Category Archives: around the world

The big top comes down: Ringling Bros. circus is closing after 146 years. Hiway America.

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Ringling Brothers

barnumandbaileytop

 Charles and John Ringling, along with their brothers Albert and Otto, founded the Ringling Bros. Circus in 1884, in Baraboo, Wisconsin. By the 1930s, the Ringling brothers were among the most famous American entrepreneurs, and were known throughout the world. By that time, they had bought out their biggest competitor, the Barnum & Bailey Circus, and were operating as the largest circus in the United States.

The big top comes down: Ringling Bros. circus is closing

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 Circus Ringling Bros.Barnum & Bailey Kings of the Circus

Ringling bros and barnum bailey circus Atlanta 2016 final

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus train and Union Pacific 3985
History was made today when the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus train and Union Pacific Railroad’s “Challenger,” No. 3985, joined together, literally, between Speer, Wyo., and Denver, Colo., to celebrate U.S. railroad heritage. Challenger pulled the mile-long circus train, packed full of international performers, exotic animals, and all the equipment needed to present the all-new Ringling Bros. Circus, Barnum’s FUNundrum!SM, which makes a two-week stop in Denver. Union Pacific’s No. 3985 continues on a six-state tour from Cheyenne, Wyo., to Gorham, Ill.
“We are proud that No. 3985 pulled the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus train into Denver. A record was set when Challenger pulled a 65-car train that is more than 6,000 tons and nearly 6,100 feet long, the most for a steam locomotive in the 21st century,” said Dick Hartman, Union Pacific’s director of public affairs for Colorado and Wyoming.
The combined trains arrived shortly after 10:00 am and were met by over 500 excited fans at the intersection of York Street and East 47th Avenue. A welcome celebration followed that featured Ringmaster Johnathan Lee Iverson and performers from Ringling Bros., officials from Union Pacific, and Denver city auditor, Dennis Gallagher, who presented a proclamation from the Mayor of Denver.
“Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey is excited to be part of this railroad heritage celebration; we’ve been riding the rails for the last 140 years, so we are a part of railroad history,” said Johnathan Lee Iverson, Ringmaster for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey.
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Presents Barnum’s FUNundrum!SM, is a monumental, once in a lifetime show, celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of the legendary P.T. Barnum, and can only be experienced at The Greatest Show On Earth, Barnum’s living legacy! Ringling Bros. will be performing in Denver through October 10, 2010 and then will continue on its two-year tour.
For more information about Ringling Bros., visit http://www.Ringling.com.
For more information about Union Pacific or No. 3985, visit http://www.up.com.
Stock Footage – CIRCUS PEOPLE, 1950

Ringling Bros. Circus Chooses First Female Ringmaster in Its 146-Year History

History of the Circus Sideshow / Freakshow

A visit to Ringling Brothers Circus Museum in Florida

Tamara Lush, Associated Press
Associated PressJanuary 15, 2017

ELLENTON, Fla. (AP) — After 146 years, the curtain is coming down on “The Greatest Show on Earth.” The owner of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus told The Associated Press that the show will close forever in May.

The iconic American spectacle was felled by a variety of factors, company executives say. Declining attendance combined with high operating costs, along with changing public tastes and prolonged battles with animal rights groups all contributed to its demise.

“There isn’t any one thing,” said Kenneth Feld, chairman and CEO of Feld Entertainment. “This has been a very difficult decision for me and for the entire family.”

The company broke the news to circus employees Saturday night after shows in Orlando and Miami.

Ringling Bros. has two touring circuses this season and will perform 30 shows between now and May. Major stops include Atlanta, Washington, Philadelphia, Boston and Brooklyn. The final shows will be in Providence, Rhode Island, on May 7 and in Uniondale, New York, at the Nassau County Coliseum on May 21.

The circus, with its exotic animals, flashy costumes and death-defying acrobats, has been a staple of entertainment in the United States since the mid-1800s. Phineas Taylor Barnum made a traveling spectacle of animals and human oddities popular, while the five Ringling brothers performed juggling acts and skits from their home base in Wisconsin. Eventually, they merged and the modern circus was born. The sprawling troupes traveled around America by train, wowing audiences with the sheer scale of entertainment and exotic animals.

