Category Archives: hippies

Read ’em & Weep (Part 2)

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RoadsideArchitecture.com -- the companion blog

I’m updating the Signs section at my websitenow.  It will probably take another couple of months to go through all the pages and StreetView maps.  I’m methodically proceeding alphabetically by state.  Here are some of the tragedies and changes, from Alabama, Arkansas, and Arizona.

The Moon Winx Lodge sign in Tuscaloosa, AL was put up for sale in 2016.  Either the owner changed his mind or he didn’t get a big enough offer.  The sign was repainted this past September.  The neon appears to still be intact. The wording at the bottom of the sign was unfortunately changed and that neon is now lost.  The new paint (evergreen & turquoise) is not as nice as what was on the sign previously.  But glass 3/4 full, right?  Here’s my photo from 2007:

winx

This weblink has a slider bar so that you can compare the old paint/new paint:

http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/news/20171018/then-and-now-moon-winx-lodge-sign
Fortunately, no significant…

View original post 196 more words

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Behind the Scenes at Andy Warhol’s Silver Factory

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Art & Photography / In Pictures

Behind the Scenes at Andy Warhol’s Silver Factory

Warhol’s one-time lover and unofficial Factory photographer, Billy Name, offers an exclusive glimpse into New York’s underground art scene

Name not only documented the Factory, but also played a pivotal role in constructing it. Previously a lighting designer, his first encounter with amphetamines was instrumental in the birth of his signature silver interior decorating style, and he employed it with abandon in the film and theatre sets he worked on throughout the 1960s. As Glenn O’Brien remembers in his introduction to the book: “One day Ondine gave Billy some amphetamines. Billy recalled, ‘All of a sudden I had energy to get up off the floor and start doing things.’ One of the first things Billy did was redecorate the apartment as an artwork, turning the whole thing silver with aluminum foil and spray paint.”

When Warhol visited Name’s apartment to attend one of his famous hair-cutting parties soon afterwards – Name’s father had been a barber – he invited Name to recreate the style at his new loft, a former hat factory on East 47th Street. “Andy didn’t just see a guy’s place and think, ‘That’s a real kook – he’s got foil all over the place,’” Name recalls. “He saw that I had done an installation.”

Name duly hung the walls with aluminium foil, and sprayed everything with Krylon paint. The Silver Factory was born. “It was like constructing this environment,” he said. “For me the whole place was a sculpture. And each time I added a piece to it was like adding another gem to the collection. I never did a specifically articulated thing. I always did a maximal job, but it was the same art thing, it was the same signature, or my tag; the whole silver thing.”

The silver of the factory walls reverberates in Name’s photography – a seemingly never-ending series of lunar faces peering out from between the Factory walls; building installations, making prints, or having parties. “I’m very much interested in portraiture, not only of people but of space, or people in spaces,” he says in the book. “When I take a picture I’m usually looking at a certain structural composition of the whole thing that is going on live, and when it’s just perfect my finger pushes the button… The camera, when I first started using it, wasn’t just about snapshots. I could see things that were matched to my aesthetic framework in that click.”

His singular portraits epitomise Warhol’s golden age and all of the characters who contributed to it, many of whom – Brigid Berlin, Gerard Malanga, Viva, Mary Woronov – have also been involved in the creation of Name’s new book. Flicking through it almost feels like disappearing momentarily into the alternative universe of the Silver Factory; Name and his contemporaries’ memories accompany the photographs, animating the oft-captured faces of Edie Sedgwick, Nico and Brigid Berlin with a new and utterly compelling fervour. Above all, his extensive archive serves to remind us of how extraordinary this era really was.

Billy Name: The Silver Age is available now, published by Reel Art Press. The series will be available to view at at Serena Morton in London from September 30th until October 23rd.

Pranksters Install Swings on BART Public Transit System in San Francisco

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Pranksters Install Swings on BART Public Transit System in San Francisco

swings on BART

photo by Audrey Penven

Some brilliant pranksters installed beautiful swings on BART last night. What apparently happened, according to witnesses, was a team of six or so people hopped on to a north-bound train from 24th Street station in San Francisco around 8:30 p.m. last night, installed three matching red swings, and then exited at 16th Street leaving their swings behind for public consumption.

