Category Archives: quotes

repost -60 Dumbest Celebrity Quotes

Standard
60 Dumbest Celebrity Quotes
Published on 5/4/2007

Famous funny, dumb and stupid celebrity quotes:

  • «Smoking kills. If you’re killed, you’ve lost a very important part of your life.»

    – Brooke Shields, during an interview to become spokesperson for a federal anti-smoking campaign. One of the worst celebrity quotes ever.

  • «If we don’t succeed, we run the risk of failure.»

    – Dan Quayle, former U.S. Vice President

  • «So, where’s the Cannes Film Festival being held this year?»

    Christina Aguilera

  • «Fiction writing is great. You can make up almost anything.»
    – Ivana Trump, on finishing her first novel
  • «I’m convinced the Beatles are partly responsible for the fall of Communism.»
    – Milos Forman, Film director
  • «When I’m a blonde, I can say the world is purple, and they’ll believe me because they weren’t listening to me.»
    – Kylie Bax, Model/Actress, in Stuff magazine.
  • «The internet is a great way to get on the net.»
    – Bob Dole, Republican presidential candidate
  • «You guys, line up alphabetically by height.»
    – Bill Peterson, Florida State football coach
  • «I get to go to lots of overseas places, like Canada.»
    – Britney Spears, on Blender Magazine (April 2004)
  • «I think war is a dangerous place.»
    – George W. Bush, Washington, D.C. (May 7, 2003)
  • «I owe a lot to my parents, especially my mother and father.»
    – Greg Norman, Golfer
  • «It’s nice, it gives you a feeling of security so that if something breaks we know we can always call a guy over and he’ll bring a drill or something.»
    – Brooke Shields, Actress, on why it was is good to live in a co-ed dormitory when she was in college
  • «Rotarians, be patriotic! Learn to shoot yourself.»
    – Gyrator, Chicago Rotary Club journal
  • «These people haven’t seen the last of my face. If I go down, I’m going down standing up.»
    – Chuck Person, NBA Basketball player
  • «I’m so smart now. Everyone’s always like ‘take your top off’. Sorry, NO! They always want to get that money shot. I’m not stupid.»
    – Paris Hilton (December 2003)

    • «I think gay marriage is something that should be between a man and a woman»

      – Arnold Schwarzenegger

    • «Whenever I watch TV and see those poor starving kids all over the world, I can’t help but cry. I mean I’d love to be skinny like that but not with all those flies and death and stuff.»

      – Mariah Carey, pop singer

    • «Predictions are difficult. Especially about the future.»

      – Yogi Berra, Baseball player

  • «My sister’s expecting a baby, and I don’t know if I’m going to be an uncle or an aunt.»
    – Chuck Nevitt, North Carolina State basketball player, explaining to Coach Jim Valvano why he appeared nervous at practice.
  • «The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation’s history. I mean in this century’s history. But we all lived in this century. I didn’t live in this century.»
    – Dan Quayle, former U.S. Vice-President
  • «And now the sequence of events in no particular order.»
    – Dan Rather, television news anchor
  • «Natural gas is hemispheric. I like to call it hemispheric in nature because it is a product that we can find in our neighborhoods.»
    – George W Bush, Austin, Texas, Dec. 20, 2000
  • «The doctors X-rayed my head and found nothing.»
    – Dizzy Dean, explaining how he felt after being hit on the head by a ball in the 1934 World Series.
  • «I was in a no-win situation, so I’m glad that I won rather than lost.»
    – Frank Bruno, Boxer
  • «I have opinions of my own –strong opinions– but I don’t always agree with them.»
    – George Bush
  • «I want to rush for 1,000 or 1,500 yards, whichever comes first.»
    – George Rogers, NFL New Orleans Saint RB, when asked about the upcoming season
  • «I do not like this word “bomb.” It is not a bomb. It is a device that is exploding.»
    – Jacques le Blanc, French ambassador on nuclear weapons
  • «The word ‘genius’ isn’t applicable in football. A genius is a guy like Norman Einstein.»
    – Joe Theisman, quarterback and sports analyst
  • «Half this game is ninety percent mental.»
    – Danny Ozark, Philadelphia Phillies manager
  • «Be sure and put some of those neutrons on it.»
    – Mike Smith, Baseball pitcher, ordering a salad at a restaurant.

    • «If I sold all my liabilities, I wouldn’t own anything. My wife’s a liability, my kids are liabilities, and I haven’t sold them.»

      – Ted Turner, media mogul, on selling off his money losing properties

    • «They misunderestimated me.»

      – George W Bush, Bentonville, Ark., (Nov. 6, 2000)

    • «I don’t diet. I just don’t eat as much as I’d like to.»