By midcentury, the circus was routine, wholesome family entertainment. But as the 20th century went on, kids became less and less enthralled. Movies, television, video games and the internet captured young minds. The circus didn’t have savvy product merchandising tie-ins or Saturday morning cartoons to shore up its image.

“The competitor in many ways is time,” said Feld, adding that transporting the show by rail and other circus quirks — such as providing a traveling school for performers’ children— are throwbacks to another era. “It’s a different model that we can’t see how it works in today’s world to justify and maintain an affordable ticket price. So you’ve got all these things working against it.”

The Feld family bought the Ringling circus in 1967. The show was just under 3 hours then. Today, the show is 2 hours and 7 minutes, with the longest segment — a tiger act — clocking in at 12 minutes.

“Try getting a 3- or 4-year-old today to sit for 12 minutes,” he said.

Feld and his daughter Juliette Feld, who is the company’s chief operating officer, acknowledged another reality that led to the closing, and it was the one thing that initially drew millions to the show: the animals. Ringling has been targeted by activists who say forcing animals to perform is cruel and unnecessary.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, a longtime opponent of the circus, wasted no time in claiming victory.

“After 36 years of PETA protests, which have awoken the world to the plight of animals in captivity, PETA heralds the end of what has been the saddest show on earth for wild animals, and asks all other animal circuses to follow suit, as this is a sign of changing times,” Ingrid Newkirk, president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, wrote in a statement.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States, acknowledged the move was “bittersweet” for the Felds but said: “I applaud their decision to move away from an institution grounded on inherently inhumane wild animal acts.”

In May of 2016, after a long and costly legal battle, the company removed the elephants from the shows and sent the animals to live on a conservation farm in Central Florida. The animals had been the symbol of the circus since Barnum brought an Asian elephant named Jumbo to America in 1882. In 2014, Feld Entertainment won $25.2 million in settlements from groups including the Humane Society of the United States, ending a 14-year fight over allegations that circus employees mistreated elephants.

By the time the elephants were removed, public opinion had shifted somewhat. Los Angeles prohibited the use of bull-hooks by elephant trainers and handlers, as did Oakland, California. The city of Asheville, North Carolina nixed wild or exotic animals from performing in the municipally owned, 7,600-seat U.S. Cellular Center.

Attendance has been dropping for 10 years, said Juliette Feld, but when the elephants left, there was a “dramatic drop” in ticket sales. Paradoxically, while many said they didn’t want big animals to perform in circuses, many others refused to attend a circus without them.

“We know now that one of the major reasons people came to Ringling Bros. was getting to see elephants,” she said. “We stand by that decision. We know it was the right decision. This was what audiences wanted to see and it definitely played a major role.”

The Felds say their existing animals — lions, tigers, camels, donkeys, alpacas, kangaroos and llamas — will go to suitable homes. Juliette Feld says the company will continue operating the Center for Elephant Conservation.

Some 500 people perform and work on both touring shows. A handful will be placed in positions with the company’s other, profitable shows — it owns Monster Jam, Disney on Ice and Marvel Live, among other things — but most will be out of a job. Juliette Feld said the company will help employees with job placement and resumes. In some cases where a circus employee lives on the tour rail car (the circus travels by train), the company will also help with housing relocation.

Kenneth Feld became visibly emotional while discussing the decision with a reporter. He said over the next four months, fans will be able to say goodbye at the remaining shows.

In recent years, Ringling Bros. tried to remain relevant, hiring its first African American ringmaster, then its first female ringmaster, and also launching an interactive app. It added elements from its other, popular shows, such as motorbike daredevils and ice skaters. But it seemingly was no match for Pokemon Go and a generation of kids who desire familiar brands and YouTube celebrities.

“We tried all these different things to see what would work, and supported it with a lot of funding as well, and we weren’t successful in finding the solution,” said Kenneth Feld.