BART Swings

photo by Neiltron

I personally love this prank because of the joy that it inspires in the innocent by-standers. Look at the photos. Even the dudes that are not swinging are smiling (except for one woman – that is just how some people roll, I guess). I declare this to be an epic victory for joy and whimsy over the mundane!

SUM HIPPIE JOKES

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NBHY

Q: How can you tell a hippie has been at your house?

A: He’s still there.

Q: What did he say when you told him to leave?

A: Namaste.


Q: What’s the difference between a hippie chick and a joint?

A: The joint won’t make it all the way around the circle.


Q: How do you starve a hippie?

A: Hide his drug money under the soap.


Q: What did the Deadhead say when he ran out of weed?

A: Man, this music sucks!


Q: What do hippie chicks and hockey players have in common?

A: They both shower and change pads after 3 periods.


So this guy got his dog really high. He tells the dog “Play dead.” And the dog says, “Nah man, play Floyd!”

Q: Why do hippies wave their arms around when they dance?

603
A: To keep the music out of their eyes.

Q: Why didn’t the lifeguard save the hippie from drowning?

A: He was too far out!

Q:How do you hide money from a hippie?

Put it under the soap

Q: Why did so many hippies move to Oregon?

A: They heard there was no work there.

How do you get 20 hippies into a phone booth? Throw in a joint.
How do you get them out? Throw in a bar of soap.

KYg7ZG

HIWAY AMERICA-These coders used 13,000 old photos to make a Google Street View map of San Francisco in the 1800s

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These coders used 13,000 old photos to make a Google Street View map of San Francisco in the 1800s

Above: OldSF.

Image Credit: Screenshot

If you’ve ever wondered what it would feel like to travel back in time and walk the streets of San Francisco, this might be the closest you’ll get.

Two developers, Dan Vanderkam and Raven Keller, had the brilliant idea to take all the old photographs from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collectionand put them on an interactive map. This map functions similarly to Google Street View, except when you zoom in on a particular place, it gives you photos from as far back as 1850.

The project, called OldSF, lets you manipulate a slider to change the range of years (it goes from 1850 all the way up to 2000). Vanderkam and Keller have geocoded about 13,000 images.

Visit the site here, or look below for some of the best photos we saw from the 1800s, marked with their locations in the city. (All photos via San Francisco History Center/San Francisco Public Library.)


Point Lobos Avenue and 43rd, Dick’s Saloon, 1890

point-lobos-avenue-and-43rd-dicks-saloon-1890


Central Park, 8th and Mission, circa 1887

central-park-8th-and-mission-circa-1887


Group of people overlooking the Cliff House from Sutro Heights, 1890

group-of-people-overlooking-the-cliff-house-from-sutro-heights-1890


Bush Street, west of Kearny, 1877

bush-street-west-of-kearny-1877


Palm Avenue in Jefferson Square, 1881

palm-avenue-in-jefferson-square-1881


View from City Hall, looking south down 8th at Central Park, 1896

view-from-city-hall-looking-south-down-8th-at-central-park-1896


Woodward’s Gardens, 1864

woodwards-gardens-1864


California Street, looking east from Montgomery, 1865

california-street-looking-east-from-montgomery-1865


Exterior of the What Cheer House on the south side of Sacramento, below Montgomery, 1865

exterior-of-the-what-cheer-house-on-the-south-side-of-sacramento-below-montgomery-1865


Building on northeast corner of Front and California, 1890

building-on-northeast-corner-of-front-and-california-1890


Baldwin Hotel bar, 1880

baldwin-hotel-bar-1880


Steuart Street, 1864

steuart-street-1864


J. C. Flood Mansion, California Street, 1886

j-c-flood-mansion-california-street-1886


St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, southeast corner of Sacramento Street and Van Ness, 1895

st-lukes-episcopal-church-southeast-corner-of-sacramento-street-and-van-ness-1895


