Hiway America -Louisville,Kentucky.Welcome to the Messy World of Jerry’s Junk

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Pranksters Install Swings on BART Public Transit System in San Francisco

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Pranksters Install Swings on BART Public Transit System in San Francisco

swings on BART

photo by Audrey Penven

Some brilliant pranksters installed beautiful swings on BART last night. What apparently happened, according to witnesses, was a team of six or so people hopped on to a north-bound train from 24th Street station in San Francisco around 8:30 p.m. last night, installed three matching red swings, and then exited at 16th Street leaving their swings behind for public consumption.

BART Swings

photo by Neiltron

I personally love this prank because of the joy that it inspires in the innocent by-standers. Look at the photos. Even the dudes that are not swinging are smiling (except for one woman – that is just how some people roll, I guess). I declare this to be an epic victory for joy and whimsy over the mundane!

Hunter S. Thompson’s 9/11 Essay Is Still Chillingly Accurate 16 Years Later

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Hunter S. Thompson’s 9/11 Essay Is Still Chillingly Accurate 16 Years Later

“This is going to be a very expensive war, and Victory is not guaranteed ― for anyone,” he wrote.

However, writer Hunter S. Thompson turned out to be amazingly prescient.

Shortly after the tragedy, the famed gonzo journalist wrote an essay for ESPN.com where he laid out his thoughts on what could happen in this new era.

Sixteen years later, his remarks are still chillingly accurate:

“Boom! Boom! Just like that. The towers are gone now, reduced to bloody rubble, along with all hopes for Peace in Our Time, in the United States or any other country.

“Make no mistake about it: We are At War now ― with somebody ― and we will stay At War with that mysterious Enemy for the rest of our lives. It will be a Religious War, a sort of Christian Jihad, fueled by religious hatred and led by merciless fanatics on both sides. It will be guerilla warfare on a global scale, with no front lines and no identifiable enemy.”

HO NEW/REUTERS
Writer Hunter S. Thompson predicted “guerilla warfare on a global scale, with no front lines and no identifiable enemy” after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.
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Thompson wrote that the United States is “going to punish somebody for this attack, but just who or what will be blown to smithereens for it is hard to say.”

He continued:

“Maybe Afghanistan, maybe Pakistan or Iraq, or possibly all three at once. Who knows? Not even the Generals in what remains of the Pentagon or the New York papers calling for WAR seem to know who did it or where to look for them.”

Thompson, who died in 2005 from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, also laid out how then-President George W. Bush would react to the attack and how his decisions would affect the lives of everyday Americans.

“This is going to be a very expensive war, and Victory is not guaranteed ― for anyone, and certainly not for anyone as baffled as George W. Bush. All he knows is that his father started the war a long time ago, and that he, the goofy child-President, has been chosen by Fate and the global Oil industry to finish it Now.

“He will declare a National Security Emergency and clamp down Hard on Everybody, no matter where they live or why. If the guilty won’t hold up their hands and confess, he and the Generals will ferret them out by force. Good luck. He is in for a profoundly difficult job ― armed as he is with no credible Military Intelligence, no witnesses and only the ghost of Bin Laden to blame for the tragedy.”

A Chicago club crawl with a bus-driving bluesman

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A Chicago club crawl with a bus-driving bluesman

Story by Marnie Hunter, video by Channon Hodge and Robert Sevilla, CNNUpdated 20th July 2017
Chicago (CNN) — Toronzo Cannon has more energy before 5 a.m. than some people can muster all day.
“Hey now, you OK? You gonna be cool today?” he asks one co-worker at a Chicago bus garage. “How you doin’?” he asks another. “These guys right here owe me money, so take a picture of all of them,” he jokes.