#barnum_bailey_circus#circus#ringling_brothers#the-big-top#the-greatest-show-on-earth#wisconsin#beatnikhiway.com#ana_christy#anachristy#entertainment

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Artist Christo Guelov Creates Dozens of Colorfully Alternative Pedestrian Crossings in Madrid

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Artist Christo Guelov Creates Dozens of Colorfully Alternative Pedestrian Crossings in Madrid     

Seeing opportunity just under his feet, artist Christo Guelov wondered how a mundane street crossing could be turned into a thing of beauty. Like the design of a chair or the face of a watch, it turns out the possibilities are probably endless. The Bulgarian artist transformed dozens of pedestrian crossings in Madrid as part of his seriesFunnycross, working with a palette of friendly colors to paint fun geometric patterns on streets across the city. You can see much more of the project on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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There’s A Psychedelic Party On A Shoreditch Rooftop, And You’re Invited

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There’s A Psychedelic Party On A Shoreditch Rooftop, And You’re Invited

There’s A Psychedelic Party On A Shoreditch Rooftop, And You’re Invited

Photo: Graham Turner

Shoreditch’s Queen of Hoxton rooftop bar has taken on the theme A Tribute To Dr Strange this year, in a bid to transport revellers back to the flower power age of the 1960s.

Rainbow food adorns the menu, including this psychedelic ice cream sandwich (clearly e-numbers weren’t a concern in the 60s). Burgers, fish and salads are also on the menu, for those with less of a sweet tooth.

Photo: Graham Turner

Ice cream floats, slushies and themed cocktails will cool rooftop-goers down on those long, hot summer days while they take in views of the City and the East End.

Photo: Graham Turner

The decor of the roof garden is every bit as eye-catching as the food, and best of all, entry is free.

We’re not entirely sure what this is, but we wouldn’t want to meet it down a dark alley. Photo: Graham Turner

Special events take place on the rooftop throughout the summer, including film screenings, flower garland workshops, and, for those who really want to embrace their inner hippie, festival clothing customisation sessions. Check the website for upcoming events (there’s a charge for most events).

Those not gifted with a sweet tooth won’t starve. Photo: Graham Turner

Queen of Hoxton summer rooftop is open 7 days a week, 12pm-10pm (closed for special events — worth checking before you go). Entry is free.

Love this? Check out London’s other rooftop bars open this summer.

Riding the Delhi Metro During Crush Hour

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Riding the Delhi Metro During Crush Hour

 

The Delhi Metro.

 

Holy Moly, you guys.

 

A bit of advice for expats braving the Delhi Metro.

 

Hands down, riding the Delhi metro is the most chaotic traveling situation I’ve ever been in.

 

Important Travel Tip:

 

If you ask directions, ask a minimum of three people for the same bit of advice.

 

Never forget that your culture travels with you only in your heart. You may very well find that while traveling in Asia you’ll never hear the words “I don’t know”. If you ask a question, you will be given an answer. Regardless of if the person knew the answer.

 

Aaaaand, that’s how we find ourselves a little lost on the Delhi Metro on a recent day trip. Thankfully it didn’t cause a problem for our schedule but we did waste a good hour.

 

Delhi Metro Sign

Also, it comes in handy to know how to read Hindi. I realize most tourists won’t have that skill at their disposal. I read Hindi like a kindergartner but it was encouraging to be able to read “You are here” once or twice. Of course, after painstakingly reading this Hindi metro sign, I found a sign in English at the other end of the platform.

 

I was feeling pretty hard core for riding the metro in Delhi, in standing room only, until we switched lines. Nothing can prepare you for the Blue Line during rush hour. Or as it’s affectionately called,crush hour. It looks a lot like this.

 

delhi metro rush hour

People clawing their way out. People pushing their way in. Intense is an understatement.

 

Once you’re in the crowd to get on, you couldn’t not board if you tried. Everyone behind you pushes in a collective effort to cram as many sardines people as possible onto to train. I never could have imagined that so many bodies could fit in one compartment. “Standing room only” doesn’t properly describe it. You’re packed in so tightly, if someone passed out, they’d continue to stand upright.

 

Also, fair warning – there may be groping. My fifteen year experienced some wandering hands.

 

But that’s not the hard part. The truly scary bit is trying to get back off. After you’ve been squished into the train, at every stop after that you continue to somehow get forced further and further away from the door. And there’s nothing you can do about it. Seriously zip.

 

So you’d better be good and ready when your stop comes. Elbows out, people. You yell and push to get to the door because you only get one chance. We barely got all six of us off, with my husband pulling up the rear and kicking the doors back open.