Sacramento and Van Ness, 1887

sacramento-and-van-ness-1887


Woodward’s Gardens, 1874

woodwards-gardens-1874


Miss Lake’s School for Young Ladies, corner Sutter and Octavia, 1890

miss-lakes-school-for-young-ladies-corner-sutter-and-octavia-1890


Howard Street, looking east from 6th, 1866

howard-street-looking-east-from-6th-1866


1919 California Street, 1887

1919-california-st-1887


Southern Pacific passenger depot, 1879

southern-pacific-passenger-depot-1879


Cablecar at South Park, 1865

cablecar-at-south-park-1865


Fire Engine No. 13 at 1458 Valencia, 1884

fire-engine-no-13-at-1458-valencia-1884


Shotwell Street near 20th, Snowfall, 1887

shotwell-street-near-20th-snowfall-1887


The Willows, 18th & Valencia, 1864

the-willows-18th-and-valencia-1864


Musicians performing outside the “Haunted Swing” at the Midwinter Fair in Golden Gate Park, 1894

musicians-performing-outside-the-haunted-swing-at-the-midwinter-fair-in-golden-gate-park-1894

This story originally appeared on Www.businessinsider.com. Copyright 2016

Jerry Garcia Family Launches Online Visual Art Collection

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Jerry Garcia Family Launches Online Visual Art Collection

March 02, 2017

Jerry Garcia’s family has announced the launch of a new online collection of visual art from the legendary Grateful Dead guitarist, offering up creations from throughout Garcia’s life alongside commentary from his daughter Trixie Garcia.

The Jerry Garcia Collection features both known work and some previously unseen art from the guitarist, who was an prolific visual artist along with his music career.

“I think it was just a way he was able to communicate with the world,” Trixie says in the introduction video, which can be seen below. “I always considered him kind of multilingual. He was fluent in all these different languages, and when words failed in one point, he had other options to express himself.”

Visit the gallery here and view some of the pieces below.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjerrygarciaofficial%2Fvideos%2F993858477413866%2F&show_text=0&width=560

Read more: https://www.relix.com/news/detail/jerry_garcia_family_launches_online_visual_art_collection#ixzz4af3ds8PG

In Defense of Hippies

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(crossposted from the front page of My Left Wing)First of all, the stereotype for hippies is about as reliable as the stereotype for any other people, that is to say not at all.  Hippy culture was never monolithic.  It encompassed well over half of every kind of kid there was in the late 60s and early 70s, and spanned every socio-economic strata of American society.  If you weren’t a hippy in those days, what you know and think about hippies is probably wrong.  It’s not your fault.  The media has distorted the reality as a part of the conservative culture wars.  They are, and have always been, threatened by hippies who never had any trouble seeing straight through them and who consistently called them on their bullshit.  Progressivism (or enlightened thinking), started well before the age of the hippies, but for that one seminal decade, hippies were its natural home (though not exclusively of course).

 What do you think when you hear the term hippy?  Most likely you think of spaced out goofballs without anything more than a tenuous connection to reality, mildly dangerous dope fiends who blather endlessly about inane bullshit, or hippy-dippy airheads without an intelligent thought or coherent idea worth noting.  That kind of outrageous distortion is what a conservative and unprincipled media is capable of doing.  Were there people who approached the stereotype somewhat?  Sure – somewhat, although practically no one is that goofy or detached from reality.  Was that a majority?  No, not even nearly so in my experience.  It was at most a distinct minority, and again none of them were as goofy as the conservative propaganda has many believing.  It’s all a rightwing `big lie’, just like the one about liberals being idiots, or pacifists being pushovers.  No truth to it, just a big ugly lie told over and over to `catapult the propaganda’.

I have often encountered strongly biased attitudes toward hippies.  Most of the time there’s not much point in saying anything.  Too often people don’t want to be educated about hippies.  Hippies are beneath them, an object of scorn or derision.  I understand that it’s usually just rightwing propaganda having its way.  You can’t avoid it and if you’re insufficiently discerning, if you don’t have your bullshit detectors on, why almost anyone could end up believing it.  The other day I came across this comment in a thread about the lack of activism on the part of today’s young people, which BTW thereisnospoon did a fine job of debunking in his thread Where are the Youth? I’ll tell you where they are!

