PUNK MUSIC 60’S AND UP

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BLONDIE COLLAGE BY ANA CHRISTY #BLONDIE#ANA_CHRISTY#COLLAGE#PUNK

 

 

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The Foundations of Punk Rock

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The beginnings of punk rock are often furiously debated. This is partially because everyone has different definition of punk rock, and partially because its foundation stones are found in several places.

MY FAVORITE GROUP IS THE VELVET UNDERGROUND

THE WHO GREATEST HITS (1964-2004)

https://youtu.be/Cwn1ArVHxnA

The Fugs – Second Album (Full Album)

https://youtu.be/flN2TFeCgdo

oye isabel The Iguanas

https://youtu.be/8Udh5x4sSXs?list=PLSppaHvgP-Ip2Lgz7_fAjghNIQhfRh4hN

The Troggs – Hit Single Anthology (Full Album)

https://youtu.be/4LDYVeFVMZg

The Sonics-1965 – Here Are The Sonics[Full Album]

https://youtu.be/yoY-VCxhWQ8

The Velvet Underground & Nico Full Album (Stereo) [HQ]

https://youtu.be/aVrTORySXjU

Small Faces – Ogdens´ Nut Gone Flake – Full record

https://youtu.be/qBOFm96rTsg

The Stooges – Fun House (Full Album)

https://youtu.be/JWcrDGvdgW0

Blondie – Rapture

https://youtu.be/pHCdS7O248g

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“Punk Rock” was originally used to describe the garage musicians of the ’60’s. Bands like the Sonics were starting up and playing out with no musical or vocal instruction, and often limited skill.

Because they didn’t know the rules of music, they were able to break the rules.

The mid to late ’60s saw the appearance of the Stooges and the MC5 in Detroit. They were raw, crude and often political. Their concerts were often violent affairs, and they were opening the eyes of the music world.

The Velvet Underground is the next piece in the puzzle. The Velvet Underground, managed by Andy Warhol, were producing music that often bordered on noise. They were expanding the definitions of music without even realizing it.

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The final primary influence is found in the foundations of Glam Rock. Artists like David Bowie and the New York Dolls were dressing outrageously, living extravagantly and producing loud trashy rock and roll.

Glam would end up splitting up its influence, doling out portions to hard rock, “hair metal” and punk rock.

New York: The First Punk Rock Scene

The first concrete punk rock scene appeared in the mid ’70s in New York. Bands like The Ramones, Wayne County, Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers, Blondie and the Talking Heads were playing regularly in the Bowery District, most notably at the legendary club CBGB.

The bands were unified by their location, camaraderie, and shared musical influences. They would all go on to develop their own styles and many would shift away from punk rock.

While the New York scene was reaching its heyday, punk was undergoing a separate creation story in London.

Meanwhile, Across the Pond

England’s punk scene had political and economic roots. The economy in the United Kingdom was in poor shape, and unemployment rates were at an all-time high. England’s youth were angry, rebellious and out of work. They had strong opinions and a lot of free time.
This is where the beginnings of punk fashion as we know it emerged, and they centered out of one shop.

The shop was simply called SEX, and it was owned by Malcolm McClaren.

Malcolm McClaren had recently returned to London from the U.S., where he had unsuccessfully tried to reinvent the New York Dolls to sell his clothing. He was determined to do it again, but this time looked to the youths who worked and hung out in his shop to be his next project. This project would become the Sex Pistols, and they would develop a large following very quickly.

Enter The Bromley Contingent

Among the fans of the Sex Pistols was an outrageous bunch of young punks known as the Bromley Contingent. Named after the neighborhood they all came from, they were at the first Sex Pistols shows, and quickly realized they could do it themselves.

Within a year, the Bromleys had formed a large portion of the London Punk scene, including The Clash, The Slits, Siouxsie & the Banshees, Generation X (fronted by a young Billy Idol) and X-Ray Spex. The British punk scene was now in full swing.

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The Punk Rock Explosion

By the late ’70s, punk had finished its beginning and had emerged as a solid musical force. With its rise in popularity, punk began to split into numerous sub-genres. New musicians embraced the DIY movement and began to create their own individual scenes with specific sounds.

