Category Archives: history

Remembering the Challenger Disaster

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On January 28, 1986, the American shuttle orbiter Challenger broke up 73 seconds after liftoff, bringing a devastating end to the spacecraft’s 10th mission. The disaster claimed the lives of all seven astronauts aboard, including Christa McAuliffe, a teacher from New Hampshire who had been selected to join the mission and teach lessons from space to schoolchildren around the country. It was later determined that two rubber O-rings, which had been designed to separate the sections of the rocket booster, had failed due to cold temperatures on the morning of the launch. The tragedy and its aftermath received extensive media coverage and prompted NASA to temporarily suspend all shuttle missions.

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In 1976, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) unveiled the world’s first reusable manned spacecraft, known as the space shuttle. Five years later, shuttle flights began when Columbia traveled into space on a 54-hour mission. Launched by two solid-rocket boosters and an external tank, the aircraft-like shuttle entered into orbit around Earth. When the mission was completed, the shuttle fired engines to reduce speed and, after descending through the atmosphere, landed like a glider. Early shuttles took satellite equipment into space and carried out various scientific experiments.

Challenger, NASA’s second space shuttle to enter service, embarked on its maiden voyage on April 4, 1983, and made a total of nine voyages prior to 1986. That year, it was scheduled to launch on January 22 carrying a seven-member crew that included Christa McAuliffe, a 37-year-old high school social studies instructor from New Hampshire who had earned a spot on the mission through NASA’s Teacher in Space Program. After undergoing months of training, she was set to become the first ordinary American citizen to travel into space.

The mission’s launch from Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida, was delayed for six days due to weather and technical problems. The morning of January 28 was unusually cold, and engineers warned their superiors that certain components—particularly the rubber O-rings that sealed the joints of the shuttle’s solid rocket boosters—were vulnerable to failure at low temperatures. However, these warnings went unheeded, and at 11:39 a.m. Challenger lifted off.

Seventy-three seconds later, hundreds on the ground, including the families of McAuliffe and the other astronauts on board, stared in disbelief as the shuttle broke up in a forking plume of smoke and fire. Millions more watched the wrenching tragedy unfold on live television. Within instants, the spacecraft broke apart and plunged into the ocean, killing its entire crew, traumatizing the nation and throwing NASA’s shuttle program into turmoil.

Shortly after the disaster, President Ronald Reagan appointed a special commission to determine what went wrong with Challenger and to develop future corrective measures. Headed by former secretary of state William Rogers, the commission included former astronaut Neil Armstrong and former test pilot Chuck Yeager. Their investigation revealed that the O-ring seal on Challenger’s solid rocket booster, which had become brittle in the cold temperatures, failed. Flames then broke out of the booster and damaged the external fuel tank, causing the spacecraft to disintegrate.

The commission also found that Morton Thiokol, the company that designed the solid rocket boosters, had ignored warnings about potential issues. NASA managers were aware of these design problems but also failed to take action. Famously, scientist Richard Feynman, a member of the commission, demonstrated the O-ring flaw to the public using a simple glass of ice water.

After the accident, NASA refrained from sending astronauts into space for more than two years as it redesigned a number of the shuttle’s features. Flights began again in September 1988 with the successful launching of Discovery. Since then, the space shuttle has carried out numerous important missions, including the repair and maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope and the construction of the International Space Station. On February 1, 2003, a second space shuttle disaster rocked the United States when Columbia disintegrated upon reentry, killing all aboard. While missions resumed in July 2005, the space shuttle is slated for retirement in 2011.

Ten years after the Challenger tragedy, two large pieces from the spacecraft washed ashore on a Florida beach. The remaining debris is now stored in a missile silo at Cape Canaveral.

#challenger#tragedy#explosion#Christa McAuliffe#beatnikhiway.com#ana_christy#Cape Canaveral#January 28, 1986##astronuats##space_shuttle#Kennedy Space Center

New Yorks bohemian Greenwich Village.

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Published on Jun 17, 2015

Beatniks, Counterculture and Bohemian life in the sixties.

In this short compelling documentary from 1961, we’re taken back to the thriving cultural life of New Yorks bohemian Greenwich Village.

From The Prelinger Archives
Greenwich Village Sunday
Producer: Stewart Wilensky
Music: Charles Mills
https://archive.org/details/Greenwic1960

5 Inexplicable Events from New York City’s Eerie Past

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Watch the series premiere of Damien, Monday, March 7 at 10/9c on A&E.

