Category Archives: photography

HIWAY AMERICA-These coders used 13,000 old photos to make a Google Street View map of San Francisco in the 1800s

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These coders used 13,000 old photos to make a Google Street View map of San Francisco in the 1800s

Above: OldSF.

Image Credit: Screenshot

If you’ve ever wondered what it would feel like to travel back in time and walk the streets of San Francisco, this might be the closest you’ll get.

Two developers, Dan Vanderkam and Raven Keller, had the brilliant idea to take all the old photographs from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collectionand put them on an interactive map. This map functions similarly to Google Street View, except when you zoom in on a particular place, it gives you photos from as far back as 1850.

The project, called OldSF, lets you manipulate a slider to change the range of years (it goes from 1850 all the way up to 2000). Vanderkam and Keller have geocoded about 13,000 images.

Visit the site here, or look below for some of the best photos we saw from the 1800s, marked with their locations in the city. (All photos via San Francisco History Center/San Francisco Public Library.)


Point Lobos Avenue and 43rd, Dick’s Saloon, 1890

point-lobos-avenue-and-43rd-dicks-saloon-1890


Central Park, 8th and Mission, circa 1887

central-park-8th-and-mission-circa-1887


Group of people overlooking the Cliff House from Sutro Heights, 1890

group-of-people-overlooking-the-cliff-house-from-sutro-heights-1890


Bush Street, west of Kearny, 1877

bush-street-west-of-kearny-1877


Palm Avenue in Jefferson Square, 1881

palm-avenue-in-jefferson-square-1881


View from City Hall, looking south down 8th at Central Park, 1896

view-from-city-hall-looking-south-down-8th-at-central-park-1896


Woodward’s Gardens, 1864

woodwards-gardens-1864


California Street, looking east from Montgomery, 1865

california-street-looking-east-from-montgomery-1865


Exterior of the What Cheer House on the south side of Sacramento, below Montgomery, 1865

exterior-of-the-what-cheer-house-on-the-south-side-of-sacramento-below-montgomery-1865


Building on northeast corner of Front and California, 1890

building-on-northeast-corner-of-front-and-california-1890


Baldwin Hotel bar, 1880

baldwin-hotel-bar-1880


Steuart Street, 1864

steuart-street-1864


J. C. Flood Mansion, California Street, 1886

j-c-flood-mansion-california-street-1886


St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, southeast corner of Sacramento Street and Van Ness, 1895

st-lukes-episcopal-church-southeast-corner-of-sacramento-street-and-van-ness-1895


Sacramento and Van Ness, 1887

sacramento-and-van-ness-1887


Woodward’s Gardens, 1874

woodwards-gardens-1874


Miss Lake’s School for Young Ladies, corner Sutter and Octavia, 1890

miss-lakes-school-for-young-ladies-corner-sutter-and-octavia-1890


Howard Street, looking east from 6th, 1866

howard-street-looking-east-from-6th-1866


1919 California Street, 1887

1919-california-st-1887


Southern Pacific passenger depot, 1879

southern-pacific-passenger-depot-1879


Cablecar at South Park, 1865

cablecar-at-south-park-1865


Fire Engine No. 13 at 1458 Valencia, 1884

fire-engine-no-13-at-1458-valencia-1884


Shotwell Street near 20th, Snowfall, 1887

shotwell-street-near-20th-snowfall-1887


The Willows, 18th & Valencia, 1864

the-willows-18th-and-valencia-1864


Musicians performing outside the “Haunted Swing” at the Midwinter Fair in Golden Gate Park, 1894

musicians-performing-outside-the-haunted-swing-at-the-midwinter-fair-in-golden-gate-park-1894

This story originally appeared on Www.businessinsider.com. Copyright 2016

SOME RARE PHOTOS FROM HISTORY

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MORE RARE PHOTOS FROM HISTORY

History is fascinating and it seems like we’re uncovering more of it every day.  Here is yet another collection of photos you may have never seen before.

 


Miss America 1924.

http://i.imgur.com/n58Idgh.jpg
Vikki “The Back” Dougan, 1957. She was the inspiration for the cartoon femme fatale, Jessica Rabbit.


Annie Oakley.


For the 50th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1985, 300,000 people crossed it on foot.  The weight caused the bridge to sag by five feet.


The blood-stained gloves that Lincoln was wearing when he was assassinated at Ford’s Theater.

http://i.imgur.com/YXxZTUc.jpg
Route 66 in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1969.


