Tag Archives: 1960’s

Behind the Scenes at Andy Warhol’s Silver Factory

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Art & Photography / In Pictures

Behind the Scenes at Andy Warhol’s Silver Factory

Warhol’s one-time lover and unofficial Factory photographer, Billy Name, offers an exclusive glimpse into New York’s underground art scene

Name not only documented the Factory, but also played a pivotal role in constructing it. Previously a lighting designer, his first encounter with amphetamines was instrumental in the birth of his signature silver interior decorating style, and he employed it with abandon in the film and theatre sets he worked on throughout the 1960s. As Glenn O’Brien remembers in his introduction to the book: “One day Ondine gave Billy some amphetamines. Billy recalled, ‘All of a sudden I had energy to get up off the floor and start doing things.’ One of the first things Billy did was redecorate the apartment as an artwork, turning the whole thing silver with aluminum foil and spray paint.”

When Warhol visited Name’s apartment to attend one of his famous hair-cutting parties soon afterwards – Name’s father had been a barber – he invited Name to recreate the style at his new loft, a former hat factory on East 47th Street. “Andy didn’t just see a guy’s place and think, ‘That’s a real kook – he’s got foil all over the place,’” Name recalls. “He saw that I had done an installation.”

Name duly hung the walls with aluminium foil, and sprayed everything with Krylon paint. The Silver Factory was born. “It was like constructing this environment,” he said. “For me the whole place was a sculpture. And each time I added a piece to it was like adding another gem to the collection. I never did a specifically articulated thing. I always did a maximal job, but it was the same art thing, it was the same signature, or my tag; the whole silver thing.”

The silver of the factory walls reverberates in Name’s photography – a seemingly never-ending series of lunar faces peering out from between the Factory walls; building installations, making prints, or having parties. “I’m very much interested in portraiture, not only of people but of space, or people in spaces,” he says in the book. “When I take a picture I’m usually looking at a certain structural composition of the whole thing that is going on live, and when it’s just perfect my finger pushes the button… The camera, when I first started using it, wasn’t just about snapshots. I could see things that were matched to my aesthetic framework in that click.”

His singular portraits epitomise Warhol’s golden age and all of the characters who contributed to it, many of whom – Brigid Berlin, Gerard Malanga, Viva, Mary Woronov – have also been involved in the creation of Name’s new book. Flicking through it almost feels like disappearing momentarily into the alternative universe of the Silver Factory; Name and his contemporaries’ memories accompany the photographs, animating the oft-captured faces of Edie Sedgwick, Nico and Brigid Berlin with a new and utterly compelling fervour. Above all, his extensive archive serves to remind us of how extraordinary this era really was.

Billy Name: The Silver Age is available now, published by Reel Art Press. The series will be available to view at at Serena Morton in London from September 30th until October 23rd.

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New Yorks bohemian Greenwich Village.

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Published on Jun 17, 2015

Beatniks, Counterculture and Bohemian life in the sixties.

In this short compelling documentary from 1961, we’re taken back to the thriving cultural life of New Yorks bohemian Greenwich Village.

From The Prelinger Archives
Greenwich Village Sunday
Producer: Stewart Wilensky
Music: Charles Mills
https://archive.org/details/Greenwic1960

COOL PEOPLE-BOBBY DARIN

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The LegendaryBobby Darin


Bobby Darin Biography
Film Actor, Singer (1936–1973
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NAME
Bobby Darin
OCCUPATION
Film Actor, Singer
BIRTH DATE
May 14, 1936
DEATH DATE
December 20, 1973
PLACE OF BIRTH
The Bronx, New York
PLACE OF DEATH
Los Angeles, California
ORIGINALLY
Walden Robert Cassotto

The Legendary
Bobby Darin

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Bobby Darin was an American singer, songwriter and actor who became a ubiquitous presence in pop entertainment in the late 1950s and 1960s.

QUOTES
“My goal is to be remembered as a human being and as a great performer.”
—Bobby Darin

Bobby Darin – Splish Splash Singer (TV-14; 1:12) Watch a short video about Bobby Darin and find out what tragic historical event sent this singer into seclusion.
Synopsis

Born in 1936, Bobby Darin moved from performing in New York City coffeehouses into recording in the late 1950s. In 1958, “Splish Splash,” a novelty song he wrote relatively quickly, became an international hit. He then recorded adult-oriented tracks, hitting it big with “Mack the Knife” and earning two Grammys. He died on December 20, 1973 in Los Angeles, and posthumously entered the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame decades later.

