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50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

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50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

6 time Golden Globe winner Paul Newman boating in Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

Source: reddit.com

Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

A young Harrison Ford

Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

Source: twitter.com

Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip at the horse races (1968)

Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

Jimi Hendrix backstage at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

323kPeople Sharing
Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

6 time Golden Globe winner Paul Newman boating in Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

Source: reddit.com

Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

Cosmos host and astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson at a college wrestling match

Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

Source: twitter.com

Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip at the horse races (1968)

Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

Jimi Hendrix backstage at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

Throwback Thursday: Jackie Kennedy in a Photo Booth

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Throwback Thursday: Jackie Kennedy in a Photo Booth

Throwback Thursday: Jackie Kennedy in a Photo Booth

By Mark Shaw.

Jacqueline Kennedy in her first official White House photograph, featured on Vanity Fair’s May 2004 cover, 10 years after her death.

This week marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Jackie Kennedy Onassis, who passed away on May 19, 1994, at the age of 64. Camelot royalty and one of America’s most celebrated icons, the First Lady had been a perennial fixture of Vanity Fair, gracing five covers, including one special issue on the Kennedy family. Herewith, we recall her glamour and grace, captured in photographs originally featured in Vanity Fair 10 years ago this month.

If this photo booth capture were in color, it would be hard to tell it’s 50 years old.

seeing the subway

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seeing the subway

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Faith of Graffiti

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Subway-01.jpgByron Company, “Queensboro Tunnel” (1918 ), from the the Museum of the City of New York.

 

Seeing the Subway
Posted by Jessie Wender

Looking on Instagram, it’s hard not to see at least a picture a day from the New York City subway. Photographers armed with iPhones shoot from the hip, casually glancing at the screen of their phone or pushing in front of fellow-passengers to capture dancers on a moving train. The subway has long been a subject for photographers, from early anonymous photographs of its construction to images of passengers in repose, beautiful graffiti, homeless dwellers, the casual rider, and its majestic architecture. This week, we’re taking a look at pictures of the New York subway, often by artists with bodies of work devoted to the subject. Next week, we’ll look at underground systems around the world.
“Between 1938 and 1941 Evans photographed passengers in the New York City Subway with a camera cleverly hidden inside his coat,” according to the Metropolitan’s Web site. “With the focus and exposure of his 35mm Contax predetermined, Evans was completely free to attend to the transient expressions and conduct of his fellow passengers.” Evans said of photographing on the train: “These anonymous people who come and go in the cities and who move on the land; it is on what they look like now; what is in their faces and in the windows and the streets beside and around them, what they are wearing and what they are riding in, and how they are gesturing that we need to concentrate, consciously, with the camera.”
Subway-03.jpgStanley Kubrick, “Life and Love on the New York City Subway (Couple Sleeping on a Subway)” (1946)/Courtesy collections of the Museum of the City of New York.
“Stanley took thousands of images for Look Magazine between 1945 and 1950,” Phil Grosz, from SK Film Archives, told me. “He sold the first image at age sixteen.” The Museum of the City of New York writes, “Many of the shots are candid portraits of people seemingly unaware of any camera, perhaps indicating the use of some sort of spy or buttonhole camera.”
Subway-04.jpegEnrico Natali, from the book “New York Subway, 1960” published in by Nazraeli Press in association with the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.
“This photograph is from a series taken in the New York subway during a four-month period in 1960,” Natali told me. “At the time, although I worked professionally as a photographer, I didn’t take it seriously as a profession. I did it because it was fun. I had worked for Antron Bruehl, a high-end commercial photographer, where we did top-of-the-line advertising photographs. It was interesting, but, quite truthfully, I despised advertising and most of the people associated with it, most particularly the art directors. So I thought maybe photojournalism would be more to my taste, and decided to shoot a few stories and learn how to do it. Since I lived in the depths of Brooklyn and rode the subway to where I worked in Manhattan, it seemed reasonable to make the subway my first project. I became so involved in the work that for a time I all but lived in the subway. One night, looking over the photographs, I had the realization that they were larger than I was, that photography was my vocation, and America my subject.”
Subway-05.jpgJon Naar, “Times Square Shuttle” (1973), from the book “The Birth of Graffiti.”
“In the winter of 1972, I was assigned by Pentagram Design London to photograph a brochure on N.Y.C.,” Naar told me. “The hot topic was the spray-can-graffiti phenomenon, and I became the first professional photographer to document it. My ten-day shoot resulted in in the iconic book ‘The Faith of Graffiti,’ with an introduction by Norman Mailer.”
Subway-06.jpgMartha Cooper
“In the late seventies, I was working on a personal photo project documenting kids on the Lower East Side playing with toys they made from trash,” Cooper told me. “One boy showed me sketches in his notebook, and explained that he was practicing his nickname to paint on a wall. When I expressed interest, he offered to introduce me to a ‘king.’ The king turned out to be Dondi, and I became obsessed with graffiti. From Dondi and his crew, I heard many stories about the exploits of subway writers. Finally, in 1980, I accompanied them on a mission to the New Lots yards, in Brooklyn. In this photo, Dondi is completing a top-to-bottom car he titled ‘Children of the Grave Part 3,’ because there had been two previous versions. This shot was taken at sunrise, following a night of spray painting. Because the subway cars were parked in parallel rows, the writers could brace themselves between them and reach the top. This was probably the most exciting night of my life, and this is my all-time favorite photo.”
Subway-07.jpgBruce Davidson (1980)/Courtesy Magnum.
“The subway has even more meaning today than in the past, for we live in turbulent and tense times, where humanity can be both amazing and horrific,” Bruce Davidson writes in “Notes on the Subway,” the 2003 rerelease of his book “Subway.” “Although nearly 25 years have passed and the subway itself has changed and improved, we are not always aware of our past, what awaits us, or the passage of time. I explored the six hundred miles of subway tracks, uncovering layers of live in a bestial and beautiful subterranean world. Today the world is riding the rails on a subway to unknown destinations, where social strife and suicidal sadism are trapped in the same train with ordinary people trying best to live their lives. The gruesome biological, chemical and nuclear weapons of mass destruction ride along with us. The train has long left the station and again, we find ourselves hanging on together.”
Subway-08.jpgMargaret Morton, “Bernard, the Tunnel” (1993).
“Between 1991 and 1996, I photographed the homeless individuals who lived in the tunnel that stretches for two and a half miles beneath Riverside Park,” Morton told me. “Bernard Isaac, who made his home in the tunnel for eleven years, was known by many of the forty-five members of this underground community as Lord of the Tunnel. ‘The Tunnel’ is a book of my photographs and oral histories of the residents and the homes that they created for themselves underground.”

 

a breathtaking aerial vidw of the Chicago skyline as reflected on Lake Michagan-click for bigger view

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a breathtaking aerial vidw of the Chicago skyline as reflected on Lake Michagan-click for bigger view

whoa

A Breathtaking Aerial View of the Chicago Skyline as Reflected on Lake Michigan sunset clouds cityscapes Chicago

While on approach to Chicago O’Hare International Airport last week after a business trip, amateur photographer Mark Hersch glanced out his window at the setting sun and decided to pull out his iPhone to take a photo. Right then the plane banked for a 180-degree left turn over Lake Michigan for a final westward approach when an unexpected play of light occurred: the entire skyline of Chicago was suddenly projected in shadow from underneath the cover of clouds. It’s safe to say this is textbook definition of a once-in-a-lifetime shot. Photo courtesy Mark Hersch. (via Twisted Sifter)