Helen Keller meets Charlie Chaplin.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2050/2170742902_b434352462_o.jpg
The first aerial photograph of Lower Manhattan taken in 1924.


From 1924, this is Belva Annan.  Her murder trial records inspired the musical “Chicago.”

http://i.imgur.com/AYsDIPG.jpg
A Plexiglas “ghost” car in 1940.

Amy Johnson was one of the first women to gain a pilot’s license and won fame when she flew solo from Britain to Australia in 1930.  Later she flew solo to India and Japan and became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic East to West.  Johnson volunteered to fly for The Women’s Auxiliary Air Force in World War II, but her plane was shot down over the River Thames and she was killed.

http://i.imgur.com/UdLfyzE.jpg
14 inch shells on the deck of the USS New Mexico in 1944.


Victorian sideshow performers.

http://i.imgur.com/V5ORAaA.jpg
Mountain climbing in questionable attire near Chamonix in the 1890’s


An x-ray of Hitler’s skull.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Rip_Dicken_Medal_Dog_IWM_D_5937.jpg
Rip, a rescue dog who found one hundred victims of air raids in London between 1940 and 1941. He received the Dickin Medal for bravery in 1945.


A very young Lucille Ball.


Atlanta, Georgia in 1864.


Jessie Tarbox, a photojournalist in the 1900’s.

http://i.imgur.com/y7EOXme.jpg
Proving to the public that London’s double-decker buses are not a tipping hazard in 1933

MORE RARE PHOTOS FROM HISTORY

History is fascinating and it seems like we’re uncovering more of it every day.  Here is yet another collection of photos you may have never seen before.

 


Miss America 1924.

http://i.imgur.com/n58Idgh.jpg
Vikki “The Back” Dougan, 1957. She was the inspiration for the cartoon femme fatale, Jessica Rabbit.


Annie Oakley.


For the 50th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1985, 300,000 people crossed it on foot.  The weight caused the bridge to sag by five feet.


The blood-stained gloves that Lincoln was wearing when he was assassinated at Ford’s Theater.

http://i.imgur.com/YXxZTUc.jpg
Route 66 in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1969.


Helen Keller meets Charlie Chaplin.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2050/2170742902_b434352462_o.jpg
The first aerial photograph of Lower Manhattan taken in 1924.


From 1924, this is Belva Annan.  Her murder trial records inspired the musical “Chicago.”

http://i.imgur.com/AYsDIPG.jpg
A Plexiglas “ghost” car in 1940.


Amy Johnson was one of the first women to gain a pilot’s license and won fame when she flew solo from Britain to Australia in 1930.  Later she flew solo to India and Japan and became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic East to West.  Johnson volunteered to fly for The Women’s Auxiliary Air Force in World War II, but her plane was shot down over the River Thames and she was killed.

http://i.imgur.com/UdLfyzE.jpg
14 inch shells on the deck of the USS New Mexico in 1944.


Victorian sideshow performers.

http://i.imgur.com/V5ORAaA.jpg
Mountain climbing in questionable attire near Chamonix in the 1890’s


An x-ray of Hitler’s skull.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Rip_Dicken_Medal_Dog_IWM_D_5937.jpg
Rip, a rescue dog who found one hundred victims of air raids in London between 1940 and 1941. He received the Dickin Medal for bravery in 1945.


A very young Lucille Ball.


Atlanta, Georgia in 1864.


Jessie Tarbox, a photojournalist in the 1900’s.

http://i.imgur.com/y7EOXme.jpg
Proving to the public that London’s double-decker buses are not a tipping hazard

50 Hottest Most Grooviest Photos from the Past That Will Redefine Your Style Statement

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 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2016

50 Hottest Most Grooviest Photos from the Past That Will Redefine Your Style Statement

A pictorial celebration of the coolest kids from the past… From beatniks to bikers, mods to rude boys, hippies to ravers. And everything in between. These are images that will set your soul on fire. Get ready to get a style check.

