Tag Archives: SINGER

COOL PEOPLE- WOODIE GUTHRIE- BIO, MUSIC AND SUCH

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COOL PEOPLE- WOODIE GUTHRIE- BIO, MUSIC AND SUCH

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 THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND was written at a small boarding house on 43rd Street. His autobiography BOUND FOR GLORY and many of his most popular songs were written in various locations around town; JESUS CHRIST, TOM JOAD, VIGILANTE MAN, and RIDING IN MY CAR are among the 600 songs he composed here.

http://youtu.be/XaI5IRuS2aE

My Name Is New York – Deluxe Audio Book

http://youtu.be/HFYpdbrKEOA

Now, for the first time, you’ll actually be able to hear these stories told by those who knew him best, in many different ways and through various encounters and circumstances; music partners Pete Seeger, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Sonny Terry, and Bess Lomax Hawes, Woody’s first wife Mary Guthrie, Woody’s merchant marine buddy Jimmy Longhi, Bob Dylan, Woody’s second wife Marjorie Guthrie, Arlo Guthrie, Nora Guthrie and many others share their memories with you first-hand.

With this new audio tour, we invite you to walk the streets, ride the buses and subways, or sit down and relax on some of the stoops, park benches, or beaches where Woody Guthrie did — always strumming away on his guitar, always working on a new song.

 http://youtu.be/HFYpdbrKEOA

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Woody Guthrie Biography

Singer, Guitarist, Songwriter (1912–1967)
Woody Guthrie was a singer-songwriter, and one of the legendary figures of American folk music.

Woody Guthrie – Centennial Birthday Festival at City Winery (TV-14; 03:04) American folk musician Woody Guthrie’s songs and legacy continue to influence music and politics. To celebrate his 100th birthday, City Winery in New York City held a three day festival of concerts celebrating his life and work.Synopsis
Woody Guthrie wrote more than 1,000 songs, including “So Long (It’s Been Good to Know Yuh)” and “Union Maid.” After serving in WWII, he continued to perform for farmer and worker groups. “This Land Is Your Land” was his most famous song, and it became an unofficial national anthem. His autobiography,Bound for Glory (1943), was filmed in 1976. His son Arlo also achieved success as a musician.Woody Guthrie Photo Gallery: Woody was warmly embraced by leftist artists, union organizers and folk musicians.
Born on July 14, 1912 in Okemah, Oklahoma, Woody Guthrie was the second son of Charles and Nora Belle Guthrie. The future folk hero was born just weeks after Woodrow Wilson was nominated as the Democratic candidate for president in 1912; as his namesake later told a crowd of concertgoers, “My father was a hard, fist-fighting Woodrow Wilson Democrat, so Woodrow Wilson was my name.”Both parents were musically inclined and taught young Woody a wide array of folk tunes, songs that he soon learned to play on his guitar and harmonica. Tragedy and personal loss visited the budding musician early and often throughout his childhood, providing a bleak context for his future songs and supplying him with a wry perspective on life.In short order, Guthrie experienced the accidental death of his older sister Clara, a fire that destroyed the family home, his father’s financial ruin, and the institutionalization of his mother, who was suffering from Huntington’s disease. At the age of just 14, Guthrie and his siblings were left to fend for themselves while their father worked in Texas to repay his debts. As a teenager, Guthrie turned to busking in the streets for food or money, honing his skills as a musician while developing the keen social conscience that would later be so integral to his legendary music.When Guthrie was 19, he married his first wife, Mary Jennings, in Texas, where he had gone to be with his father. Eventually, Woody and Mary would have three children, Gwen, Sue and Bill. The Great Depression hit the Guthrie family hard, and when the drought-stricken Great Plains transformed into the infamous Dust Bowl, Guthrie left his family in 1935 to join the thousands of “Okies” who were migrating West in search of work. Like many other “Dust Bowl refugees,” Guthrie spent his time hitchhiking, riding freight trains, and when he could, quite literally singing for his supper.With his guitar and harmonica, Guthrie sang in the hobo and migrant camps, developing into a musical spokesman for labor and other left-wing causes. These hardscrabble experiences would provide the bedrock for Guthrie’s songs and stories, as well as fodder for his future autobiography, “Bound for Glory.” It was also during these years that Guthrie developed a taste for the road that would never quite leave him.Folk Revolutionary
In 1937, Guthrie arrived in California, where he landed a job with partner Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman as a radio performer of traditional folk music on KFVD in Los Angeles. The duo soon garnered a loyal following from the disenfranchised “Okies” living in migrant camps across California and it wasn’t long before Guthrie’s populist sentiments found their way into his songs.In 1940, Guthrie’s wanderlust led him to New York City, where he was warmly embraced by leftist artists, union organizers and folk musicians. Through fruitful collaboration with the likes of Alan Lomax, Leadbelly, Pete Seeger and Will Geer, Guthrie’s career blossomed. He took up social causes and helped establish folk music not only as a force for change, but also as a viable new commercial genre within the music business. Guthrie’s success as a songwriter with the Almanac Singers helped launch him into the popular consciousness, garnering him even greater critical acclaim. The ensuing fame and hardships of the road led to the end of Guthrie’s marriage in 1943. A year later, he would go on to record his most famous song, “This Land is Your Land,” an iconic populist anthem which remains popular today and is regarded by many as a kind of alternative national anthem.During World War II, the singer/songwriter joined the Merchant Marine and began composing music with a more strident antifascist message. (Guthrie was famous for performing with the slogan, “This Machine Kills Fascists,” scrawled across his acoustic guitar.) While he was out of the Merchant Marine on furlough, he married Marjorie Greenblatt Mazia, and after the war the couple made their home in Coney Island, New York, eventually filling the house with four children: Cathy, Arlo, Joady and Nora. This period in Guthrie’s life would prove to be his most musically prolific, as he continued to produce political anthems while also writing children’s classics like, “Don’t You Push Me Down,” “Ship In The Sky” and “Howdi Doo.”

Highway 66 Blues

BEEN ON THIS ROAD FOR A MIGHTY LONG TIME

TEN MILLION MEN LIKE ME

YOU DRIVE US FROM YO’ TOWN, WE RAMBLE AROUND

I GOT THEM 66 HIGHWAY BLUES

Hard Travelin’ by Woody Guthrie. With Depression Era photos by the great Farm Security Administration photographer John Vachon. Created in honor of Woody’s 100th birthday.

http://youtu.be/yI9OJ6PIbso

Play MIDI

Highway 66 Blues
(Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger)

There is a Highway from coast to the coast,
New York to Los Angeles,
I'm a goin' down that road with troubles on my mind
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Every old town that I ramble' round,
Down that Lonesome Road,
The police in yo' town they shove me around,
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Makes me no difference wherever I ramble
Lord, wherever I go,
I don't wanna be pushed around by th' police in yo' town,
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Been on this road for a mighty long time,
Ten million men like me,
You drive us from yo' town, we ramble around,
And got them 66 Highway Blues.

Sometimes I think I'll blow down a cop,
Lord, you treat me so mean,
I done lost my gal, I aint got a dime,
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Sometimes I think I'll get me a gun,
Thirty eight or big forty fo',
But a number for a name and a big 99,
Is worse than 66 Highway Blues.

I'm gonna start me a hungry man's union,
Ainta gonna charge no dues,
Gonna march down that road to the Wall Street Walls
A singin' those 66 Highway blues.

Copyright Stormking Music, Inc.

