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The Foundations of Punk Rock



The beginnings of punk rock are often furiously debated. This is partially because everyone has different definition of punk rock, and partially because its foundation stones are found in several places.




The Fugs – Second Album (Full Album)


oye isabel The Iguanas


The Troggs – Hit Single Anthology (Full Album)


The Sonics-1965 – Here Are The Sonics[Full Album]


The Velvet Underground & Nico Full Album (Stereo) [HQ]


Small Faces – Ogdens´ Nut Gone Flake – Full record


The Stooges – Fun House (Full Album)


Blondie – Rapture



“Punk Rock” was originally used to describe the garage musicians of the ’60’s. Bands like the Sonics were starting up and playing out with no musical or vocal instruction, and often limited skill.

Because they didn’t know the rules of music, they were able to break the rules.

The mid to late ’60s saw the appearance of the Stooges and the MC5 in Detroit. They were raw, crude and often political. Their concerts were often violent affairs, and they were opening the eyes of the music world.

The Velvet Underground is the next piece in the puzzle. The Velvet Underground, managed by Andy Warhol, were producing music that often bordered on noise. They were expanding the definitions of music without even realizing it.


The final primary influence is found in the foundations of Glam Rock. Artists like David Bowie and the New York Dolls were dressing outrageously, living extravagantly and producing loud trashy rock and roll.

Glam would end up splitting up its influence, doling out portions to hard rock, “hair metal” and punk rock.

New York: The First Punk Rock Scene

The first concrete punk rock scene appeared in the mid ’70s in New York. Bands like The Ramones, Wayne County, Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers, Blondie and the Talking Heads were playing regularly in the Bowery District, most notably at the legendary club CBGB.

The bands were unified by their location, camaraderie, and shared musical influences. They would all go on to develop their own styles and many would shift away from punk rock.

While the New York scene was reaching its heyday, punk was undergoing a separate creation story in London.

Meanwhile, Across the Pond

England’s punk scene had political and economic roots. The economy in the United Kingdom was in poor shape, and unemployment rates were at an all-time high. England’s youth were angry, rebellious and out of work. They had strong opinions and a lot of free time.
This is where the beginnings of punk fashion as we know it emerged, and they centered out of one shop.

The shop was simply called SEX, and it was owned by Malcolm McClaren.

Malcolm McClaren had recently returned to London from the U.S., where he had unsuccessfully tried to reinvent the New York Dolls to sell his clothing. He was determined to do it again, but this time looked to the youths who worked and hung out in his shop to be his next project. This project would become the Sex Pistols, and they would develop a large following very quickly.

Enter The Bromley Contingent

Among the fans of the Sex Pistols was an outrageous bunch of young punks known as the Bromley Contingent. Named after the neighborhood they all came from, they were at the first Sex Pistols shows, and quickly realized they could do it themselves.

Within a year, the Bromleys had formed a large portion of the London Punk scene, including The Clash, The Slits, Siouxsie & the Banshees, Generation X (fronted by a young Billy Idol) and X-Ray Spex. The British punk scene was now in full swing.


The Punk Rock Explosion

By the late ’70s, punk had finished its beginning and had emerged as a solid musical force. With its rise in popularity, punk began to split into numerous sub-genres. New musicians embraced the DIY movement and began to create their own individual scenes with specific sounds.

In order to better see the evolution of punk, check out all of the subgenres that punk split off into. It’s a list that’s constantly evolving, and it’s only a matter of time before more categories appear.
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Punk Music Expert
Updated July 03, 2014.
What is Hardcore?:







  • Albums







Mount Lehman Grease Band 
Notorious Smorg Brothers
Young Canadians


Early punk[edit]





  • Events


Punk rock[edit]


Fast, loud and furious – these are the elements of hardcore. From its inception in the late ‘70s, hardcore began to pick up the attitudes and messages employed by the first punk bands, setting them to driving guitar and drum lines that were more frenzied than those played by earlier bands that fell under the punk description. Faster and heavier than other contemporary punk bands, hardcore songs were often very short and very frenzied.