 

riding the metro

In hindsight, not a great way to travel with kids. There’s a very real chance of getting separated, I would think. Jeremy and I both clung desperately to our youngest two so they wouldn’t get trampled or left behind.

 

The picture to the right is my daughter when we only thought we were crowded. Soon after that the Blue Line put us in our place.

 

Whew.

 

Have you ever ridden the metro anywhere?

#dehli#metro#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com

This Woman Hitchhiked Around the World (And Lived to Tell the Tale) — Thought Catalog

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Kristin AddisThe first time it happened haphazardly. I was in my early 20s. A friend and I deplaned at Liberia, a tiny airport in Costa Rica, thinking we could get a bus to our next destination. We emerged from the gate confused and lost, seeing that there were no buses around. Desperation started to well…

via This Woman Hitchhiked Around the World (And Lived to Tell the Tale) — Thought Catalog

#Kristin Addis#travels#world#hitchhiked#beatnikhiway.com#ana_christy

Mexicans torch Donald Trump effigy during annual Easter eve celebrations Donald Trump effigy Mexicans set fire to an effigy of Donald Trump on March 26, 2016, in Mexico City during Holy Week celebrations. For many years, Mexicans have made cardboard figures representing all forms of evil, which are then torched to commemorate the “Burning of Judas,” a tradition in which Mexicans torch effigies of the devil, politicians and others they dislike on the eve of Easter Sunday. (Yuri Cortez, AFP/Getty Images) Joshua Partlow The Washington Post Who would you build if you had to make a monster of mythical proportions? An evil equal to a biblical scourge? A traitor to be burned in effigy whose fiery demise would cleanse our corrupted souls? In Mexico, that would be Donald J. Trump. (J for Judas?) Or at least a 10-foot-tall papier-mache version of him: eyes wide, mouth agape, with painted-on business suit and golden mane. On Saturday night, just as every year on the day before Easter, Mexicans gathered on street corners and church squares to celebrate the Holy Week and set fire to their Judases, a popular ritual in this heavily Catholic country. Those demons are typically forked-tongue devils and flaming dragons, and often reviled politicians. “For Latinos here and in the U.S., he’s a danger, a real threat,” said Leonardo Linares, a 52-year-old artist who built a Trump effigy over the past week in his Mexico City studio. “He’s a good man to burn as a Judas.” Promoted stories from PoliticsChatter.com Saturday Night Live’s best parodies of politicians Photos: The White House Easter Egg Roll throughout the years 14 things to know about FOX News anchor Megyn Kelly Linares, a jolly craftsman in paint-splattered clothes, presided over this block party that attracted hundreds of revelers, with kids chasing cotton candy wisps and pitched funny-foam battles. Linares and his relatives, who have been running this show for decades, chose the order of the Judas burnings, beginning with diminutive devils and wee minions and moving to the big dogs: President Barack Obama with a cigar in his mouth and a Cuban flag, a black-clad Islamic State fighter with a Kalashnikov and the grand Trumpian finale. Donald Trump effigy Mexicans prepare to set fire to an effigy depicting Donald Trump during Holy Week celebrations in Mexico City on March 26, 2016. (Yuri Cortez, AFP/Getty Images) The ceremonies take place across Mexico, a symbolic way to destroy evil before Easter. Santa Rosa Xochiac, a hillside neighborhood to the southwest of the capital, has become one of the popular Judas torching spots. More than a dozen groups of people spend months building their effigies, then parade them through the streets before rigging them with fireworks and sparklers and setting them ablaze. “Mostly it’s devils, monsters,” said Ricardo Sanchez, a 27-year-old mechanic as he put the finishing touches on 20-foot tall dragon. “One year we burned Osama bin Laden.” Mexicans take special pleasure in skewering Trump, the front-running Republican candidate who has threatened to deport millions of Mexicans and claims he’ll build a giant wall across the United States’ southern border and have Mexico pay for it. Since he launched his campaign last summer calling them “rapists” and “criminals,” Mexicans have fired back with a variety of satires. A pair of comedians put on a play, “The Sons of Trump,” featuring greedy villains bumbling around in blond wigs. Trump’s likeness has been crafted into pinatas and bashed, digitized into a video game character and pegged with tomatoes. His name is the brunt of folk song jokes. Trump wants to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Can it be done? Trump wants to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Can it be done? There has also been more earnest criticism, from former Mexican presidents and current senior government officials, who have warned that Trump’s xenophobic rhetoric is damaging relations between the two countries. “He’s crazy,” said Alberto Rueda, a 30-year-old shopkeeper who attended the Trump burning in the La Merced neighborhood. “His ideas are not the solution, on the contrary. If he builds a wall, people will build tunnels.” Linares, who has been building burnable Judases since he was a boy, has traveled extensively in the U.S., including Washington and New York, showing his art. Making giant paper dolls has been a family business for decades, he said, and he’s reduced many politicians to ashes over the years. Former President Carlos Salinas is a fan favorite, he said, along with corrupt former Mexico City police Chief Arturo Durazo. His was not the only Trump on display. Fernando Padilla, 33, a neighbor, built a likeness of a Mexican drug lord riding an airplane while carrying Trump’s severed head in his hand. “Latinos have contributed a lot to the United States,” Linares said. “Trump’s a buffoon. With him as president, the U.S. will lose a lot of credibility in the world.” Donald Trump and the ‘affluenza’ crisis at Emory Donald Trump and the ‘affluenza’ crisis at Emory The mood on the street was a mix of neighborhood festival and war zone, with showering sparks, gigantic firework blasts that knocked people down, the whole street cloaked in a gunpowder haze. The dolls seemed to stay in character. The Islamic State fighter exploded his payload in one chaotic blast; Obama’s fuse was lit repeatedly but refused to blow. When it came time for the climax, Trump went slowly, gruesomely, one leg blasting off, then the other, as the by-then boozy crowd chanted “Death! Death!” When his blond head exploded, there were thunderous cheers. Linares looked spent as he surveyed the carnage. “We’re satisfied,” he said. “The people liked it.” Copyright © 2016, Chicago Tribune Mexico Donald Trump