COOL PEOPLE -JANIS JOPLIN- Tony Winner Will Play Janis Joplin in Upcoming Biopic

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COOL PEOPLE -JANIS JOPLIN- Tony Winner Will Play Janis Joplin in Upcoming Biopic

Janis Joplin

Janis Joplin – Ball And Chain (Amazing Performance at Monterey)

With Big Brother and the Holding Company, she performed the song at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967 to an enthusiastic audience and critical reception. The first performance on June 17 was not filmed, so the band was persuaded to perform the song again on the next day. This shorter version

http://youtu.be/Bld_-7gzJ-o

Janis Joplin – Piece Of My Heart

http://youtu.be/7uG2gYE5KOs

 

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Singer (1943–1970)

Bio

Janis Joplin – Mini Biography (TV-14; 02:53) Breaking new ground for women in rock music, Janis Joplin rose to fame in the late 1960s and was known for her powerful, blues-inspired vocals

Synopsis

 

Born on January 19, 1943, in Port Arthur, Texas, Janis Joplin developed a love of music at an early age, but her career didn’t take off until she joined the band Big Brother and the Holding Company in 1966. Their 1968 album, Cheap Thrills, was a huge hit. However, friction between Joplin and the band prompted her to part ways with Big Brother soon after. Known for her powerful, blues-inspired vocals, Joplin released her first solo effort, I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!, in 1969. The album received mixed reviews, but her second project, Pearl (1971), released after Joplin’s death, was a huge success. The singer died of an accidental overdose on October 4, 1970, at age 27.
Janis Lyn Joplin was born on January 19, 1943, in Port Arthur, Texas. Breaking new ground for women in rock music, Joplin rose to fame in the late 1960s and became known for her powerful, blues-inspired vocals. She grew up in a small Texas town known for its connections to the oil industry with a skyline and dotted with oil tanks and refineries. For years, Joplin struggled to escape from this confining community, and spent even longer to trying to overcome her memories of her difficult years there.Developing a love for music at an early age, Joplin sang in her church choir as a child and showed some promise as a performer. She was an only child until the age of 6, when her sister, Laura, was born. Four years later, her brother, Michael, arrived. Joplin was a good student and fairly popular until around the age of 14, when some side effects of puberty started to kick in. She got acne and gained some weight.At Thomas Jefferson High School, Joplin began to rebel. She eschewed the popular girls’ fashions of the late 1950s, often choosing to wear men’s shirts and tights, or short skirts. Joplin, who liked to stand out from the crowd, became the target of some teasing as well as a popular subject in the school’s rumor mill. She was called a “pig” by some, while others said that she was sexually promiscuous.Joplin eventually developed a group of guy friends who shared her interest in music and the Beat Generation, which rejected the standard norms and emphasized creative expression (Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg were two of the Beat movement’s leading figures).

Early Musical Interests

Musically, Janis Joplin and her friends gravitated toward blues and jazz, admiring such artists as Lead Belly. Joplin was also inspired by legendary blues vocalists Bessie Smith, MaRainey andOdetta, an early leading figure in the folk music movement. The group frequented local working-class bars in the nearby town of Vinton, Louisiana. By her senior year of high school, Joplin had developed a reputation as a ballsy, tough-talking girl who like to drink and be outrageous.After graduating from high school, Joplin enrolled at Lamar State College of Technology in the neighboring town of Beaumont, Texas. There, she devoted more time to hanging out and drinking with friends than to her studies. At the end of her first semester at Lamar, Joplin left the school. She went on to attend Port Arthur College, where she took some secretarial courses, before moving to Los Angeles in the summer of 1961. This first effort to break away from wasn’t a success, however, and Joplin thus returned to Port Arthur for a time.In the summer of 1962, Joplin fled to the University of Texas at Austin, where she studied art. In Austin, Joplin began performing at folksings—casual musical gatherings where anyone can perform—on campus and atThreadgill’s, a gas station turned bar, with the Waller Creek Boys, a musical trio with whom she was friends. With her forceful, gutsy singing style, Joplin amazed many audience members. She was unlike any other white female vocalist at the time (folk icons like Joan Baez and Judy Collins were known for their gentle sound).In January 1963, Joplin ditched school to check out the emerging music scene in San Francisco with friend Chet Helms. But this stint out west, like her first, proved to be unsuccessful, as Joplin struggled to make it as a singer in the Bay Area. She played some gigs, including a side-stage performance at the 1963 Monterey Folk Festival—but her career didn’t gain much traction. Joplin then spent some time in New York City, where she hoped to have better luck getting her career off the ground, but her drinking and drug use (she’d begun regularly using speed, or amphetamine, among other drugs) there proved to be detrimental to her musical aspirations. In 1965, she left San Francisco and returned home in an effort to get herself together again.

Back in Texas, Joplin took a break from her music and her hard-partying lifestyle, and dressed conservatively, putting her long, often messy hair into a bun and doing everything else she could to appear straight-laced. But the conventional life was not for her, and her desire to pursue her musical dreams wouldn’t remain submerged for long.

Joplin slowly returned to performing, and in May 1966, was recruited by friend Travis Rivers to audition for a new psychedelic rock band based in San Francisco, Big Brother and the Holding Company. At the time, the group was managed by another longtime friend of Joplin’s, Chet Helms. Big Brother, whose members included James Gurley, Dave Getz, Peter Albin and Sam Andrew, was part of the burgeoning San Francisco music scene of the late 1960s; among the other bands involved in this scene were the Grateful Dead.Big Brother

Joplin blew the band away during her audition, and was quickly offered membership into the group. In her early days with Big Brother, she sang only a few songs and played the tambourine in the background. But it wasn’t long before Joplin assumed a bigger role in the band, as Big Brother developed quite a following in the Bay Area. Their appearance at the now legendary Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—specifically their version of “Ball and Chain” (originally made famous by R&B legend Big Mama Thornton) brought the group further acclaim. Most of the praise, however, focused on Joplin’s incredible vocals. Fueled by heroin, amphetamines and the bourbon she drank straight from the bottle during gigs, Joplin’s unrestrained sexual style and raw, gutsy sound mesmerized audiences—and all of this attention caused some tension between Joplin and her bandmates.After hearing Joplin at Monterey, Columbia Records President Clive Davis wanted to sign the band. Albert Grossman, who already managed Bob Dylan, the Band, and Peter, Paul & Mary, later signed on as the band’s manager, and was able to get them out of another record deal they’d signed earlier with Mainstream Records.While their recordings for Mainstream never found much of an audience, Big Brother’s first album for Columbia, Cheap Thrills (1968), was a huge hit. While the album was wildly successful—quickly becoming a certified gold record with songs like “Piece of My Heart” and “Summertime”—creating it had been a challenging process, causing even more problems between Joplin and band’s other members. (The album was produced by John Simon, who’d had the band do take after take in an attempt to create a technically perfect sound.)Cheap Thrills helped solidify Joplin’s reputation as a unique, dynamic, bluesy rock singer. Despite Big Brother’s continued success, Joplin was becoming frustrated with group, feeling that she was being held back professionally.

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Solo Career

Joplin struggled with her decision to leave Big Brother, as her bandmates had been like a family to her, but she eventually decided to part ways with the group. She played with Big Brother for the last time in December 1968.

Following a historic performance at Woodstock (August 1969), Joplin released her first solo effort, I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!, in September 1969, with Kozmic Blues Band. Some of the project’s most memorable songs were “Try (Just a Little Bit Harder)” and “To Love Somebody,” a cover of a Bee Gees tune. But Kozmic Blues received mixed reviews, with some media outlets criticizing Joplin personally. Feeling uniquely pressured to prove herself as a female solo artist in a male-dominated industry, the criticism caused distress for Joplin. “That was a pretty heavy time for me,” she later said in an interview with Howard Smith of The Village Voice. “It was really important, you know, whether people were going to accept me or not.” (Joplin’s interview with Smith was her last; it took place on September 30, 1970, just four days before her death.) Outside of music, Joplin appeared to be struggling with alcohol and drugs, including an addiction to heroin.

Joplin’s next album would be her most successful, but, tragically, also her last. She recorded Pearl with the Full Tilt Boogie Band and wrote two of its songs, the powerful, rocking “Move Over” and “Mercedes Benz,” a gospel-styled send-up of consumerism.Tragic Death and Legacy

Following a long struggle with substance abuse, Joplin died from an accidental heroin overdose on October 4, 1970, at a hotel in Hollywood’s Landmark Hotel. Completed by Joplin’s producer, Pearl was released in 1971 and quickly became a hit. The single “Me and Bobby McGee,” written by Kris Kristofferson, a former love of Joplin’s, reached the top of the charts.Despite her untimely death, Janis Joplin’s songs continue to attract new fans and inspire performers. Numerous collections of her songs have been released over the years, including In Concert (1971) and Box of Pearls(1999). In recognition of her significant accomplishments, Joplin was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, and honored with a Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammy Awards in 2005.Dubbed the “first lady of rock ‘n’ roll,” Joplin has been the subject of several books and documentaries, including Love, Janis (1992), written by sister Laura Joplin. That book was adapted into a play of the same title.

