yak
    3. Teen Angel
    4. Jailhouse Rock
    5. Wipe Out
    6. (Who Wrote) The Book of Love
    7. Duke of Earl
    8. At the Hop
    9. Na Na Theme
  • Jimi Hendrix had insisted on being the final performer of the festival and was scheduled to perform at midnight. Due to various delays, he did not take the stage until nine o’clock on Monday morning. The crowd, estimated at over 400,000 at its peak, is reported to have been no larger than 80,000 when his performance began. His set lasted two hours — the longest of his career — and featured 17 songs, concluding with “Hey Joe”; but it played to a relatively empty field. The full list of Hendrix’s Woodstock performance repertoire follows:
    1. Message to Love
    2. Hear My Train A Comin’
    3. Spanish Castle Magic
    4. Red House
    5. Mastermind
    6. Lover Man
    7. Foxy Lady
    8. Jam Back At The House
    9. Izabella
    10. Gypsy Woman
    11. Fire
    12. Voodoo Child (Slight Return)/Stepping Stone
    13. Star Spangled Banner
    14. Purple Haze
    15. Woodstock Improvisation
    16. Villanova Junction
    17. Hey Joe

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Cancelled appearances

The Jeff Beck Group was scheduled to perform at Woodstock, but failed to make an appearance due to the band’s break-up the week before.

Iron Butterfly was stuck at an airport, and their manager demanded helicopters and special arrangements just for them. They were wired back and told, as impolitely as Western Union would allow, “to get lost”, but in other ‘words’.
Neil Young joined Crosby, Stills & Nash, but refused to be filmed; by his own report, Young felt the filming was distracting both performers and audience from the music. Young’s “Sea of Madness,” heard on the album, was actually recorded a month after the festival at the Fillmore East dance hall.

Joni Mitchell was slated to perform but her agent informed her that it was more important that she appear on “The Dick Cavett Show” on Monday, with its national audience, rather than “sit around in a field with 500 people.” Ironically, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and Jefferson Airplane (who both performed at the festival) also made it to the show. She wrote and recorded the song “Woodstock” that was also a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and was recorded by Richie Havens on his 2004 album Grace of the Sun.


Ethan Brown was a solo guitarist highly admired by the ‘hippie’ youth, but he was arrested three days before the festival on LSD related charges. He is known best for his earlier childhood friendship with The Doors piano player, Ray Manzarek.

Canadian band Lighthouse was originally scheduled to play at Woodstock, but in the end they decided not to, fearing that it would be a bad scene. Later, several members of the group would say that they regretted the decision.

Mind Garage declined for various reasons but one of the primary reasons is that the band had agreed to a paid gig in Cleveland. Had they known that many of their friends were playing at this concert they would have attended. Read the entire story by clicking here.

Refused Invitations

The promoters contacted John Lennon, requesting for The Beatles to perform. Lennon said that he couldn’t get the Beatles, but offered to play with his Plastic Ono Band. The promoters turned this down.

The Doors were considered as a potential performing band, but cancelled at the last moment. Contrary to popular belief that this was related in some fashion to lead singer Jim Morrison’s arrest for indecent exposure while performing earlier that year, the cancellation was most likely due to Morrison’s known and vocal distaste for performing in large outdoor venues.[2] There also was a widely spread legend that Morrison, in a fit of paranoia, was fearful that someone would take a shot at him while he was onstage Drummer John Densmore attended and can be seen on the side of the stage during Joe Cocker’s set.

Led Zeppelin were asked to perform, their manager Peter Grant stating “We were asked to do Woodstock and Atlantic were very keen, and so was our US promoter, Frank Barcelona. I said no because at Woodstock we’d have just been another band on the bill.” “Led Zeppelin: The Concert Files”, Lewis & Pallett, 1997, Omnibus Press, ISBN 0.7119.5307.4

Jethro Tull refused to perform, claiming that it wouldn’t be a big deal.

The Moody Blues for unknown reasons declined to perform. They later regretted not performing. They were however promoted as being a performer on the third day on early posters that stated the site being Wallkill.