With its dark alleys, underground tunnels, and shadowy figures, New York City is no stranger to strangeness.

Here are five mysterious events that actually took place in New York City; they remain unresolved and unexplained to this day.

Martha Wright Disappearance From Lincoln Tunnel

In 1975, Jackson Wright and his wife Martha were driving through the Lincoln Tunnel from New Jersey to New York City when Jackson pulled the car over inside the tunnel to wipe condensation from the car’s windshield. To speed things along, he took to the front windshield while Martha worked on the rear window. Moments later, Jackson turned around to find his wife had vanished without a trace. Jackson reported no other cars in the tunnel at the time of her disappearance, and nowhere she could have run to or been snatched away in such a short amount of time. A police investigation ensued, but Martha was never found.

Manhattan’s Mole People

Beneath the hustle and bustle of the city lives an underworld of Gothamites known as the Mole People. The true and harrowing existence of New York’s homeless sub-population of pallor complexioned underlings has been documented by journalist Jennifer Toth in the book, “The Mole People: Life In The Tunnels Beneath New York City.” Based on her research and reporting, it’s believed that the Mole People have lived their lives in secret hovels in the undercarriage of the city’s subway system since the early 90s, free to do as they please away from the New York that rejects them above ground. Toth’s account is grim and shocking – these underground inhabitants forage, eat rats, and even take on creature-like physical appearances due to their sun starved plight, a la sci-fi populations like H.G. Wells’ Morlocks in “Time Machine.”

Toynbee Tiles

These messages of unknown origin are embedded in the streets of Manhattan (there are over 50), a flummoxing conspiracy that’s had curious followers scratching their heads for decades. Buried beneath the asphalt the tiles surface over time with wear and tear, becoming a naturally strange part of the landscape. The linoleum tiles, which have mysteriously cropped up in busy intersections in various cities across the world, all bear strange messages along the lines of:
TOYNBEE IDEA
IN KUBRICK’S 2001
RESURRECT DEAD
ON PLANET JUPITER
What does it mean? It’s a little philosophical, a little sci-fi, tiles touting bizarre political theories and ideologies, possibly referencing British historian Arnold Toynbee, or Ray Bradbury’s “The Toynbee Convector,” as well as Stanley Kubrick’s film, “2001: A Space Odyssey.” There are theories, but no one knows for certain who is behind the tiles and what they mean. There’s even a documentary dedicated to the lore of the tiles, called ‘Resurrect Dead.’

Mystery Booming Noise In The Sky

Starting around 2011, multiple New York City residents across the boroughs have reported hearing unidentifiable “booming” or “rumbling” noises from the sky, and they all insist it is not thunder, construction work, or any other explainable phenomena. One man who uploaded a video to YouTube of the mystery noises in his Brooklyn neighborhood reported that people he knew “across the water in Jersey, and in other parts of Brooklyn,” had heard the very same booming noise where they were. It is uncertain what might be causing these sounds, leaving residents unsettled and determined to find answers. Is it UFOs? Sonic booms? No one is quite sure what the noises are or what they mean, and cases of these strange noises have still been reported as recently as June 2015.

Columbia University Tunnel Network & A Slain Security Guard

A vast underground tunnel system exists beneath Columbia University’s Morningside Heights campus connecting several school buildings. The tunnels beneath Buell Hall measure only a few feet wide, and it is speculated that the building was formerly an insane asylum. Under Pupin Hall, scientists once used the tunnels as a meeting place in the beginning stages of the Manhattan Project. In an effort to keep rogue and nefarious tunnel travelers off the campus, use of the tunnels is now largely forbidden, with ramped up security to dissuade would be tunnel journeymen from stirring up trouble. One such security guard, Garry Germain, was slain execution style in 1988 while on his standard night security shift. Thorough investigations revealed no forensic evidence, no weapon, no discernible motive, and no viable entrance or exit for the killer. One of the only possible explanations is that the perpetrator might have entered the campus undetected via the tunnel system. To this day, Garry’s murder remains unsolved.