Challenging Childhood

Born on May 14, 1936, in the Bronx, New York, entertainer Bobby Darin reached the heights of fame in his all-too-brief life. He grew up poor in New York City. Throughout his childhood, Darin was told that his parents were Sam and Polly Cassotto. Sam Cassotto had been an associate of crime boss Frank Costello and had died in Sing Sing Prison. Polly, a former vaudeville performer, encouraged young Bobby to become a star like Frank Sinatra.

In fact, Darin was actually the Cassottos’ grandson. His real mother was Nina Cassotto, the woman he grew up believing was his sister. Nina had gotten pregnant as an unwed teenager, and she and Polly decided that it would be better if Polly assumed the role of mother. While he later learned the truth about his mother, Darin never discovered who his father really was.

Darin was a thin, sickly child. Several bouts of rheumatic fever had permanently damaged his heart, and he was plagued by other health problems as well. Around the age of 6 or 7, Darin overheard a doctor’s grim prognosis for him. The doctor said he didn’t expect Darin to live past the age of 16. Rather than depress him, these words seemed to serve as an inspiration for Darin.

Early Ambitions

Well versed in several instruments, Darin started out as playing in a band in high school. One of his first gigs was a school dance. At 16, he and his band mates landed a job at a Catskills resort for the summer. Darin showed a knack not just for music but comedy as well. After high school, he briefly attended Hunter College. Darin launched his professional music career writing songs for the Aldon Music label and eventually landed his own record contract with Atco.

In 1958, Darin made it big with the lighthearted catchy rock tune “Splish Splash”—a song he wrote that reached the Top 5 of the pop charts. He quickly became one of the teen idols of the era with such songs as “Queen of the Hop.” Darin, however, proved himself to be more than another Dion or Frankie Avalon. In 1959, he scored big with two songs, “Dream Lover” and “Mack the Knife,” the latter of which was his first No. 1 hit on the Billboard charts and won him a Grammy Award for record of the year. Darin also won a Grammy for best new artist.

Top Entertainer

Darin continued to enjoy great popularity in the early 1960s. Moving from the concert stage to the big screen, he starred in the romantic comedy Come September (1961) with Rock Hudson, Gina Lollobrigida and Sandra Dee. Darin and Dee were a celebrity couple off-screen as well, having eloped together the previous year.

Trying his hand at a musical, he starred with Pat Boone and Ann-Margret in State Fair (1962). Darin went on to earn an Academy Award nomination for his work in 1963’s Captain Newman, M.D.. This World War II film stars Gregory Peck, Tony Curtis and Angie Dickinson.

Around this time, Darin also established himself as one of the top acts in Las Vegas. He became a popular crooner, not unlike his hero Frank Sinatra. Yet Darin drew inspiration from a broader musical background and was a more restless and ambitious performer. Darin became such a force in Las Vegas that he reportedly even helped Wayne Newton get his career off the ground there.

On the music charts, Darin enjoyed such hits as “Beyond the Sea” and “You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby.” He even had success with his take on country music with “Things” and “You’re the Reason I’m Living.” A song he wrote for his wife Sandra Dee, “18 Yellow Roses,” also proved to be a hit with fans.

Final Years

Darin had his last major hit in 1966 with his take on the folk song “If I Were a Carpenter.” Around this time, his marriage to actress Sandra Dee came to end. The couple had one son named Dodd together before splitting up.

As music tastes were changing, Darin himself seemed to be evolving. He became more politically and campaigned on behalf of Robert F. Kennedy during his 1968 presidential bid. Kennedy’s assassination that June was a devastating blow to Darin. Around this time, he opened his own label Direction Records and continued to explore his interest in folk music and protest songs. Darin wrote “Simple Song of Freedom,” which became a hit for Tim Hardin.

In the early 1970s, Darin signed with Motown Records. His later efforts failed to attract much of an audience, but he still remained popular with his live act in Las Vegas. Darin’s heart problems finally caught up with him. On December 20, 1973, he died of heart failure in Hollywood, California. Darin was only 37 years old at the time. He was survived by his second wife Andrea Joy Yeager, whom he had married the previous year, and his son Dodd.

While he may be gone, Darin’s music still lives on. His songs have appeared on numerous film and television soundtracks, including Goodfellas, American Beauty and The Sopranos. Actor Kevin Spacey helped bring Darin’s life story to the big screen in Beyond the Sea in 2004. Spacey starred and directed the project and served as its co-writer as well.