The Early Days of Hardcore:

At the beginning, hardcore punk was primarily a phenomenon in the states. Hardcore punk’s rise to popularity in the late ’70s and early ’80s happened in multiple cities throughout the U.S. almost simultaneously. Musicians that had been raised on heavy metal but were being influenced by punk were taking these two influences, combining them, and speeding them up into something exciting and unheard of.

At the same time, on opposite coasts, three bands help usher in the era of hardcore. LA’s Black Flag and Washington DC’s Minor Threat and Bad Brains were the primary pioneers of the hardcore sound, which also ushered in the era of slamdancing at punk rock shows.

While it had been around for a while at punk rock shows, the intensity of hardcore music really brought it into prominence.

Hardcore Breaks Out:

With the birth of these early scenes came a DIY ethic that allowed hardcore scenes to pop up all over. The Midwest was especially dense; In Detroit, Negative iApproach ruled the roost, in Lansing, Michigan, the Meatmen started a scene, and Minneapolis-St. Paul spawned the amazingly complex Husker Du, who mixed jazz, psychedelia, acoustic folk and pop in with their hardcore riffs.

It was true everywhere, though. Nevada had 7Seconds. New Jesey had the Misfits. Gang Green was raging in Boston. And New York was putting hardcore shows on by the Beastie Boys, a hardcore band that would later be better known as a rap outfit.

Once the sound began, it was impossible to put a lid on it. Essentially, any city or town large enough to have a scene seemed to have a hardcore scene, with its own chunk of local hardcore bands and local hardcore followers. This continues to be the case, and while it was (and continues to be) primarily popular in the U.S., hardcore scenes are evident all over the world.

While hardcore records are obviously an essential part of hardcore music, and without them we’d have no recorded history of the music, hardcore music and its encompassing scene was and is really about the hardcore show, where all of the DIY ethic comes together. Even now, hardcore house and club shows happen everywhere, with bands getting together to play out of basements and garages, selling self-recorded music and handmade t-shirts, and advertised by self-produced fliers.

Hardcore In The Mainstream Media:

From the early days, hardcore shows were misunderstood as violent affairs by the mainstream media. TV talk shows grabbed onto these shows as violent affairs, and TV dramas depicted them as dark violent events. The most famous is arguably the punk episode of Quincy M.E., which has spawned its own pop references in the punk scene, including a song and band name.



A Message?:

Hardcore music’s only unifying factor is its sound. The lyrics and messages vary from band to band. While some hardcore bands preach drug- and alcohol-free living (known as straightedge), other bands write songs that are all about partying. There are even Christian hardcore bands with a strong religious message.

What’s Next?:

Hardcore continues to be a subgenre of music with a strong following. While it paved the way for thrash metal and other heavy sounds, many of the early hardcore bands are still together and new bands rise up constantly. Along with the continuing tide of hardcore is a wave of bands known as post-hardcore bands, but that’s another story entirely.
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Review: If You Like The Ramones…
A solid cultural history revolving around one of punk’s most influential groups
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If You Like The Ramones… Backbeat Books

Ryan Cooper
Punk Music Expert When I was getting into punk rock, one of my first exposures to the sound was the Ramones. Short, fast repetitive tunes delivered with a deceptive simplicity, Ramones’ songs were stripped down and raw, delivered with a sublime sense of humor that paved the way for countless bands to follow.


At the same time, a common enough form of recommendation came from friends in the form of “If you like the Ramones, then you should check out out,” followed by the name of another band that delivered more short, fast raw punk rock.

It was a fast fun way to broaden my musical horizons. Decades later, writer and Chrome Cranks frontman (who is also responsible for influencing countless contemporaries) Peter Aaron has released, If You Like The Ramones… Here Are Over 200 Bands, CDs, Films and Other Oddities You’ll Love.