We’ve grown up being too afraid to rock the boat. Many of us grew up learning that although Vietnam was a mistake and a bad war, the protestors were even worse. “Dirty hippies who spit on soldiers” is the last thing we want to be compared with.~ anonymous young kossack

The rightwing noise machine has our kids right where they want them.  Afraid to rock the boat and of becoming no better than `dirty hippies’ (who spit on soldiers).  There were some goofy hippies and there were some dirty hippies (though most weren’t), but I never saw ANYONE spit on a soldier.  Most soldiers related well to us and vice versa – especially the one’s who had been to Nam.  They always came off the boats shooting peace signs at us, and us to them.  They hated the war and we did too.  We were natural allies.  There was no spitting.Seeing the horror and fucked-upedness of Vietnam showed people that the hippies were right all along – and that our government was strictly bad news, full of fucking liars and chickenhawks who were willing to let them die for nothing.  Well, the more things change the more they stay the same.  And the one thing I can tell you all is that it is high time to rock the fucking boat!

Also, let me point out that `dirty’ people (as bad as that sounds) are merely people with dirt.  Being clean doesn’t make you a better person – only cleaner.  I’d much rather associate with Jim S., the dirty homeless man my son and I had lunch with recently (Nam vet, former heroin addict, borderline alcoholic with a strong core of human decency that shone right through all the dirt and pathos) than to get anywhere near the spit-shined K Street crowd or the gleaming, buttoned-down, slicked-up, squeaky clean neocons out to destroy humanity.  Quaint homilies aside, cleanliness does NOT equate to human decency – or Godliness.

Another big slam on the hippies is about all the drugs they used.  First, let’s face the fact that on this issue, as with so many others, our overly conservative culture is shockingly hypocritical.  The fact is that people have always used drugs and always will.  It’s just a question of whose drugs are in and whose drugs are out at any given time.  You can’t smoke pot, but drinking yourself to death is just fine.  Alcohol, one of the very worst drugs, destroys millions of lives each year–and it’s perfectly legal.  Fancy that.  The next worst drugs after alcohol are crystal meth, heroin, pcp, and pharmaceuticals in general.  These substances are very destructive.  They attack the person who uses them.  My father is embroiled in a class-action lawsuit because the Vioxx he took for three years gave him a near fatal stroke.   Some pharmaceuticals are milder than others–but it’s all bad medicine.  The good medicines are organic: plants, fungi, cacti, which are often illegal.  Plants like cannabis, hallucinogenic mushrooms, and peyote are strongly outlawed in most countries these days, yet traditional peoples often viewed these substances as medicine as well as allies, friends and guides to assist them on their spiritual journeys.  Pharmaceutical companies hate medicines that people can grow themselves or find in the forest.  It cuts into their obscene profits from the poisons they push.  In 1971 Richard Milhouse Nixon declared the `War on Drugs’.  Tricky Dick had a pathological hatred of `drugs’, and yet swilled scotch like a drunken monkey.  His so-called `War on Drugs’ has caused irreparable harm to our society, torn families apart, ruined millions of individual lives, and overwhelmed our courts and prisons.  We should have listened to the hippies.  Drugs should be legal, rehab should be free, and education and harm reduction should be our focus.

There was a time when the pull to become a hippy was damn near universal for my generation.  When this simple song came out, it spoke directly to us all.

If you’re going to San Francisco
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair
If you’re going to San Francisco
You’re gonna meet some gentle people thereFor those who come to San Francisco
Summertime will be a love-in there
In the streets of San Francisco
Gentle people with flowers in their hair

All across the nation such a strange vibration
People in motion
There’s a whole generation with a new explanation
People in motion people in motion

For those who come to San Francisco
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair
If you come to San Francisco
Summertime will be a love-in there

If you come to San Francisco
Summertime will be a love-in there

~ written by ‘Poppa’ John Phillips, recorded by Scott McKenzie

There really was a strange vibration all across the nation.  We all felt it – me and all of my friends, and millions upon millions of others.  You didn’t really have to decide to become a hippy, you either felt the vibe or you didn’t.