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Citation Information

Article Title

Bobby Darin Biography
Author

Biography.com Editors
Website Name

The Biography.com website
URL

http://www.biography.com/people/bobby-darin-9266149

Visit the Site Index

Check Here For What’s New

“My goal is to be remembered
as a human being and as a great
performer.”
– Bobby Darin –

BOBBY’S ON FACEBOOK

BOBBY DARIN HONORED WITH GRAMMY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

A SPECIAL LETTER OF GRATITUDE FROM DODD

NOMINATE BOBBY FOR A US POSTAGE STAMP

PLEASE SIGN THE GUEST BOOK

“The Bobby Darin Show” DVD

“Seeing Is Believing”  DVD

“Aces Back to Back” DVD/CD

“Songs from Big Sur” CD

Jimmy Scalia, Official Darin Archivist

#bobby_darin#singer#pop#bio#music#1960#1970#beatnikhiway.com#ana_christy#heartthrob

 

 

NEW YORK CITY IN THE 60’S

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TO SET THE MOOD -Bryan Adams – Summer Of 69 Live

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https://youtu.be/NgpcwYooLO0

Amazing Photographs Of The Summer Of 1969 In New York

Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick

David McCabe, Andy Warhol & Edie Sedgwick with Empire State Building New York, 1964. C-print. 47.5 x 33.5 cm.

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COOL PEOPLE – THE BEATLES BIO AND IN PICTURES

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THE BEATLES “IN MY LIFE”

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BEATLES HITS

The Beatles

Biography

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Bruce McBroom/ ©Apple Corps Ltd.

No band has influenced pop culture the way the Beatles have. They were one of the best things to happen in the twentieth century, let alone the Sixties. They were youth personified. They were unmatched innovators who were bigger than both Jesus and rock & roll itself: During the week of April 4, 1964, the #Beatles held the first five slots on the Billboard Singles chart; they went on to sell more than a billion records; and 2000’s 1, a compilation of the Beatles Number One hits, hit Number One in 35 countries and went on to become the best-selling album of the 2000s.

Every record was a shock when it came out. Compared to rabid R&B evangelists like the Rolling Stones, the Beatles arrived sounding like nothing else. They had already absorbed Buddy Holly, the Everly Brothers and Chuck Berry, but they were also writing their own songs. They made writing your own material expected, rather than exceptional. As musicians, the Beatles proved that rock & roll could embrace a limitless variety of harmonies, structures, and sounds; virtually every rock experiment has some precedent on Beatles records. As a unit the Beatles were a synergistic combination: Paul McCartney’s melodic bass lines, Ringo Starr’s slaphappy no-rolls drumming, George Harrison’s rockabilly-style guitar leads, John Lennon’s assertive rhythm guitar — and their four fervent voices. As personalities, they defined and incarnated Sixties style: smart, idealistic, playful, irreverent, eclectic. Their music, from the not-so-simple love songs they started with to their later perfectionistic studio extravaganzas, set new standards for both commercial and artistic success in pop.

#Lennon was performing with his amateur skiffle group the Quarrymen at a church picnic on July 6, 1957, in the Liverpool suburb of Woolton when he met McCartney, whom he later invited to join his group; soon they were writing songs together, such as “The One After 909.” By the year’s end #McCartney had convinced Lennon to let Harrison join their group, the name of which was changed to Johnny and the Moondogs in 1958. In 1960 an art-school friend of Lennon’s, Stu Sutcliffe, became their bassist. Sutcliffe couldn’t play a note but had recently sold one of his paintings for a considerable sum, which the group, now rechristened the Silver Beetles (from which “Silver” was dropped a few months later, and “Beetles” amended to “Beatles”), used to upgrade its equipment.

##Tommy Moore was their drummer until Pete Best replaced him in August 1960. Once Best had joined, the band made its first of four trips to Hamburg, Germany. In December Harrison was deported back to England for being underage and lacking a work permit, but by then their 30-set weeks on the stages of Hamburg beer houses had honed and strengthened their repertoire (mostly #Chuck Berry, ##Little Richard, #Carl Perkins, and #Buddy Holly covers), and on February 21, 1961, they debuted at the #Cavern club on Mathew Street in #Liverpool, beginning a string of nearly 300 performances there over the next couple of years.

In April 1961 they again went to Hamburg, where Sutcliffe (the first of the Beatles to wear his hair in the long, shaggy style that came to be known as the Beatle haircut) left the group to become a painter, while McCartney switched from rhythm guitar to bass. The Beatles returned to Liverpool as a quartet in July. Sutcliffe died from a brain hemorrhage in Hamburg less than a year later.