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Tony Winner Will Play Janis Joplin in Upcoming Biopic
Nina Arianda set to portray the singer, with Sean Durkin directing

BY ROLLING STONE

An upcoming Janis Joplin biopic has found its star: Tony award-winning actress Nina Arianda will appear as the singer in the Sean Durkin-directed Joplin, Deadline reports.

According to producer Peter Newman, who’s been trying to put together a Joplin flick along with his partners for the past 12 years, Arianda will sing all of Joplin’s music. That’s no easy task, especially trying to capture Joplin’s signature grit, but Newman says he’s confident in his star’s talents.

“I’ve never in my life seen an actress walk on a stage and convey the duality of vulnerability with overheated sexuality, which is what Janis was all about,” Newman told Deadline.

While this isn’t Arianda’s first foray into film – she’s held supporting roles in Midnight -n Paris, Tower Heist and others – it will be her first major starring role. The actress won acclaim and a Tony for best actress in a play for her turn in the Broadway show Venus in Fur. Meanwhile, director Durkin broke out last year with his film Martha Marcy May Marlene, which garnered plenty of praise at festivals and landed him the Best Director honor at Sundance.

Joplin will focus on the last six months of the Texas-born musician’s career, though it will also include flashbacks to her early career. The film has exclusive rights to use 21 of Joplin’s best known tracks.

While there have been other attempts to produce a Joplin biopic, especially as Newman’s sat on the back-burner, the producer had scored Joplin’s crucial song and life rights as well as the arrangements by backing band Big Brother and the Holding Company. Newman also holds the rights to the collection of letters Love, Janis and Piece of My Heart, the book written by Rolling Stone reporter David Dalton, who traveled with Joplin during the six months before the heroin overdose that killed her in 1970.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/tony-winner-will-play-janis-joplin-in-upcoming-biopic-20120710#ixzz3K6cF1LwT
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Nina Arianda set to portray the singer, with Sean Durkin directing

nina arianda janis joplin
D Dipasupil/Getty Images; GAB Archive/Redferns
Nina Arianda to star as Janis Joplin in upcoming biopic
BY | July 10, 2012

An upcoming Janis Joplin biopic has found its star: Tony award-winning actress Nina Arianda will appear as the singer in the Sean Durkin-directed Joplin, Deadline reports.

According to producer Peter Newman, who’s been trying to put together a Joplin flick along with his partners for the past 12 years, Arianda will sing all of Joplin’s music. That’s no easy task, especially trying to capture Joplin’s signature grit, but Newman says he’s confident in his star’s talents.

“I’ve never in my life seen an actress walk on a stage and convey the duality of vulnerability with overheated sexuality, which is what Janis was all about,” Newman told Deadline.

While this isn’t Arianda’s first foray into film – she’s held supporting roles in Midnight -n Paris, Tower Heist and others – it will be her first major starring role. The actress won acclaim and a Tony for best actress in a play for her turn in the Broadway show Venus in Fur. Meanwhile, director Durkin broke out last year with his film Martha Marcy May Marlene, which garnered plenty of praise at festivals and landed him the Best Director honor at Sundance.

Joplin will focus on the last six months of the Texas-born musician’s career, though it will also include flashbacks to her early career. The film has exclusive rights to use 21 of Joplin’s best known tracks.

While there have been other attempts to produce a Joplin biopic, especially as Newman’s sat on the back-burner, the producer had scored Joplin’s crucial song and life rights as well as the arrangements by backing band Big Brother and the Holding Company. Newman also holds the rights to the collection of letters Love, Janis and Piece of My Heart, the book written by Rolling Stone reporter David Dalton, who traveled with Joplin during the six months before the heroin overdose that killed her in 1970.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/tony-winner-will-play-janis-joplin-in-upcoming-biopic-20120710#ixzz3K6cF1LwT
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

COOL PEOPLE – ‘Best night of my life? The one I spent with Keith Richards': Inside the head of Marianne Faithfull

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 SISTER MORPHINE

http://youtu.be/m42F4da-Fr4

Marianne Faithfull

Real Name:
Marianne Evelyn Gabriel Faithfull
Profile:
Born: December 29, 1946 in Hampstead, London, EnglandMarianne Faithfull is an award winning English singer, songwriter and actress whose career has spanned over four decades. From 1966 to 1970, she had a highly-publicized romantic relationship with Rolling Stones’ lead singer, Mick Jagger.

‘Best night of my life? The one I spent with Keith Richards':

Inside the head of Marianne Faithfull

By GRAEME THOMSON FOR THE MAIL ON SUNDAY

The husky-voiced chanteuse and original Sixties wild child has grown up a bit… well, she’s given up the fags, booze and drugs. But, she says, she’s stubborn as a mule, brooks no nonsense – and still cherishes that night with Keith Richards…

What has been your biggest achievement? 'I got myself out of that straitjacket I was in during the Sixties. It's not 'Marianne from the Sixties' or 'the ex-girlfriend of Mick Jagger' any more,' said Marianne Faithfull

What has been your biggest achievement? ‘I got myself out of that straitjacket I was in during the Sixties. It’s not ‘Marianne from the Sixties’ or ‘the ex-girlfriend of Mick Jagger’ any more,’ said Marianne Faithfull

What sort of child were you?

I was a cheerful, naughty and wicked. I was an only child, which of course I liked. I didn’t crave a sibling, God no! As I grew up I was very spoilt by my mother, because I was so pretty.

When did you last cry?

I don’t cry. I never cry. I guess there have been some terrible, tragic, personal things where I have almost cried. Tears come to my eyes occasionally, but I haven’t really cried since I was 19. It’s a shame, isn’t it?

How do you relax?

Cigarettes calmed me down, but I just stopped smoking so now I don’t have nuffink. I used to have a joint, or a line of cocaine, or a cigarette, or a drink, but I can’t do any of that now. Occasionally it crosses my mind. I went to a little Japanese restaurant last night and I did have a moment of regret that I couldn’t have sake, but I just can’t.

With the smoking, it’s been ten months. I’m very proud of myself, but I’m just getting more and more curt. I don’t put up with any s*** from anyone. That might already have been the case anyway, but not like it is now. I’m much worse.

Describe the best night of your life: 'The night I spent with Keith. Even now, it stands out. I think it was so great and memorable because it was just one night. That was it. And we're still great friends,' said Marianne

Describe the best night of your life: ‘The night I spent with Keith. Even now, it stands out. I think it was so great and memorable because it was just one night. That was it. And we’re still great friends,’ said Marianne

 What has been your biggest achievement?

I got myself out of that straitjacket I was in during the Sixties. It’s not ‘Marianne from the Sixties’ or ‘the ex-girlfriend of Mick Jagger’ any more, and I think that’s a great achievement. It took a long time, in fact it’s only really just started, but thank God. It makes life much easier.

What is your greatest regret?

I regret that I couldn’t love people more. I think I’ve realised now how important that is, which I don’t know if one realises when one is young. It’s the only thing we’ve got, actually, against the horror of life. Love is the only thing that makes it bearable, otherwise things are very bleak indeed. Now I can see that of course I should have wished for brothers and sisters, because the more people for me to love and who would have loved me back the better. But I didn’t.

What are you best at?

Writing songs, making songs and performing. I have achieved a level of mastery at it, but I could certainly be better.

Who do you most admire?

I really admired Oscar Wilde and Baudelaire when I was young, and I still love Wilde. He’s one of my best friends. I live in Paris so I can go and see him in the cemetery any time I like and talk to him. I also really admire Jeanne Moreau, Catherine Deneuve and Barbara Castle. Strong women. Elegant.