Set in New York City, Damien is a follow-up to the classic horror film, The Omen. The show follows the adult life of Damien Thorn, the mysterious child from the 1976 motion picture, who has grown up seemingly unaware of the satanic forces around him. Haunted by his past, Damien must now come to terms with his true destiny – that he is the Antichrist.
Watch the series premiere of Damien Monday, March 7 at 10/9c on A&E. View a sneak peek now at aetv.com/shows/damien.
#strange#new_york#past#mysterious#history#underground_tunnel#colunbia_university#mole_people#messages#streets#lincoln_tunnel#sky#noise

13 Chilling Childhood Photos Of History’s Most Infamously Evil Humans

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13 Chilling Childhood Photos Of History’s Most Infamously Evil Humans

 
It’s hard to fathom that some of the most evil humans in history entered this world as innocent infants. These chilling photos remind us that, while they are known universally as some of the world’s most hated and brutal individuals, they all started off as chaste and innocent youths. All though they descended into evil over the years, their childhood photos will send a chill down your spine. Little did these photographers know that they were capturing some of the most infamous men of all time.
  • Joseph Stalin

  • Widely considered a psychopath, Joseph Stalin is estimated to be responsible for anywhere from 20-40 million deaths total. Coming from a troubled childhood, he ruled Russia with an iron fist during the Red Terror. To see him as a formative youth is mind-boggling.

  • Ted Bundy

  • The most infamous serial killer of all time, Theodore Robert Bundy is estimated to have killed anywhere from 40 to 100 women in unspeakably gruesome ways. It’s heartbreaking to know the future that awaits this seemingly normal child.

  • Osama bin Laden

  • Bin Laden is known for founding al-Qaeda, the militant organization that claimed responsibility for the September 11 attacks on the United States, in addition to many other mass-casualty attacks against civilian and military targets. Can you tell from this childhood photo what future he had in store?

  • Adolf Hitler

  • A man whose name has come to signify evil in all its capacities, Hitler is probably the most infamous and evil person in all of human history. He directly caused the death of millions of innocent Jews, gypsies, homosexuals and people with mental and physical illness, not to mention the millions of other lives lost in World War II as an indirect result of his actions. Seeing this baby photo of him is as creepy as it gets.

  • Heinrich Himmler

  • The commander of the SS Schutzstaffel and head of the concentration camps, Himmler was the mastermind who gassed inmates with toxic poison in chambers and systematically worked and starved them to death. Responsible for the genocide of millions, Himmler committed suicide in 1945.

  • Charles Manson

  • Manson is a murderer and conspiracist who ordered his commune members to murder rich people in Beverly Hills. He’s still in prison to this day.

  • Jeffrey Dahmer

  • Dahmer was an American serial killer and sex offender, who committed the rape, murder and dismemberment of 17 men and boys between 1978 and 1991. Many of his later murders also involved cannibalism to some extent. Dahmer was beat to death in prison, but his childhood photo is chilling to look at.

  • John Wayne Gacy, Jr.

  • Nicknamed the Killer Clown, Gacy was an American serial killer and rapist who was convicted of the sexual assault and murder of at least 33 teenage boys and young men in a series of killings committed between 1972 and 1978 in Chicago. From his childhood photo, however, he just looks like a standard troublemaker. Eerie.

  • Emperor Hirohito

  • Hirohito served as Emperor of Japan from 1926 to 1989, but is most remembered for the 1937 war crime called The Rape of Nanking (then the capital of China, now known as Nanjing). During the occupation of Nanjing, the Japanese army committed many atrocities, such as rape, looting, arson and the execution of prisoners of war and civilians. The death toll is estimated to be around 300,000. It’s hard to believe the happy baby in this picture could preside over such an atrocity.

  • Gary Ridgway

  • Known as the Green River Killer, Ridgway was a serial killer convicted of 48 separate murders who later confessed to nearly twice that number. His childhood picture is nothing but innocent, however.

  • Albert DeSalvo

  • Between June 14, 1962 and January 4, 1964, DeSalvo killed between 13 women in the Boston area. Pictured here on the left, it’s hard to believe he would grow up to be a serial killer.

  • Saddam Hussein

  • The fifth President of Iraq was largely condemned throughout the world for the brutality of his dictatorship. He was executed after being convicted of charges related to the killings of 148 Iraqi Shi’ites.

  • Alexander Pichushkin

  • Known as “the Chessboard Killer,” Pichushkin murdered nearly 50 elderly homeless men in and around Moscow, Russia. According to him, he murdered people because he was competing with another killer. Could you tell from his childhood picture what future awaited him?

a few cool facts about The #White House

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The White House contains 6 floors and 3 elevators.The White House contains 6 floors and 3 elevators.