Cannon, 49, has been a Chicago Transit Authority bus driver for 24 years. He’s also a blues musician whose career is on the upswing, and his near tirelessness is working in his favor.
Cannon drives 10-hour shifts Monday through Thursday, then jets off on weekends to play the Chicago blues across the country and around the world. He spends his vacation time playing back-to-back international dates.
The contrast of strolling by the Eiffel Tower and steering a bus through the streets of Chicago isn’t lost on Cannon. Yet his day job keeps him grounded, provides his family with health insurance and yields vivid material for songs.
The Eiffel Tower was “right down the street for the most part, and now I’m on the West Side of Chicago getting cursed out by some lady that’s short a quarter,” he said.
“I’m a bus driver, so I travel through several tax brackets. You know, I see from the poorest of the poor to the richest of the rich.”
“The Chicago Way,” Cannon’s latest album and his first on renowned blues label Alligator Records, chronicles the human stories that unfold on both jobs.
A few hours after he gets off work, Cannon will go from bus driver to bluesman, swapping his CTA hat for a dapper chapeau as he takes us to some of the blues clubs he came up in.
Toronzo Cannon plays the blues all over the world.

Toronzo Cannon plays the blues all over the world.

‘Everything is moving, everything is loud’

Raw and rhythmic, blues music was developed by African-Americans in the post-Civil War South, with an emphasis on vocals that tell the stories of everyday people, usually of men, women and the ups and downs between them.
Starting during World War I and spurred by oppression and economic hardship, millions of Southern blacks headed for cities in the North as part of the Great Migration. The music traveled with them, and Chicago eventually became the epicenter of urban blues.
The solo acoustic blues of the South gave way to band music featuring electric instruments and drums after World War II, creating a grittier, more aggressive sound.
Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter and Jimmy Reed put Chicago blues on the map in that era, and by the 1960s the music had gained a worldwide audience.
“When blues got to Chicago, it got dirty. It got dirty from the electricity of the city,” Cannon said. “As you get to the big city where everything is fast, everything is moving, everything is loud, that does something to you,” Cannon said.
“Chicago blues is not background music. You know, you need to be heard, you need to be looked at. You’ve got something to say.”

Buddy Guy’s Legends

At 88, “Bar Room Preacher” Jimmy Johnson has witnessed his share of Chicago’s electric city living.
As this night’s headliner at downtown South Loop club Buddy Guy’s Legends, Johnson puts his gospel-tinged voice to the blues’ central theme:
Learn to love me or leave me. Either one you wanna do
Learn to love me or leave me. Either one you wanna do

Because strange things are happening. Something strange might happen to you
Johnson belts out these lyrics at the glossiest club on our two-night blues hop, a spot opened in 1989 by Chicago blues legend Buddy Guy.
Bluesman Jimmy Johnson performs at Buddy Guy's Legends in downtown Chicago.

Bluesman Jimmy Johnson performs at Buddy Guy’s Legends in downtown Chicago.
The spacious club’s walls are dotted with photos, instruments and other mementos of the famous and up-and-coming artists who’ve played its stage.
“Buddy Guy’s is the premier blues club in Chicago,” said Cannon. “You get a bunch of national acts to come through. He’s like the man now, when it comes to the blues.”
Guy, 80, is often spotted at the bar and sometimes steps in to play a few songs when he’s not on the road. He plays a series of formal dates at his club each January.

Rosa’s Lounge

About 10 minutes from downtown on Chicago’s Near Northwest Side, Rosa’s Lounge in Logan Square has a cozier neighborhood feel. Most of the performers are from Chicago, although bands from all over the world come through.
Late blues greats David Honeyboy Edwards, Pinetop Perkins and Homesick James all played Rosa’s.
On a recent Friday evening, Chicago blues guitarist Melvin Taylor’s fiery playing had patrons moving to the music. One particularly energetic dancer launched himself across the floor in a series of riveting, whole-body spasms.
This is a friendly club where colored lights, Christmas ornaments, larger-than-life photos of blues giants and glittery anniversary decorations create the kind of deep, layered history that’s only enhanced by zany self-expression and fans whose ages span at least a half-century.
Guitarist Melvin Taylor is a top draw at Rosa's Lounge in Logan Square.

Guitarist Melvin Taylor is a top draw at Rosa’s Lounge in Logan Square.
And Rosa’s Lounge is a family affair. Musician and owner Tony Mangiullo arrived in Chicago from Milan in 1978 to play the blues, and he opened Rosa’s in 1984.
“The story goes Tony, the owner, loved the blues so much that he came to Chicago and didn’t leave, didn’t want to leave. He’s from Italy. And he built the club and he named it after his mother,” said Cannon.
Mama Rosa was definitely the impetus for the club.
“Mama said it was not enough for Mama to see me play drums. … She said, ‘You want to be here, you have to do a business,'” Mangiullo said.
Mama clearly knows what’s best for generations of blues fans, too.