      – Linda Evangelista, Supermodel

  • «Facts are stupid things.»
    – Ronald Reagan, Former U.S. President
  • «What a waste it is to lose one’s mind. Or not to have a mind is being very wasteful. How true that is.»
    – Dan Quayle, former U.S. Vice President
  • «That’s just the tip of the ice cube.»
    – Neil Hamilton, BBC2
  • «A bachelor’s life is no life for a single man.»
    – Samuel Goldwyn
  • «I may be dumb, but I’m not stupid.»
    – Terry Bradshaw, Former football player/announcer
  • «It isn’t pollution that is hurting the environment, it’s the impurities in our air and water that are doing it.»
    – Dan Quayle, former U.S. Vice-President
  • «I’ve never had major knee surgery on any other part of my body.»
    – Winston Bennett, University of Kentucky basketball forward.
  • «The only happy artist is a dead artist, because only then you can’t change. After I die, I’ll probably come back as a paintbrush.»
    – Sylvestor Stallone, Actor
  • «Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country.»
    – Mayor Marion Barry, Washington, DC
  • «We are not ready for an unforeseen event that may or may not occur.»
    – Dan Quayle, former U.S. Vice President
  • «Will the highways on the internet become more few?»
    – George W Bush, Concord, New Hampshire, (29th January 2000)
  • «Traditionally, most of Australia’s imports come from overseas.»
    – Keppel Enderbery, Former Australian cabinet minister

    • «There is certainly more in the future now than back in 1964.»

      – Roger Daltrey, Singer/Actor

    • «We’re going to turn this team around 360 degrees.»

      – Jason Kidd, upon his drafting to the Dallas Mavericks

    • «I’ve never really wanted to go to Japan. Simply because I don’t like eating fish. And I know that’s very popular out there in Africa.»

      — Britney Spears

  • «Pitching is 80% of the game. The other half is hitting and fielding.»
    – Mickey Rivers, baseball player
  • «I love California, I practically grew up in Phoenix.»
    – Dan Quayle, former U.S. Vice President
  • «Put the ‘off’ button on.»
    – George W. Bush, Associated Press, 14th February 2000
  • «So Carol, you’re a housewife and mother. And have you got any children?»
    – Michael Barrymore
  • «Food is an important part of a balanced diet.»
    – Fran Lebowitz, US writer
  • «We’ve got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?»
    – Lee Iacocca, Chairman of the Chrysler corporation
  • «For NASA, space is still a high priority.»
    – Dan Quayle
  • «He’s a guy who gets up at six o’clock in the morning regardless of what time it is.»
    – Lou Duva, veteran boxing trainer
  • «If it weren’t for electricity we’d all be watching television by candlelight.»
    – George Gobel
  • «If only faces could talk…»
    – Pat Summerall, Sportscaster, during the Super Bowl
  • «Every minute was more exciting than the next.»
    – Linda Evans, actress
  • «I’m not anorexic. I’m from Texas. Are there people from Texas that are anorexic? I’ve never heard of one. And that includes me.»
    — Jessica Simpson
Advertisements

THE 100 BEST QUOTES FROM SONGS

Standard

CHAPTER 1 – ABSOLUTELY THE 100 BEST

ID# Song Quote – Artist, Title
1 All lies and jest, still, a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest. – Simon and Garfunkel, The Boxer
2 All of us get lost in the darkness, dreamers learn to steer by the stars. – Rush, The Pass
3 All you need is love, love. Love is all you need. – The Beatles, All You Need Is Love
4 An honest man’s pillow is his peace of mind. – John Cougar Mellencamp, Minutes To Memories
5 And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make. – The Beatles, The End
6 Before you accuse me take a look at yourself. – Bo Diddley; Creedance Clearwater Revival; Eric Clapton, Before You Accuse Me
7 Bent out of shape from society’s pliers, cares not to come up any higher, but rather get you down in the hole that he’s in. – Bob Dylan, It’s Alright, Ma
8 Different strokes for different folks, and so on and so on and scooby dooby dooby. – Sly and the Family Stone, Everyday People
9 Don’t ask me what I think of you, I might not give the answer that you want me to. – Fleetwood Mac, Oh Well
10 Don’t you draw the Queen of Diamonds, boy, she’ll beat you if she’s able. You know, the Queen of Hearts is always your best bet. – The Eagles, Desperado
11 Even the genius asks questions. – 2 Pac, Me Against The World
12 Every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end. – Semisonic, Closing Time
[1/9]

Use arrow keys to navigate from page to page or go to:

[Discussion] or [Next Chapter]

Note – The “100 Best” song quotes are not in ranking order (ID numbers are unique and for reference purposes only).  See the Chapter Commentary [Discussion] for how the “100 Best” were derived.

#ana_christy#quotes#music#beatnikhiway.com

Quotes That Will Give You Chills

Standard

tumblr_mo3wniisPs1qln2e2o1_500 (1)

 Quotes That Will Give You Chills

COOL PEOPLE- HARRY DEAN STANTON

Standard

Harry-Dean-Stanton-008

10images 9 9images 8images 7images 6imagesrepo-man-movie-poster-1983-1020191315 2download 43download

Harry Dean Stanton – Sings “Cancion Mixteca”-Very Cool

http://youtu.be/Q9ZxQ-5vZLE

Harry Dean Stanton on Life, Film, Music & The Void

http://youtu.be/uW7-_ibnXm8

Wim Wenders – Paris Texas – Ry Cooder – Cancion Mixteca.