1. A flirtatious Brigitte Bardot in a white swimsuit.

2. London, 1904.

3. Little hippie girl going dance crazy at Woodstock, 1969.

4. Young boys strike a pose for the camera, Jamaica.

5. Muhammad Ali with his all of his ‘Ginormous’ winnings, 1974.

6. Pretty girl selling flowers on the roadside, Oklahoma, 1973.

7. Bathing beauties in vivid Kodachrome, 1944.

8. Arnold Schwarzenegger swags it up with his glass of cognac.

9. A punk guy rocking a kickass Mohawk, 1970.

10. Ann Margaret totally rocking it out on her bike, 1969.

11. Morgan Freeman sporting a wicked afro in the ’70s.

12. Boys of the future, New York, 1970.

13. Two foxxy couples in Harlem, New York, 1970s.

14. Hugh Hefner with his new bunnies, 1970s.

15. The stylish Greta Garbo.

16. Mick Jagger, Andy Warhol, and Jane Holzer, circa 1965.

17. Candy Cigarette by photographer Sally Man, 1989.

18. A stylish couple enjoying the romantic rain in London, 1963.

19. The Bowdoin College Tug of War Team, 1891.

20. Sean Connery leaves his basement flat in London for a game of golf, 1962.

21. A beautiful girl admiring her reflection in a Rolls Royce while men around her get mesmerized, London, 1968.

22. Woman in the British Royal Army Corps flaunts her new tattoo, 1940.

23. The Beatles arrive in style at the JFK airport, New York, 1964.

24. The Saturday Night Live original cast, 1975.

25. Jimi Hendrix on Carnaby Street in London, 1967.

26. A young and debonair Robin Williams, 1969.

27. Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip at the horse races, 1968.

28. A gang of young and vivacious girls, 1930.

29. Actress Joan Bradshaw keeps heads turning as she walks down Hollywood Boulevard, 1957.

30. A group of handsome Southside Boys, Chicago, 1941.

31. A 1970s biker girl cranking up some tunes.

32. Rita Hayworth looking hot on her bicycle, 1940s.

33. A couple dancing in a 1950s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

34. The amazing Ann-Margret in Bye Bye Birdie, 1963.

35. Bruce Willis living the life, 1989.

36. A woman experiences heaven in the 1961 Buick “Flamingo” equipped with a rotating front seat.

37. Princess Yvonne and Prince Alexander party like rockstars, Germany, 1955.

38. Two girls walking down the street in Cape Town, 1965.

39. Picasso in his studio, 1956.

40. A high school girl setting a groovy fashion statement, 1964.

41. Presenting Diana Rigg, Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones, 1967.

42. Too cool for school, Brooklyn teenagers in the ’80s.

43. Pretty roller skating girls humor some boys at an Outdoor Roller Skating Rink, 1970s.

44. A scooter girl, 1969.

45. Nat King Cole enjoys a smoke while he plays his tunes on a piano.

46. Jane Fonda stretches and relaxes in the back of her limo, 1958.

47. Ann Margaret poses with a baby leopard, 1960s.

48. The University of Texas women’s track team practices, 1964.

49. Harrison Ford looking sharp, 1980.

50. Pacific Southwest Airlines stewardesses, 1972.

(via Emlii)

#old#photos#cool#famous_people

“Brother, [If I Make You Laugh] Can You Spare a Dime?”

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“Brother, [If I Make You Laugh] Can You Spare a Dime?”

Though homelessness is no laughing matter, consider comedian Chris Rock’s spoken-word song No Sex (In the Champagne Room):

“If a homeless person has a funny sign,
He hasn’t been homeless that long.
A real homeless person is too hungry to be funny.”

To wit:

1. Cut the guy some slack, you know what he means.

Buger

2. This guy’s brave, that’s all we can say.

Quarter

 

3. Albus Dumbledore Outed, Fired as Headmaster at Prestigious Hogwarts, Last Seen Panhandling in Kingston upon Thames

Beer

4. Gotta love the enthusiasm.

Kidnap

5. Translation? “My life’s amok. It really sucks.”

Buck_2

6. Working hard or hardly working?

Many

7. Had Jerry Garcia been tone-deaf.

Sparechange

8. When you wish upon a star…

Homelessbill

9.  Makes no bones about it, does he?

Pot

10. If you could just channel some of that creativity…

Time

#homeless#signs#humor

THE GREAT DEPRESSION AND PHOTOS OF THE DROUGHT STRICKEN AREA OF THE AMERICAN MIDWEST

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The Great Depression

  • The Great Depression (1929-39) was the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world. In the United States, the Great Depression began soon after the stock market crash of October 1929, which sent Wall Street into a panic and wiped out millions of investors. Over the next several years, consumer spending and investment dropped, causing steep declines in industrial output and rising levels of unemployment as failing companies laid off workers. By 1933, when the Great Depression reached its nadir, some 13 to 15 million Americans were unemployed and nearly half of the country’s banks had failed. Though the relief and reform measures put into place by President Franklin D. Roosevelt helped lessen the worst effects of the Great Depression in the 1930s, the economy would not fully turn around until after 1939, when World War II kicked American industry into high gear.