'Physically, ageing can be tough but there are a lot of positives about getting older,' said Marianne

http://youtu.be/Wy7TrQsiqvg

‘Physically, ageing can be tough but there are a lot of positives about getting older,’ said Marianne

Which living person do you most despise?

David Cameron, but I don’t really like thinking along those lines. I really try to avoid that kind of s***.

Who would you like to say sorry to and why?

I hurt my mother and I wish I hadn’t, but I didn’t actually have any choice. I wasn’t able to be what she wanted me to be, I just couldn’t do it, and so I had to escape from where I was. Too bad, really.  I would have to say, ‘I’m sorry I hurt you, but I’m not actually sorry for what I did. I think I did the right thing.’ I don’t have to say sorry to my father, he always understood what I was doing, but perhaps I do to my son Nicholas. I think he understands now, a little bit, but obviously when he was little he didn’t understand my behaviour at all.

What is your best characteristic?

I’m open-minded and I think I’m generous, at least with my time. I haven’t really got any money so I can’t do much on that level, but I’ve tried to give what I have. I don’t consciously mentor people, but you kind of pass things on subconsciously. I learned an awful lot about music from Mick and Keith [Richards], and an awful lot from Charlie [Watts], actually, about jazz, but I don’t think he had any idea that I was looking up to him and drinking in his words. He would have been appalled.

 And the worst?

My stubbornness. My inability to listen and take counsel. It’s got better, but still, the minute someone tries to give me advice or tell me some wise thing I rear up and say, ‘Absolutely not!’ I’m afraid it must be a Pavlovian response, I don’t even think twice.

What is your biggest fear?

I’m a very, very fearful person, but also very brave. The two go hand in hand in this woman. I have a general fear of everything – and with good reason. These last two years I broke my back and I broke my hip, but I still made a great record and now I’m going on tour. Physically, ageing can be tough but there are a lot of positives about getting older. I’ve become much more confident and sure of myself.

Describe the best night of your life

The night I spent with Keith. Even now, it stands out. I think it was so great and memorable because it was just one night. That was it. And we’re still great friends.

Marianne Faithfull’s new album ‘Give My Love To London’ is out on September 29. She plays the Royal Festival Hall on Nov 29.

‘A Life On Record’ is published in November. mariannefaithfull.org.uk

THE LAST WORD

Marianne Faithfull puts on stunning stage performance

Marianne Faithfull Claims Her Ex-Boyfriend Killed Jim Morrison in 1971 Paris Bathtub Death
CELEBRITY NEWS AUG. 7, 2014 AT 5:45PM BY ESTHER LEE

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Marianne Faithful and Jim Morrison
Credit: Terry O’Neill/Getty Images; Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Here’s a shocking twist in rock ‘n roll history. Marianne Faithfull claimed in a recent interview with Mojo magazine that Doors frontman Jim Morrison’s 1971 Parisian bathtub death was, actually, a murder—and it involved her ex-boyfriend Jean de Breteuil.

PHOTOS: Stars gone too soon

The singer/songwriter, 67, recalled that fateful summer when she traveled to France with de Breteuil, a heroin dealer whose clients included several high-profile celebs. Upon their arrival, Faithfull’s beau told her he had to stop by the Lizard King’s apartment, located at 17 Rue Beautreillis.

“I could intuitively feel trouble,” Faithfull recalled, resulting in her taking “a few Tuinal” and conking out. “He went to see Jim Morrison and killed him,” she claimed. “I mean I’m sure it was an accident. Poor bastard.”

PHOTOS: Celebrity drug confessions

“The smack was too strong?” she speculated to herself. “Yeah. And he died. And I didn’t know anything about this. Anyway, everybody connected to the death of this poor guy is dead now. Except me.”

While Morrison is long gone, the numerous conspiracy theories regarding his death continue to thrive. At the time, French authorities decided to skip the autopsy as no foul play was believed to be suspected in his death.

PHOTOS: Celebrity scandals and meltdowns

As for Jean de Breiteuil? The former dealer died of an overdose in Morocco that same year. “He was a horrible guy, someone who had crawled out from under a stone,” Faithfull recalled in her 2000 autobiography. “What I liked about him was that he had one yellow eye and one green eye. And he had a lot of dope. It was all about drugs and sex.”

PHOTOS: Stars we lost in the last year

In the same interview with Mojo, Faithfull also discussed another fallen music legend, Amy Winehouse, who, like Morrison, also died at age 27. “Amy was very, very wary of me,” Faithfull said. “She knew that I knew and she didn’t want me to say anything. There’s a level of narcissism which is all mixed up with self-hatred. I know it well…. But I can’t think what I could have done apart from take her and shake her! ‘You stupid little c—! Wake up!'”

Faithfull is back in the news as her new album, Give My Love to London, is released on Sept. 29.

Read more: http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/marianne-faithfull-claims-ex-killed-jim-morrison-in-1971-paris-death-201478#ixzz3Cdzt8oJz
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COOL PEOPLE – TWIGGY’S 63rd. BIRTHDAY-A 60’s ICON

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COOL PEOPLE – TWIGGY’S 63rd. BIRTHDAY-A 60’s ICON

 

 

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COOL TWIGGY FOOTAGE

ALL ABOUT TWIGGY
TWIGGY SINGING

TWIGGY AND TOMMY TUNE

Synopsis

With her thin build and wide eyes, Twiggy became one of the world’s first supermodels and face of London’s “swinging ’60s” mod scene. She has also made numerous appearances on television, and her films include The Boy Friend (1971), The Blues Brothers (1981) and Madame Sousatzka (1989). More recently, Twiggy appeared as a judge on America’s Next Top Model.

1960s Fashion Icon

Born Lesley Hornby on September 19, 1949 in London, England, Twiggy first rose to fame as a model in the 1960s. She has since established herself as an actress, singer and television personality. Twiggy is the youngest of three sisters. One of her earlier nicknames during her school years was “Sticks.” But the name she is famous for was given to her as a teenager. She dropped out of school around the age of 15.

Before long, Twiggy became one of the world’s top models. She had her career breakthrough when she was named the face of 1966 by the Daily Express newspaper. With her thin build, dramatic eyes and boyish hair style, Twiggy captured the spirit of the “swinging sixties” in London’s Carnaby Street mod scene. She soon appeared on the cover of many leading fashion magazines, including Elle and British Vogue.

Twiggy was one of the first models to parlay her success as a model into other business ventures. In 1967, she came to the United States to promote her own clothing line as well as model. The trip also afforded her a chance to work with famed photographer Richard Avedon. Twiggy became so popular in America that she even inspired her own Barbie doll. More Twiggy merchandise soon followed, including a board game and a lunch box. Fans would even copy her distinctive eye look with their own set of Twiggy fake eyelashes.

Later Career

Twiggy started acting in the 1970s, making her film debut in Ken Russell’s musical The Boy Friend (1971) with Tommy Tune. More movie roles followed, including appearances in The Blues Brothers (1980) with John Belushi and Madame Sousatzka (1988) with Shirley MacLaine. Twiggy also enjoyed some success on the stage. In 1983, she made her Broadway debut in My One and Only with Tommy Tune.

Over the years, Twiggy has also made numerous television appearances as well. She was briefly co-presenter of ITV’s popular This Morning program in 2001. On American television, Twiggy also served as a judge on Tyra Banks’s popular modeling-competition show America’s Next Top Model.

Twiggy became the face of Marks & Spencer in 2005. In addition to modeling for the company, she sells a line of clothing through its website. Twiggy has also been a model for Olay beauty products in recent years. She also remained a subject of great interest and fascination with several books and documentaries made about her life and career. In 2009, Twiggy: A Life in Photographs was published.

Personal Life

In 1977, Twiggy married actor Michael Witney. The couple had one daughter, Carly, before Witney’s death in 1983. She married her second husband, actor Leigh Lawson, in 1988. Twiggy is an advocate of animal welfare and is recognized for her support of breast cancer research groups.