Most of the hippies I knew were extremely bright, full of intellectual curiosity and life – and were just a lot of fun to be around.  Think of college kids today, now imagine them as much more liberal (and progressive), much more keen to engage the larger world in a profound way, and inhabiting a time of great cultural and spiritual upheaval. Throw in some recreational drugs, a massive dose of primal rock-n-roll, an `establishment’ that stunk to high heaven and of which we wanted no part, the paranoia of a bloody shooting war in Vietnam and an active draft, and you begin to get a picture of what hippies were really like.  In school they were more often the smart kids than the dumb ones.  They tended to be intellectuals, or in some cases just different – although there was also room for the underachievers as we were pretty much equal opportunity employers (so to speak).

Hippies attracted kids who were offbeat or not readily accepted in other cliques, kids who looked a little strange or thought a little differently.  Why?  Because hippies were tolerant and accepting people who would try to love you even if the reasons why they should were not abundantly apparent.  Love, peace, and kindness were our highest ethics.  Almost anyone could find a home with the hippies as long as they were non-violent.  That’s what made the hippy sections of large cities so damned interesting – the sheer variety of colorful characters who felt at home there.  Hippies were welcoming and generous people.  They cared about humanity for humanity’s sake.  You didn’t have to be an important person, a successful person, wealthy, accomplished, learned, or whatever.  You could be any of those things or none of those things.  It was enough to be a person.  The idea was to be a good and decent person, an authentic person, a person unlike those who thought it was okay to drop bombs on people.

Plastic people, ooh baby now, you’re such a drag!  ~ Frank Zappa

`Plastic people’ was what we called those who were so superficial and lame that they never questioned anything they were told by the `authorities’ – the same sort of folks sometimes referred to as sheeple these days.  Hippies were different – we questioned everything.  We believed that everyone should think for themselves.  Contrary to popular belief, virtually all of the best and brightest of our generation were hippies.  If you were between the ages of 15 and 30 between 1965 and 1975, and you were smart and had a soul, you were most likely a hippy.

It was fun being a hippy.  We were like a large extended family.  We sheltered each other, fed each other, and helped each other.  We raised money to pay for free clinics, food co-ops, and bail funds for busted hippies.  We acted as a real and unusually caring community.  There were crash pads if you needed a place to stay, free food was generally available, and people took care of each other as the need arose.

As a hippy you could go into any large city, find the hippy part of town, and instantly connect to like-minded brethren – though all were strangers.

Let me acknowledge that I am generalizing somewhat because hippies were not all alike by any stretch of the imagination – yet we tended to have certain things in common, certain philosophies.  We opposed war, the one in Vietnam that was ongoing at the time, and all others as well.  We believed it was possible for civilized people to work things out without resorting to violence.  We believed in tolerance, acceptance, and compassion.  We advocated peace, love, and understanding.


What’s so funny about peace, love, and understanding?

~ Nick Lowe

The hippies I knew and respected most were among the most serious people I would ever meet.  They were radically curious and unwilling to accept false or facile answers to tough questions.  We were very serious young people who took our responsibility to understand the world accurately and to act upon it in a profoundly positive way very seriously indeed – much more seriously than a majority of our non-hippy peers I dare say.

But mostly we were brothers and sisters embracing an ethic of gentleness and kindness, and who felt a deeply human and humane connection to one another.  My closest friends, hippies all (or freaks as we came to call ourselves), as I look back on them in all their joyful idealism, were among the noblest creatures to ever grace this planet.

1967 is the year the hippy movement took root in the USA, though it had been building for years.  I turned 15 that year and was already dialed in.  I knew all about Timothy Leary (turn on, tune in, drop out), had read all about pot and couldn’t wait to start smokin’ it.  I worshipped the Beatles and the Stones and all the other rock gods.I was a hippy waiting to happen, and when the wave came I caught it.  I smoked, dropped acid, and took mescaline.  I left home, dropped out of school, and hit the road hitchhiking across the country to get a realeducation.