http://youtu.be/lBSidn2tNEo

Paris, Texas – Opening (Full)

http://youtu.be/Sd2EzQsZteA

Paris, Texas The Observer
Harry Dean Stanton: ‘Life? It’s one big phantasmagoria’
The wine, the women, the song… The great Harry Dean Stanton talks to Sean O’Hagan about jogging with Dylan, Rebecca de Mornay leaving him for Tom Cruise and why Paris, Texas is his greatest film
Harry Dean Stanton
Harry Dean Stanton: ‘I surrender to acting in the same way I surrender to life’ Photograph: Steve Pyke
Sean O’Hagan
Saturday 23 November 2013 15.00 EST Last modified on Thursday 22 May 2014 05.00 EDT
mn876images

Harry Dean Stanton is singing “The Rose of Tralee”. His wavering voice echoes across the rows of people gathered in the Village East cinema in New York, where a special screening of a new documentary about his life and work, Partly Fiction, has just finished. You can tell that the director, Sophie Huber, and the cinematographer, Seamus McGarvey, who are sitting beside him, are used to this sort of thing from Harry, but the rest of us are by turns delighted and a little bit nervous on his behalf. Now that he’s 87, Stanton’s voice is as unsteady as his gait, but he steers the old Irish ballad home in his inimitable manner and the audience responds with cheers and applause.

“Singing and acting are actually very similar things,” says Stanton when I ask him about his other talent, having seen him perform about 15 years ago with his Tex-Mex band in the Mint Bar in Los Angeles. “Anyone can sing and anyone can be a film actor. All you have to do is learn. I learned to sing when I was a child. I had a babysitter named Thelma. She was 18, I was six, and I was in love with her. I used to sing her an old Jimmie Rodgers song, ‘T for Thelma’.” Closing his eyes, he breaks into song: “T for Texas, T for Tennessee, T for Thelma, that girl made a wreck out of me.” He smiles his sad smile. “I was singing the blues when I was six. Kind of sad, eh?”

87u76images

There is indeed a peculiar kind of sadness about Harry Dean Stanton, a mix of vulnerability, honesty and seeming guilelessness that has lit up the screen in his greatest performances. It’s there in his singing cameo in 1967’s prison movie Cool Hand Luke, in his leading role in Alex Cox’s underrated cult classic Repo Man in 1984 and, most unforgettably, in his almost silent portrayal of Travis, a man broken by unrequited love in Wim Wenders’s classic, Paris, Texas. “After all these years, I finally got the part I wanted to play,” Stanton once said of that late breakthrough role. “If I never did another film after Paris, Texas I’d be happy.”

Paris Texas

Now, with mortality beckoning, Stanton still gives off the air of someone who, as he puts it, “doesn’t really give a damn”. In his room in a hip hotel on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, the aircon is on full blast despite his runny nose and troubling cough, and he smokes like a train as if oblivious to the law and the health police. He looks scarecrow thin, but dapper, in his western suit, embroidered shirt and ornately embossed cowboy boots: a southern dandy even in old age. His hearing is not so good, but his voice remains unmistakable, that soft trace of his southern upbringing in rural Kentucky still detectable. “I’ve worked with some of the best of them,” he says. “Not just directors like Sam Peckinpah and David Lynch, but writers like Sam Shepard and singers like Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson. I could have made it as a singer, but I went with acting, surrendered to it, in a way.”

09898images

Paris Texas
Harry Dean Stanton in 1984’s Paris, Texas – the film of which he is most proud. Photograph: Ronald Grant Archive
Before Paris, Texas, Stanton had appeared in around 100 films and since then he has acted in more than 50 more, though often as a supporting actor. The lead roles did not materialise in the way he expected them to, perhaps because he is so singular, both in looks and acting ability. When given the right script and a sympathetic director, though, he is as charismatic as anyone, as his role in David Lynch’s The Straight Story showed. Recently he has shone fitfully in Martin McDonagh’s Seven Psychopaths, and in the HBO series Big Love as a self-proclaimed Mormon prophet. He has also appeared in action pics such as The Last Stand with Arnie Schwarzenegger and in the Marvel blockbuster Avengers Assemble. He appears not to care too much about the kind of fame and huge earning power that other actors without an iota of his onscreen presence command.

 

“Harry is a walking contradiction,” says Huber, who has known him for 20 years. “He has this pride in appearing to not have to work hard to be good. He definitely does not want to be seen to be trying. It’s part of his whole Buddhist thing.” His worldview is a mixture of various Buddhist and other more esoteric eastern philosophies, shaped in the late 60s by the writings of Alan Watts, the Beat poet and Zen sage, and adapted over the years to suit Stanton’s singular, slightly eccentric lifestyle.

o0o98images

Lately, though, at screenings of Huber’s documentary, he has reacted angrily to Wim Wenders’s onscreen observation that Stanton was insecure about playing the lead role in Paris, Texas. “I asked him: ‘Harry, how come you are angry at that scene? I thought you didn’t have an ego,'” says Huber. “He just nodded and said: ‘Yeah, I guess I should shut up.’ But it had obviously got to him.”

Stanton tells me more than once that he has no ego and no regrets, but you have to wonder if that is true. He is, as Partly Fiction shows, a kind of lone drifter in Hollywood, perhaps the last of that generation of great American postwar character actors, and certainly one of the most singular.