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Culture

’60s

London in the mid-to late-1960s was as central to the look and feel of that fabled era as any place on earth. The (the Beatles, the Stones, the Who, Cream and countless others) was, in large part, the soundtrack of the Sixties. The street scenes, especially along Carnaby Street in Soho, with the eminently picturesque Mods and hippies hanging out in their utterly distinctive gear, provided youth culture around the world with exemplars of cool that are still embraced today.

Finally, the fashions that emerged from London, as well as the models who made those fashions both hip and famous, still echo through pop culture. Jean Shrimpton, Penelope Tree and, of course, the extraordinary woman known as Twiggy (born Lesley Hornby) were for several years in the mid-1960s the heavily made-up faces of Swinging London itself.

[See TIME.com on Twiggy as an “All-Time 100 Fashion Icon.”]

Today, Twiggy remains not only a fashion touchstone — with any slim young thing who sports short hair and liberal eye shadow inevitably pegged as “Twiggy-like” — but has also, incredibly, managed to stay relevant and productive for decades. Rather than simply and endlessly recycling the elements of her appeal that made her famous in the first place, Hornby went on to act in films and on stage (not just in set pieces, but in classic plays by heavyweights like Shaw and Noel Coward); recorded — and continues to record — as a singer; appeared on TV shows (like all great stars, for example, she took a turn on The Muppets); and wrote several books, including a well-received autobiography.

It sometimes astonishes people — or people outside the UK, at least — to learn that the skinny, blonde, mop-topped, teenaged model who took the fashion world by storm in the Sixties actually survived those crazy years, grew up and, incredibly, is still around.

Here, on Twiggy’s 63rd birthday, LIFE.com celebrates her career and her enduring style with a series of rare pictures — shot in California for a feature that never appeared in the magazine — by long-time LIFE photographer Ralph Crane. Captured at the very height of her fame as one of the first-ever supermodels, and during her first visit to the U.S. when she was all of 18 years old, the Twiggy in most of these pictures seems remarkably cool and sophisticated for one so young. (Perhaps not surprising, considering that she’d been one of the most famous figures — and had one of the most famous figures — in the world for the previous whirlwind year.)

In other shots, meanwhile, she looks refreshingly like a teen who is still thrilled that her life has taken her to these sorts of places, with these sorts of people. There are other Sixties icons here, after all — Sonny and Cher, for example, and Steve McQueen (wearing a shearling coat in the Beverly Hills sun, and somehow looking cool doing it).

Throughout it all, the vibe of all of these photos is distinctly, unmistakably that of the Sixties — specifically, that brief period in 1966 and 1967, before MLK and Bobby Kennedy were assassinated, before Altamont, before the Manson family murders, before the decade died out entirely, when people might have been able to convince themselves that the Age of Aquarius was really just around the corner. Or, if not the Age of Aquarius, then at least a pretty groovy garden party at a mansion in Beverly Hills.

Read more: Twiggy: Rare Photos of a Swinging Sixties Icon | LIFE.com http://life.time.com/culture/twiggy-rare-photos-of-a-sixties-icon/#ixzz34M5BUFHw

Bob Dylan sneers at his obsessive fans, but he may have more in common with them than he might think.

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The critic Greil Marcus once told an interviewer that, among musicians, Bob Dylan had the stupidest fans. “I think it’s because something in Dylan’s writing leads people to believe that there is a secret behind every song. And if you unlock that secret then you’ll understand the meaning of life,” he said. Dylan himself seems to agree. In 2001, forty years into his career, Dylan said, “These so-called connoisseurs of Bob Dylan music, I don’t feel they know a thing, or have any inkling of who I am and what I’m about. I know they think they do, and yet it’s ludicrous, it’s humorous, and sad.” A decade later, Dylan told an interviewer for Rolling Stone, “Why is it when people talk about me they have to go crazy? What the fuck is the matter with them? … May the Lord have mercy on them. They are lost souls.”

David Kinney’s new book, “The Dylanologists,” is a journey among these so-called lost souls. Kinney is a newspaper journalist and a Dylan fan; his first book, “The Big One,” from 2009, was about a different set of obsessives: the anglers who compete in an annual fishing derby on Martha’s Vineyard. Here, he travels to a Dylan-themed diner in the singer’s hometown of Hibbing, Minnesota, which catered to visiting fans. (It recently closed, after losing its liquor license; the executive chef explained to the local paper that “people from Hibbing don’t like Bob Dylan as much as people not from Hibbing like Bob Dylan.”) He stands in line in the cold among a group of Dylan’s late-career tour regulars in order to get a prime spot in the front row. And he introduces a cast of Dylan disciples: circumspect keepers of secret bootleg recordings, feuding editors of Dylan zines and Web sites, literary detectives sourcing allusions in his lyrics, and a guy who owns Dylan’s childhood high chair.

There are plenty of creeps. In the mid-sixties, perhaps unnerved by his influence over his fans, Dylan fled upstate to Woodstock, where hopeful acolytes showed up at his house. One guy sneaked into Dylan’s bedroom to watch him and his wife sleep. Later, Dylan recalled thinking, “Now wait, these people can’t be my fans. They just can’t be.” Devotion can turn strange, and sour. After Dylan moved back to New York City, in the late sixties, he was dogged by a man named A. J. Weberman, who created a peculiar translation system to “decode” Dylan’s lyrics—“in Dylan’s language Texas might mean ‘Europe’ ”—and even went through his trash. Years later, still preoccupied by bizarre theories about Dylan, Weberman tells Kinney, “I wasted my fucking life on this shit.” Another parser of Dylan’s songs became convinced that his album “Time Out of Mind,” from 1997, foretold the death of Princess Diana. As Kinney writes, “Any fool could find whatever he wanted inside the vast Dylan songbook: drugs, Jesus, Joan Baez.”

Yet, despite these unnerving examples, most of the fans that Kinney talks to aren’t fools or stalkers. They have simply developed an usually strong affinity for an artist and his music. And though their ardor seems to make the artist himself uncomfortable, Kinney suggests that Dylan might be partially to blame for it—that his own aloofness and self-made mythologies have deepened his fans’ thralldom. “Dylan created personas and then demolished them, denied they had ever existed, and scorned the people who still clung to them,” Kinney writes. Political folkie, country farmer, travelling gypsy, born-again Christian, rustic dandy—Dylan has cycled through a series of musical characters as if playing all the parts in a one-man vaudeville act. It’s been thrilling and curious, and also—most of the time, at least—deeply persuasive. Can fans be blamed for coming under one of these spells—for believing that Dylan meant what he sang at the March on Washington, or wasn’t just messing around when he recorded “Self Portrait,” or for preferring one incarnation above the others and lamenting or resenting that version’s demolition by Dylan’s own revisionism? Kinney’s own fandom seems to have lapsed a bit into skepticism, yet he never mocks the continued devotion of those who still believe. By getting his subjects to talk about the moment, often years past, in which they were swayed by Dylan’s music, Kinney humanizes the archetype of the pop junkie.

It is risky to be an earnest Bob Dylan fan—the kind of person who is inclined to follow him around on his Never Ending Tour, which began in 1988 and hasn’t stopped, as Dylan plays on past his seventy-second birthday. Or someone like the music critic Lester Bangs, who found himself, in the seventies, using Dylan’s album “Blood on the Tracks” as “an instrument of self abuse”—something he put on after every heartbreak, a personal soundtrack of misery. Dylan might very well sneer at one of the hardcore fans whom Kinney talks to, who describes what he feels when he watches the singer onstage: “I just wanted him to know that I existed and that I loved what he did. But it goes deeper than that. I don’t know why, but if Bob is sad, or his music is sad, I feel sad, and I feel sad for him. When he’s singing and he’s hurting, it hurts me, too.” Another fan, who followed the tour as a young woman, told Kinney that she went out of her way not to meet Dylan on the road; she’d heard about his mercurial, often prickly personality, and couldn’t imagine how she could go on listening to his music if he were to shoot her an icy, dismissive stare.