Tommy James and the Shondells declined an invitation to perform at Woodstock, which they later regretted. Lead singer Tommy James stated later, “We could have just kicked ourselves. We were in Hawaii, and my secretary called and said, ‘Yeah, listen, there’s this pig farmer in upstate New York that wants you to play in his field.’ That’s how it was put to me. So we passed, and we realized what we’d missed a couple of days later.”

The Clarence White-era Byrds were given an opportunity to play, but refused to do so after a melee during their performance at the Atlanta Pop Festival earlier that summer.

Paul Revere & The Raiders declined to perform. They later regretted.

Bob Dylan was in negotiations to play, however he had to pull out as his son was taken ill. He also was unhappy about the number of the hippies piling up outside his house near the originally planned site. He would go on to perform at the Isle of Wight Festival two weeks later.

Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention Quote: “A lot of mud at Woodstock. We were invited to play there, we turned it down” – FZ. Citation: “Class of the 20th Century,” U.S. network television special in serial format, circa 1995.

Woodstock Trivia

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Jimi Hendrix’s E-string broke when he was playing Red House and played the rest of the song with five strings, which was a remarkable feat.

John Sebastian wasn’t originally scheduled to perform. He was enlisted to perform when several of the acts were late in arriving due to the traffic going to the festival.

Richie Havens’s song “Freedom” was totally improvised. He was called back for so many encores that he ran out of songs to sing, so he just picked up his guitar and started singing “Freedom.” The song includes lyrics from the Negro spiritual, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.”

Country Joe McDonald wasn’t scheduled to perform the first day. He was forced into it because many of the acts that were scheduled to perform that day hadn’t arrived yet. He also performed on Day Three with the rest of The Fish.

A 20-year-old man named Stephen Victor Tallarico (later known as Steven Tyler of Aerosmith) attended the festival.

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Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young almost didn’t perform at the festival. The helicopter that Graham Nash and the group’s drummer Dallas Taylor were on was less than 25 feet off the ground when the tail rotor failed and it began to spin. The helicopter almost crashed and Nash and Taylor were almost killed.

Michael Lang once said that his original idea was to have Roy Rogers close the festival by singing “Happy Trails.”

The character named “Woodstock” from Peanuts was named for the festival

 

Ny Times Article

NY Times Article

Woodstock Monument

In Memory of Woodstock ” A Birth of a Generation”

Did you attend the “Original” Woodstock concert? If so I would like to hear from you and your experience while attending. Write to me atwebmaster@the60sofficialsite.com

COOL PEOPLE -JOHN PRINE SINGER SONG WRITER, HIS MUSIC, AN ANA CHRISTY POEM

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COOL PEOPLE -JOHN PRINE SINGER SONG WRITER, HIS MUSIC, AN ANA CHRISTY POEM

John Prine Biography
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John Prine  is one of my favorite singers. He was a favorite of Dave’s too.

Saturday night was our party night. We’d sit at our fifties kitchen table with candles lit, incense going and the cd player playing. The scene was set as we settled in for a long night. We shared a bottle of vodka and Dave drank beer  and I drank wine. We would record our weekly internet radio show “The Can Man Says Goodnight show on luver.com. We had a great time getting really blasted and high doing the occasional snort here and there. Yes we were hippies, boozers I suppose and potheads, and good at it. I am not ashamed, we did exactly what we wanted to the fullest extent. It was, we agreed the best time of our lives, and the most productive years.

A short poem of mine

 

WALLS

these walls sometimes scream with frustration

Other times heave with the passion of love

Sometimes these walls become glacier white

With the distortion of drugs

These walls hold our existence-books and

Manuscripts piled into pyramidal corners

Balancing on cardboard boxes and metal shelves

These walls with it’s controversial posters

And flyers with cryptic messages make others

Curious

These walls would embarrass our children

And parents-

They do not understand the expressiveness

Of filled space and open minds.

Ana Christy “Beatnik Blues”

 

John Prine Biography

JOHN PRINE AND IRIS DEMENT-IN SPITE OF OURSELVES

JOHN PRINE-ANGEL FROM MONTGOMERY

JOHN PRINE -THAT’S THE WAY THE WORLD GOES ROUND

Singer, Guitarist (1946–)

Quick Facts
Name John Prine Occupation Singer, Guitarist Birth Date October 10, 1946 (age 67) Place of Birth Maywood, Illinois Full Name John Prine Zodiac Sign Libra
Synopsis
Early Years
Recording Career
Cancer Scare
John Prine is an American singer-songwriter who has issued a prodigious number of albums. His work has been covered by Bonnie Raitt, Johnny Cash and George Strait.