Back in the late 60s, he shared a house in Hollywood with Jack Nicholson, and they partied hard with the David Crosby, Mama Cass Elliot and the burgeoning Laurel Canyon rock aristocracy of the time. Now, still an unrepentant bachelor, he speaks fondly on camera about the great lost love of his life, the actor Rebecca de Mornay – “She left me for Tom Cruise.”

Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction

Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction
Harry Dean Stanton with Sophie Huber, the director of Partly Fiction. Photograph: Michael Buckner/Getty Images
When a wag in the audience asks him what Debbie Harry was like “in the sack”, he shoots back: “As good as you think!” adding that the Nastassja Kinski was pretty good, too.

Advertisement

Stanton spends most evenings, when he is not working in Dan Tana’s bar in East Hollywood, drinking with a small bunch of regulars and telling anyone who can’t quite place his face that he is a retired astronaut. “He’s an outsider but has lots of good friends,” says Huber. “He’s happy compared to most 87-year-olds. He says he doesn’t care about dying, but some days, I suspect, he thinks about it a lot. You never really know what’s going on in his head.”

This is exactly how Stanton likes it, of course. In Huber’s slow, almost meditative film, Stanton looms large while revealing little. The New York Times reviewer concluded: “You won’t learn much, but you’ll be strangely happy that you didn’t.” Stanton quotes the line back to me, grinning. “She got it,” he says approvingly. “That’s a very Buddhist thing to say.”

Huber describes Partly Fiction as “a portrait of his face” and those expressive eyes and weathered features, shot close-up in black and white by McGarvey’s luminous cinematography, do indeed speak volumes about how Stanton has made silence and stillness his most powerful means of onscreen communication. There is a great scene where David Lynch, his equal in eccentricity, talks about what Stanton does “in between the lines” and how he is “always there – whatever ‘there’ needs to be”.

Stanton smiles when I mention it. “I guess he was talking about being still and listening. Being attentive even when it’s not your line. For me, acting is not too different from what we are doing right now. We’re acting in a way, but we are not putting on an act. That’s the crucial difference for me. I just surrender to it in much the same way I surrender to life. It’s all one big phantasmagoria anyway. In the end I’ve really got nothing to do with it. It just happens, and there’s no answer to it.”

Harry Dean Stanton with Jack Nicholson
Harry Dean Stanton with Jack Nicholson. The two actors shared a house in Hollywood in the 60s. Photograph: Rex Features
In all kinds of ways, Stanton has travelled lunar miles from his smalltown upbringing in East Irvine, Kentucky. Born in 1926, he is the eldest of three sons to Ersel, who worked as a hairdresser, and Sheridan, a tobacco farmer and Baptist. Stanton describes his childhood as strict and unhappy. “My father and mother were not that compatible. She was the eldest of nine children and she just wanted to get out. I don’t think they had a good wedding night, and I was the product of that. We weren’t close. I think she resented me when I was a kid. She even told me once how she used to frighten me when I was in the cradle with a black sock.”

He laughs soundlessly but looks unbearably sad. “I brought all that stuff up with her just after I started seeing a psychiatrist. I did group therapy and all that and it all came out. So I called her one night and told her I hated her.” He shakes his head and smiles ruefully. “We made up shortly before she died. Got pretty close then, actually. That’s how it goes sometimes.”

Was acting in some way an attempt to escape that grim childhood?

“Yes, I guess so. You can do stuff onstage that you can’t do offstage. You can be angry as hell and enraged and get away with it onstage, but not off. I had a lot of rage for a time, but I let go of all that stuff a long time ago.”

Stanton served in the US Navy during the Second World War, working as a ship’s cook. “Most actors don’t have that kind of life experience now,” he says matter-of-factly. “I was lucky not to have been blown up or killed. I was there when the Japanese suicide planes were coming in. Fortunately they missed our boat. Took me a while to readjust after I went back home and went to college in Lexington, Kentucky.” There he started acting in the college drama group while studying journalism. “I acted in Pygmalion with a Cockney accent. I knew right then what I wanted to do, so I quit college and went to the Pasadena Playhouse in 1949.”

He landed his first job after answering a “singers wanted” advert in the local paper and toured for a while with a 24-piece choral group. “Twenty-four guys on a bus playing small towns. When I quit, there were only 12 guys left. The rest deserted along the way. We sang on street corners, in department stores and, at the end of a week, in a local venue. It’s called paying your dues.”

The dues-paying continued with myriad supporting roles on television in the 1950s, including appearances in popular western series such as Wagon Train and Gunsmoke. In 1967 he had a brief, but resonant, role as a guitar-strumming convict in Cool Hand Luke, starring Paul Newman. By the early 1970s, he had become a cult actor courtesy of two indie classics directed by the mercurial Monte Hellman: Two-Lane Blacktop and Cockfigher. In the former he befriended the singer James Taylor, who wrote a song, “Hey Mister, That’s Me Up On The Jukebox”, on Harry’s favourite guitar. He later befriended Bob Dylan during the famously difficult shoot for Sam Peckinpah’s elegiac western Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid in 1973. “Dylan and I got to be very close. We recorded together one time. It was a Mexican song. He offered me a copy of the tape and I said no. Shot myself in the foot. It’s never seen the light of day. I’d sure love to hear it.”