Like a disappointed father—or an angry God—Dylan seems to lament the foibles of his followers. But Kinney argues that Dylan may have more in common with his obsessive fans than he might think. Like them, he is a collector of cultural ephemera, a hoarder of odd texts and phrases, and an avid, idiosyncratic student of the past.

In the summer of 2003, a schoolteacher from Minnesota was travelling in Japan and happened to pick up a book about the world of Japanese organized crime called “Confessions of a Yakuza.” On the book’s first page, he read a line, about a man sitting like a “feudal lord,” that stood out. He realized that it echoed a line from one of Dylan’s songs from the album “Love and Theft,” which was released in 2001. He brought the book home and found a handful of other, unmistakably reused phrases. Dylan had not credited his strange source, which seemed to have been selected almost at random. In the years since, with the help of Google Books, Scott Warmuth, a fan from New Mexico, has been delving deeper into Dylan’s recent writing and finding all kinds of odd, uncredited borrowings. Passages from Dylan’s memoir, “Chronicles: Volume One” (2004), were taken from disparate sources: from H. G. Wells, Jack London, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald; from Tony Horowitz’s nonfiction book “Confederates in the Attic,” a travel guide about New Orleans, and an issue of Time, from 1961. Listeners of Dylan’s album “Modern Times” (from 2006) found lyrics that came from the work of an unremembered Civil War poet named Henry Timrod. Some have called these plain cases of plagiarism; others have suggested that they diminish or else entirely scuttle the idea of Dylan as an original American voice.

But Kinney takes a different view of these discoveries. Warmuth’s reading of Dylan’s memoir has revealed that Dylan’s “appropriations were not random. They were deliberate. When Scott delved into them, he found cleverness, wordplay, jokes, and subtexts.” The thefts that Dylan made were part of the story—he had, as Kinney writes, “hidden another book between the lines.” Kinney remarks on an especially intriguing section of “Chronicles,” in which Dylan seems to be explaining the method behind his guitar playing. Dylan writes, mysteriously, “You gain power with the least amount of effort, trust the listeners to make their own connections, and it’s very seldom that they don’t.” If this sounds inscrutable as musical technique, that’s because it is lifted from a self-help book about gaining influence over others called “The 48 Laws of Power,” by Robert Greene. This, then, is a cunning bit of dark humor: Dylan purports to explain the magic behind his music, but he’s really just revealing how susceptible devoted fans are to this kind of florid nonsense.

This unpacking of Dylan’s memoir, and the increased scrutiny given to his recent albums, is a reminder that Dylan’s work has always been spurred on by his own fannish, idiosyncratic obsessions. Michael Gray, who has written extensively about Dylan’s songwriting, tells Kinney, “You want him to be this lone genius who came from another planet. He never pretended to be. He’s created something out of something else.” Dylan’s earliest songs borrowed chords and lyrics from traditional folk songs; he has lifted lines and licks from the blues; he has repurposed and reassembled the Bible, press clippings, English poetry, the American songbook, and a half century of cultural comings and goings to create a kind of ongoing, evolving musical collage. Dylan is an archivist and a librarian in addition to being an artist.

Before Robert Zimmerman was Bob Dylan, he was an eager music fan. As a young man, he couldn’t wait to blow out of Minnesota and meet his idol, Woody Guthrie. He was, Kinney writes, “earnest, embarrassingly so. He would talk and talk and talk about traveling east, meeting Woody, making it big.” Dylan, just nineteen years old, visited Guthrie at the Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital, in New Jersey, where Guthrie, suffering from Huntington’s disease, had been committed. Guthrie was debilitated by the illness—there wasn’t much he could teach Dylan. Perhaps Dylan learned that idols never live up to a fan’s expectations, and so it’s silly to expect otherwise. But Dylan had been a musical pilgrim long before he inspired others to make pilgrimages in his footsteps. Kinney tells another story, of the time when Dylan, years later, in 2009, showed up for a tour at John Lennon’s childhood home. Or the year before, in Winnipeg, when he was spotted at the house where Neil Young grew up. Another time, he was seen at Sun Studios, in Memphis, where Elvis had cut his first records. Someone stopped him and told Dylan what his music had meant to him. Dylan responded, “Well son, we all have our heroes.”

Credit: Gijsbert Hanekroot/Redferns/Getty.

COOL PEOPLE-GARY BUSEY

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COOL PEOPLE-GARY BUSEY

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GAREY BUSEY’S CONTROVERSIAL INTERVIEW WITH HOWARD STERN

GARY BUSEY MUSIC VIDEO “ALL THESE YEARS”

GAREY BUSEY -HOW TO INTERVIEW BY HUNTERS.THOMPSON ON FILM

 

GREATEST MOMENT OF GARY BUSEY ON FILM

 

Gary Busey

Birth Name: Gary Busey
Born: 06/29/1944
Birth Place: Goose Creek, Texas, USA

Gary Busey was born in the east coast Texas town of Goose Creek (now Baytown) on June 29, 1944 and grew up in Tulsa, OK, where his father worked in construction. A born entertainer, Busey’s first outlet was music, and he constructed a drum set out of oatmeal canisters before driving his family truly crazy with a set of Ludwigs. He also sang at the Christian camp where he spent summers and broadened his interests to include acting after he was mesmerized by a matinee of Cecil B. DeMille’s “Samson and Delilah” (1949). As a teen, Busey cultivated an athletic build while working on local ranches and excelled at football, landing an athletic scholarship to Pittsburg State University in Kansas. When a serious knee injury sidelined his sports aspirations, Busey turned his attention to drama, eventually joining the theater department at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. While a student there in 1966, Busey co-founded a bluesy rock band called Carp. After several years of playing local parties and biker bars, they headed to Hollywood in search of a record deal, landing one with Epic and releasing a self-titled album in 1969. When Carp failed to generate much commercial success, most of the band’s members went on to become studio musicians, while Busey took advantage of his new locale to revive his earlier acting efforts.

Busey landed his first small screen role in a 1970 episode of the Western “The High Chaparral” (NBC, 1967-1971) and the following year made his big screen debut as a hippie in the low budget Roger Corman biker flick “Angels Hard as They Come” (1971). In 1972, he returned to Tulsa, where he became a regular performer on a local sketch comedy show and appeared in the locally filmed “Dirty Little Billy” (1972) before snaring a high profile role alongside Jeff Bridges in “The Last American Hero” (1973), about NASCAR racer Elroy Jackson, Jr. That same year he earned the unusual pop culture distinction of being the last character ever to die on “Bonanza” (NBC, 1959-1973). Busey joined the fine supporting cast (including Bridges, again) of Michael Cimino’s feature directing debut “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974) before enjoying a brief stint as series regular Truckie Wheeler of “The Texas Wheelers” (ABC, 1974-75). Busey returned to the music business in 1975 touring as drummer for Oklahoma songwriter Leon Russell, who had first become a fan of Busey through his popular Tulsa TV character Teddy Jack Eddy. Busey also played drums on Russell’s classic album Will o’ the Wisp that year, in addition to recording with The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Kinky Friedman, and contributing the song “Since You’ve Gone Away” to Robert Altman’s epic film “Nashville” (1975).

Busey’s music background proved key to truly igniting his film career. His turn as the road manager who keeps Kris Kristofferson in line in “A Star Is Born” (1976) brought him his first widespread attention, though his title role in “The Buddy Holly Story” (1978) made him a star. Busey had always felt a special spiritual kinship with the iconic Texas songwriter-guitarist who died tragically young in an icy plane crash, and his spot-on portrayal of the man and his music earned Busey a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his efforts. Despite his highly acclaimed leading role, Busey’s ensuing career consisted mainly of charismatic supporting roles, his potential possibly compromised by a new cocaine addiction that he would battle for decades. He was convincing as a small time carnival hustler in the atmospheric road movie “Carny” (1980) and provided able country boy-support as the protégé of a legendary outlaw (Willie Nelson) in the well-received “Barbarosa” (1982). In one of his rare appearances in a comedy Busey played one of a crew of misfit taxi drivers in “D.C. Cab” (1983) and also contributed the song, “Why Baby Why” to the soundtrack.