B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted

A sliver of a club, B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted on the North Side of Chicago in Lincoln Park is long on atmosphere, thanks to its decidedly no-frills aesthetic and tight quarters that leave little distance between patrons and musicians.
It’s one of the first clubs Cannon played. “They put me on on a Thursday, I remember it. And I’ve been playing there for years. It’s a smaller club, more intimate,” he said.
Like many hometown musicians who’ve reached wider audiences, Cannon now plays most of his gigs on the road, but he still plays Chicago clubs about five times a year.
B.L.U.E.S., which opened in 1979, books primarily Chicago musicians, from elder statesmen like Eddie Shaw and Jimmy Johnson to younger artists who are still getting established on the club circuit.
Tonight, clubgoers are perched on the cracked vinyl barstools, soaking up bluesman Jimmy Burns’ soulful tunes.
B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted is an intimate club in Lincoln Park.

B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted is an intimate club in Lincoln Park.
Burns also graciously ceded the stage to Cannon and Mike Wheeler, who popped over from a gig across the street at Kingston Mines to play a few songs with his friend.
The two clubs on Halsted Street have a friendly rivalry. Kingston Mines is larger, with two stages and meal service. B.L.U.E.S. keeps its offering to blues and booze.
Wheeler, 56, and Cannon, 49, are among the local artists building on traditions passed down from longtime bluesmen like Burns, 74.
And by and large, they’re doing it the Chicago way.
“I think the Chicago way means, you know, working hard and kind of using what you got to get what you want,” said Cannon.
“There’s certain things that you do in life to let people know that you’re here, and my way of letting people know that I’m here is my blues.”

If you go

Buddy Guy’s Legends: Cover charges are $10 or $20, depending on the night, and shows that start after 8 p.m. are 21 and over. Seats are first come, first served. The club serves Louisiana-style Cajun and soul food at lunch and in the evening.
700 S. Wabash, Chicago 60605, http://buddyguy.com/
Rosa’s Lounge: Cover charges range from $7 to $20. Reserved seating is available. The club doesn’t usually serve food, although catering is available for special events. Patrons can also bring food or order for delivery.
3420 W. Armitage Ave., Chicago 60647, http://rosaslounge.com/
B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted: Covers range from $5 to $10. 21 and up. On Sunday nights the cover at B.L.U.E.S. gets guests into Kingston Mines and vice versa.
2519 N. Halsted St., Chicago 60618, http://www.chicagobluesbar.com/

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A Chicago club crawl with a bus-driving bluesman

Story by Marnie Hunter, video by Channon Hodge and Robert Sevilla, CNNUpdated 20th July 2017
Chicago (CNN) — Toronzo Cannon has more energy before 5 a.m. than some people can muster all day.
“Hey now, you OK? You gonna be cool today?” he asks one co-worker at a Chicago bus garage. “How you doin’?” he asks another. “These guys right here owe me money, so take a picture of all of them,” he jokes.

Cannon, 49, has been a Chicago Transit Authority bus driver for 24 years. He’s also a blues musician whose career is on the upswing, and his near tirelessness is working in his favor.
Cannon drives 10-hour shifts Monday through Thursday, then jets off on weekends to play the Chicago blues across the country and around the world. He spends his vacation time playing back-to-back international dates.
The contrast of strolling by the Eiffel Tower and steering a bus through the streets of Chicago isn’t lost on Cannon. Yet his day job keeps him grounded, provides his family with health insurance and yields vivid material for songs.
The Eiffel Tower was “right down the street for the most part, and now I’m on the West Side of Chicago getting cursed out by some lady that’s short a quarter,” he said.
“I’m a bus driver, so I travel through several tax brackets. You know, I see from the poorest of the poor to the richest of the rich.”
“The Chicago Way,” Cannon’s latest album and his first on renowned blues label Alligator Records, chronicles the human stories that unfold on both jobs.
A few hours after he gets off work, Cannon will go from bus driver to bluesman, swapping his CTA hat for a dapper chapeau as he takes us to some of the blues clubs he came up in.
Toronzo Cannon plays the blues all over the world.

