HIWAY AMERICA-THE ATLANTIC CITY BOARDWALK, ATLANTIC CITY N.J.

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BEACHES & BOARDWALK

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Duality, Atlantic City’s 3D Lightshow at Boardwalk Hall

http://youtu.be/P6APD4x9Mb0

 THE BOARDWALK VIDEO

http://youtu.be/cp-MXQF3MYE

Atlantic City Beach: 1900 to 1910

http://youtu.be/AYBFWE1UKWo

Miss America Winners 1921-2013

The Miss America Pageant began as a marketing idea. The Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City needed to develop a plan to keep tourists on the boardwalk past Labor Day. They organized a Fall Frolic and held it on September 25, 1920. There were many events that day, but the most popular was a parade of young women being pushed along the Boardwalk in rolling chairs. Ernestine Cremona, dressed in a flowing white robe, was in charge of this event. This event was such a success that a similar one was planned for the following year, and so on. At the same time, in an effort to increase circulation, newspapers on the East Coast had begun sponsoring beauty pageants judged on photograph submissions. The Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City got ear of this and decided to capitalize on this idea. They invited the winners of these local newspaper beauty contests to the next Fall Frolic to compete in an “Inter-City Beauty” Contest. This contest had two parts—a popularity contest and a beauty contest. The winner of the beauty contest, the “Most Beautiful Bathing Girl in America”, was to be awarded the title of “Golden Mermaid”. On September 8, 1921, one hundred thousand people came to the Boardwalk to watch the contestants, a turn out much more than the Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City had expected. A panel of artists serving as judges named sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman of Washington, D.C., the winner of both contests and awarded her a $100 prize. When Gorman returned in 1922 to defend her laurels, she was draped in the American flag and called “Miss America”.

http://youtu.be/2T1vqCrtlkI

Beaches with boardwalks offer big benefits!

Sun, sand, towering resort hotels, the bustling boardwalk, the awe-inspiring Atlantic — this is one beach party you don’t want to miss. The South Jersey beaches of Atlantic City are famous, and rightly so. Everything you could possibly want is right here within walking distance, from shops to five-star restaurants to casinos, attractions and great shows — all benefits of being one of the few American beaches with boardwalks. What better way to cap a day of shopping, shows and gourmet dining than a sunset walk on the beach? And should you want to venture into the waves, you can surf, fish, parasail or embark on a relaxing cruise.

Construction on Atlantic City’s world-famous Boardwalk began in 1870, and from then on it has become an icon in America as one of the few beaches with boardwalks. Stroll along the Boardwalk and enjoy ocean views on one side and shopping on the other, ranging from high-end retail to saltwater taffy shops.

Atlantic City Beach and Boardwalk activities include surfing, kayaking, windsurfing and fishing. Explore the Boardwalk and beaches in Atlantic City here. Make Atlantic City’s beaches your destination for summer fun – start planning your trip today!

About the Atlantic City Boardwalk

The Boardwalk in Atlantic City starts at Absecon Inlet and runs along the beach for four miles to the city limit. An additional one and one half miles  of the Boardwalk extend into Ventnor City. There are many retail stores, restaurants, and amusements on the Boardwalk as well as world famous Casinos. Several piers including Morey’s Piers extend the boardwalk over the Atlantic Ocean.

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