I was with eager anticipation that I tore into this book, expecting a collection of punk records I was already quite familiar with, anticipating a trip down memory lane along with the possibility of learning about other bands that I had missed.

And I was wrong. That’s not what this book is about at all. Or rather, that’s just a small part of what it’s about.

What Aaron has compiled is something much more ambitious and exciting, a book that serves as a resource on musical history that starts with a single influential band and uses it as a springboard for what came before, after, and at the same times.

Aaron recognizes that the Ramones weren’t born from a musical void, and that while they were pioneers of their specific sound, they were influenced in no small part by a wide range of bands.

He begins with the early roots of rock and roll, recognizing greats that don’t immediately leap to mind when thinking of the Ramones, like Bo Diddly and Buddy Holly, calling out their influence on rock in general, and the Ramones in particular. I was especially pleased to see his recognition of Eddie Cochran, a British rockabilly great with a tragically short career that I feel is all too often ignored for his influence on punk rock.

He calls out the more prominent influences on the Ramones as well – the girl groups and surf musicians that had a prominent effect on the band’s sounds, along with the British Invasion bands (and he’s not shy about recognizing the contributions of big names like The Beatles, Rolling Stones and The Who on the band) along with the American garage rockers (from prominent names like the Sonics to obscure bands like the Monks) who added one element to the group’s sound.

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By the time he calls out the band’s hard rock and glam influences (and relates the tale of Dust, a proto-metal band that featured the drummer who would become Marky Ramone years later), not only has it been a pleasant trip through musical history, but the hidden complexity of the band’s sound has been laid bare. Ramones songs may sound simple, but their foundations are anything but.

It’s over 100 pages into the book before he even touches upon the music that I had expected to comprise the majority of the book. This is when he reaches the punk era, exploring all of the Ramones’ contemporaries both stateside and abroad, giving a concise snapshot of the scene as it existed.

A good amount of attention is given to the fact that the Ramones weren’t solely influenced by music either, with a chapter devoted to their pop culture roots, calling out the classic cartoons that influenced the band, as well as relative newcomers like Ren and Stimpy and South Park that were born of the era, along with the TV, films and comics that laid down the band’s pop culture upbringing.

The other part that I expected to make up the bulk of the book – a listing of bands influenced by the Ramones – is much smaller than anticipated, but still quite thorough. And the book is rounded out by a complete collection of the Ramones themselves on film (including bit appearances on shows like The Simpsons and Space Ghost Coast to Coast), the various side projects of the bands, and some highly recommended Ramones tributes.

For anyone just getting into punk rock, I always recommend the Ramones, preferably with their extensive box set Weird Tales of the Ramones (Compare Prices). Moving forward, I’ll recommend If You Like The Ramones… as a literary companion. It’s much more that just a musical primer for Ramones fans, it’s a complex music history using one of the greats as a jumping off point. Instead of just a trip down a musical memory lane, I’m finding out about a range of old-timers of all styles that I want to check out, and a desire to expand my own musical horizons much further. It’s an eye-opening and in-depth book that could have simply been OK had Aaron been less ambitious, but his legwork has elevated it from a “fun read” to a “must read.”

If You Like The Ramones… Here Are Over 200 Bands, CDs, Films and Other Oddities You’ll Love
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COOL PEOPLE – Dave Van Ronk


Dave Van Ronk – Hang Me, Oh Hang Me


Meet the Folk Singer Who Inspired ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’

Dave Van Ronk’s memoir ‘Mayor of MacDougal Street’ inspired the Coen Brothers’ latest film

BY December 2, 2013

Dave Van Ronk performs in New York City.
Dave Van Ronk performs in New York City. Kai Shuman/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

People who were close to Dave Van Ronk, the Greenwich Village folk-blues-jazz institution, had a feeling someone might be making a movie inspired by his life. A few years ago, Elijah Wald, who co-wrote Van Ronk’s posthumous memoir, The Mayor of MacDougal Street, heard that an unnamed filmmaker had optioned the rights to the book — but wasn’t told who. Van Ronk’s widow, Andrea Vuocolo Van Ronk, heard of the interest too, and finally had it confirmed when she came home from work one day: “There was a message on my machine from Joel Coen saying, ‘We’re going to start shooting and want to talk to you.'”