Toronzo Cannon plays the blues all over the world.

‘Everything is moving, everything is loud’

Raw and rhythmic, blues music was developed by African-Americans in the post-Civil War South, with an emphasis on vocals that tell the stories of everyday people, usually of men, women and the ups and downs between them.
Starting during World War I and spurred by oppression and economic hardship, millions of Southern blacks headed for cities in the North as part of the Great Migration. The music traveled with them, and Chicago eventually became the epicenter of urban blues.
The solo acoustic blues of the South gave way to band music featuring electric instruments and drums after World War II, creating a grittier, more aggressive sound.
Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter and Jimmy Reed put Chicago blues on the map in that era, and by the 1960s the music had gained a worldwide audience.
“When blues got to Chicago, it got dirty. It got dirty from the electricity of the city,” Cannon said. “As you get to the big city where everything is fast, everything is moving, everything is loud, that does something to you,” Cannon said.
“Chicago blues is not background music. You know, you need to be heard, you need to be looked at. You’ve got something to say.”

Buddy Guy’s Legends

At 88, “Bar Room Preacher” Jimmy Johnson has witnessed his share of Chicago’s electric city living.
As this night’s headliner at downtown South Loop club Buddy Guy’s Legends, Johnson puts his gospel-tinged voice to the blues’ central theme:
Learn to love me or leave me. Either one you wanna do
Learn to love me or leave me. Either one you wanna do

Because strange things are happening. Something strange might happen to you
Johnson belts out these lyrics at the glossiest club on our two-night blues hop, a spot opened in 1989 by Chicago blues legend Buddy Guy.
Bluesman Jimmy Johnson performs at Buddy Guy's Legends in downtown Chicago.

Bluesman Jimmy Johnson performs at Buddy Guy’s Legends in downtown Chicago.
The spacious club’s walls are dotted with photos, instruments and other mementos of the famous and up-and-coming artists who’ve played its stage.
“Buddy Guy’s is the premier blues club in Chicago,” said Cannon. “You get a bunch of national acts to come through. He’s like the man now, when it comes to the blues.”
Guy, 80, is often spotted at the bar and sometimes steps in to play a few songs when he’s not on the road. He plays a series of formal dates at his club each January.

Rosa’s Lounge

About 10 minutes from downtown on Chicago’s Near Northwest Side, Rosa’s Lounge in Logan Square has a cozier neighborhood feel. Most of the performers are from Chicago, although bands from all over the world come through.
Late blues greats David Honeyboy Edwards, Pinetop Perkins and Homesick James all played Rosa’s.
On a recent Friday evening, Chicago blues guitarist Melvin Taylor’s fiery playing had patrons moving to the music. One particularly energetic dancer launched himself across the floor in a series of riveting, whole-body spasms.
This is a friendly club where colored lights, Christmas ornaments, larger-than-life photos of blues giants and glittery anniversary decorations create the kind of deep, layered history that’s only enhanced by zany self-expression and fans whose ages span at least a half-century.
Guitarist Melvin Taylor is a top draw at Rosa's Lounge in Logan Square.

Guitarist Melvin Taylor is a top draw at Rosa’s Lounge in Logan Square.
And Rosa’s Lounge is a family affair. Musician and owner Tony Mangiullo arrived in Chicago from Milan in 1978 to play the blues, and he opened Rosa’s in 1984.
“The story goes Tony, the owner, loved the blues so much that he came to Chicago and didn’t leave, didn’t want to leave. He’s from Italy. And he built the club and he named it after his mother,” said Cannon.
Mama Rosa was definitely the impetus for the club.
“Mama said it was not enough for Mama to see me play drums. … She said, ‘You want to be here, you have to do a business,'” Mangiullo said.
Mama clearly knows what’s best for generations of blues fans, too.