Synopsis

Singer-songwriter John Prine was born on October 10, 1946 in Maywood, Illinois. Born into a music-making family, Prine began playing guitar at age 14. By his early 20s, he was living in Chicago and entrenched in the city’s folk music scene. In 1971, Prine put out his self-titled debut album, which earned critical praise and helped pave the way for a career that has spanned more than four decades.

Early Years

The grandson of a musician, singer-songwriter John Prine was born on October 10, 1946 in Maywood, Illinois. His grandfather was a guitar player for country-western star Merle Travis. His grandfather’s talents were evidently passed down to Prine, who began playing guitar at the age of 14.

Following a two-year stint in the Army, Prine moved to Chicago, where he immersed himself in the city’s folk music scene. His sound and style eventually caught the attention of Kris Kristofferson, who helped his new friend land a record contract.

Recording Career

In 1971, Prine released his self-titled debut album, which features the critically lauded song “Sam Stone,” an account of a drug-infused Vietnam. The album was adored by critics, but never enjoyed much commercial success. The same held true for his follow-up albums, Diamonds in the Rough (1972) and Sweet Revenge (1973).

In 1975, Prine released Common Sense, which offered his fans a heavier sound than they were accustomed to with his music. Backed by the popular song “Come Back to Us Barbara Lewis Hare Krishna Beauregard,” the record cracked the Billboard 100 chart. In the years since, Prine’s career has continued on a similar trajectory. His albums haven’t been overwhelming sellers, but they’ve managed to attract a dedicated following of fans who adore his music and songwriting.

Along the way, Prine has shown an ability to adapt and change. In the early 1980s, after getting dropped from his label, Asylum Records, Prine picked up the pieces and started his own recording company, Oh Boy Records. In 1991, he released the Grammy-winning LP The Missing Years, with guest appearances by Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty and Bonnie Raitt, among others. The album went on to sell more than 250,000 copies.

In recent years, Prine has maintained a steady recording career. His 2005 album of new material, Fair and Square, earned Prine a Grammy Award for best contemporary folk album. Prine’s 2007 release, Standard Songs for Average People, recorded with guitarist Mac Wiseman, offers his fans a collection of country and folk classics. In 2010, Prine put out In Person and On Stage, an album of live performances of his songs.

Cancer Scare

In 1998, Prine received a serious health scare—he was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, a cancer that had formed on the side of his neck. Surgery and radiation treatment soon followed. Prine made a full recovery and was able to complete his 1999 album, In Spite of Ourselves.

John Prine resides in Nashville with his wife, Fiona Whelan.

John Prine. (2014). The Biography.com website. Retrieved 01:39, May 21, 2014, from http://www.biography.com/people/john-prine-20871737.

John Prine. [Internet]. 2014. The Biography.com website. Available from: http://www.biography.com/people/john-prine-20871737 [Accessed 21 May 2014].

“John Prine.” Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2014. Web. 21 May 2014.

COOL PEOPLE -Grateful for Bob Weir -An interview by the New Yorker and bio

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COOL PEOPLE -Grateful for Bob Weir -An interview by the New Yorker and bio

Bob Weir Biography

Environmental Activist, Guitarist (1947–)

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Quick Facts
Name Bob Weir Occupation Environmental Activist, Guitarist Birth Date October 16, 1947 (age 66) Education Menlo Atherton High School, Fountain Valley High School Place of Birth San Francisco, California AKA Bob WeirFull Name Robert Hall Weir Zodiac Sign Libra
Synopsis
Early Life
Musical Career
Personal Life
Cite This Page

Bob Weir was a rhythm guitarist for the legendary rock band the Grateful Dead from 1964 to 1995 and later reunited to tour with former members as The Other Ones.

Synopsis

Guitarist Bob Weir was born on October 16, 1947 in San Francisco, California. In 1964, he started a band that was eventually called the Grateful Dead, with Jerry Garcia and Ron McKernan. In 1972, Weir put out his first solo album. He also performed with other bands throughout his time with the Dead. After Garcia died in 1995, Weir toured with RatDog, and later reunited with former Dead members to tour.