The Beatles had been playing regularly to packed houses at the Cavern when they were spotted on November 9 by Brian Epstein (b. Sep. 19, 1934, Liverpool). After being discharged from the British Army on medical grounds, Epstein had attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London for a year before returning to Liverpool to manage his father’s record store.

The request he received for a German import single entitled “My Bonnie” (which the Beatles had recorded a few months earlier in Hamburg, backing singer Tony Sheridan and billed as the Beat Brothers) convinced him to check out the group. Epstein was surprised to discover not only that the Beatles weren’t German but that they were one of the most popular local bands in Liverpool. Within two months he became their manager. Epstein cleaned up their act, eventually replacing black leather jackets, tight jeans, and pompadours with collarless gray Pierre Cardin suits and mildly androgynous haircuts.

Epstein tried landing the Beatles a record contract, but nearly every label in Europe rejected the group. In May 1962, however, producer George Martin (b. Jan. 3, 1926, North London, Eng.) signed the group to EMI’s Parlophone subsidiary. Pete Best, then considered the group’s undisputed sex symbol, was asked to leave the group on August 16, 1962, and Ringo Starr, drummer with a popular Liverpool group, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, was added, just in time for the group’s first recording session. On September 11 the Beatles cut two originals, “Love Me Do” b/w “P.S. I Love You,” which became their first U.K. Top 20 hit in October. In early 1963 “Please Please Me” went to Number Two, and they recorded an album of the same name in one 10-hour session on February 11, 1963. With the success of their third English single, “From Me to You” (Number One), the British record industry coined the term “Merseybeat” (after the river that runs through Liverpool) for groups such as the Beatles and Gerry and the Pacemakers, Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas, and the Searchers.

By mid-year the Beatles were given billing over Roy Orbison on a national tour, and the hysterical outbreaks of Beatlemania had begun. Following their first tour of Europe in October, they moved to London with Epstein. Constantly mobbed by screaming fans, the Beatles required police protection almost any time they were seen in public. Late in the year “She Loves You” became the biggest-selling single in British history (in the years since, only six other singles have sold more copies there). In November 1963 the group performed before the Queen Mother at the Royal Command Variety Performance.

EMI’s American label, Capitol, had not released the group’s 1963 records (which Martin licensed to independents like Vee-Jay and Swan with little success) but was finally persuaded to release its fourth single, “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” and Meet the Beatles (identical to the Beatles’ second British album, With the Beatles) in January 1964 and to invest $50,000 in promotion for the then unknown British act. The album and the single became the Beatles’ first U.S. chart-toppers. On February 7 screaming mobs met them at New York City’s Kennedy Airport, and more than 70 million people watched each of their appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9 and 16. In April 1964 “Can’t Buy Me Love” became the first record to top American and British charts simultaneously, and that same month the Beatles held the top five positions on Billboard singles chart (“Can’t Buy Me Love,” “Twist and Shout,” “She Loves You,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” “Please Please Me”).

Their first movie,# A Hard Day’s Night (directed by Richard Lester), opened in America in August; it grossed $1.3 million in its first week. The band was aggressively merchandised – Beatle wigs, Beatle clothes, Beatle dolls, lunch boxes, a cartoon series — from which, because of Epstein’s ineptitude at business, the band made surprisingly little money. The Beatles also opened the American market to such British Invasion groups as the Dave Clark Five, the Rolling Stones, and the Kinks.

By 1965 Lennon and McCartney rarely wrote songs together, although by contractual and personal agreement songs by either of them were credited to both. The Beatles toured Europe, North America, the Far East, and Australia that year. Their second movie, #Help! (also directed by Lester), was filmed in England, Austria, and the Bahamas in the spring and opened in the U.S. in August. On August 15 they performed to 55,600 fans at New York’s Shea Stadium, setting a record for largest concert audience. McCartney’s “Yesterday” (Number One, 1965) would become one of the most often covered songs ever written.

In June the #Queen of England had announced that the Beatles would be awarded the MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire). The announcement sparked some controversy — some MBE holders returned their medal — but on October 26, 1965, the ceremony took place at Buckingham Palace. (Lennon returned his medal in 1969 as an antiwar gesture. Interestingly, even though he rejected the medal, the honor itself cannot be returned; Lennon technically remained an MBE.)