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 Mexicans torch Donald Trump effigy during annual Easter eve celebrations
Joshua PartlowThe Washington Post

Who would you build if you had to make a monster of mythical proportions? An evil equal to a biblical scourge? A traitor to be burned in effigy whose fiery demise would cleanse our corrupted souls?

In Mexico, that would be Donald J. Trump. (J for Judas?)

Or at least a 10-foot-tall papier-mache version of him: eyes wide, mouth agape, with painted-on business suit and golden mane. On Saturday night, just as every year on the day before Easter, Mexicans gathered on street corners and church squares to celebrate the Holy Week and set fire to their Judases, a popular ritual in this heavily Catholic country. Those demons are typically forked-tongue devils and flaming dragons, and often reviled politicians.

“For Latinos here and in the U.S., he’s a danger, a real threat,” said Leonardo Linares, a 52-year-old artist who built a Trump effigy over the past week in his Mexico City studio. “He’s a good man to burn as a Judas.”

Linares, a jolly craftsman in paint-splattered clothes, presided over this block party that attracted hundreds of revelers, with kids chasing cotton candy wisps and pitched funny-foam battles. Linares and his relatives, who have been running this show for decades, chose the order of the Judas burnings, beginning with diminutive devils and wee minions and moving to the big dogs: President Barack Obama with a cigar in his mouth and a Cuban flag, a black-clad Islamic State fighter with a Kalashnikov and the grand Trumpian finale.

The ceremonies take place across Mexico, a symbolic way to destroy evil before Easter. Santa Rosa Xochiac, a hillside neighborhood to the southwest of the capital, has become one of the popular Judas torching spots. More than a dozen groups of people spend months building their effigies, then parade them through the streets before rigging them with fireworks and sparklers and setting them ablaze.

“Mostly it’s devils, monsters,” said Ricardo Sanchez, a 27-year-old mechanic as he put the finishing touches on 20-foot tall dragon. “One year we burned Osama bin Laden.”