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Read more at http://thechive.com/2015/07/30/a-few-random-facts-you-never-knew-about-the-white-house-25-photos/#QEZEwrS4KFIhtzL2.99

10 #Buildings that Changed America

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10 Buildings that Changed America

10 Buildings that Changed America premiered May 12, 2013.

 

Full Episode

Full Episode

10 trend-setting works of architecture that aren’t just historic structures by famous architects. These buildings have dramatically influenced our built environment in many ways — and in one case, for over two centuries.

       Watch

WAY BACK WHEN- SIXTIES IMAGES

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GREENWICH VILLAGE 1960’S

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Yoichi R. Okamoto. President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with Martin Luther King, Jr. in the White House Cabinet Room, 18 March 1966.

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Bob Dylan in New York

Richard Avedon. Bob Dylan, Singer, 132nd Street and FDR Drive, Harlem, New York City, November 4, 1963. Gelatin silver print, printed 1965. 10 x 7 3/4 in. (25.4 x 19.7 cm).

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[Image via Vogue]

When seeking to romanticize or humanize the turbulent lives of the Kennedys, few photographers came as far as Mark Shaw, who toured with then-Senator Kennedy during the 1959 presidential campaign, and eventually followed them to their home in Cape Cod. The President liked the pictures so much that Shaw eventually became the family’s de facto portraitist.

Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick

David McCabe, Andy Warhol & Edie Sedgwick with Empire State Building New York, 1964. C-print. 47.5 x 33.5 cm.

 

 

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[Image via Christie’s]

Many photographers besides Warhol himself tried to capture the copacetic energies of Warhol and the heiress and model Edie Sedgwick. Among the few successes was this three-part portrait by David McCabe, which echoes Warhol’s fascination with the New York tower as a metaphor for fame.

Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick

David McCabe, Andy Warhol & Edie Sedgwick with Empire State Building New York, 1964. C-print. 47.5 x 33.5 cm.

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[Image via Christie’s]

Many photographers besides Warhol himself tried to capture the copacetic energies of Warhol and the heiress and model Edie Sedgwick. Among the few successes was this three-part portrait by David McCabe, which echoes Warhol’s fascination with the New York tower as a metaphor for fame.

Nikita Khrushchev at the UN

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[Image via AP]

According to Khrushchev’s granddaughter, Nina L. Khrushcheva, this source of decades-long parody and embarrassment began when the Secretary General decided he was uncomfortable with a new pair of shoes. Railing in response to speeches by Philippines delegate Lorenzo Sumulong and British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, he decided to take them off, and on his way back up to the lectern, decided to pick one up and bang it against the podium for effect. Though it is reproduced most of the time with a shoe inserted artificially into the Soviet premier’s hand, details about the notorious “Khrushchev shoe-banging incident” remain disputed.

The execution of Nguyen Van Lem

tumblr_ku7aqi2MTC1qzmeu3[Image via Wikipedia]

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Optimism about the progress of the Vietnam War reached a turning point following the Tet Offensive, during which Nguyen Van Lem, a soldier for the Viet Cong, was executed on the streets of Saigon by a South Vietnamese officer named Nguyen Ngoc Loan. The offensive, which interrupted a truce during the Tet lunar new year celebrations, jolted global perceptions of what Communist guerrillas in Vietnam were capable of, and gave ample fuel to the anti-war movement in America. UPDATE: Readers have rightly pointed out that noted photojournalist Eddie Adams (1933 – 2004) won a Pulitzer Prize for this image.

John and Yoko’s Bed-In

bed_in_01[Image via Time]

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John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s mostly jesting protest against the Vietnam War took place shortly after the couple exchanged their vows on March 20, 1969 and took up residence in Room 902 at the Amsterdam Hilton. Knowing their new marriage would attract attention, Lennon and Ono deliberately sought friends in television and print media to announce that they would stay in bed for two weeks, in a variation on the popular “sit-in” strategy of peace activism. The following month, John and Yoko reportedly sent acorns, symbols of peace and rebirth, to heads of state around the world, hoping that they would be ceremonially replanted. They received no response.