With 1965’s Rubber Soul, the Beatles’ ambitions began to extend beyond love songs and pop formulas. Their success led adults to consider them, along with #Bob Dylan, spokesmen for youth culture, and their lyrics grew more poetic and somewhat more political.

In summer 1966 controversy erupted when a remark Lennon had made to a British newspaper reporter months before was widely reported in the U.S. The quote — “Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue with that; I’m right and will be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now” — incited denunciations and Beatles record bonfires. The anti-Beatles backlash was particularly intense in the U.S., where the group was set to begin a tour just two weeks after the controversy erupted, and included death threats against the group. Largely out of concern for the safety of his fellow band members, Lennon apologized at a Chicago press conference.

The Beatles gave up touring after an August 29, 1966, concert at San Francisco’s #Candlestick Park and made the rest of their music in the studio, where they had begun to experiment with exotic instrumentation (“Norwegian Wood,” 1965, had featured sitar) and tape abstractions such as the reversed tracks on “Rain.” “Strawberry Fields Forever,” part of a double-sided single released in February 1967 to fill the unusually long gap between albums, featured an astonishing display of electronically altered sounds and hinted at what was to come. With “Taxman” and “Love You To” on Revolver, Harrison began to emerge as a songwriter.

It took four months and $75,000 to record #Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band using a then state-of-the-art four-track tape recorder and building each cut layer by layer. Released in June 1967, it was hailed as serious art for its “concept” and its range of styles and sounds, a lexicon of pop and electronic noises; such songs as “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” and “A Day in the Life” were carefully examined for hidden meanings. The album spent 15 weeks at Number One (longer than any of their others) and has sold over 8 million copies. On June 25, 1967, the Beatles recorded their new single, “All You Need Is Love,” before an international television audience of 400 million, as part of a broadcast called Our World.

On August 27, 1967 – while the four were in Wales beginning their six-month involvement with @##Transcendental Meditation and the Maharishi #Mahesh Yogi (which took them to India for two months in early 1968) — Epstein died alone in his London flat from an overdose of sleeping pills, later ruled accidental. Shaken by Epstein’s death, the Beatles retrenched under McCartney’s leadership in the fall and filmed #Magical Mystery Tour, which was aired by BBC-TV on December 26, 1967, and later released in the U.S. as a feature film. Although the telefilm was panned by British critics, fans, and Queen Elizabeth herself, the soundtrack album contained their most cryptic work yet in “#I Am the Walrus,” a Lennon composition.

As the Beatles’ late-1967 single “Hello Goodbye” went to Number One in both the U.S. and Britain, the group launched the Apple clothes boutique in London. McCartney called the retail effort “Western communism”; the boutique closed in July 1968. Like their next effort, Apple Corps Ltd. (formed in January 1968 and including Apple Records, which signed James Taylor, Mary Hopkin, and Badfinger), it was plagued by mismanagement. In July the group faced its last hysterical crowds at the premiere of Yellow Submarine, an animated film by Czech avant-garde designer and artist Heinz Edelmann featuring four new Beatles songs; a revised soundtrack featuring nine extra songs was released in 1999 (Number 15).

In August they released McCartney’s “Hey Jude” (Number One), backed by Lennon’s “Revolution” (Number 12), which sold over 6 million copies before the end of 1968 — their most popular single. Meanwhile, the group had been working on the double album The Beatles (frequently called the White Album), which showed their divergent directions. The rifts were artistic — Lennon moving toward brutal confessionals, McCartney leaning toward pop melodies, Harrison immersed in Eastern spirituality — and personal, as Lennon drew closer to his wife-to-be, Yoko Ono. Lennon and Ono’sTwo Virgins (with its full frontal and back nude cover photos) was released the same month as The Beatles and stirred up so much outrage that the LP had to be sold wrapped in brown paper. (The Beatles, went to Number One, Two Virgins peaked at Number 124.)

The Beatles attempted to smooth over their differences in early 1969 at filmed recording sessions. When the project fell apart hundreds of hours of studio time later, no one could face editing the tapes (a project that eventually fell to record producer Phil Spector), and “Get Back” (Number One, 1969) was the only immediate release. Released in spring 1970, Let It Be is essentially a documentary of their breakup, including an impromptu January 30, 1969, rooftop concert at Apple Corps headquarters, their last public performance as the Beatles.