Mexicans take special pleasure in skewering Trump, the front-running Republican candidate who has threatened to deport millions of Mexicans and claims he’ll build a giant wall across the United States’ southern border and have Mexico pay for it. Since he launched his campaign last summer calling them “rapists” and “criminals,” Mexicans have fired back with a variety of satires. A pair of comedians put on a play, “The Sons of Trump,” featuring greedy villains bumbling around in blond wigs. Trump’s likeness has been crafted into pinatas and bashed, digitized into a video game character and pegged with tomatoes. His name is the brunt of folk song jokes.

There has also been more earnest criticism, from former Mexican presidents and current senior government officials, who have warned that Trump’s xenophobic rhetoric is damaging relations between the two countries.

“He’s crazy,” said Alberto Rueda, a 30-year-old shopkeeper who attended the Trump burning in the La Merced neighborhood. “His ideas are not the solution, on the contrary. If he builds a wall, people will build tunnels.”

Linares, who has been building burnable Judases since he was a boy, has traveled extensively in the U.S., including Washington and New York, showing his art.

Making giant paper dolls has been a family business for decades, he said, and he’s reduced many politicians to ashes over the years. Former President Carlos Salinas is a fan favorite, he said, along with corrupt former Mexico City police Chief Arturo Durazo. His was not the only Trump on display. Fernando Padilla, 33, a neighbor, built a likeness of a Mexican drug lord riding an airplane while carrying Trump’s severed head in his hand.

“Latinos have contributed a lot to the United States,” Linares said. “Trump’s a buffoon. With him as president, the U.S. will lose a lot of credibility in the world.”

The mood on the street was a mix of neighborhood festival and war zone, with showering sparks, gigantic firework blasts that knocked people down, the whole street cloaked in a gunpowder haze.

The dolls seemed to stay in character. The Islamic State fighter exploded his payload in one chaotic blast; Obama’s fuse was lit repeatedly but refused to blow. When it came time for the climax, Trump went slowly, gruesomely, one leg blasting off, then the other, as the by-then boozy crowd chanted “Death! Death!” When his blond head exploded, there were thunderous cheers.

Linares looked spent as he surveyed the carnage.

“We’re satisfied,” he said. “The people liked it.”

Copyright © 2016, Chicago Tribune
  • Mexico
  • Donald Trump
  • #trump#mexico#easter#effigy#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com#current_affairs#humor#donald_trump

When Train Riders Moved Away From Passenger, This Woman Held His Hand

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“He needed someone to touch.”

02/11/2016 11:07 am ET | Updated Feb 11, 2016

A tiny bit of compassion can have a huge impact.

Two weeks ago, Ehab Taha, a 26-year-old from Canada, was riding public transit in Metro Vancouver when a large man he described on Facebook as “suffering from drug abuse and\or mental health issues” became aggressive in his train car.

The man was alarming fellow passengers “with erratic movements, cursing, shouting” until a 70-year-old woman decided to reach out and help him by extending her hand and grabbing his.

EHAB TAHA
“At the end, he said ‘Thanks, Grandma,’ and walked away,” Taha told HuffPost Canada.

The sweet gesture soothed the man. Eventually he sank to the floor of the train as tears flooded his eyes.

“It was quite incredible how much he calmed down in a split moment,” Taha toldHuffPost Canada. “It was the most touching thing I’ve ever seen.”

Moved by “the incredible display of humanity,” Taha snapped a picture of the two holding hands and posted it to Facebook.

“I spoke to the woman after this incident and she simply said, ‘I’m a mother and he needed someone to touch.’ And she started to cry,” he wrote in the caption for the photo.

Although the woman felt a great amount of empathy for the man, like most, she was initially petrified to interfere.

“She was very brave,” Taha hold HuffPost Canada. “She even mentioned that she thought about what would happen if he stabbed her with the pen — because he had one in his hand — but she said it was more important he didn’t feel alone.”

#metro_canada#subway#acts_of_kindness#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com#drug_abusive

 

Fleeing the Scene

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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Titanic_iceberg.jpg

On April 15, 1912, the German liner Prinze Adelbert was steaming through the North Atlantic when its chief steward noticed an iceberg with a curious scar bearing red paint. He took this photo.

He learned only later that the Titanic had gone down in those waters less than 12 hours earlier.

