Category Archives: writer

Hunter S. Thompson’s 9/11 Essay Is Still Chillingly Accurate 16 Years Later

Standard

Hunter S. Thompson’s 9/11 Essay Is Still Chillingly Accurate 16 Years Later

“This is going to be a very expensive war, and Victory is not guaranteed ― for anyone,” he wrote.

However, writer Hunter S. Thompson turned out to be amazingly prescient.

Shortly after the tragedy, the famed gonzo journalist wrote an essay for ESPN.com where he laid out his thoughts on what could happen in this new era.

Sixteen years later, his remarks are still chillingly accurate:

“Boom! Boom! Just like that. The towers are gone now, reduced to bloody rubble, along with all hopes for Peace in Our Time, in the United States or any other country.

“Make no mistake about it: We are At War now ― with somebody ― and we will stay At War with that mysterious Enemy for the rest of our lives. It will be a Religious War, a sort of Christian Jihad, fueled by religious hatred and led by merciless fanatics on both sides. It will be guerilla warfare on a global scale, with no front lines and no identifiable enemy.”

HO NEW/REUTERS
Writer Hunter S. Thompson predicted “guerilla warfare on a global scale, with no front lines and no identifiable enemy” after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.
Subscribe to The Morning Email
Wake up to the day’s most important news.

Thompson wrote that the United States is “going to punish somebody for this attack, but just who or what will be blown to smithereens for it is hard to say.”

He continued:

“Maybe Afghanistan, maybe Pakistan or Iraq, or possibly all three at once. Who knows? Not even the Generals in what remains of the Pentagon or the New York papers calling for WAR seem to know who did it or where to look for them.”

Thompson, who died in 2005 from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, also laid out how then-President George W. Bush would react to the attack and how his decisions would affect the lives of everyday Americans.

“This is going to be a very expensive war, and Victory is not guaranteed ― for anyone, and certainly not for anyone as baffled as George W. Bush. All he knows is that his father started the war a long time ago, and that he, the goofy child-President, has been chosen by Fate and the global Oil industry to finish it Now.

“He will declare a National Security Emergency and clamp down Hard on Everybody, no matter where they live or why. If the guilty won’t hold up their hands and confess, he and the Generals will ferret them out by force. Good luck. He is in for a profoundly difficult job ― armed as he is with no credible Military Intelligence, no witnesses and only the ghost of Bin Laden to blame for the tragedy.”

Advertisements

‘Call Me Burroughs’ pins down the extreme life of William Burroughs

Standard

BOOK REVIEW

‘Call Me Burroughs’ pins down the extreme life of William Burroughs

Barry Miles’ William Burroughs biography ‘Call Me Burroughs’ is an extensive, fascinating biography of the ‘Naked Lunch’ author, including the William Tell shooting death of his wife and his life as countercultural spokesman.

February 05, 2014|By Jim Ruland
  • Cover of the book "Call Me Burroughs" by Barry Miles.
Cover of the book “Call Me Burroughs” by Barry Miles. (Twelve )

William S. Burroughs’ “Naked Lunch” stands with Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road” and Allen Ginsburg’s “Howl” as the seminal texts of the Beat Generation. With its harrowing scenes of junkie depravity, its view of postwar America was the most extreme of all the Beats. Yet few American literary figures have enjoyed more second acts than Burroughs. He was spokesman for the countercultural movement in the ’70s, begrudgingly bore the label Godfather of Punk in the ’80s, and was a spoken-word performer and visual artist until his death in 1997.

Barry Miles’ new biography, “Call Me Burroughs,” begins with the invention of the adding machine in 1888, which brought fortune to the Burroughs family and provided young master Bill a sizable allowance that he enjoyed until he was 50. Nice work if you can get it.

Wealthy or not, the 20th century childhood of a sensitive gay man was rarely easy, but Burroughs was fortunate to have received his awakening early. Alert to their son’s sensitivities, his parents sent him to an experimental school in northern New Mexico where the great outdoors was as much a part of the curriculum as French, Latin and Greek.

It was an all-boys school with an all-male staff that provided Bill with plenty of opportunities to confirm what he already knew about his sexual orientation. Getting caught resulted in immediate expulsion. Some semesters more teachers than students were sent home. The school was shut down when the government bought the land to build the Los Alamos National Laboratory, birthplace of the atom bomb. “It seemed to me right, somehow,” Burroughs quipped

#william.s.burroughs#Call Me Burroughs#biography#bool#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com

Togetherness

Standard

Togetherness

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Louisa_May_Alcott.jpg  little

 

Louis May Alcott’s father suffered a stroke in 1888, and she arrived at his bedside on March 2, just two days before he died.