Everywhere I went I had an instant connection to other hippies.  We all instantly recognized each other (most of us were sort of hard to miss 😀 ).  Flashing a peace sign was like showing ID.  It said `Hey!  I’m one of the cool ones!’  Most hippies were generous and kind to a fault.  Most anybody you met would offer you a place to stay for a day or two, and treat you like an honored guest whilst you were amongst them.

Hippies would always pick me up hitchhiking, and usually get me stoned, feed me, whatever.  There was a powerful sense of brotherhood between hippies.  It was a trip…like having family you never met in every city.  There was a ton of goodwill between us.  We all believed in peace and love after all.

The height of my hippy career was Woodstock in August of 69…three days of peace and music…I can still feel the love.  🙂  I haven’t felt a sense of brotherhood like that since those days went by the wayside.

Though I don’t much look like it these days, I will always think of myself as a hippie.  It was the best damn thing I ever was.

~ Easy Livin’, coolest hippie I ever knew

Hippies had a major impact on the broader culture.  For all of those who hated us, others were inspired by us – people such as artists, musicians, and intellectuals.  Popular art was strongly affected by the counter culture.

We also influenced the fine art of the day – or perhaps it’s more accurate to say that we shared influences.

Our numerous wonderful and colorful influences on American culture were appreciated by many, but not all.  Conservatives, whom the culture was trying desperately to break away from, hated us.  We saw them for what they were and we called a spade a spade.  We called them pigs because that’s what they were (and still are).  They didn’t much like that – or us for that matter.  They hated the truth about themselves or about anything else – and they hated us for telling it.  Because of their grip on the propaganda machine, their voices dominated and we faced horrible discrimination as a result.  Ironically, this only served to strengthen our bonds with black Americans, Native Americans, gay Americans and all others who experienced the same sort of treatment.  We embraced Truth, Love, and Peace.  Nothing is more threatening to those who live on Lies, Hatred, and War.  We preached against materialism while their whole world ran on it.  Greed and materialism was what they were all about and we told them so.  We filled them with fear and loathing, and they were merciless towards us.

The legacy of the hippies:

– There’s nothing funny about Peace, Love, and Understanding.
– Peace is better than War, Love is better than Hate, and Understanding is better than Ignorance.
– An opened mind is a useful approach to life.
– People deserve to be loved, accepted, and cared for.
– Drug warriors and laws against drugs do infinitely more harm than drugs themselves.
– People should be totally free as long as they aren’t hurting or causing harm to anyone.
– We should all have more respect, empathy, and concern for one another.
– War and violence suck and have no place in civilized society!
– Our government lies like a fucking rug and must be restrained by the people.
– The excesses of capitalism must likewise be restrained by the people.
– It is easier to mock, scorn, or trivialize than it is to understand, but understanding is worth the effort.

SOME RARE PHOTOS FROM HISTORY

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MORE RARE PHOTOS FROM HISTORY

History is fascinating and it seems like we’re uncovering more of it every day.  Here is yet another collection of photos you may have never seen before.

 


Miss America 1924.

http://i.imgur.com/n58Idgh.jpg
Vikki “The Back” Dougan, 1957. She was the inspiration for the cartoon femme fatale, Jessica Rabbit.


Annie Oakley.


For the 50th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1985, 300,000 people crossed it on foot.  The weight caused the bridge to sag by five feet.


The blood-stained gloves that Lincoln was wearing when he was assassinated at Ford’s Theater.

http://i.imgur.com/YXxZTUc.jpg
Route 66 in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1969.


Helen Keller meets Charlie Chaplin.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2050/2170742902_b434352462_o.jpg
The first aerial photograph of Lower Manhattan taken in 1924.


From 1924, this is Belva Annan.  Her murder trial records inspired the musical “Chicago.”

http://i.imgur.com/AYsDIPG.jpg
A Plexiglas “ghost” car in 1940.