By spring 1969 Apple was losing thousands of pounds each week. Over McCartney’s objections, the other three brought in manager Allen Klein to straighten things out; one of his first actions was to package nonalbum singles as Hey Jude. With money matters temporarily out of mind, the four joined forces in July and August 1969 to record Abbey Road, featuring an extended suite as well as more hits, including Harrison’s much-covered “Something” (Number Three, 1969). While its release that fall spurred a “Paul Is Dead” rumor based on clues supposedly left throughout their work, Abbey Road became the Beatles’ best-selling album, at 9 million copies. Meanwhile, internal bickering persisted. In September Lennon told the others, “I’m leaving the group. I’ve had enough. I want a divorce.” But he was persuaded to keep quiet while their business affairs were untangled. On April 10, 1970, McCartney released his first solo album and publicly announced the end of the Beatles. At the same time, Let It Be finally surfaced, becoming the group’s 14th Number One album (a postbreakup compilation would become their 15th in 1973) and yielding the Beatles’ 18th and 19th chart-topping singles, “Let It Be” and “The Long and Winding Road.”

Throughout the Seventies, as repackages of Beatles music continued to sell, the four were hounded by bids and pleas for a reunion. Lennon’s murder by a mentally disturbed fan on December 8, 1980, ended those speculations. In 1988 the Beatles were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. McCartney, citing business conflicts with the two other surviving members, did not attend. Relations between him and Harrison, in particular, had been strained for some time.

In January 1994 Goldmine magazine reported that McCartney, Harrison, and #Starr had begun recording music for a long-rumored Beatles documentary the previous August, with more secret sessions scheduled. There were other signs that the three band members were on the mend — when Lennon was inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist in 1994, for instance, McCartney did the honors (McCartney himself was inducted in 1999). Later in 1994 Live at the BBC was released, featuring 56 songs the Beatles performed on the British radio between 1962 and 1965. It debuted at Number One in the U.K.; in the U.S., it debuted and peaked at Number Three.

#The Beatles Anthology, the long-awaited six-hour television special, was broadcast over three nights in November 1995, coinciding with the release of the George Martin-compiled double-CD Anthology 1 (Number One), which featured alternate takes, demos, and rare tracks, and premiered the first new song by John, Paul, George, and Ringo since 1970. “Free as a Bird” (Number Six, 1995), a demo recorded by Lennon in 1977, was completed by the other three and produced by Jeff Lynne; it became the Beatles 34th Top 10 single. Lennon’s lyrics didn’t extend much beyond the title, and so Harrison and McCartney collaborated on lyrics for a new bridge.

Two additional double CDs, Anthology 2 and 3 (both Number One), followed in 1996, as well as an extended videotape version of the documentary. Anthology 2‘s “Real Love” (again a Lennon demo, from 1979, with modern additions by the others) reached Number 11 and became the group’s 23rd gold single (the most of any group).

The Liverpool juggernaut continued to roll on in 2000: the Beatles became the highest certified act of all time, with over 113 million albums sold in America (which grew to 170 million albums in 2008); a coffee table book, The Beatles Anthology, topped the New York Times bestseller list; and 1, a collection of the band’s Number One hit songs, became the Beatles’ 19th chart-topping album, selling 25 million copies by 2005.

On November 29, 2001, George Harrison, diagnosed with lung cancer in the late 1990s, became the second Beatle to pass away. Three years later Capitol Records released all of the Beatles’ U.S. albums (in both stereo and original mono versions) as two box sets, The Capitol Albums, Vols. 1 and 2. In 2006, George Martin and his son Giles produced a set of Beatles remixes, Love, for the soundtrack to Cirque du Soleil’s theater production of the same name. The following year, McCartney and Starr appeared on CNN’s Larry King Live to talk about the project; they joined Beatles widows Ono and Olivia Harrison in Las Vegas to celebrate the Love production’s first anniversary.

Until 2007, the Beatles’ #Apple Corp. was in legal limbo with the Apple, Inc. computer company over use of the name. Apple Corp. had sued Apple, Inc. after the computer company opened its online iTunes music store; one result of the suit was that the Beatles’ group and solo music was not made available for digital download. In February 2007, the two sides came to an agreement. Apple, Inc. would retain ownership of the name and license it back to the Apple Corp. record label. By October, all of the Beatles’ solo works were available on iTunes, but as of early 2010 the Beatles catalogue was still not available on iTunes.

September 9, 2009 was a day of 21st century Beatlemania: Apple/EMI released remastered versions of the band’s studio albums, with dramatically improved sound. (Mono versions were also available, though only as a box.) Also that day, The Beatles Rock Band video game hit shelves, featuring 45 Beatle songs; by the end of 2009, it had sold more than one million copies worldwide.

