HIWAY AMERICA -GULLOP N.M. ROUTE 66 PART 8

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GALLUP (Navajo: Naʼnízhoozhí) is a city in McKinley County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 21,678 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of McKinley County[1] and the most populous city between Flagstaff, Arizona, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Gallup, NM was also named as the winner in the Best of the Road Contest as the Most Patriotic Small Town in America for 2013–2014.[2]

History

Gallup was founded in 1881 as a railhead for the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. The city was named after David Gallup, a paymaster for the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. During World War II, the city fought successfully to prevent 800 Japanese American residents from being placed in wartime internment. Gallup is known as the “Heart of Indian Country” because it is in the middle of many Native America reservations and home to many tribes.[2]

Culture

Route 66 runs through Gallup, and the town’s name is mentioned in the lyrics to the song, “Route 66“. In 2003, the U.S. and New Mexico Departments of Transportation renumbered US Highway 666, the city’s other major highway, as Route 491; however, this change was unrelated to the fact that the number “666” is associated with Satan and Devil worship, and thus it was considered “cursed” or a “Beast” to some locals.[3]

The historic El Rancho Hotel & Motel has hosted a numerous array of movie stars including John Wayne, Ronald Reagan, Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Kirk Douglas, Doris Day, Gregory Peck and Burt Lancaster. The rugged terrain surrounding Gallup was popular with Hollywood filmmakers during the 1940s and 1950s for the on-location shooting of Westerns. Actors and film crews would stay at the hotel during filming. Films made in Gallup included Billy the Kid (1930), Pursued (1947), The Sea of Grass (1947), Four Faces West (1948), Only the Valiant (1951), Ace in the Hole (1951), Escape from Fort Bravo (1953), A Distant Trumpet (1964) and The Hallelujah Trail (1965).

Gallup is sometimes called the “Indian Capital of the World”, for its location in the heart of Native American lands, and the presence of Navajo, Zuni, Hopi and other tribes. One-third of the city’s population has Native American roots. Gallup’s nickname references the huge impact of the Native American cultures found in and around Gallup. However, the city is criticized in the novel Ceremony, authored by the Native American writer Leslie Marmon Silko, for the city’s slums.

Gallup was the setting as the center of activity in a 2006 Sci Fi Channel mini-series The Lost Room, starring Peter Krause. Akon filmed a music video in Gallup in 2005. In 1994, parts of the movie Natural Born Killers were filmed in the city.

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“GET YOUR KICKS ON ROUTE 66” BY NAT KING COLE

“(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66”, often rendered simply as “Route 66”, is a popular song and rhythm and blues standard, composed in 1946 by American songwriter Bobby Troup. It was first recorded in the same year by Nat King Cole, and was subsequently covered by many artists including Chuck Berry in 1961, The Rolling Stones in 1964, Depeche Mode in 1987, Pappo’s Blues in 1995, John Mayer in 2006, and Glenn Frey in 2012.[1] The song’s lyrics follow the path of the U.S. Route 66 highway, which used to run a long distance across the U.S., going from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California.

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GALLUP (Navajo: Naʼnízhoozhí) is a city in McKinley County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 21,678 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of McKinley County[1] and the most populous city between Flagstaff, Arizona, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Gallup, NM was also named as the winner in the Best of the Road Contest as the Most Patriotic Small Town in America for 2013–2014.[2]

History[edit]

Gallup was founded in 1881 as a railhead for the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. The city was named after David Gallup, a paymaster for the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. During World War II, the city fought successfully to prevent 800 Japanese American residents from being placed in wartime internment. Gallup is known as the “Heart of Indian Country” because it is in the middle of many Native American reservations and home to many tribes.[2]

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2 responses »

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