In Partly Fiction (which has yet to get a UK release date), Kris Kristofferson, who played the lead in that film, recalls Peckinpah throwing a knife in anger at Stanton when the actor messed up a crucial scene by running through the shot. “As I recall, he pulled a gun on me, too. It was because me and Dylan fucked up the shot.”

On purpose? “No, we were jogging and we ran right across the background.” The vision of Dylan and Stanton jogging together seems altogether too absurd, but I let it pass. He describes Peckinpah as “a fucking nut, but a very talented nut”. Likewise the maverick British director Alex Cox, who cast him in Repo Man in 1984. “He was another nut. Brilliantly talented and a great satirist, but an egomaniac.”

That same year, Stanton made Paris, Texas, and created his most iconic role. “It’s my favourite film that I was in. Great directing by Wenders, great writing by Sam Shepard, great cinematography by Robby Müller, great music by Ry Cooder. That film means a lot to a lot of people. One guy I met said he and his brother had been estranged for years and it got them back together.”

Does he think he should have had bigger, better roles in the years since? He lights up another cigarette and stares into the middle distance, lost in some private reverie. “You get older,” he says finally. “In the end, you end up accepting everything in your life – suffering, horror, love, loss, hate – all of it. It’s all a movie anyway.”

He closes his eyes and recites a few lines from Macbeth, sounding suddenly Shakespearean, albeit in his own wavering way. “A tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” He opens his eyes again. “Great line, eh?” he says, smiling and reaching for a cigarette. “That’s life right there.”

COOL PEOPLE- ONE LINERS FROM GROUCHO MARX

Standard

Groucho Marx – 30 great one-liners

Groucho Marx in 1933

Groucho Marx (1890-1977):

‘I never forget a face, but in your case I’d be glad to make an exception.’

COOL PEOPLE – Ernest Hemingway Trivia

Standard
Ernest Hemingway Trivia


“The first draft of anything is shit.” – Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway’s favorite bars: Ritz, Paris; Harry’s Bar, Venice; Costello’s, New York; Sloppy Joe’s, Key West; and La Floridita, Cuba.

“The whiskey warmed his tongue and the back of his throat, but it did not change his ideas any, and suddenly, looking at himself in the mirror behind the bar, he knew that drinking was never going to do any good to him now. Whatever he had now he had, and it was from now on, and if he drank himself unconscious when he woke up it would be there.” —To Have and Have Not, 1937

Ernest Hemingway once dubbed Key West, Florida, the “St. Tropez of the poor.”

COOL PEOPLE – HUNTER S. THOMPSON QUOTES

Standard

25 QUOTES ABOUT WHISKEY FROM THE FAMOUS DRINKERS WHO LOVED IT BEST

Standard

25 famous people quotes on whiskey

“The drink which enables a man to magnify his joy, and his happiness.”

quotes-whiskey

There’s little in life better than pouring a double whiskey and sitting down to relax after a long day.

Whether you drink Scotch, rye, or bourbon, you are in the company of some of the world’s finest minds and characters. Mark Twain, Winston Churchill, and James Joyce all enjoyed a dram, and they had no reservations about speaking publicly on the subject.

To help inspire your deeper investigation of whiskey (or your next whiskey barouting), we’ve put together a list of the romantic, funny, and even wistful things that celebrated wits, writers, politicians, and even athletes have said about their beloved booze.

Scroll down to read our favorite whiskey-related musings.

MARK TWAIN

In three words: Besuited American humorist
Thoughts on whiskey: “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.”

“Give an Irishman lager for a month, and he’s a dead man. An Irishman is lined with copper, and the beer corrodes it. But whiskey polishes the copper and is the saving of him.”

Twainwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

RAYMOND CHANDLER

In three words: Novelist and screenwriter
Thoughts on whiskey: “There is no bad whiskey. There are only some whiskeys that aren’t as good as others.”

chandlerwhiskey 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


WINSTON CHURCHILL

In three words: British Prime Minister
Thoughts on whiskey: “The water was not fit to drink. To make it palatable, we had to add whisky. By diligent effort, I learned to like it.”

churchillwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

TOMMY COOPER

In three words: British prop comedian
Thoughts on whiskey: “I’m on a whisky diet. I’ve lost three days already.”

cooperwhiskey jpg1 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


HUMPHREY BOGART

In three words: American actor, Casablanca
Thoughts on whiskey: His last words were, “I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis.”

bogartwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

JOHNNY CARSON

In three words: Late Night host
Thoughts on whiskey: “Happiness is having a rare steak, a bottle of whisky, and a dog to eat the rare steak.”

carson whiskey 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


JOEL ROSENBERG

In three words: American author, strategist
Thoughts on whiskey: “I’m a simple man. All I want is enough sleep for two normal men, enough whiskey for three, and enough women for four.”

rosenbergwhiskey 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

In three words: 16th U.S. president
Thoughts on whiskey: “Tell me what brand of whiskey that Grant drinks. I would like to send a barrel of it to my other generals.”

lincolnwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


TUG MCGRAW

In three words: MLB relief pitcher
Thoughts on whiskey: “Ninety percent I’ll spend on good times, women, and Irish Whiskey. The other ten percent I’ll probably waste.”