In order to better see the evolution of punk, check out all of the subgenres that punk split off into. It’s a list that’s constantly evolving, and it’s only a matter of time before more categories appear.
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Bad Brains. ROIRRyan Cooper
Punk Music Expert
Updated July 03, 2014.
What is Hardcore?:

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Mount Lehman Grease Band 
Notorious Smorg Brothers
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Fast, loud and furious – these are the elements of hardcore. From its inception in the late ‘70s, hardcore began to pick up the attitudes and messages employed by the first punk bands, setting them to driving guitar and drum lines that were more frenzied than those played by earlier bands that fell under the punk description. Faster and heavier than other contemporary punk bands, hardcore songs were often very short and very frenzied.

The Early Days of Hardcore:

At the beginning, hardcore punk was primarily a phenomenon in the states. Hardcore punk’s rise to popularity in the late ’70s and early ’80s happened in multiple cities throughout the U.S. almost simultaneously. Musicians that had been raised on heavy metal but were being influenced by punk were taking these two influences, combining them, and speeding them up into something exciting and unheard of.

At the same time, on opposite coasts, three bands help usher in the era of hardcore. LA’s Black Flag and Washington DC’s Minor Threat and Bad Brains were the primary pioneers of the hardcore sound, which also ushered in the era of slamdancing at punk rock shows.

While it had been around for a while at punk rock shows, the intensity of hardcore music really brought it into prominence.

Hardcore Breaks Out:

With the birth of these early scenes came a DIY ethic that allowed hardcore scenes to pop up all over. The Midwest was especially dense; In Detroit, Negative iApproach ruled the roost, in Lansing, Michigan, the Meatmen started a scene, and Minneapolis-St. Paul spawned the amazingly complex Husker Du, who mixed jazz, psychedelia, acoustic folk and pop in with their hardcore riffs.

It was true everywhere, though. Nevada had 7Seconds. New Jesey had the Misfits. Gang Green was raging in Boston. And New York was putting hardcore shows on by the Beastie Boys, a hardcore band that would later be better known as a rap outfit.

Once the sound began, it was impossible to put a lid on it. Essentially, any city or town large enough to have a scene seemed to have a hardcore scene, with its own chunk of local hardcore bands and local hardcore followers. This continues to be the case, and while it was (and continues to be) primarily popular in the U.S., hardcore scenes are evident all over the world.

While hardcore records are obviously an essential part of hardcore music, and without them we’d have no recorded history of the music, hardcore music and its encompassing scene was and is really about the hardcore show, where all of the DIY ethic comes together. Even now, hardcore house and club shows happen everywhere, with bands getting together to play out of basements and garages, selling self-recorded music and handmade t-shirts, and advertised by self-produced fliers.

Hardcore In The Mainstream Media:

From the early days, hardcore shows were misunderstood as violent affairs by the mainstream media. TV talk shows grabbed onto these shows as violent affairs, and TV dramas depicted them as dark violent events. The most famous is arguably the punk episode of Quincy M.E., which has spawned its own pop references in the punk scene, including a song and band name.

THE WHO GREATEST HITS

https://youtu.be/Cwn1ArVHxnA

A Message?:

Hardcore music’s only unifying factor is its sound. The lyrics and messages vary from band to band. While some hardcore bands preach drug- and alcohol-free living (known as straightedge), other bands write songs that are all about partying. There are even Christian hardcore bands with a strong religious message.

What’s Next?:

Hardcore continues to be a subgenre of music with a strong following. While it paved the way for thrash metal and other heavy sounds, many of the early hardcore bands are still together and new bands rise up constantly. Along with the continuing tide of hardcore is a wave of bands known as post-hardcore bands, but that’s another story entirely.
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Review: If You Like The Ramones…
A solid cultural history revolving around one of punk’s most influential groups
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ifyoulikeramones.JPG – Backbeat Books
If You Like The Ramones… Backbeat Books

Ryan Cooper
Punk Music Expert When I was getting into punk rock, one of my first exposures to the sound was the Ramones. Short, fast repetitive tunes delivered with a deceptive simplicity, Ramones’ songs were stripped down and raw, delivered with a sublime sense of humor that paved the way for countless bands to follow.

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At the same time, a common enough form of recommendation came from friends in the form of “If you like the Ramones, then you should check out out,” followed by the name of another band that delivered more short, fast raw punk rock.