Early Life

Bob Weir was born October 16, 1947, in San Francisco, California. He was raised by wealthy adoptive parents in the suburban town of Atherton, California.

Weir started playing guitar at the age of 13. As a teen, Weir first attended Menlo Atherton High School, but his struggles with undiagnosed dyslexia and his poor academic performance led his exasperated parents to send him away to boarding school. There, at Fountain Valley High School, Weir met John Perry Barlow, who would later write lyrics for the Grateful Dead. After Weir was kicked out of Fountain Valley, he spent most of his time hanging out in Palo Alto, California, checking out the Bay Area folk-rock scene. He spent his days at a record store where Jerry Garcia gave guitar lessons, and his nights at a club called the Tangent. At the Tangent, Weir had the good fortune to see several rock legends in the making, including Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane and the familiar face from the music shop, Jerry Garcia.

Musical Career

In 1964, when Weir was just 17, Garcia convinced him and Ron “Pigpen” McKernan to start a folk-rock and blues band called Mother McCree’s Uptown Jug Champions, with Weir as their rhythm guitarist. After first renaming the band the Warlocks, the band eventually settled on the name the Grateful Dead and expanded to include drummers Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, bass guitarist Phil Lesh and several different keyboardists over the life of the group.

Although the Dead played nearly 100 shows yearly throughout the 1970s, Weir also participated in other musical projects during this time. In 1972 he put out his first solo album, called Ace. He also performed and recorded with other bands, including Kingfish, in the 1970s. In the early 1980s Weir toured with Bobby and the Midnites and contributed to recording two albums with the band. During this time he met recording session musician Brent Mydland, whom he would invite to join the Grateful Dead as a keyboardist in 1979.

Weir refocused primarily on playing with the Grateful Dead in the late 1980s and continued to tour with them extensively until Jerry Garcia’s death in 1995. After Garcia died, Weir started touring nonstop with RatDog, the band he had recently started with bassist Rob Wasserman. In 1998 Weir reunited with remaining members of the Grateful Dead under the band name The Other Ones. The Other Ones recorded a new album in 1999 and toured in 2000, the same year RatDog’s first album was released.

Weir would tour with former Grateful Dead band members again in 2009. The 2009 tour made Weir and Lesh nostalgic for the band’s old chemistry, leading them to combine members of the Dead and RatDog to form a new successful band called Furthur.

Personal Life

While Weir has devoted most of his time and energy to music, he has also been active in a number of social causes. He’s been a board member of Seva, a foundation that combats blindness in South America and Asia, and has also been an activist for Greenpeace. Together, Weir and members of the Dead formed the Rex Foundation, which provides community support for creative endeavors.

In his off-stage life, Weir also has two daughters—Monet and Chloe—with Natascha Müenter, whom he married in 1999.
Robert Hall Weir. (2014). The Biography.com website. Retrieved 05:07, May 08, 2014, from http://www.biography.com/people/bob-weir-20878671.

“Robert Hall Weir.” 2014. The Biography.com website. May 08 2014 http://www.biography.com/people/bob-weir-20878671.

 
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     BLACK THROATED WIND BY BOB WEIR

April 28, 2014

Grateful for Bo

 

 

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I went to the Tribeca Film Festival to see “The Other One: The Long, Strange Trip of Bob Weir,” because I have always liked Bob Weir, the second guitarist of the Grateful Dead. Usually you would call such a musician a rhythm guitarist, but Weir isn’t anything like a garden-variety rhythm guitarist. To the initial exasperation of his bandmates, who wanted someone to keep time more diligently, he developed one of the most unusual styles in rock and roll, built on lyric asides and cunning contrapuntal remarks that suggest a line of melody travelling through the map of the chord changes.