1981 Fleer 7 McGraw jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

ALEXANDER FLEMING

In three words: Scottish inventor, penicillin
Thoughts on whiskey: “A good gulp of hot whiskey at bedtime—it’s not very scientific, but it helps.”

flemingwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


ERROL FLYNN

In three words: Swashbuckling movie star
Thoughts on whiskey: “I like my whisky old and my women young.”

flynnwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

COMPTON MACKENZIE

In three words: Proud Scotsman, writer
Thoughts on whiskey: “Love makes the world go round? Not at all. Whiskey makes it go round twice as fast.”

mackenziewhiskey 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


NGUYEN CAO KY

In three words: Vietnamese political leader
Thoughts on whiskey: “Americans are big boys. You can talk them into almost anything. Just sit with them for half an hour over a bottle of whiskey and be a nice guy.”

%name 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

AVA GARDNER

In three words: Glamorous movie star
Thoughts on whiskey: ‎”I wish to live to 150 years old, but the day I die, I wish it to be with a cigarette in one hand and a glass of whiskey in the other.”

gardnerwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


HARUKI MURAKAMI

In three words: Japanese bestselling author
Thoughts on whiskey: “Whiskey, like a beautiful woman, demands appreciation. You gaze first, then it’s time to drink.”

murakamiwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW

In three words: Irish playwright, Pygmalion
Thoughts on whiskey: “Whisky is liquid sunshine.”

shawwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


W.C. FIELDS

In three words: American funnyman, actor
Thoughts on whiskey: “Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite and furthermore always carry a small snake.”

“Drown in a cold vat of whiskey? Death, where is thy sting?”

fieldswhiskey 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

ANDREW JACKSON

In three words: Wild 7th president
Thoughts on whiskey: “I have never in my life seen a Kentuckian who didn’t have a gun, a pack of cards, and a jug of whiskey.”

jacksonwhiskey 399x500 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


WILLIAM FAULKNER

In three words: Celebrated Southern author
Thoughts on whiskey: “My own experience has been that the tools I need for my trade are paper, tobacco, food, and a little whisky.”

faulknerwhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

JAMES JOYCE

In three words: Dubliners and Ulysses
Thoughts on whiskey: “The light music of whiskey falling into a glass—an agreeable interlude.”

joycewhiskey jpg 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best


IGOR STRAVINSKY

In three words: Russian pianist, composer
Thoughts on whiskey: “My God, so much I like to drink Scotch that sometimes I think my name is Igor Stra-whiskey.”

stravinskywhiskey 25 Quotes About Whiskey from the Famous Drinkers Who Loved It Best

NOAH “SOGGY” SWEAT

In three words: Southern legislator, judge
Thoughts on whiskey: Sweat gave his famous “If-by-whiskey” speech to the Mississippi legislature in 1953. Author John Grisham’s reading begins at 5:04 in the clip below.

“I had not intended to discuss this controversial subject at this particular time. However, I want you to know that I do not shun controversy. On the contrary, I will take a stand on any issue at any time, regardless of how fraught with controversy it might be. You have asked me how I feel about whiskey. All right, here is how I feel about whiskey.

If when you say whiskey you mean the devil’s brew, the poison scourge, the bloody monster, that defiles innocence, dethrones reason, destroys the home, creates misery and poverty, yea, literally takes the bread from the mouths of little children; if you mean the evil drink that topples the Christian man and woman from the pinnacle of righteous, gracious living into the bottomless pit of degradation, and despair, and shame and helplessness, and hopelessness, then certainly I am against it.

But; If when you say whiskey you mean the oil of conversation, the philosophic wine, the ale that is consumed when good fellows get together, that puts a song in their hearts and laughter on their lips, and the warm glow of contentment in their eyes; if you mean Christmas cheer; if you mean the stimulating drink that puts the spring in the old gentleman’s step on a frosty, crispy morning; if you mean the drink which enables a man to magnify his joy, and his happiness, and to forget, if only for a little while, life’s great tragedies, and heartaches, and sorrows; if you mean that drink, the sale of which pours into our treasuries untold millions of dollars, which are used to provide tender care for our little crippled children, our blind, our deaf, our dumb, our pitiful aged and infirm; to build highways and hospitals and schools, then certainly I am for it.

This is my stand. I will not retreat from it. I will not compromise.”

10 Devastating Author-To-Author Insults

Standard

10 Devastating Author-To-Author Insults

STEFFANI JACOBY AUGUST 21, 2014

Throughout history, some of the most renowned authors were also the most harshly criticized—often by their equally famous peers. Some of the best-known works of literature, from Shakespeare’s plays to Hemingway’s novels, have been on the receiving end of some truly excoriating putdowns.