B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted

A sliver of a club, B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted on the North Side of Chicago in Lincoln Park is long on atmosphere, thanks to its decidedly no-frills aesthetic and tight quarters that leave little distance between patrons and musicians.
It’s one of the first clubs Cannon played. “They put me on on a Thursday, I remember it. And I’ve been playing there for years. It’s a smaller club, more intimate,” he said.
Like many hometown musicians who’ve reached wider audiences, Cannon now plays most of his gigs on the road, but he still plays Chicago clubs about five times a year.
B.L.U.E.S., which opened in 1979, books primarily Chicago musicians, from elder statesmen like Eddie Shaw and Jimmy Johnson to younger artists who are still getting established on the club circuit.
Tonight, clubgoers are perched on the cracked vinyl barstools, soaking up bluesman Jimmy Burns’ soulful tunes.
B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted is an intimate club in Lincoln Park.

B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted is an intimate club in Lincoln Park.
Burns also graciously ceded the stage to Cannon and Mike Wheeler, who popped over from a gig across the street at Kingston Mines to play a few songs with his friend.
The two clubs on Halsted Street have a friendly rivalry. Kingston Mines is larger, with two stages and meal service. B.L.U.E.S. keeps its offering to blues and booze.
Wheeler, 56, and Cannon, 49, are among the local artists building on traditions passed down from longtime bluesmen like Burns, 74.
And by and large, they’re doing it the Chicago way.
“I think the Chicago way means, you know, working hard and kind of using what you got to get what you want,” said Cannon.
“There’s certain things that you do in life to let people know that you’re here, and my way of letting people know that I’m here is my blues.”

If you go

Buddy Guy’s Legends: Cover charges are $10 or $20, depending on the night, and shows that start after 8 p.m. are 21 and over. Seats are first come, first served. The club serves Louisiana-style Cajun and soul food at lunch and in the evening.
700 S. Wabash, Chicago 60605, http://buddyguy.com/
Rosa’s Lounge: Cover charges range from $7 to $20. Reserved seating is available. The club doesn’t usually serve food, although catering is available for special events. Patrons can also bring food or order for delivery.
3420 W. Armitage Ave., Chicago 60647, http://rosaslounge.com/
B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted: Covers range from $5 to $10. 21 and up. On Sunday nights the cover at B.L.U.E.S. gets guests into Kingston Mines and vice versa.
2519 N. Halsted St., Chicago 60618, http://www.chicagobluesbar.com/

Hiway America -Ghostly “White Vortex” Captured During Texas Hotel Investigation

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Ghostly “White Vortex” Captured During Texas Hotel Investigation

Posted by  on August 14, 2017 // Ghosts & Phantoms // 0 Comments

Paranormal investigators allegedly encountered supernatural mist at the Magnolia Hotel in Seguin, Texas earlier this month.

The video shows a “black mist” roll into the hotel’s Campbell Room at around 1:48 AM on August 5, 2017. The footage has been circulating online since it was posted last week by the YouTube channel Strange Town, based in Austin, Texas.

Haunted Magnolia Hotel

The black mist enters twice, first dissipating, then transforming into what the video describes as a “white vortex” much closer to the camera. It kind of swirls around, and you can even make out what some would possibly call a ghost orb or two.

“A spinning white vortex forms in the middle of the smoke-room while being preceded by a black mist entering the smoke-room…Boot steps are often heard on the wooden floor, and the smell of cigar smoke will appear in the air.” – Strange Town

Many aren’t convinced the video shows anything paranormal. Some commented on the possibility that the “white vortex” could just be smoke (from vaping or otherwise) from someone behind the camera.

However, the owners have stated that they were present at the time and smoking of any kind was not allowed. Others questioned if it could be AC condensation, but again, one of the building’s owners, Erin Wallace, commented that “the hotel does not have central ac only a small window unit.”

The Magnolia Hotel is, naturally, known for paranormal activity, hence the presence of investigators there in the first place. The hotel’s official website contains newspaper clippings regarding the death of Emma Voelcker, who was brutally murdered there in 1874 when she was only about 13 years old. She’s not the only one said to now roam the hotel from beyond the grave.

AN UN-ICKY INTRODUCTION TO DUMPSTER DIVING

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DUMPSTER DIVING ZERO WASTE

AN UN-ICKY INTRODUCTION TO DUMPSTER DIVING

An unicky introduction to dumpster diving - Green Indy Blog

I’ll start my introduction to dumpster diving with the typical shocking stats: according to a late 2016 Guardian article, “roughly 50 percent of all produce in the United States is thrown away—some 60 million tons (or $160 billion) worth of produce annually, an amount constituting “one third of all foodstuffs.” (source)

Pretty mind blowing, right?!