Some find it heartening that the Sixties still resonate at all, with men and women who lived through those years and millions more who were born long after the decade ended; others decry the fact (or what they see as the fact) that the ideals of the era have been irretrievably co-opted by the triumph of turbocharged consumerism; still others find the entire mythology of the Age of Aquarius utterly obnoxious and tiresome, and can not wait for the Woodstock Generation to, quite frankly, die off.

New York counterculture leader Ed Sanders, 1967; photo by John Loengard.

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But even the most ardent Sixties-bashers can sometimes find themselves inexorably drawn to the era — or, as the case may be, to one specific, pivotal year.

Take 1967. There was an awful lot going on in the U.S. and around the world at the time. The war in Vietnam was only getting bloodier. Race riots rocked American cities. Baseball fans reveled in one of the most exciting pennant races in history. A young comedian named Woody Allen was killing in Vegas. Iran crowned a new Shah. The “counterculture,” in all its protean forms, was in full bloom. Hippies were flooding to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury — soon to be followed by far more toxic forces (meth and heroin, for example, and the casualties that customarily follow in their wake) that would effectively bring an ugly end to the “Summer of Love” almost before it began.

The photos in this gallery are not meant to represent “the best” pictures made by LIFE’s photographers in 1967. Instead, in their variety of style and theme, they illustrate the fluid, volatile new world that millions were struggling to come to grips with, and to somehow safely navigate, throughout the charged weeks and months of that long, strange year.
Read more: 1967: Vietnam, Hippies, Race Riots, and More, Pictured by LIFE Magazine Photographers | LIFE.com http://life.time.com/culture/1967-pictures-from-a-pivotal-year/#ixzz3TB60ewjf

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Hells Angels 1965

Hells Angels 1965

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HIPPIES AND SKINHEADS IN LONDON

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COOL PEOPLE- CHE GUEVARA

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COOL PEOPLE- CHE GUEVARA

Che Guevara, Social Activist –

ccmn 7uyimages qoiimages bb67 download (33) iomimagesChe Guevara Quotes

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We cannot be sure of having something to live for unless we are willing to die for it.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Hasta la Victoria Siempre. [Until Victory, Always]
Ernesto Che Guevara’s complimentary closing for his letters and speeches

If you tremble indignation at every injustice then you are a comrade of mine.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Words that do not match deeds are unimportant.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Cruel leaders are replaced only to have new leaders turn cruel!
Ernesto Che Guevara

I know you’ve come to kill me. Shoot, coward, you’re only going to kill a man.
Ernesto Che Guevara (just before he was shot and murdered)

Revolutionary

At the risk of seeming ridiculous, let me say that the true revolutionary is guided by a great feeling of love. It is impossible to think of a genuine revolutionary lacking this quality.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Our every action is a battle cry against imperialism, and a battle hymn for the people’s unity against the great enemy of mankind: the United States of America. Wherever death may surprise us, let it be welcome, provided that this, our battle cry, may have reached some receptive ear, that another hand may be extended to wield our weapons, and that other men be ready to intone our funeral dirge with the staccato singing of the machine guns and new battle cries of war and victory.
Ernesto Che Guevara

We must carry the war into every corner the enemy happens to carry it: to his home, to his centers of entertainment; a total war. It is necessary to prevent him from having a moment of peace, a quiet moment outside his barracks or even inside; we must attack him wherever he may be, make him feel like a cornered beast wherever he may move.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Why does the guerrilla fighter fight? We must come to the inevitable conclusion that the guerrilla fighter is a social reformer, that he takes up arms responding to the angry protest of the people against their oppressors, and that he fights in order to change the social system that keeps all his unarmed brothers in ignominy and misery.
Ernesto Che Guevara

The guerrilla fighter needs full help from the people of the area. This is an indispensable condition.
Ernesto Che Guevara

 The handsome Argentine doctor with an aristocratic heritage who ended up a revolutionary, a guerrilla leader, a diplomat, Fidel Castro’s right-hand man, and a dominant figure in the United Party of the Cuban Socialist Revolution, ranks ahead of other towering activists such as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., due to his immense popularity among teenagers and students around the world. His incredibly famous photo, Guerrillero Heroico, which appears on this list, has been cited by the Maryland Institute College of Art and Time magazine as the most famous photograph in the world and has simultaneously made Che Guevara a global symbol of rebellion and popular culture. A strange combination, indeed.