It was a fast fun way to broaden my musical horizons. Decades later, writer and Chrome Cranks frontman (who is also responsible for influencing countless contemporaries) Peter Aaron has released, If You Like The Ramones… Here Are Over 200 Bands, CDs, Films and Other Oddities You’ll Love.

I was with eager anticipation that I tore into this book, expecting a collection of punk records I was already quite familiar with, anticipating a trip down memory lane along with the possibility of learning about other bands that I had missed.

And I was wrong. That’s not what this book is about at all. Or rather, that’s just a small part of what it’s about.

What Aaron has compiled is something much more ambitious and exciting, a book that serves as a resource on musical history that starts with a single influential band and uses it as a springboard for what came before, after, and at the same times.

Aaron recognizes that the Ramones weren’t born from a musical void, and that while they were pioneers of their specific sound, they were influenced in no small part by a wide range of bands.

He begins with the early roots of rock and roll, recognizing greats that don’t immediately leap to mind when thinking of the Ramones, like Bo Diddly and Buddy Holly, calling out their influence on rock in general, and the Ramones in particular. I was especially pleased to see his recognition of Eddie Cochran, a British rockabilly great with a tragically short career that I feel is all too often ignored for his influence on punk rock.

He calls out the more prominent influences on the Ramones as well – the girl groups and surf musicians that had a prominent effect on the band’s sounds, along with the British Invasion bands (and he’s not shy about recognizing the contributions of big names like The Beatles, Rolling Stones and The Who on the band) along with the American garage rockers (from prominent names like the Sonics to obscure bands like the Monks) who added one element to the group’s sound.

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By the time he calls out the band’s hard rock and glam influences (and relates the tale of Dust, a proto-metal band that featured the drummer who would become Marky Ramone years later), not only has it been a pleasant trip through musical history, but the hidden complexity of the band’s sound has been laid bare. Ramones songs may sound simple, but their foundations are anything but.

It’s over 100 pages into the book before he even touches upon the music that I had expected to comprise the majority of the book. This is when he reaches the punk era, exploring all of the Ramones’ contemporaries both stateside and abroad, giving a concise snapshot of the scene as it existed.

A good amount of attention is given to the fact that the Ramones weren’t solely influenced by music either, with a chapter devoted to their pop culture roots, calling out the classic cartoons that influenced the band, as well as relative newcomers like Ren and Stimpy and South Park that were born of the era, along with the TV, films and comics that laid down the band’s pop culture upbringing.

The other part that I expected to make up the bulk of the book – a listing of bands influenced by the Ramones – is much smaller than anticipated, but still quite thorough. And the book is rounded out by a complete collection of the Ramones themselves on film (including bit appearances on shows like The Simpsons and Space Ghost Coast to Coast), the various side projects of the bands, and some highly recommended Ramones tributes.

For anyone just getting into punk rock, I always recommend the Ramones, preferably with their extensive box set Weird Tales of the Ramones (Compare Prices). Moving forward, I’ll recommend If You Like The Ramones… as a literary companion. It’s much more that just a musical primer for Ramones fans, it’s a complex music history using one of the greats as a jumping off point. Instead of just a trip down a musical memory lane, I’m finding out about a range of old-timers of all styles that I want to check out, and a desire to expand my own musical horizons much further. It’s an eye-opening and in-depth book that could have simply been OK had Aaron been less ambitious, but his legwork has elevated it from a “fun read” to a “must read.”

If You Like The Ramones… Here Are Over 200 Bands, CDs, Films and Other Oddities You’ll Love
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#ana_christy#punk_rock,#punk_rock_bands#sixties#70’s#antiestablishment#rebel#beatnikhiway.com

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About hobo hippie

Hi I am an old hippie, a "beat" poet and novelist, and digital artist. I was co -editor and publisher of "Alpha Beat Press" alpha beat soup, bouillabaisse and cokefish and cokefishing in alpha beat soup with my late husband Dave Christy. My novel "eeenie meenie minee moe is for sale on amazon books. my other blogs are http://tilliespuncturedromance.wordpress.com about humor and the weird. The blog is named after a Charlie Chaplin movie. http://concretebologna.wordpress.com a blog about world art.

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