Zero waste is all about drastically reducing your own personal waste, but what about the waste that others make? Is there any way to help even more by taking on the burden of someone else’s trash?

In my experience, dumpster diving is a great answer to these questions.

For those who don’t know, dumpster diving is the salvaging of waste from commercial, residential, industrial and construction containers to find items that have been discarded by their owners, but that may prove useful to the picker. (Thanks, Wikipedia!)

Interested to find out more about dumpster diving and how to get into it? Let’s go!

Introduction to dumpster diving - find!
Could be trash – could be treasure!

Personal Experience

For this introduction to dumpster diving, I must say that I’m in no way a pro.

I have rummaged around in a few dumpsters in my day, almost exclusive for non-consumables. Two of my current tables are straight from the dumpster as well as several kitchen items and almost all of the plastic pots I use for flowers/compost/etc.

The best spots for items of furniture/home goods are around large apartment complexes, local second hand stores (they toss a lot of stuff they deem unsalable), or on the side of the road in nicer neighborhoods on a weekend afternoon.

On the consumable side, yes I have fished food out of a dumpster before. I tend to take packaged items as I’m always a little wary of open produce, but I have taken the odd fruit or veggie that can easily be washed off.

And before you ask, no, I do not physically get into the dumpster. I think people seriously underestimate the amount of food waste happening at grocery stores – there’s often so much that you can simply peek in and pick stuff off the top. That said, for something really good, I might hop in. (Really!)

I’ve found that Whole Foods and Kroger tend to have the best selection here in Indy. CVS and Walgreensalso tend to toss lots of packaged stuff away.

Avoid more downtown locations and/or areas of high homelessness as businesses tend to have their dumpsters more secure. Think above 50-somethingth street or below 465 on the south.

I’ve never been caught (I usually go before the store opens), but I also think getting caught would fall into the “awkward” category more than the “going to jail”.

Overall, I think my personal experience basically boils down to: yeah, it’s kind of awkward when someone walks by you rummaging through a dumpster. But… you’re the one who scored free (perfectly good) items that would otherwise be thrown into a landfill.

Introduction to dumpster diving - find!
Table found in the dumpster!

Practical Tips

As shown above, I am by no means a dumpster diving expert, but I am someone who has no compunction about rummaging around other people’s trash. So here’s what I’ve learned so far:

  • Get to know local laws. Dumpster diving is not illegal in the US, but may be restricted in your city/town. That being said, if it’s an open dumpster and someone catches you politely rifling through it, likely the worst that’s going to happen is they’ll ask you to leave. Make sure never to mess with dumpsters locked up/surrounded by a fence – that’s just asking for trouble.
  • Go during off hours. This is a pretty no duh idea, but go when there won’t be very many people around, either workers or consumers. I prefer to go early on a Sunday because I’m a morning person and I feel that it’s slightly less creepy to be going through a dumpster in early morning light rather than in total darkness. Be aware, though, you need to go early since garbage trucks often do pickups in the morning.
  • Leave the dumpster/area cleaner than when you arrived. It makes sense – the best way to have a company A) notice you’ve been there and B) lock everything up is by rifling through their trash with reckless abandon. So yes, paw through bags and take what you like, but make sure the area’s neat once you depart.
  • Dress properly. Another no-duh. While you may not be diving headfirst into a dumpster, it’s probably a good idea not to wear your Sunday best. Also, if you plan to dig a little, gloves are always a good option.
  • Don’t take more than you need. While the odds of someone else dumpster diving in your area is probably pretty low, it doesn’t pay to load up. Unless, of course, you’re sharing the wealth. Then, go ahead!

Resources

Falling Fruit: a user-edited resource that shows where “overlooked culinary bounty” may be found in cities all over the world. I particularly love Falling Fruit because it not only highlights easily accessible dumpsters, but it also points out the location of edible plants throughout the city.

Freegan.Info: freegans are people who survive on a strictly foraged diet (AKA no buying in stores!). This site is a compilation of awesome information about dumpster diving and other ways of consuming with less waste created.

r/DumpsterDiving/: while it’s mostly personal wins, the Reddit page may be useful if you have any questions about getting started.