#titanic#ship#sinking#ana_christy#iceberg#beatnikhiway.com# Prinze Adelbert

this woman knits cozy hats and jumpers for homeless greyhounds

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This woman knits cosy hats and jumpers for homeless greyhounds at Christmas
Alison Lynch for Metro.co.ukWednesday 2 Dec 2015 8:27 am
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This woman knits cosy hats and jumpers for homeless greyhounds at Christmas
Just some greyhounds in Christmas hats (Picture: Caters)
Dog lover Jan Brown (aka Knitty Jan) has spent more than 4,000 hours knitting cosy hats, jumpers and snoods for homeless greyhounds.

Fifty-two-year-old mum Jan from Seaburn in Sunderland, started making her cheery knits five years ago and has now hand-knitted over 300 jumpers for abandoned dogs.

Each one is made with love and can take her up to 20 hours to complete.

She started knitting her woolly hats, scarves and jumpers for Greyhound Rescue Northeast, a small family-run rescue centre based in Tyne & Wear, in 2008. They rescue retired greyhounds, whippets and the odd lurcher and find them new homes.

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This guy LOVES his pom pom hat (Picture: Caters)
To keep up with demand, Jan quit her job in 2012 and started knitting full-time. She now sells her knits to dog owners around the world, via her Knitted With Love website, with all profits going towards supplying jumpers to rescue centres across the UK, free of charge.

Kerry Elliman from the Birmingham Greyhounds Protection says her help is invaluable: ‘Jan’s been absolutely amazing for us – she’s saved us a lot of money that we need to spend on vet bills for our greyhounds.’

At Christmas, Jan ramps up the festive knits, making Father Christmas outfits, woolly antlers and Christmas hats for the pups.

‘I can’t think of anything I would rather do than knit woolly clothing for dogs,’ Jan says. ‘I have spent over 4,000 hours knitting but it’s all worthwhile when I see them sporting their new jumpers and hats.

PIC FROM CATERS NEWS – (PICTURED: Australian customer Donna Matthews with her pets and jumpers ) – Meet the mum who spends more than 4,000 hours knitting Christmassy jumpers for abandoned dogs. Jan Brown, 52, from Seaburn, Sunderland, has hand-knitted more than 300 of her festive designs to give a warm woolly gift to homeless greyhounds at Christmas. Each jumper can take the up to 20 hours to complete and are sent to pet rescue centres across the country. Since starting five years ago she has made Father Christmas outfits, antlers to even woolly hats, scarves and snoods for dogs as well as reconditioning old blankets into coats. SEE CATERS COPY.
Australian customer Donna Matthews with her dogs in their knits (Picture: Caters)
‘It’s really sweet seeing them in their festive Christmas jumpers and it’s giving much needed help to the rescue centres,’ she adds, explaining: ‘Greyhounds have very thin fur so they really feel the cold during the winter so my gifts help keep them warm during walks.

‘There are so many dogs that won’t be rehomed this Christmas so for many of them it’s the only gift they will get.’

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2015/12/02/this-woman-knits-cosy-hats-and-jumpers-for-homeless-greyhounds-at-christmas-5538559/#ixzz3tBLkAkaM

#greyhounds#knitting#hats and jumpers#donna matthews,#ana_christy

Madonna-don’t cry for me Argentina

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ana_christy#madonna

The origin of Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina
Joe Queenan on the only song ever written by a knight that was recorded by both Tom Jones and Sinead O’Connor and banned from British airwaves during a war
Friday 7 September 2007 06.58 EDT

Every once in a while, somebody comes along and writes a catchy tear-jerking ballad in honor of a dead fascist’s dead wife that makes you forget all the other great crypto-fascist tear-jerkers you’ve ever heard. Just such a number is Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina. Composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice for the musical Evita, the song was released in 1976, the year the United States of America was celebrating 200 years of freedom, and Argentina wasn’t. As a matter of fact, the year the song came out, Argentina was in the throes of an undeclared civil war which would result in thousands of brutal murders, mutilations, rapes and disappearances in a conflict whose seeds had been planted by the aforementioned dead fascist and his cronies. One thing you’ve got to say for Andrew Lloyd Webber: His politics may be obtuse, but his timing is impeccable.