McCartney and Starr continued to tour and record throughout the 2000s. McCartney, who is reportedly a billionaire, released three solo albums during the decade as well as three live albums, including Good Evening New York City, which documented the inaugural concerts at New York’s Citi Field in 2009. Starr released three albums in the 2000s, as well as 2010’s Y Not. He appeared with McCartney at several events, including 2002’s Concert for George, a charitable event held on the first anniversary of Harrison’s death.

Portions of this biography appeared in The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll (Simon & Schuster, 2001).

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Popular Automobiles of the 60s Decade

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Popular Automobiles of the 60s Decade

 Cartoon Car


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1966 Ford Mustang - Image 3 of 13                                                                                                               1966 Ford Mustang
Schrecks-photo-template-convertibles- Schrecks-photo-template-60s-cars

The 60s was a great decade for automobiles not only because I grew up during that era but because they were cool and practical. Automobiles of the 60s were made for cruisin’. You could pile in all your buddies and collect 50 cents from each of them and because gas at that time was around 30 cents a gallon, you could cruise half the night. You make a run to the hangout then to the pizza joint and down Main Street USA making your stops and verbal jibes at all the people you know. You peeled rubber to show off (except if you had a Corvair.) I had a buddy who had a Corvair and I can’t remember if ever that car peeled rubber and it was a standard which should have made it easier. I characterized the Corvair as one of the worst cars of the 60s although it was very popular at the time.

 If anybody still has their old car from this era please email mewebmaster@the60sofficialsite.com  and I will include its picture on the site. Any memories of 60s cruising or a special car leave a comment in the  Guestbook.

  Do you remember the old Pontiac Service Sign?

Chief Pontiac Service Center Logo

 

 

Submitted by Thumpa Clift.

US musician Phil Everly dies aged 74

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4 January 2014 Last updated at 02:34 ET

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“ALL I NEED TO DO IS DREAM”

http://youtu.be/lTYe9eDqxe8

“LET IT BE ME”

.http://youtu.be/4d1ig-dYuLk

US musician Phil Everly dies aged 74

Phil (left) and Don’s hits included Bye Bye Love, Wake Up Little Suzie and All I Have To Do Is Dream

US musician Phil Everly, one half of the Everly Brothers, has died, aged 74, in California, his family says.

Everly died in the Los Angeles suburb of Burbank of complications from lung disease, his wife, Patti, told the Los Angeles Times.

“We are absolutely heartbroken,” she said, adding that the disease was the result of a lifetime of smoking.

Phil Everly and his brother Don made up the Everly Brothers, one of the biggest pop acts of the 1950s and early 1960s.

They had a string of close-harmony hits including Wake Up Little Suzie, Cathy’s Clown, Bye Bye Love, and All I Have To Do Is Dream.

“It’s a terrible, terrible loss – for me, for everybody,” US rock pioneer Duane Eddy, a friend of Everly, told BBC Radio 5live.

Infamous

Guitarist and friend Duane Eddy: Death of Phil Everly is “a huge blow”

Everly died on Friday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his son Jason Everly told AP.

The Washington Post quoted a woman at Don Everly’s home as saying he was too upset to talk about the death of his brother. “He expected to go first,” she told the newspaper.

Rolling Stone magazine calls the Everly Brothers “the most important vocal duo in rock”.

In its biography of the pair, the magazine says Phil and his older brother Don were the children of Midwestern country music singers Ike and Margaret Everly and performed on the family radio show while growing up.

In their heyday between 1957 and 1962, the Everly Brothers had 19 Top 40 hits, according to the Associated Press. They influenced acts such as the Beatles and the Beach Boys.

The pair had an onstage breakup in 1973 that led to a decade-long estrangement, but Phil later told Time magazine the brothers’ relationship had survived this.

“Don and I are infamous for our split,” Phil said, “but we’re closer than most brothers.”

The Everly Brothers were elected to the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame in its first year, 1986, and they were given a lifetime achievement award at the Grammys in 1997.

Among the musicians paying tribute to the singer and guitarist, was singer-songwriter Charlie Daniels, who tweeted: “Rest in peace Phil Everly. You guys brought us a lot of pleasure back in the day.”