10George Bernard Shaw On Shakespeare

george-bernard-shaw

George Bernard Shaw, the only writer to receive both an Academy Award and the Nobel Prize for Literature, produced a variety of well-known (and award-winning) plays, the most famous of which was Pygmalion. Apparently, his success as a playwright led him to believe he had the credentials to make a few scathing comments about Shakespeare himself:

“With the single exception of Homer, there is no eminent writer, not even Sir Walter Scott, whom I can despise so entirely as I despise Shakespeare. The intensity of my impatience with him occasionally reaches such a pitch, that it would positively be a relief to me to dig him up and throw stones at him.”

Shaw wasn’t the only famous author who loved hating the Bard: Voltaire called Shakespeare a “drunken savage” who only appealed to audiences in “London and Canada.” For good measure, he also described his works as a “vast dunghill.”

9Mark Twain On Jane Austen

Mark-Twain-Public-domain

For many, Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) remains the quintessential American author. And apparently he harbored some strong feelings about perhaps the quintessential English novelist. In a critical essay on Jane Austen’s works, Twain remarked:

“She makes me detest all her people, without reserve. Is that her intention? It is not believable. Then is it her purpose to make the reader detest her people up to the middle of the book and like them in the rest of the chapters? That could be. That would be high art. It would be worth while, too. Some day I will examine the other end of her books and see.”

“Every time I read Pride and Prejudice, I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone.”

Twain’s talent for vitriol wasn’t limited to Austen—he also penned a hilarious essay titled “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offenses,” in which he claimed that Cooper’s The Deerslayer managed to commit “114 offenses against literary art out of a possible 115 . . . its humor is pathetic; its pathos is funny; its conversations are—oh! indescribable; its love-scenes odious; its English a crime against the language.” Some argue that Twain addressed these jibes at other famous authors just for the fun of it.

8Charlotte Bronte On Jane Austen

Charlotte-Bront-007

Jane Austen might be known for her refined characters, but she certainly had a way of making people angry. Charlotte Bronte, a near-contemporary of Austen known to prefer passion over stolid practicalism, let loose after a cursory reading of Pride and Prejudice:

“She ruffles her reader by nothing vehement, disturbs him with nothing profound. The passions are perfectly unknown to her. What sees keenly, speaks aptly, moves flexibly, it suits her to study: but what throbs fast and full, though hidden, what the blood rushes through, what is the unseen seat of life and the sentient target of death—this Miss Austen ignores.”

Later, in a letter to a friend who had warned her not to be too melodramatic, Bronte said she couldn’t have tolerated being confined to the refined gardens and elegant society featured in Austen’s novels.

Authors and critics often base their opinion of Austen on her development of emotion (or lack thereof). Ian Watt claimed that Austen’s works appeal only to those who view logic as superior to emotion. Virginia Woolf, on the other hand, valued Austen’s work, arguing that she was “mistress of greater emotion than appears on the surface.”

7Oscar Wilde On Alexander Pope

t2-arts-oscar-wilde_88660c

Both authors are among the most prominent in British history, among the few to be honored with memorials in Poet’s Corner of Westminster Abbey. But it appears that Wilde wasn’t a fan of his renowned predecessor. A famously quotable author, full of flippant jabs and insults, Wilde once wrote a letter to a friend in which he observed:

“There are several ways to dislike poetry; one is to dislike it, the other is to read Alexander Pope.”

Since Pope was dead at the time, he didn’t get the chance to reply to Wilde’s putdown, but it’s a fairly safe bet that his response would have been scathing. After all, when the writer Lewis Theobald criticized his adaptations of Shakespeare, Pope responded by making him the main character of an epic, four-volume work of poetry called “The Dunciad,” in which he is supposedly the son and favorite of the goddess “Dulness.” When he later fell out with the playwright Colley Cibber, Pope rewrote the poem to make him the title character instead.

Despite his seeming disdain, critics have noted allusions to Pope’s work in Wilde’s only novel, The Picture Of Dorian Gray, where a turn of conversationstrikingly resembles a line from Pope’s The Rape of the Lock.

6Virginia Woolf On James Joyce

jamesjoyce_whitecoat

In a 1922 letter to T.S. Eliot, Woolf asked the poet for his sincere opinion on Joyce’s newly released book, Ulysses. That same year, she wrote to her sister, encouraging her to get to know Joyce: “I particularly want to know what he’s like.”

However, Woolf’s fascination with Joyce didn’t at all indicate that she respected his literary skills. After reading the first few hundred pages ofUlysses, she confided to her diary:

“An illiterate, underbred book it seems to me: the book of a self-taught working man, and we all know how distressing they are, how egotistic, insistent, raw, striking, and ultimately nauseating.”

Woolf wasn’t the only author who had trouble making it through Ulysses. D.H. Lawrence, often associated with Joyce as a master of the modern novel, claimed to be “one of the people who can’t read Ulysses,” although he conceded that Joyce would doubtless “look as much askance on me as I on him.”