His sports prowess and ability to crank up the high-drama masculine energy made for strong performances as Alabama State football coach Paul Bryant in “The Bear” (1984), and as a baseball playing icon in “Insignificance” (1985), Nicolas Roeg’s gloriously cinematic examination of fame in America. But Busey’s highest profile role of the era was as a nasty drug dealing Vietnam vet in “Lethal Weapon” (1988). His Mr. Joshua had ice in his veins, and though the ruthless albino killer was the actor’s first screen villain, it would certainly not be his last. Busey would go on to make a name for himself with supporting characters that were truly terrifying. His career was interrupted, however, by a motorcycle accident in 1988 that fractured his skull. The actor received a lot of press during his recovery for defending his choice not to wear a helmet and for his claim of a roadside, near-death experience. Doctors feared Busey had suffered brain damage, and his increasingly strange ramblings and pseudo-philosophy while making public appearances seemed to support that theory.

Busey returned to the screen to co-star with Danny Glover in the minor sc-fi hit “Predator 2″ (1990) and the absurd but blockbusting caper/extreme sports hybrid “Point Break” (1991) starring Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves. He was a little too good as the disturbed former psychiatric patient in the routine thriller “Hider in the House” (1991) and continued his villainous run as the evil thug plotting to steal nuclear weapons in Steven Seagal’s mega-hit actioner “Under Siege” (1992). Busey enjoyed a supporting role as a private investigator in the legal thriller “The Firm” (1993) before returning to the sports genre with a co-starring role as an aging pro baseball player in the light “Rookie of the Year” (1993). Busey’s role as a former DEA agent in John Badham’s 1994 actioner “Drop Zone” was ironic, as the actor was shortly thereafter arrested for drug possession, suffered a drug overdose, and spent time in rehab at the Betty Ford Center. Newly sober, Busey became an enthusiastic born-again Christian and ordained minister active with the Promise Keepers men’s group. But just as the unpredictable actor seemed to be gaining a new lease on life, he averted disaster yet again when he was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor in his sinus cavity.

After recuperating from surgery and radiation treatment, Busey seemed poised to resume his improved Hollywood standing, landing in a remake of the TV series “Hawaii Five-O” (CBS, 1968-1980), but the show’s pilot was reportedly a disaster and the project never moved forward. Busey rebounded with a starring role in the well-received Spanish-American war miniseries “Rough Riders” (TNT, 1997) and enjoyed cameos in art house flicks “Lost Highway” (1997) and “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” (1998) before a pair of arrests for domestic violence charges filed by ex-wife Tiani Warden and a string of dismal low-budget films reduced Busey’s name to a pop culture curiosity, known more for the mug shot seen ’round the world than for the promise he had once shown as an actor. Embracing his new reputation, Busey began to appear as an oddball artifact on “The Man Show” (Comedy Central, 1999-2004) and Howard Stern’s radio show before cementing his tarnished image as the center of Comedy Central’s “I’m with Busey” reality show (2003). Over 13 uncomfortable episodes, Busey shared his off-kilter wisdom of the world with alleged fan and buddy Adam de la Pena. It was unclear whether Busey’s bizarre philosophical outbursts and explosive behavior were due to a mental unraveling or whether he was amping up the crazy factor for audience benefit.

The show did not paint a flattering portrait of the star but it raised his profile enough to land a recurring role (as himself) on HBO’s hot Hollywood drama “Entourage” (HBO, 2004- ). Busey’s personal life was back in the headlines in 2004 when he was taken to court for failing to pay rent on his rented Malibu home and arrested for not showing up at a hearing related to alleged millions owed his ex-wife. In 2005, Busey claimed his prayers for a fitness opportunity were answered when he was asked to join the cast of the VH1 weight loss chronicle “Celebrity Fit Club 2,” during which he allegedly lost 50 pounds. Busey’s film career was busier than ever regardless of his reputation, with the actor headlining over 20 low-budget and direct-to-DVD titles from 2004-06. He made gossip column headlines in February of 2008 for a red carpet appearance at the Academy Awards that sent nervous stars including Jennifer Garner – whose neck he appeared to either bite or kiss – and E! host Ryan Seacrest looking for the exit. Busey next appeared on the second season of “Celebrity Rehab” (VH1, 2008- ). He claimed to appear on the show not as an addict, but as an inspirational figure for the other patients, which initially confused the show’s star, Dr. Drew Pinsky, Busey nonetheless went through an enormously successful transformation. Following a cameo appearance in the hit comedy “Grown Ups” (2009), starring Adam Sandler, David Spade and Chris Rock, Busey joined the season four cast of the celebrity version of “The Apprentice” (NBC, 2004- ), playing for charity against the likes of model Niki Taylor, former “Survivor” winner Richard Hatch, and rap star Lil Jon.

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GAREY BUSEY FILMOGRAPHYd

http://www.aceshowbiz.com/celebrity/gary_busey/filmography.html

COOL PEOPLE-DEBBIE HARRY

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COOL PEOPLE-DEBBIE HARRY
DEBBIE HARRY SINGING “HEART OF GLASS” 1979
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BLONDIE HAS MORE FUN Deborah Harry, lead singer of Blondie, photographed in New York City.

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In 1974, Blondie pushed punk onto the New Wave dance floor and helped introduce hip-hop to the masses. Now, after 40 years, the band is as inventive and forward-thinking as ever. “We’re gonna re-establish ourselves in a way that we haven’t done in a while,” Debbie Harry says. This spring, she and her bandmates will release a two-disc package entitled Blondie 4(0) Ever, pairing one album of their greatest hits with another set of completely new tracks. “We’ve got this new music we’ve been playing, and it’s relevant, and important to me that people are saying the new music really fits in perfectly with the Blondie music that they know, and how interesting and beautiful it is that they fit together like that,” she says. “And we can do an almost seamless kind of show that goes over a long time, a lot of years.”

While everything may seem so much slicker and glossier today than in punk’s heyday, it’s basically impossible for Debbie not to be genuine in all things. She prefers special nights out at different little New York City clubs (especially the places where you can dance) to watching live performances on the computer or the phone. “Going to see live shows, your friends or bands you’re curious about play in little clubs, is always super-special, you know. The intimacy is great. With phones, it’s sort of like somebody’s making decisions for you. I really want to see something. I’d rather watch what is really happening at the moment. They’re sort of missing it. They’re missing the fucking important part of what the music is.”

And when the band commences its 40th Anniversary World Wide Tour, in March, expect music, fashion, a vision, and an experience that move you, not just chitter-chatter. “Today, people really like to be exposing themselves constantly,” says Debbie. “It’s almost like everybody’s some kind of an intellectual flasher.”

As for the band’s sound today, she says, “Even though technologically, and technically as musicians, we’ve changed and improved, you know, there is definitely a continuity. And that’s kind of perfect, really.”

THE SUBLIME JUDY COLLINS

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THE SUBLIME JUDY COLLINS

“SOME DAY SOON” JUDY COLLINS ON THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS SHOW 1969

“SEND IN THE CLOWNS” JUDY COLLINS

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“I AM A MAID OF CONSTANT SORROW”

Judy Collins has inspired audiences with sublime vocals, boldly vulnerable songwriting, personal life triumphs, and a firm commitment to social activism. In the 1960s, she evoked both the idealism and steely determination of a generation united against social and environmental injustices. Five decades later, her luminescent presence shines brightly as new generations bask in the glow of her iconic 50-album body of work, and heed inspiration from her spiritual discipline to thrive in the music industry for half a century.