Have you ever given dumpster diving a try? If so, what was your experience? If not, would you consider it after reading this introduction to dumpster diving?

Bibliokleptomaniacs Dig God… and Beatniks

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Bibliokleptomaniacs Dig God… and Beatniks

Bookworms are an interesting sort. Some compulsively hoard literary nuggets until their shelves sag and creak, yet never bother to actually read their collection. Others can barely tear themselves away from the freshly-vacuumed bookstore corner in which they devour the newest Malcolm Gladwell for fear that the trip home will forever interrupt their cozy date. There are bookworms with Kindles, and bookworms juggling the four paperbacks they’re reading at once. There are bookworms who get turned on by first editions, and bookworms keen on newer, abstract renditions. There are bookworms who follow the Tao of Oprah, and others who only listen to Deepak Chopra.

But perhaps the most intriguing bookworm of all is the bibliokleptomaniac, or what we like to call the kleptobrainiac. These people are book thieves, the nerdiest outlaws this side of Hogwarts. Fascinated? Appalled? Exposed? Find out what the most shoplifted books of modern times are after the jump.

In Margo Rabb’s recent New York Times essay, we learn that only 40 percent of books that are read are paid for, and only 28 percent are purchased new. What about the rest? They’re shared, lent, given away or stealthily taken by a customer with a case of the happy hands.

Depending on who you ask, the number one shoplifted book of modern times is either The Bible or The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides. After these two, (and like these two) the top 10 list is male-penned. In fact, according to store owners surveyed by Rabb, the most-nicked books share two things: fiction as a genre and a male author.

1. The Bible

bible
In tough times, both religion and shoplifting spike in popularity.

2. The Virgin Suicides

vsuicides
A modern goth novel about suicide pacts. Another sign of the times? We hope not.

3. The works of Martin Amis

money
Dubbed “The New Unpleasantness” by the New York Times, English novelist Amis rails again the excesses of modern capitalism. A comfort read?

4. The works of Charles Bukowski

Notes of a Dirty Old Man
A “laureate of American lowlife” and prolific writer, Bukowski also knew how to stick it to the man.

5. The works of William S. Burroughs
naked_lunch.uk.calder.1964
A Harvard grad, heroin dealer, and seedy bar frequenter, Burroughs was still getting an allowance from his parents when he was in his forties.

6. The works of Raymond Carver
raymond carver
Oh, just another alcoholic genius with a knack for short stories. Sensing a trend here?

7. The works of Don DeLillo

libra delillo
Post-modern novelist who quit his fancy job at Ogilvy because he “just didn’t want to work anymore.”

8. The works of Jack Kerouac

on the road
“Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion.” – Jack Kerouac …Like paying for books, right?

9. Steal This Book

6a00d09e4e067ebe2b00e398b6b3e00004-500pi
Title says it all.

10. Travel guidebooks

travel-guide-books
The thieves seem to be directionally-challenged nomads.

Brooklyn store manager Zack Zook seems to think the reason for the apparent sexism exhibited by book thieves is just part of the bro-code. “It’s mostly younger men stealing the books,” he told Rabb, “They think it’s an existential rite of passage to steal their homeboy.”

Book theft is seen as the biggest form of sacrilege to some devout word-lovers (after burning/throwing them away, of course). Others, like the author from Boulder who got caught swiping his own book, feel entitled to the works. While we’ll never know how Kerouac would feel about someone shoving his book down their pants, we would like to know how you feel. Have you ever nabbed yourself a book? If not, which one tempts you?

SUM HIPPIE JOKES

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NBHY

Q: How can you tell a hippie has been at your house?

A: He’s still there.

Q: What did he say when you told him to leave?

A: Namaste.


Q: What’s the difference between a hippie chick and a joint?

A: The joint won’t make it all the way around the circle.


Q: How do you starve a hippie?

A: Hide his drug money under the soap.


Q: What did the Deadhead say when he ran out of weed?

A: Man, this music sucks!


Q: What do hippie chicks and hockey players have in common?

A: They both shower and change pads after 3 periods.