The Grateful Dead embodied a singular approach to the mathematics of simple song forms. It occurs to me that it represented something like a model of the unconscious as it rises into awareness. The patterns of the drummers, Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart, suggested pressing impulses and intuitions, the way some poets describe hearing the rhythms of the words before the words arrive. Phil Lesh’s bass playing, the rudiments of which were taken from classical music, especially Bach and Beethoven, amounted to a layer of permeable ground. He was sometimes engaged with the drums and sometimes with the stringed instruments in the range above his own. Jerry Garcia’s guitar was the conversational voice, articulating the thoughts that ascended to the level of social discourse. In between was Weir, following the example of the left hand of the pianist McCoy Tyner, he told me years ago, inverting chords and finding passing phrases among them, mostly supporting but sometimes subverting, too.

Not that the endeavor always succeeded. There were fallow periods, periods of fatigue, and periods when Garcia’s health and drug problems seemed to dog and shadow the music. There were nights of singing and playing out of tune, of being out of sorts, and there were nights when at least one member was not entirely sober. In what they were attempting, failure is, anyway, easier to achieve than success.

Weir is a modest man, unassuming, a gentleman. He says in the movie that he takes no pride in what he has accomplished, because he regards pride as a suspect emotion. He began playing in the jug band that became the Grateful Dead when he was sixteen years old. He would arrive at his parents’ house sometimes at daybreak, after playing all night with the band, and have breakfast and go to school. Eventually, school fell aside. His mother told him that she and her husband and their daughter, Wendy, were a family and that they could no longer live with his comings and goings, and so he left and moved into a house with the band. He ran away with the circus, he says.

His nickname for a time was Mr. Bob Weir Trouble. He threw a water balloon at a cop from the roof and was arrested. When he learned that the draft board had to save every piece of correspondence from a citizen, he began sending his draft board stones and sticks and anything he could fit into a mailbox. At an airline counter, he produced a cap pistol and started playing cowboys and Indians, which got the Grateful Dead banned from the airline. His roommate at the band’s house was Neal Cassady, who is Dean Moriarty in Kerouac’s “On the Road.” Weir’s most widely performed song, “The Other One,” which the Grateful Dead played often, in variations, for nearly thirty years, describes his flight from home, with Cassady driving Furthur, the Merry Pranksters’ bus. Weir says that he never listens to old Grateful Dead music, and in the movie he says that the pleasure he took in the band’s first gold record was in being able to give it to his parents and show them that he had accomplished something. Weir was briefly in the audience for the movie, with his wife and his younger daughter—his older daughter was home in California, rehearsing for a school play. I happened to be sitting about four seats from him. I was curious to see how long he could stand to watch himself onscreen. Roughly ten minutes in, he rose and disappeared down a hallway, and didn’t come back. At the end of the movie, he performed for about forty-five minutes.

The last thing I want to say is that I saw the Grateful Dead for the first time, at the Fillmore East, in the fall of 1969, when they were still essentially a regional California attraction. I had gone with friends to the Saturday-night late show to see my favorite band at the time, Country Joe and the Fish, who were the headliners. Bill Graham announced that the order of the concert would be reversed, and that Country Joe would play first. This was to accommodate the Grateful Dead, who were known to play for hours.

The Fillmore was a small theatre. I was sitting in the third row. Not long after the Grateful Dead took the stage, at around one or two in the morning, I fell asleep, for how long I have no idea. I tried not to, but I was seventeen years old, and not used to staying up late. I kept feeling my chin fall forward, and then I would open my eyes to a different tableau, which gave the concert the atmosphere of a dream. Country Joe had performed as a band. The Grateful Dead took the stage like a troupe of minstrels. There were seven of them: two drummers, two guitarists (Weir and Garcia), a bass player, a man who played the piano and the organ, and Pigpen, a small, slight figure in denim, with a thin beard and a crumpled hat, who sometimes played the organ, sometimes the conga drums, and other times just wandered around the stage, standing in front of the other musicians and pointing a camera at them. Sometimes, one of the drummers got up from his kit, walked over, and struck a gong or shook bells, like a shepherd. A man who looked like a gang biker came from the wings now and then, and knelt and held a cigarette lighter to a tube on the floor, and an arrow of flames shot toward the ceiling, like those flames on top of gas wells. The fronts of all the amplifiers were covered with elaborately tie-dyed fabric and were lavish and arresting to look at, like something from a bazaar in a country it was difficult to reach and a little scary to visit. An intricate wooden sign, embedded with lights, descended from the ceiling. It read “Grateful Dead” in the same curving, mysterious, psychedelic font as the cover of their album “Aoxomoxoa,” a nonsensical palindrome.