The American economy entered an ordinary recession during the summer of 1929, as consumer spending dropped and unsold goods began to pile up, slowing production. At the same time, stock prices continued to rise, and by the fall of that year had reached levels that could not be justified by anticipated future earnings. On October 24, 1929, the stock market bubble finally burst, as investors began dumping shares en masse. A record 12.9 million shares were traded that day, known as “Black Thursday.” Five days later, on “Black Tuesday” some 16 million shares were traded after another wave of panic swept Wall Street. Millions of shares ended up worthless, and those investors who had bought stocks “on margin” (with borrowed money) were wiped out completely.

As consumer confidence vanished in the wake of the stock market crash, the downturn in spending and investment led factories and other businesses to slow down production and construction and begin firing their workers. For those who were lucky enough to remain employed, wages fell and buying power decreased. Many Americans forced to buy on credit fell into debt, and the number of foreclosures and repossessions climbed steadily. The adherence to the gold standard, which joined countries around the world in a fixed currency exchange, helped spread the Depression from the United States throughout the world, especially in Europe.

Despite assurances from President Herbert Hoover and other leaders that the crisis would run its course, matters continued to get worse over the next three years. By 1930, 4 million Americans looking for work could not find it; that number had risen to 6 million in 1931. Meanwhile, the country’s industrial production had dropped by half. Bread lines, soup kitchens and rising numbers of homeless people became more and more common in America’s towns and cities. Farmers (who had been struggling with their own economic depression for much of the 1920s due to drought and falling food prices) couldn’t afford to harvest their crops, and were forced to leave them rotting in the fields while people elsewhere starved.

In the fall of 1930, the first of four waves of banking panics began, as large numbers of investors lost confidence in the solvency of their banks and demanded deposits in cash, forcing banks to liquidate loans in order to supplement their insufficient cash reserves on hand. Bank runs swept the United States again in the spring and fall of 1931 and the fall of 1932, and by early 1933 thousands of banks had closed their doors. In the face of this dire situation, Hoover’s administration tried supporting failing banks and other institutions with government loans; the idea was that the banks in turn would loan to businesses, which would be able to hire back their employees.

Hoover, a Republican who had formerly served as U.S. secretary of commerce, believed that government should not directly intervene in the economy, and that it did not have the responsibility to create jobs or provide economic relief for its citizens. In 1932, however, with the country mired in the depths of the Great Depression and some 13-15 million people (or more than 20 percent of the U.S. population at the time) unemployed, Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt won an overwhelming victory in the presidential election. By Inauguration Day (March 4, 1933), every U.S. state had ordered all remaining banks to close at the end of the fourth wave of banking panics, and the U.S. Treasury didn’t have enough cash to pay all government workers. Nonetheless, FDR (as he was known) projected a calm energy and optimism, famously declaring that “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

Roosevelt took immediate action to address the country’s economic woes, first announcing a four-day “bank holiday” during which all banks would close so that Congress could pass reform legislation and reopen those banks determined to be sound. He also began addressing the public directly over the radio in a series of talks, and these so-called “fireside chats” went a long way towards restoring public confidence. During Roosevelt’s first 100 days in office, his administration passed legislation that aimed to stabilize industrial and agricultural production, create jobs and stimulate recovery. In addition, Roosevelt sought to reform the financial system, creating the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) to protect depositors’ accounts and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to regulate the stock market and prevent abuses of the kind that led to the 1929 crash.

Among the programs and institutions of the New Deal that aided in recovery from the Great Depression were the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), which built dams and hydroelectric projects to control flooding and provide electric power to the impoverished Tennessee Valley region of the South, and the Works Project Administration (WPA), a permanent jobs program that employed 8.5 million people from 1935 to 1943. After showing early signs of recovery beginning in the spring of 1933, the economy continued to improve throughout the next three years, during which real GDP (adjusted for inflation) grew at an average rate of 9 percent per year. A sharp recession hit in 1937, caused in part by the Federal Reserve’s decision to increase its requirements for money in reserve. Though the economy began improving again in 1938, this second severe contraction reversed many of the gains in production and employment and prolonged the effects of the Great Depression through the end of the decade.