5T.S. Eliot On Aldous Huxley

Hux

Some experts seem to think that T.S. Eliot and Aldous Huxley admired each other, at least to some degree. Both were members of the Bloomsbury Circle of Lady Ottoline Morrel, an artsy social group of the time, and both read the others’ work closely. Huxley’s most famous work, Brave New World, and Eliot’s The Hollow Men share many of the same ideas. But that didn’t stop Eliot from taking potshots at Huxley, once remarking:

“Huxley, who is perhaps one of those people who have to perpetrate thirty bad novels before producing a good one, has a certain natural—but little developed—aptitude for seriousness. Unfortunately, this aptitude is hampered by a talent for the rapid assimilation of all that isn’t essential.”

H.G. Wells, another author whose works centered on futuristic, often dystopian scenarios, was greatly disappointed in Huxley’s dark vision of things to come, saying that a writer of Huxley’s standing had “no right to betray the future as he did in that book.”

4William Faulkner On Ernest Hemingway

Faulken

Some authors, like Huxley and Wells, fall out over philosophical differences. Faulkner’s beef with Hemingway was much more straightforward— he didn’t like his style. Of Hemingway’s characteristically brief, simple sentences, Faulkner said:

“He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.”

Faulkner’s writing style was certainly more complex than Hemingway’s—it’s not unusual to encounter page-long sentences in his works. Those prolix sentences weren’t an accident; they were part of his writing philosophy. In an interview, Faulkner said he wanted “to put the whole history of the human heart on the head of a pin . . . the long sentence is an attempt to get [a character’s] past and possibly his future into the instant in which he does something.”

And forget using a dictionary to look up words—some of Faulkner’s fabricated portmanteau words, including “allknowledgeable,” “droopeared,” and “fecundmellow,” wouldn’t be found in even the most exhaustive reference works.

3Ernest Hemingway On William Faulkner

Ernest-Hemingway

Of course, as a man who once responded to an insult by punching Orson Welles, Hemingway wasn’t about to back down from a fight. In response to Faulkner’s “dictionary” quip, Hemingway sneered:

“Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words?”

Hemingway believed that writing should be clear and straightforward enough that readers wouldn’t have to hunt down a reference book to decipher an idea. The best writers don’t need to consult dictionaries, he maintained.

Ironically, some of Hemingway’s works are riddled with foreign words and phrases, which can be tricky for a monolingual English-speaker to understand. Apparently, sending readers to a dictionary was only a problem for Hemingway when an English dictionary was required.

If you want to copy Hemingway’s style, the ever-helpful Hemingway App can assist you by highlighting sentences that need to be simplified and adverbs that need to be deleted. If, on the other hand, you prefer to adopt Faulkner’s style, you might want to sit down with an unabridged Oxford English Dictionary and start reading and randomly combining words.

2W.H. Auden and T.S. Eliot On Edgar Allan Poe

Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was one of the great writers of the 19th century. Many call him the inventor of the murder mystery, and he was certainly a dark, brooding predecessor to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. Poe also won worldwide acclaim (mostly posthumously) for his lyric poetry, which often focuses on death or loss.

But not everyone approved of Poe’s macabre tales and melodramatic, depressed style. The poet W.H. Auden was less than complimentary, calling Poe:

“An unmanly sort of man whose love-life seems to have been largely confined to crying in laps and playing mouse.”

T.S. Eliot, slightly more politely, attributed to Poe: “the intellect of a highly gifted person before puberty.”

Poe’s life was almost as rocky as his dark stories and poems. After dropping out of school because of financial trouble, finding out his sweetheart had become engaged to another man, and going to visit his mother only to find that she had died, he set out on a quest for fame.

When he was 27, he married 13-year-old Virginia Clemm, who died of tuberculosis a short time later. Poe ultimately expired in a manner as mysterious as his own macabre stories—he was found dead in a public house after disappearing in Baltimore for five days. Today, Poe is either hailed as a literary mastermind or reviled as a pedophile with a fetish for blackbirds.

1Martin Amis On Miguel de Cervantes

miguel-de-cervantes

We all have them—those family members or friends whose visits only serve to convince us that they’ve completely lost their minds. Martin Amis, an English novelist most famous for the cult classics Money and London Fields, seems to think Miguel de Cervantes’s famous 17th-century masterpiece embodies that eccentric, ever-inappropriate relative:

“Reading Don Quixote can be compared to an indefinite visit from your most impossible senior relative, with all his pranks, dirty habits, unstoppable reminiscences, and terrible cronies.”

Though Don Quixote met with a mixed reception on its release, many now hail it as the first real modern novel. Harold Bloom, well-respected literary critic and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale, only has scintillating things to say about Cervantes’ landmark novel:

“Cervantes and Shakespeare, who died almost simultaneously, are the central western authors, at least since Dante, and no writer since has matched them, not Tolstoy or Goethe, Dickens, Proust, Joyce.”

In the same article, Bloom makes an interesting point: “Cervantes inhabits his great book so pervasively that we need to see that it has three unique personalities: the knight, Sancho, and Cervantes.” If that’s true, maybe Cervantes himself is the personification of that “impossible senior relative” we all know.

Steffani is a freelance writer and coffee addict living on the island of Guam. She’s also a scuba diver, a knitter, and an E.A. Poe aficionado who often gets segments of “The Raven” stuck in her head on repeat. Steffani blogs about life in Guam atOriginalFootprints.com.