She said, “Father, here is your Louy, what are you thinking as you lie here so happily?”

He said, “I am going up. Come with me.

She said, “Oh, I wish I could.”

She did: She died four days later, on March 6.

#louis_may_alcott#author#writer#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com#little_woman

Charles Bukowski – Poems Insults!

Standard

 

Charles Bukowski – Poems Insults! – Live Reading City Lights

buk1

https://youtu.be/61t-Smksvvc

#ana_christy#bukowski#writer#poet#beatnikhiway.com

 

The ORIGINAL BEATS outtakes: HERBERT HUNCKE

Standard

 

The ORIGINAL BEATS outtakes: HERBERT HUNCKE

Published on Mar 10, 2012

Never seen before outtakes from the film of Francois Bernadi

HERBERT HUNCKE AT THE CHELSEA HOTEL 1994

 

ana-christy#herbert_huncke#beatnikhiway.com#counterculture#junkie

Andy Warhol & William S. Burroughs Have Dinner At The Chelsea Hotel

Standard

andy1 andy2

https://youtu.be/LlH7xKXvVRY

Andy Warhol & William S. Burroughs Have Dinner At The Chelsea Hotel

#andy_Warhol#William_burroughs##artist_ana_christy_video#chelsez_hotel_beatnikhiway.com

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TRUMAN CAPOTE Born: September 30, 1924, New Orleans, LA

Standard

Truman Capote Facts

truman

#Truman Capote was an American writer best known for his true crime novel In Cold Blood and his novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s. He was born Truman Streckfus Persons on September 30th, 1924 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Lillie Mae Faulk and Archulus Persons, a salesman. When he was four his parents divorced and he went to live with relatives in Monroeville, Alabama where he became friends with future author Harper Lee. Truman began writing fiction when he was 11 and was often seen carrying a notebook and dictionary with him. His mother remarried and the family moved around from Monroeville, to New York City, to Greenwich, Connecticut, and then back to New York City. Truman graduated from the Dwight School in 1943 and began working at The New Yorker. He returned to Alabama within 2 years and began writing his first novel.
Interesting Truman Capote Facts:
Truman Capote’s friend Harper Lee went on to write the book To Kill a Mockingbird, which won her a Pulitzer Prize in 1961.
Truman’s name was changed to Truman Garcia Capote in 1935 when his mother married Joseph Capote, and he adopted Truman as his own son.
Truman’s mother was emotionally abusive to him once they moved to New York City following her second marriage. She alternated between being kind or cruel to him, depending on her mood.
While in school some of Truman’s teachers encouraged him to pursue writing, believing that he had talent.
Truman did not see the point in attending a post-secondary institution, believing that he was either a good writer or he wasn’t. He didn’t believe that school could teach him to be good.
While working at The New Yorker Truman tried to get his work published but had no success. He quit and returned to Alabama to write his first novel Summer Crossing. The book was set aside and was not published until 2005.
Truman Capote’s first successful works were short stories. In 1945 his story Miriam was published in Mademoiselle and a fiction editor at Harper’s Bazaar noticed his work and his writing career had begun. He won the O. Henry Award for Miriam.
His first published novel was Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948). The book sold well despite Capote being a new author.
Truman Capote’s second published novel The Grass Harp was published in 1951 and a Broadway producer asked Truman to adapt it for stage. It opened in 1952 and ran for 36 performances.
Truman Capote wrote several screenplays including Beat the Devil and The Innocents.
Truman developed friendships with several well-known people including Jacki Kennedy and Gloria Guinness.
Breakfast at Tiffany’s was published in 1958 and later became one of Hollywood’s most beloved films.
Truman Capote began working on In Cold Blood with Harper Lee, which began as a story for The New Yorker, and evolved into a book. It was an instant bestseller when it was released in 1965. The book was a true crime book and Truman and Harper attended the trial. Truman and Harper interviewed the suspected killers during research for the book.
It is believed that the dark nature of In Cold Blood took its toll on Truman Capote, who began drinking too much and taking drugs.
Truman Capote died on August 25th, 1984 at the age of 59. He had liver cancer. He died in Bel Air, Los Angeles. His ashes were scattered at crooked Pond in Southampton, New York. # ana christy