Depression-era hardships had fueled the rise of extremist political movements in various European countries, most notably that of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi regime in Germany. German aggression led war to break out in Europe in 1939, and the WPA turned its attention to strengthening the military infrastructure of the United States, even as the country maintained its neutrality. With Roosevelt’s decision to support Britain and France in the struggle against Germany and the other Axis Powers, defense manufacturing geared up, producing more and more private sector jobs. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941 led to an American declaration of war, and the nation’s factories went back in full production mode. This expanding industrial production, as well as widespread conscription beginning in 1942, reduced the unemployment rate to below its pre-Depression level.

When the Great Depression began, the United States was the only industrialized country in the world without some form of unemployment insurance or social security. In 1935, Congress passed the Social Security Act, which for the first time provided Americans with unemployment, disability and pensions for old age.

Drought-stricken areas of the American Midwest from which thousands of farm families migrated during the Great Depression. Click any thumbnail for a slideshow. This gallery has 32 images. Sort by most recently added.

LARRY KEENAN PHOTOS OF NEAL CASSADY AND KEN KESEY IN OAKLAND CA.

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Larry Keenan - Beat Generation & Counterculture Photos - Photographs Gallery
early 1960sbeat generation1960s & 1970s counterculturemodern counterculturecity lights booksdead beatscontactbiography

Beat Generation Gallery

NEAL CASSADY WATCHING OUT FOR THE COPS

NEAL CASSADY WATCHING OUT FOR THE COPS
Oakland 1966

While waiting for Ken Kesey to arrive, Cassady kept a lookout for the cops. Kesey was a fugitive at the time. Cassady asked me, “What’s the heat like around here, man?” Thinking he was talking about the weather, I said, “Pretty nice.” He gave me the weirdest look, then I knew what he meant.

KEN KESEY / PROFILE

KEN KESEY / PROFILE
Oakland, 1966

Fugitive Ken Kesey was giving a talk to some students at the California College of Arts and Crafts when I shot this picture. I sent Neal Cassady some prints. The FBI intercepted Cassady’s mail, found this photograph and put it on a wanted poster. It was the only current profile they had of Kesey.

CASSADY AND MURPHY

CASSADY AND MURPHY
Oakland 1966

Neal Cassady, and an old girlfriend of his, Ann Murphy, were at CCAC to attend an underground lecture. The lecture was by Ken Kesey, who had jumped bail and was now a wanted fugitive. Cassady was there at my school to be sure no cops were around before Kesey arrived.

GYPSY & NEAL CASSADY

GYPSY & CASSADY
Oakland, 1966

Gypsy was a Hell’s Angel from Colorado, where he said he knew Dylan. Neal Cassady is lighting Gypsy’s cigarette from his, in this photograph. Both of them were talking in ‘con talk’ most of the time. Neal asks Gypsy “Hey, have you got any animals, man?” Gypsy replies that he doesn’t have any animals. Later, I asked Gypsy what Cassady asked him for and he said that Neal wanted some Camel cigarettes.

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#larry_keenan#photography#cassady#ken_kesey#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com

THE 1960S PHOTOGRAPHY OF DENNIS HOPPER

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THE 1960S PHOTOGRAPHY OF DENNIS HOPPER
08.20.2014
11:44 amTopics:
Art
Movies

Tags:
Dennis Hopper


Self-portrait

I am a child of the 1970s, so Dennis Hopper really means two things to me, Blue Velvet first and Easy Rider second. For me, Hopper doesn’t have much of an identity before Easy Rider, which goes to explain why I had scarcely any idea of his excellent photography (and excellent connections to the art world) during the 1960s. This information helps inform some of his filmmaking career, for instance his artistic intransigence over The Last Movie—only someone steeped in modernist art and abstract expressionism would ever have made such a stand. Everyday I Show brings us an excellent selection of Hopper’s b/w pics from the 1960s, be sure to click there to see more of them. Hopper wasn’t in the league of a Diane Arbus or a Garry Winogrand, but he clearly knew what he was doing and also had some great subjects in the form of Jane Fonda, Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, plus Teri Garr (!).

Three years ago Taschen came out with a gorgeous book dedicated to Hopper’s early photographic work, Dennis Hopper: Photographs 1961-1967.