The Coen Brothers’ Classic Folk Tale: Behind ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’

The movie was Inside Llewyn Davis, Joel and his brother Ethan’s film about a turbulent period in the life of its title character, a fictional Village folkie, during 1961. (After months of industry buzz, the movie opens this week.) Technically speaking, Davis isn’t Van Ronk, a New York institution who died of colon cancer in 2002. Start with the way he looks. “I remember I got the audition and came in to the casting director,” says compact-sized Oscar Isaac, who plays Davis, “and I knew it was loosely based on Dave Van Ronk, who was a 6’5″ 250-pound Swede.” Davis is also a much different singer than Van Ronk, who had a gruff, commanding style that was 180 degrees removed from Isaac’s sonorous balladeering.

Yet the film has more than its share of nods to Van Ronk. In it and on the accompanying soundtrack album, Isaac sings three Van Ronk-associated songs, which he learned from one of the late singer’s Village folk buddies. The faux-cover of Davis’ “album” is a direct nod to Van Ronk’s 1963 LP Inside Dave Van Ronk. “Hopefully people will see this movie and make that connection,” says Jeff Place, head archivist at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Smithsonian/Folkways just released the three-disc retrospective Down in Washington Square, which includes Van Ronk recordings from the Fifties through some of his last sessions, cut shortly before his death. (One highlight of the latter is a bluesy cover of Bob Dylan‘s “Buckets of Rain.”)

Dave Van Ronk – Buckets Of Rain


Born in Brooklyn in 1936, Van Ronk moved to the Village as a teenager and never left. Over five decades, he recorded scores of albums that blended blues, jazz, jug-band stomping, and sea chanteys. He was an early champion of Dylan and other up-and-coming songwriters like Joni Mitchell. When Joan Baez was beginning her own career in the Boston and Cambridge areas, she would hear reports of Van Ronk, who was a few years older than her. “He was already a myth,” Baez says. “He had terrible teeth, but he had the most astonishing pitch, sweet little notes amidst the growly ones. I knew thousands of people who sang the blues, but there weren’t many who did it well. He was the closest living offshoot of Leadbelly that I could get to see.”

Although Van Ronk never sold anywhere near the amount of records his protégés did, he accumulated many boldface-name fans. In Chronicles Volume One, Dylan wrote that he’d first heard Van Ronk’s records while growing up in the Midwest. “He was passionate and stinging,” wrote Dylan, “sang like a solder of fortune and sounded like he paid the price. . . I loved his style.” Tom Waits (whose voice recalls Van Ronk’s) has long been an admirer, and Stephen King dropped Van Ronk’s name in his novella Riding the Bullet.



Vuocolo Van Ronk, who met Van Ronk in the Seventies but didn’t hook up with him until the early Eighties (Van Ronk was married before, to Terri Thal), recalls the time she and Van Ronk had just returned home to their Village apartment after a trip. There was a knock on the door, and expecting it to be Van Ronk, who’d run out for an errand, she opened it — and found Dylan standing there. “Dave around?” he asked. She invited him in and offered him coffee, and the two waited for Van Ronk to show up, after which the two men talked for hours. “I thought, ‘Bob Dylan is sitting in my living room,'” says Vuocolo Van Ronk. “He seemed a little nervous, but he wanted to be alone with Dave, and Dave was very happy to see him.”