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Che Guevara.  Public Domain Image
BIOErnesto Guevara de la Serna (1928-1967) was an Argentine physician and revolutionary who played a key role in the Cuban Revolution. He also served in the government of Cuba after the communist takeover before leaving Cuba to try and stir up rebellions in Africa and South America. He was captured and executed by Bolivian security forces in 1967. Today, he is considered by many to be a symbol of rebellion and idealism, while others see him as a murderer.

Early Life

Ernesto was born into a middle class family in Rosario, Argentina. His family was somewhat aristocratic and could trace their lineage to the early days of Argentine settlement. The family moved around a great deal while Ernesto was young. He developed severe asthma early in life: the attacks were so bad that witnesses were occasionally scared for his life. He was determined to overcome his ailment, however, and was very active in his youth, playing rugby, swimming and doing other physical activities. He also received an excellent education.

Medicine

In 1947 Ernesto moved to Buenos Aires to care for his elderly grandmother. She died shortly thereafter and he began medical school: some believe that he was driven to study medicine because of his inability to save his grandmother. He was a believer in the human side of medicine: that a patient’s state of mind is as important as the medicine he or she is given. He remained very close to his mother and stayed fit through exercise, although his asthma continued to plague him. He decided to take a vacation and put his studies on hold.

The Motorcycle Diaries

At the end of 1951, Ernesto set off with his good friend Alberto Granado on a trip north through South America. For the first part of the trip, they had a Norton motorcycle, but it was in poor repair and had to be abandoned in Santiago. They traveled through Chile, Peru, Colombia and Venezuela, where they parted ways. Ernesto continued to Miami and returned to Argentina from there. Ernesto kept notes during his trip, which he subsequently made into a book named The Motorcycle Diaries. It was made into an award-winning movie in 2004. The trip showed him the poverty and misery all throughout Latin America and he wanted to do something about it, even if he did not know what.

 Guatemala

Ernesto returned to Argentina in 1953 and finished medical school. He left again almost immediately, however, heading up the western Andes and traveling through Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and Colombia before reaching Central America. He eventually settled for a while in Guatemala, at the time experimenting with significant land reform under President Jacobo Arbenz. It was about this time that he acquired his nickname “Che,” an Argentine expression meaning (more or less) “hey there.” When the CIA overthrew Arbenz, Che tried to join a brigade and fight, but it was over too quickly. Che took refuge in the Argentine Embassy before securing a safe passage to Mexico.

Mexico and Fidel

In Mexico, Che met and befriended Raúl Castro, one of the leaders in the assault on the Moncada Barracks in Cuba in 1953. Raúl soon introduced his new friend to his brother Fidel, leader of the 26th of July movement which sought to remove Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batistafrom power. The two hit it right off. Che had been looking for a way to strike a blow against the imperialism of the United States that he had seen firsthand in Guatemala and elsewhere in Latin America. Che eagerly signed on for the revolution, and Fidel was delighted to have a doctor. At this time, Che also became close friends with fellow revolutionary Camilo Cienfuegos.

To Cuba

Che was one of 82 men who piled onto the yacht Granma in November, 1956. The Granma, designed for only 12 passengers and loaded with supplies, gas and weapons, barely made it to Cuba, arriving on December 2. Che and the others made for the mountains, but were tracked down and attacked by security forces. Less than 20 of the original Granma soldiers made it into the mountains: the two Castros, Che and Camilo were among them. Che had been wounded, shot during the skirmish. In the mountains, they settled in for a long guerrilla war, attacking government posts, releasing propaganda and attracting new recruits.

 

The True Story of Che Guevara – The Documentary 

The Argentinian doctor; joined Castro in Mexico in 1954; a leader of the 1956-59 Cuban Revolution. Che served as president of Cuba’s national bank and as Cuba’s minister of industry in the period immediately following the Cuban Revolution.

 http://youtu.be/g-ZJAS_ZzKU

 Che Guevara in New York, USA 1964 –interview

http://youtu.be/qRuH_8W1bwY

HIWAY AMERICA -MACY’S 14TH AND 6 AVE. HERALD SQUARE, N.Y.C.- Inside The Guts Of New York’s Macy’s Herald Square

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HIWAY AMERICA -MACY’S 14TH AND 6 AVE. HERALD SQUARE, N.Y.C.- Inside The Guts Of New York’s Macy’s Herald Square

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