Jane Fonda (with bow & arrow), Malibu, 1965


Biker Couple, 1961


Ed Ruscha, 1964


Double Standard, 1961


Andy Warhol and Members of the Factory (Gregory Markopoulos, Taylor Mead, Gerard Malanga, Jack Smith), 1963


Ike and Tina Turner, 1965


Tuesday Weld, 1965


Robert Rauschenberg, 1966


Andy Warhol with Flower, Slight Smile, 1963


Bruce Conner (in tub), Toni Basil, Teri Garr, and Ann Marshall, 1965


Self-portrait at porn stand, 1962

via Tombolare

 Posted by Martin Schneider
#dennis_hopper#photographs#1970’s#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com#blue_velvet#easy_rider#jane_fonda#tuesday_weld#ike and tina turner#counterculture#andy_warhol#

I Photograph The Homeless By Becoming One Of Them

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I Photograph The Homeless By Becoming One Of Them

I Photograph The Homeless By Becoming One Of Them

I’m inundated with emails on a daily basis. “What camera do you use?”, “How do you obtain the black background in your images?”, “Will you employ me as your assistant?” to quote but a few. The questions are varied, but all…

click title for more

HIWAY AMERICA- THE DRIVE IN MOVIE

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THE HISTORY OF THE DRIVE IN MOVIE THEATRE

drive in 1

“WAY BACK WHEN” COLLAGE #ANA CHRISTY

 

DRIVE12 DRIVE13 DRIVE14 DRIVE6 DRIVE8

 
 Related Resources
History of Motion Pictures 
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Drive-In Theater Ads
Gallery of old drive-in theater movie advertisements
drive-in theater.com History and trivia f drive-in theaters.
Virtual Tour Drive-In Theater History
Many drive-in theatres have come and gone since the great boom in the fifties. Browse over 150 drive-ins arranged by state. 
Find a drive-in with Drive-In Movie.com

Advertising Ideas – Snack Bar Rico’s Nachos (Vintage Drive-In Movie Ad) – 1970s

https://youtu.be/AuVsGxox4Qc

Drive-In Movie Ads : Drive in Intermission 1960’s

https://youtu.be/26pQNKEOXjo

By Mary Bellis

Richard Hollingshead was a young sales manager at his dad’s Whiz Auto Products, who had a hankering to invent something that combined his two interests: cars and movies.

Richard Hollingshead’s vision was an open-air movie theater where moviegoers could watch from their own cars. He experimented in his own driveway at 212 Thomas Avenue, Camden, New Jersey. The inventor mounted a 1928 Kodak projector on the hood of his car, projected onto a screen he had nailed to trees in his backyard, and used a radio placed behind the screen for sound.

The inventor subjected his beta drive-in to vigorous testing: for sound quality, for different weather conditions (Richard used a lawn sprinkler to imitate rain) and for figuring out how to park the patrons’ cars. Richard tried lining up the cars in his driveway, which created a problem with line of sight if one car was directly parked behind another car. By spacing cars at various distances and placing blocks and ramps under the front wheels of cars that were further away from the screen, Richard Hollingshead created the perfect parking arrangement for the drive-in movie theater experience.

The first patent for the Drive-In Theater (United States Patent# 1,909,537) was issued on May 16, 1933. With an investment of $30,000, Richard opened the first drive-in on Tuesday June 6, 1933 at a location on Crescent Boulevard, Camden, New Jersey. The price of admission was 25 cents for the car and 25 cents per person.

The design did not include the in-car speaker system we know today. The inventor contacted a company by the name of RCA Victor to provide the sound system, called “Directional Sound.” Three main speakers were mounted next to the screen that provided sound. The sound quality was not good for cars in the rear of the theater or for the surrounding neighbors.

The largest drive-in theater in patron capacity was the All-Weather Drive-In of Copiague, New York. All-Weather had parking space for 2,500 cars, an indoor 1,200 seat viewing area, kid’s playground, a full service restaurant and a shuttle train that took customers from their cars and around the 28-acre theater lot.

The two smallest drive-ins were the Harmony Drive-In of Harmony Pennsylvania and the Highway Drive-In of Bamberg, South Carolina. Both drive-ins could hold no more than 50 cars.

An interesting innovation was the combination drive-in and fly-in theater. On June 3, 1948, Edward Brown, Junior opened the first theater for cars and small planes. Ed Brown’s Drive-In and Fly-In of Asbury Park, New Jersey had the capacity for 500 cars and 25 airplanes. An airfield was placed next to the drive-in and planes would taxi to the last row of the theater. When the movies were over, Brown provided a tow for the planes to be brought back to the airfield.

The drive-in theater movie experience cannot be beat.

all artwork Mary Bellis – (original photo source LOC)

Allegra Sleep Fine Art

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