As conceived in the musical, Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina is a show-stopping number meant to be belted out by the character playing Eva Peron, the second wife of the colourful South American dictator Juan Peron. An illegitimate child, but plucky, Eva Peron rose from poverty and obscurity to become a colourful actress and radio personality who would one day win the heart of the reform-minded generalissimo. The Hugo Chavez of his time, Peron started out as the savior of the working class, much to the chagrin of aristocrats and privileged intellectuals, but then fell in with the wrong crowd and ended up becoming just another South American thug. Peronism, which continues to exist today, even despite Evita, is a rabble-rousing cult whose ideology is difficult to pin down, because it is neither left nor right, neither fish nor fowl, but an eclectic mix of the worst elements of both. Eva, with her own solid working-class credentials, had little trouble winning the hearts of the hoi polloi, but could never quite seduce the upper classes, who found her pushy, Machiavellian, absurdly coiffed and just a smidgen trashy.

Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina belongs to a fascinating category of songs purists refer to as the geographically hortatory; that is, songs in which a city, state or nation is addressed directly and exhorted to take a particular course of action at the direction of the singer, no matter how onerous or implausible. Examples include San Francisco (Open Your Pearly Gates) and New York, New York (“Start spreading the news…”), but do not include O Canada, From Russia With Love, Oklahoma!, Kansas City, Here I Come or LA Woman. Thematically linked to La Marseillaise, in which the “children of the fatherland” are strongly encouraged to “slake” the “thirsting furrows of their fields” with “impure” blood, the more decorous Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina counsels the peons of the pampas to avoid shedding tears for Mrs Peron, as no tears are required. The reason no tears are required is because Mrs Peron, all through her “wild years”, has kept her promise to her kinsmen. Apparently, her promise was a stipulation in her will expressly barring Liza Minnelli from playing her in the biopic about her life, because this would be unfair to the people of Argentina, who had already suffered enough. Michael Collins made similar pre-assassination arrangements vis-a-vis Kevin Costner.

With its lush orchestral passages, which evoke both the magic of the pampas and the smoky romance of those sultry Buenos Aires evenings we all dream of in our private moments when we discreetly cue up a few Astor Piazzolla tangos on the trusty old iPod and imagine ourselves clad as gauchos, Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina addresses an Argentina of the mind. The real Argentina is a bit less attractive; Nobelist VS Naipul once said that Argentina’s farcical performance since 1900, given its immense natural resources, highly developed economy, powerful middle class, and ties to European civilization, is one of the greatest mysteries of the twentieth century. It didn’t help that the Argentine people kept electing thugs like Peron, who served as president not once, not twice, but three times.

Evita was a studio album before it was mounted on the stage, producing a No 1 UK hit for Julie Covington in 1977. An intergalactic favorite, Evita finally made its way to the screen in 1996 with a somewhat limp Madonna playing the title role, sharing the stage with Antonio Banderas, cast as the lovable psychopath Che Guevara. For a while, there was talk about an Oscar for Madonna, but then the cocaine supply dried up in Hollywood and everyone came to their senses.

From the time Evita debuted, Webber was criticized for writing a musical that seems to idolize a Nazi sympathizer. (The Village Voice referred to Little Eva as “Cinderella Fascist.”) But as a number of historians have argued since that time, Eva Peron was not so much a fascist as an idiot. While it is true that her husband helped Nazis escape from Germany, and ultimately fled to Paraguay – a rainforest retirement community for Nazis – after he was ousted from office, there is no evidence that either he or his second wife were Nazis. In Juan’s case, it seems more likely that he was the gracious host who admired Nazis as people, enjoyed their company at dinner, and probably pocketed a few Deutschmarks in exchange for his conviviality, but never embraced their divisive, millenarian policies. As for Eva, she was too politically unsophisticated to know the difference between a commie and a Nazi, as she was basically a lounge act. Thus, in selecting Eva Peron as their heroine, Webber and Rice were less interested in Evita the Politician than in Evita the Diva. This is no more offensive than writing a musical called Mrs Petain or Attila’s Last Girlfriend or Franco’s Main Squeeze. Harmless fun. Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina is the only song ever written by a knight that was recorded by both Tom Jones and Sinead O’Connor and banned from British airwaves during a war. To be fair, the ban occurred before Jones recorded it.

https://youtu.be/MEMUsC8ppU0