1967 THE BEAT SCENE-WRITERS

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Richard Brautigan.  Trout Fishing in America..
Trout Fishing in America
Richard Brautigan
RICHARD BRAUTIGAN WAS another member of the Beat scene of San Francisco in the fifties and is often considered a bridge between the decades. He became, with the publication of Trout Fishing in America, one of the most popular of the counterculture writers of the sixties. He is often thought of as a modern Thoreau; his love of nature and his concern for the environment are recurring themes in his works‚in one sequence he writes of sections of a trout stream being sold in a junkyard for $6.50 per foot. Written in 1961, Trout Fishing in America was finally published by the small Four Seasons Foundation in 1967, and was so popular that many of the communes that sprang up around the country were named after the novel. Thousands of copies of Trout Fishing in America were ordered for sporting goods stores in the mistaken belief that the book was about the subtle art of angling. Richard Brautigan died in 1984, an apparent suicide. Richard Brautigan.  Love Poem
Love Poem
Richard Brautigan
Richard Farina.  Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me Cover
Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me
Richard Farina
THOUGH RICHARD FARINA died young and his literary output was minimal, he was a larger-than-life figure whose writings and exploits entrenched him in the mythology of the sixties. Farina was of Irish and Cuban heritage; in the fifties he fought both with the Irish Republican Army in Ireland and Fidel Castro in the mountains of Cuba. He attended Cornell University, where Thomas Pynchon was his friend and roommate. Pynchon writes of the novel, “It’s been a while since I’ve read anything quite so groovy, quite such a joy from beginning to end.” Richard Farina died at the age of thirty in a motorcycle accident on his way to a publication party for this book.
Allen Ginsberg.  T.V. Baby Poems.
T.V. Baby Poems
Allen Ginsberg
JUST AS HE did for the Beat era, Allen Ginsberg, perhaps more than any other figure, helped to define and shape the aesthetics of the psychedelic sixties. He was one of the earliest experimenters with hallucinogenic drugs, having taken psilocybin mushrooms with Timothy Leary in 1960; he traveled in India, Nepal, and Japan, to study Eastern religions; his association with Bob Dylan purportedly helped transform Dylan from a one-dimensional protest singer into a modern poetic genius; and his participation in virtually every counterculture event from war protests to the various Love Ins, Acid Tests, and musical festivals made him one of the most influential figures of the era. T.V. Baby Poems is one of his many publications from the sixties.
Michael McClure. The Beard Cover
The Beard
Michael McClure
TROPIC OF CANCER and Naked Lunch had challenged literary censorship in America, but there would be many more in the new era of freedom of speech. Michael McClure was an integral member of the Beat scene in San Francisco in the fifties, (see page 31), and he segued easily into the new Psychedelic Era that was beginning to coalesce in San Francisco in the sixties. The Beard brought to the stage a raw, explicit look at sex, violence, and conventional morality, exploring a relationship between Billy the Kid and Jean Harlow in the afterlife. Performed in San Francisco in 1968, the cast members were arrested and jailed on fourteen consecutive nights, due to their depiction of simulated sex in the third act. Michael McClure continues to write plays, novels, and books of poetry.
 
Terry Southern.  Red Dirt Marijuana and Other Tastes.
Red Dirt Marijuana and Other Tastes
Terry Southern
TERRY SOUTHERN GAINED renown in the early sixties as a writer of controversial novels and screenplays. Candy, published in 1958 was one of the few novels in English ever banned in France on grounds of indecency, and The Magic Christian, published in 1960, was a brilliant, dark satire that Lenny Bruce called, “the funniest book I’ve ever read.” Stanley Kubrick tapped Southern to work on Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the bomb, a movie that film historian Robert Sklar said, “satirized the cold-war mentality and helped lay the groundwork for the 1960s counterculture.” Southern later collaborated with Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda on Easy Rider, a movie that became an instant counterculture classic.
 
Diane Di Prima.  The City of San Francisco Oracle.
The City of San Francisco Oracle
Allen Cohen, ed.
EVERY SUCCESSFUL SOCIAL movement needs a newspaper and the Oracle became the most important and influential of the serial publications to come out of the Haight Ashbury community. Allen Cohen, with financial backing from psychedelic entrepreneur, Ron Thelin, published the first issue of the Oracle in September 1966. Easily recognized by its psychedelic covers, the Oracle’s goal was, in the words of Cohen, “to judo the tabloid lowprice anguish propaganda and profit form to confront its readers with a rainbow of beauty and words ringing with truth and transcendence.” Vol. 1, no. 7. features Timothy Leary, Allen Ginsberg, Alan Watts, and Gary Snyder on the cover. The four had gathered for a “historic” meeting to discuss “the problem of whether to drop out or take over.”

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