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I was a senior in high school. The spooky flames, the disorder that seemed only half under control, the carnival atmosphere, and the powerful, serpentine music were my first awarenesses that the world was deeper, more capacious, and more thrilling than I knew. I thought that the music I was hearing would need hieroglyphs, not notes, to represent it. Weir played his guitar as if he were exploring it, with curiously studious gestures. Rhythm guitarists in those days strummed. Weir, however, appeared to be apprehending and enacting possibilities within the fabric of the music. The band itself seemed like the exemplification of a mystery, and the musicians like sorcerers. They were young men then, all in their twenties, and they had a great deal of energy. My friends and I had gone into the theatre a little before midnight, and by the time the concert was over and the doors had opened, the sun had risen. People who had slept all night were walking on Second Avenue in their day clothes. The sudden transit from darkness to daylight made it seem as if I had emerged from a forest or a tunnel. I remember a man carrying a copy of the Sunday Times and a container of coffee. He seemed, obscurely, to have the faintest head start in time on me. We found my friend’s car and drove home to the suburbs and our parents’ houses. I now knew something that they didn’t know: life is more than we imagine it to be.

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Perhaps 1969 was late to be arriving at such an awareness, but it wasn’t so late for a boy at a school in the suburbs of New York. A few of my friends seemed to know about it, but not everyone. It was still a secret to hold, a freemasonry. And what is adolescence but the reducing of the world to a manageable idea that you can share safely with others.

Read “Deadhead,” Nick Paumgarten’s piece about the vast recorded legacy of the Grateful Dead, and Alec Wilkinson’s Talk of the Town stories about Weir, “Blind Date” and “The Musical Life.”

The Bushwick Trailer Park Lives On! (Sort Of)

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The Bushwick Trailer Park Lives On! (Sort Of)

Urban Campers

The Bushwick Trailer Park Lives On! (Sort Of)

December 12, 2013

By Jesse Sposato

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(Photo: Jesse Sposato)
No, that crow isn’t alive. (Photo: Jesse Sposato)

Ever wonder what happened to all those trailers from the Bushwick Trailer Park, the arts collective/trailer haven that popped up on a vacant Bushwick lot a few years ago? Shortly after the park’s demise in 2011, collective founder Hayden Cummings told City Room that a third of them were sold on Craigslist; but what about the rest? Well, a few — four Airstreams from the 1950s through the ’70s, to be exact — have made their way to a smallish lot on the border of Greenpoint and Williamsburg. And Morgan O’ Kane, a banjo player and subway busker, lives in one of them.

(Photo: Jesse Sposato)
(Photo: Jesse Sposato)

After being dispersed from the trailer park, O’Kane, 35, spent the next year living in a church on Bushwick Avenue that ironically (or not ironically, at this point) was cleared out for redevelopment. “When [the fire department] kicked me out of there, they gave me 24 hours to get out, and I called my trailer park friends and they [were] like, ‘Come here!’” said O’Kane. That was a year ago. Now, making his home in a 1955 Airstream satisfies his desire to live on a boat, which he can’t do because his five-year-old son, who stays with him half the week, is too young for the life aquatic. “When he’s older,” O’Kane said optimistically. “For now this is like a land boat; this is the closest I can get to [the real thing].”

Though he wouldn’t reveal an exact amount, O’Kane’s rent is half as much as that of any other apartment he’s had in New York, even though the land boat is as big or bigger. When I inquired about the “stuff” issue (i.e. where was all of it?), he looked at me like I’d just punked him. “What do you mean stuff? I don’t have any stuff,” he said, deadpan. But his Airstream is in fact quite charming and thoughtfully decorated, with, of course, some stuff in it. There are a couple of guitars and banjos, a flat-screen television, a desk he found on the street, and Christmas lights; his Halloween-loving son’s toy spiders and pumpkin artwork adorn the walls.

(Photo: Jesse Sposato)trailer3-520x390
(Photo: Jesse Sposato)

O’Kane hasn’t actually spent all that much time living in traditional apartments, though. Even before the trailer park and the church, he rode trains and was homeless for eight years, and when he first moved to New York he lived in squats on the Lower East Side and in Brooklyn. “I’ve never been able to do the rent thing,” he confessed. “This is rent, but it’s different — [I mean] like, landlord, apartment, box — it’s just always been really hard for me. It doesn’t seem right. . . . I think rent is kind of theft.”