The award-winning singer-songwriter is esteemed for her imaginative interpretations of traditional and contemporary folk standards and her own poetically poignant original compositions. Her stunning rendition of Joni Mitchell’s “Both Sides Now” from her landmark 1967 album, Wildflowers, has been entered into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Judy’s dreamy and sweetly intimate version of “Send in the Clowns,” a ballad written by Stephen Sondheim for the Broadway musical A Little Night Music, won “Song of the Year” at the 1975 Grammy Awards. She’s garnered several top-ten hits gold- and platinum-selling albums. Recently, contemporary and classic artists such as Rufus Wainwright, Shawn Colvin, Arlo Gutherie, Joan Baez, and Leonard Cohen honored her legacy with the album Born to the Breed: A Tribute to Judy Collins.

Judy began her impressive music career at 13 as a piano prodigy dazzling audiences performing Mozart’s “Concerto for Two Pianos,” but the hardluck tales and rugged sensitivity of folk revival music by artists such as Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger seduced her away from a life as a concert pianist. Her path pointed to a lifelong love affair with the guitar and pursuit of emotional truth in lyrics. The focus and regimented practice of classical music, however, would be a source of strength to her inner core as she navigated the highs and lows of the music business.

In 1961, she released her masterful debut, A Maid of Constant Sorrow, which featured interpretative works of social poets of the time such as Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, and Tom Paxton. This began a wonderfully fertile thirty-five year creative relationship with Jac Holzman and Elektra Records. Around this time Judy became a tastemaker within the thriving Greenwich Village folk community, and brought other singer-songwriters to a wider audience, including poet/musician Leonard Cohen – and musicians Joni Mitchell and Randy Newman. Throughout the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, and up to the present, she has remained a vital artist, enriching her catalog with critically acclaimed albums while balancing a robust touring schedule.

bohoBased on the success of the CD/DVD Judy Collins Live At The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, which aired on PBS, Judy Collins filmed another spectacular show in Ireland, on September 29, 2013 at Dromoland Castle. The show features some classic Judy Collins songs like Chelsea Morning, Cat’s In The Cradle, Bird On A Wire as well as some of her favorite Irish tunes … Wild Mountain Thyme, She Moved Through the Fair (featuring the amazing Mary Black) and of course, Danny Boy. JUDY COLLINS LIVE IN IRELAND will air on PBS nationwide in early 2014.

Judy has also authored several books, including the powerful and inspiring, Sanity & Grace. For her most recent title, the memoir Sweet Judy Blue Eyes: My Life in Music, she reaches deeply inside and, with unflinching candor, recalls her turbulent childhood, extraordinary rise to fame, her romance with Stephen Stills, her epic victories over depression and alcoholism, and her redemption through embracing a healthy and stable lifestyle and finding true love with Louis Nelson, her partner of 30 years. In addition, she remains a social activist, representing UNICEF and numerous other causes. She is also the co-director, with Jill Godmillow, of an Academy Award-nominated film about Antonia Brico, the first woman to conduct major symphonies around the world–and Judy’s classical piano teacher when she was young.
Judy Collins, now 74, is as creatively vigorous as ever, writing, touring worldwide, and nurturing fresh talent. She is a modern day Renaissance woman who is also an accomplished painter, filmmaker, record label head, musical mentor, and an in-demand keynote speaker for mental health and suicide prevention. She continues to create music of hope and healing that lights up the world and speaks to the heart.

HIWAY AMERICA -THE ELVIS HOME GRACELAND, MEMPHIS,TENNESSEE

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TAKE THE 360• TOUR BELOW
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Graceland

Museum in Memphis, Tennessee

  • Graceland is a large white-columned mansion and 13.8-acre estate in Memphis, Tennessee that was home to Elvis Presley. Wikipedia
    Address: 3734 Elvis Presley Blvd, Memphis, TN 38116

  • Area: 14 acres (6 ha)

  • Architectural styles: Colonial Revival architecture, Classical Revival

    Graceland Virtual Tours

    Graceland takes you on a panoramic 360° view of Elvis Presley’s home. See where Elvis lived, relaxed and spent time with his friends and family. Take a look at the mansion from the entrance and step inside the foyer, the famous jungle room, and the racquetball trophy room to walk the same footsteps of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll. Turn your virtual experience into a live one by visiting Elvis Presley’s Graceland in Memphis. For a free Graceland online travel planner, visit Elvis.com/Graceland.

    Exterior of Graceland Mansion Elvis fans can often be seen posing for photographs at the front entrance of the mansion. As the front door swings open, guests are able to enter the private world of a rock legend. Elvis loved Graceland and always enjoyed showing it off and entertaining friends and family there.             The home welcomes over 600,000 visitors a year and holds countless memories for the many friends, fans and family whose lives he touched.
    Take the 360° tour!
    Mansion Foyer The foyer is where special guests were greeted and shown to the living room where they would wait for Elvis to come down the stairs from his private area upstairs. Elvis would often entertain his guests on his 15-foot white sofa inside the living room. At the far end of the living room is the entrance into the music room where Elvis enjoyed singing and playing piano to his favorite gospel and R&B songs. Across the foyer from the living room – is the dining room where Elvis and his family would enjoy down-home Southern cooking for their evening meals. These rooms hosted many large gatherings and is where Elvis enjoyed the company of his friends and family.
    Take the 360° tour!
    Mansion Jungle Room             One of Elvis’ favorite hangouts was the “Jungle Room.” The room is known for its Polynesian feel and exotically carved wood. In the early 1960s, during one of Elvis’ home improvements, it was added to the back of the house. Elvis referred to the room as the den and later added the eccentric furniture and shag carpet reminiscent of Hawaii- one of Elvis’ favorite places to vacation. In 1976, the room was transformed into a recording studio for a series of all-night sessions that later became the album called “From Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee.” The faux fur upholstery and green shag carpet on the floor and the ceiling completes the wild look and ’70s feel – making this room an Elvis fan favorite.
    Take the 360° tour!
    Racquetball Building             The racquetball building was built in 1975 and houses a large display of Elvis’ awards and accomplishments. The court is currently used to display all of his posthumous awards and honors. Several of his stage costumes are featured including his Aztec and American Eagle jumpsuit. It is estimated that Elvis has sold over one billion records worldwide.
    I dedicate this song to my late mum who loved Elvis’s love songs I bought her this single when I was a teenager in London
    “I  CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE WITH YOU” FROM THE MOVIE BLUE HAWAII

http://youtu.be/cqhMopq5r6I

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Elvis Presley Biography
Elvis PresleyThe incredible Elvis life story began when Elvis Aaron Presley was born to Vernon and Gladys Presley in a two-room house in Tupelo, Mississippi, on January 8, 1935. His twin brother, Jessie Garon, was stillborn, leaving Elvis to grow up as an only child. He and his parents moved to Memphis, Tennessee, in 1948, and Elvis graduated from Humes High School there in 1953.

Elvis’ musical influences were the pop and country music of the time, the gospel music he heard in church and at the all-night gospel sings he frequently attended, and the black R&B he absorbed on historic Beale Street as a Memphis teenager.

In 1954, Elvis began his singing career with the legendary Sun Records label in Memphis. In late 1955, his recording contract was sold to RCA Victor. By 1956, he was an international sensation. With a sound and style that uniquely combined his diverse musical influences and blurred and challenged the social and racial barriers of the time, he ushered in a whole new era of American music and popular culture.

He starred in 33 successful films, made history with his television appearances and specials, and knew great acclaim through his many, often record-breaking, live concert performances on tour and in Las Vegas. Globally, he has sold over one billion records, more than any other artist. His American sales have earned him gold, platinum or multi-platinum awards. Among his many awards and accolades were 14 Grammy nominations (3 wins) from the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award which he received at age 36, and his being named One of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of the Nation for 1970 by the United States Jaycees. Without any of the special privileges, his celebrity status might have afforded him, he honorably served his country in the U.S. Army.

His talent, good looks, sensuality, charisma, and good humor endeared him to millions, as did the humility and human kindness he demonstrated throughout his life. Known the world over by his first name, he is regarded as one of the most important figures of twentieth century popular culture. Elvis died at his Memphis home, Graceland, on August 16, 1977.

If you enjoyed this Elvis biography, check out our fun, interactive walk through Elvis’ life story with the 75 years of Elvis Timeline, developed for Elvis’ 75th Birthday Celebration.

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