So this guy got his dog really high. He tells the dog “Play dead.” And the dog says, “Nah man, play Floyd!”

Q: Why do hippies wave their arms around when they dance?

603
A: To keep the music out of their eyes.

Q: Why didn’t the lifeguard save the hippie from drowning?

A: He was too far out!

Q:How do you hide money from a hippie?

Put it under the soap

Q: Why did so many hippies move to Oregon?

A: They heard there was no work there.

How do you get 20 hippies into a phone booth? Throw in a joint.
How do you get them out? Throw in a bar of soap.

KYg7ZG

HIWAY AMERICA-These coders used 13,000 old photos to make a Google Street View map of San Francisco in the 1800s

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These coders used 13,000 old photos to make a Google Street View map of San Francisco in the 1800s

Above: OldSF.

Image Credit: Screenshot

If you’ve ever wondered what it would feel like to travel back in time and walk the streets of San Francisco, this might be the closest you’ll get.

Two developers, Dan Vanderkam and Raven Keller, had the brilliant idea to take all the old photographs from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collectionand put them on an interactive map. This map functions similarly to Google Street View, except when you zoom in on a particular place, it gives you photos from as far back as 1850.

The project, called OldSF, lets you manipulate a slider to change the range of years (it goes from 1850 all the way up to 2000). Vanderkam and Keller have geocoded about 13,000 images.

Visit the site here, or look below for some of the best photos we saw from the 1800s, marked with their locations in the city. (All photos via San Francisco History Center/San Francisco Public Library.)


Point Lobos Avenue and 43rd, Dick’s Saloon, 1890

point-lobos-avenue-and-43rd-dicks-saloon-1890


Central Park, 8th and Mission, circa 1887

central-park-8th-and-mission-circa-1887


Group of people overlooking the Cliff House from Sutro Heights, 1890

group-of-people-overlooking-the-cliff-house-from-sutro-heights-1890


Bush Street, west of Kearny, 1877

bush-street-west-of-kearny-1877


Palm Avenue in Jefferson Square, 1881

palm-avenue-in-jefferson-square-1881


View from City Hall, looking south down 8th at Central Park, 1896

view-from-city-hall-looking-south-down-8th-at-central-park-1896


Woodward’s Gardens, 1864

woodwards-gardens-1864


California Street, looking east from Montgomery, 1865

california-street-looking-east-from-montgomery-1865


Exterior of the What Cheer House on the south side of Sacramento, below Montgomery, 1865

exterior-of-the-what-cheer-house-on-the-south-side-of-sacramento-below-montgomery-1865


Building on northeast corner of Front and California, 1890

building-on-northeast-corner-of-front-and-california-1890


Baldwin Hotel bar, 1880

baldwin-hotel-bar-1880


Steuart Street, 1864

steuart-street-1864


J. C. Flood Mansion, California Street, 1886

j-c-flood-mansion-california-street-1886


St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, southeast corner of Sacramento Street and Van Ness, 1895

st-lukes-episcopal-church-southeast-corner-of-sacramento-street-and-van-ness-1895


Sacramento and Van Ness, 1887

sacramento-and-van-ness-1887


Woodward’s Gardens, 1874

woodwards-gardens-1874


Miss Lake’s School for Young Ladies, corner Sutter and Octavia, 1890

miss-lakes-school-for-young-ladies-corner-sutter-and-octavia-1890


Howard Street, looking east from 6th, 1866

howard-street-looking-east-from-6th-1866


1919 California Street, 1887

1919-california-st-1887


Southern Pacific passenger depot, 1879

southern-pacific-passenger-depot-1879


Cablecar at South Park, 1865

cablecar-at-south-park-1865


Fire Engine No. 13 at 1458 Valencia, 1884

fire-engine-no-13-at-1458-valencia-1884


Shotwell Street near 20th, Snowfall, 1887

shotwell-street-near-20th-snowfall-1887


The Willows, 18th & Valencia, 1864

the-willows-18th-and-valencia-1864


Musicians performing outside the “Haunted Swing” at the Midwinter Fair in Golden Gate Park, 1894

musicians-performing-outside-the-haunted-swing-at-the-midwinter-fair-in-golden-gate-park-1894

This story originally appeared on Www.businessinsider.com. Copyright 2016

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