The number of residents living in the mini trailer park — mostly musicians and artists like O’Kane, ranging in age from their twenties and forties — constantly fluctuates between around three and six. Between them, they all share the cost of the lot. Each trailer functions like a single apartment unit, with the communal outdoor space serving as a courtyard. Pointing to one of the trailers, O’Kane explained that it used to be home to all the shower stalls in the old trailer park. It has since been fixed back up, and is now livable again. Another Airstream serves as a second space for a couple with an apartment elsewhere in the city.

(Photo: Jesse Sposato)
(Photo: Jesse Sposato)

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The day I met O’Kane, his eponymous band had been over for a rehearsal and barbeque the night before. O’Kane plays with anywhere between two and five musicians at a given time. When he’s not practicing or gigging (the band is doing a winter residency at Black Bear Bar in Williamsburg, in anticipation of a record that comes out in March), he’s performing in a subway station, three or four times a week for a couple hours at a time. He fluctuates between Washington Square, Union Square — and Bedford only if he has to. “I don’t like to play Bedford,” he said. “[It’s] kind of like Disneyland for cool people, and it drives me crazy.” Washington Square, because it’s made up mostly of students and tourists, is always an easy score, but Union Square is his favorite because it’s “everyday people.”

If people ask O’Kane where his place is, he shares that he lives in a trailer but he doesn’t say where. “It scares the shit out of me,” he said. “Something bad always happens when it comes to [this kind of thing].” Let’s hope this time is the exception.
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Aside
This is a fantastic clip of Anchorage-based violinist Bryson Andres

Amazing BRYSON ANDRES IN DOWNTOWN SPOKANE WA.

This is a fantastic clip of Anchorage-based violinist Bryson Andres playing his sampled and looped version of OneRepublic’s Secrets on the streets of Spokane, Washington. As somebody who played violin for close to nine years I’m in awe in what Andres has accomplished in just eight … I had difficulty keeping my instrument in tune, let alone, y’know, being able to produce things that sounded like music. (via the awesomer)violin

This is a fantastic clip of Anchorage-based violinist Bryson Andres

COOL PEOPLE -RAY MANZERAK

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COOL PEOPLE -RAY MANZERAK

 

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AN INTERVIEW WITH RAY MANZEREK

 

BEST ORGAN SOLO EVER 1970

 

Singer, Music Producer (1939–2013

Ray Manzarek Biography

Quick Facts
Name Ray Manzarek Occupation Singer, Music Producer Birth Date February 12, 1939 Death Date May 20, 2013 Education DePaul University, University of California, Los Angeles Place of Birth Chicago, Illinois Place of Death Rosenheim, Germany AKA Raymond Daniel Manczarek Ray Manczarek Raymond Manczarek Ray ManzarekFull Name Raymond Daniel Manczarek Jr.
Synopsis
Early Life
Success with the Doors
Life After the Doors
Death and Legacy
Cite This Page

Ray Manzarek was a co-founder of the Doors, a 1960s rock band. His keyboard skills helped turn Doors songs like “Light My Fire” into huge hits.

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“We knew what the people wanted: the same thing the Doors wanted. Freedom.”

—Ray Manzarek

Synopsis

Ray Manzarek was born in Chicago, Illinois, on February 12, 1939. After moving to California, Manzarek became a founding member of the Doors, the psychedelic rock band. The Doors split up soon after the death of lead singer Jim Morrison, but Manzarek continued to work as a successful musician, producer and writer. Manzarek died in Rosenheim, Germany, on May 20, 2013, at the age of 74.

Early Life

Ray Manzarek was born Raymond Daniel Manczarek Jr. on February 12, 1939, in Chicago, Illinois. He trained as a classical organist and pianist during his childhood. After studying economics at DePaul University, Manzarek moved to California, where he attended film school at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Success with the Doors

In 1965, Manzarek happened to run into fellow UCLA student Jim Morrison on a beach in Venice, California. After hearing some of Morrison’s poetic song lyrics, Manzarek suggested that they form a band. Lead singer Morrison and keyboardist Manzarek were soon joined by guitarist Robby Krieger and drummer John Densmore. Together, the four men made up the Doors. Each member brought something special to the band, with Manzarek offering his powerful keyboard skills and classical, blues and jazz influences.