Amy Johnson was one of the first women to gain a pilot’s license and won fame when she flew solo from Britain to Australia in 1930.  Later she flew solo to India and Japan and became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic East to West.  Johnson volunteered to fly for The Women’s Auxiliary Air Force in World War II, but her plane was shot down over the River Thames and she was killed.

http://i.imgur.com/UdLfyzE.jpg
14 inch shells on the deck of the USS New Mexico in 1944.


Victorian sideshow performers.

http://i.imgur.com/V5ORAaA.jpg
Mountain climbing in questionable attire near Chamonix in the 1890’s


An x-ray of Hitler’s skull.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Rip_Dicken_Medal_Dog_IWM_D_5937.jpg
Rip, a rescue dog who found one hundred victims of air raids in London between 1940 and 1941. He received the Dickin Medal for bravery in 1945.


A very young Lucille Ball.


Atlanta, Georgia in 1864.


Jessie Tarbox, a photojournalist in the 1900’s.

http://i.imgur.com/y7EOXme.jpg
Proving to the public that London’s double-decker buses are not a tipping hazard in 1933

MORE RARE PHOTOS FROM HISTORY

History is fascinating and it seems like we’re uncovering more of it every day.  Here is yet another collection of photos you may have never seen before.

 


Miss America 1924.

http://i.imgur.com/n58Idgh.jpg
Vikki “The Back” Dougan, 1957. She was the inspiration for the cartoon femme fatale, Jessica Rabbit.


Annie Oakley.


For the 50th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1985, 300,000 people crossed it on foot.  The weight caused the bridge to sag by five feet.


The blood-stained gloves that Lincoln was wearing when he was assassinated at Ford’s Theater.

http://i.imgur.com/YXxZTUc.jpg
Route 66 in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1969.


Helen Keller meets Charlie Chaplin.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2050/2170742902_b434352462_o.jpg
The first aerial photograph of Lower Manhattan taken in 1924.


From 1924, this is Belva Annan.  Her murder trial records inspired the musical “Chicago.”

http://i.imgur.com/AYsDIPG.jpg
A Plexiglas “ghost” car in 1940.


Amy Johnson was one of the first women to gain a pilot’s license and won fame when she flew solo from Britain to Australia in 1930.  Later she flew solo to India and Japan and became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic East to West.  Johnson volunteered to fly for The Women’s Auxiliary Air Force in World War II, but her plane was shot down over the River Thames and she was killed.

http://i.imgur.com/UdLfyzE.jpg
14 inch shells on the deck of the USS New Mexico in 1944.


Victorian sideshow performers.

http://i.imgur.com/V5ORAaA.jpg
Mountain climbing in questionable attire near Chamonix in the 1890’s


An x-ray of Hitler’s skull.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Rip_Dicken_Medal_Dog_IWM_D_5937.jpg
Rip, a rescue dog who found one hundred victims of air raids in London between 1940 and 1941. He received the Dickin Medal for bravery in 1945.


A very young Lucille Ball.


Atlanta, Georgia in 1864.


Jessie Tarbox, a photojournalist in the 1900’s.

http://i.imgur.com/y7EOXme.jpg
Proving to the public that London’s double-decker buses are not a tipping hazard

Volkswagen Re-Releasing Classic Hippy Van As New Electric Version

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Volkswagen Re-Releasing Classic Hippy Van As New Electric Version

POSTED ONAPRIL 16, 2016LIFE 384001
vw

Are you looking for a way to get back to the good old days in one way or another?  This classic hippy van is a way to do it without compromising your values over the things that are important to you.  Most people understand that gas guzzlers are a thing of the past, but not everyone is ready to flow into the confined market of electric cars because there is not enough personalization to enjoy it.  Now, Volkswagen is introducing a brand new model of its beloved hippy van and enjoy all of the benefits that come from enjoying a modern vehicle.

The exciting part of this van is that it maintains the authenticity of the hippy van that we all love and cherish while making sure that is has all of our modern needs in terms of fuel/power as well as things like AC and a powerful engine that will take you all over the world with no carbon footprint to speak of.  This is sure to get heart pumping, I can imagine.  It’s a modern piece of history come back to us at last, and we couldn’t be more excited.

#hippie-van#volkswagen#electric#beatnikhiway.com#ana_christy

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