The musical world of the 1960s was filled with bands who wanted to speak for the counterculture, but the Doors struck a chord. The Doors were signed to Elektra Records in 1966 and released their first album the following year. Playing a Vox Continental organ, Manzarek gave many Doors songs a unique sound, as demonstrated in their No. 1 hit “Light My Fire.” The band’s other hit songs included “Break on Through (To the Other Side),” “Riders on the Storm” and “Hello, I Love You.”

The Doors had recorded six successful albums before Morrison died in Paris, France, in 1971. After Morrison’s death, Manzarek took over as vocalist. The group put out two more albums, but, as Manzarek explained, “[It] wasn’t the Doors without Morrison.” The remaining members split up in 1973.

Life After the Doors

After the Doors broke up, Manzarek stayed in the music business. In addition to putting out solo albums, he formed the band Nite City. Manzarek also worked with composer Philip Glass on a rock adaptation of “Carmina Burana,” produced albums for the punk band X, and recorded with Weird Al Yankovic.

In 2002, Manzarek began touring with Doors guitarist Krieger, leading to a legal battle with Densmore about their rights to use the band’s name (the final name the two performed under was Manzarek-Krieger). However, the dispute with Densmore didn’t keep the three remaining Doors members from recording together later, as they worked on “Breakin’ a Sweat” with electronic musician Skrillex.

In addition to music, Manzarek penned an autobiography, Light My Fire: My Life with The Doors, in 1998. He also wrote two novels that were published in the 2000s.

Death and Legacy

On May 20, 2013, after fighting bile duct cancer for years, Manzarek died at the age of 74 in a clinic in Rosenheim, Germany.

Though his life was filled with a multitude of other accomplishments, Manzarek is best known as a member of one of the most successful bands the world has ever seen. The Doors have sold more than 100 million albums worldwide, been immortalized in an Oliver Stone film and been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Being a part of a success like the Doors is something few musicians get the chance to experience, and Manzarek was proud of that legacy.

Raymond Daniel Manczarek Jr.. (2014). The Biography.com website. Retrieved 01:33, Apr 12, 2014, from http://www.biography.com/people/ray-manzarek-21232373.

Harvard Style

Raymond Daniel Manczarek Jr.. [Internet]. 2014. The Biography.com website. Available from: http://www.biography.com/people/ray-manzarek-21232373 [Accessed 12 Apr 2014].

“Raymond Daniel Manczarek Jr..” 2014. The Biography.com website. Apr 12 2014 http://www.biography.com/people/ray-manzarek-21232373.
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Ray Manzarek
By Levi Asher on Monday, May 20, 2013 08:33 pm

Audio Literature, Beat Generation, Music, Poetry Readings, Postmodernism, Summer Of Love, Tributes
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I saw Ray Manzarek, the keyboardist for the Doors who died today, at a poetry show with Michael McClure at the Bottom Line nightclub in New York City a few years ago. I was awestruck by both legends on that stage: McClure for being a Beat Generation poet and Ray Manzarek for being the most exciting keyboard player in the history of rock, the architect of the “Light My Fire” sound, a key literary/avant-garde scenester of the hippie and post-hippie era, and the enabler of Jim Morrison.

I wasn’t actually blown away by the Bottom Line poetry show, maybe because I like Michael McClure and Ray Manzarek too much individually for the tastes to go together. But, looking for a YouTube video with which to pay tribute to great Brother Ray today, I skipped the obvious Doors selections and settled instead on a McClure/Manzarek performance uploaded in 2008. Manzarek plucks shimmering riffs from “Riders on the Storm” while McClure says stuff like this:

i am my abstract alchemist of flesh made real

The luminescent celestial canvas of “Riders” is a good example of Ray Manzarek at his best. It’s good to see in this late-career video that maturity did not dim Manzarek’s spiritual major key brightness, nor slow his tempo. He died of cancer at the age of 74. As McClure says: O Muse!