Inside Llewyn Davis slips in more than a few details from Van Ronk’s memoir. Like Van Ronk, Davis spends time in the merchant marines, schleps to Chicago to unsuccessfully audition for the famed Gate of Horn club, rejects the idea of joining a Peter, Paul and Mary-style folk group, and complains to the head of his record company that he’s so broke he can’t afford a winter coat.

‘Inside Llewyn Davis’ Soundtrack: The RS Review

Those close to Van Ronk insist that the troubled, largely solipsistic Davis, who spends the film dealing with a traumatic personal event, couldn’t be further from Van Ronk. “That character is simply not Dave,” says Wald. “People slept on his couch — he didn’t sleep on theirs. And the reason Dave became who he was in the Village was the way he welcomed anyone who cared about the music. Llewyn is clearly not that guy.”

Yet both Wald and Vuocolo Van Ronk think Van Ronk would have approved of the movie, since a part of Van Ronk always wanted to be more popular. (According to Wald, Van Ronk had the idea to record “The Gambler” before Kenny Rogers did but wasn’t able to convince a record company to let him cut it.) And even if Inside Llewyn Davisisn’t technically about her late, revered husband, Vuocolo Van Ronk says there’s a small, tangible part of him in the film. During scenes set in the Upper West Side home of some of Davis’ academic friends, she donated some of Van Ronk’s collection of primitive art from New Guinea and the Pacific Northwest. “That was my way of sneaking Dave in,” she says. “It’s funny to see the movie and see pieces of our living room in there.”



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Greenwich Village Sunday (1960 Documentary On The Counterculture / Beat

Culture In 1960’s New York)



Greenwich Village: what remains of New York’s beat generation haunts?

Inside Llewyn Davis


A new Coen brothers film celebrates Greenwich Village in its 60s heyday, but what’s left of Dylan and Kerouac’s New York? Karen McVeigh takes a cycle tour of the area
Inside Llewyn Davis still
A still from the Coen Brothers new film, Inside Llewyn Davis. Photograph: Alison Rosa/Studio Canal
Karen McVeigh
Sunday 22 December 2013 01.00 EST Last modified on Thursday 22 May 2014 06.51 EDT

Five decades have passed since America’s troubadours and beat poets flocked to Greenwich Village, filling its smoky late-night basement bars and coffee houses with folk songs and influencing some of the most recognisable musicians of the era.

A few landmarks of those bygone bohemian days – most recently portrayed in the Coen brothers’ film Inside Llewyn Davis, out on 24 January – still exist. The inspiration for the movie’s fictional anti-hero, Davis, was Brooklyn-born Dave Van Ronk, a real- life blues and folk singer with no small talent, who worked with performers such as Pete Seeger and Bob Dylan, but remained rooted in the village until he died in 2002, declining to leave it for any length of time and refusing to fly for many years. Van Ronk’s posthumously published memoir, the Mayor of MacDougal Street, takes its name from the street that was home to the Gaslight Cafe, and other early 60s folk clubs.

The Village stretches from the Hudson River Park east as far as Broadway, and from West Houston Street in the south up to West 14th Street. Its small scale makes it easy to explore on foot and perfect for a musical pilgrimage, but the arrival last summer of New York’s bike-sharing scheme, Citibike, makes for a more adventurous experience.

CitiBikers in Greenwich Village
CitiBikers in Greenwich Village. Photograph: Alamy
I picked up a bike outside Franklin Street subway station, south of the Village in Tribeca, and headed out to the river, at Pier 45. Looking south you can see One World Trade Center: at 541m, it’s now the tallest building in the western hemisphere. Cycle or walk to the end of the boardwalk that juts out into the Hudson, facing Hoboken, New Jersey, and look to your left and you can see the Statue of Liberty. From there, it’s a short cycle along Christopher Street, up Hudson and along West 10th, to Bleecker Street, where designer boutiques such as Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors and Lulu Guinness mark the area’s steep gentrification.

On MacDougal Street, a jumble of comedy cellars, theatres and cheap eateries have mostly replaced the old, liquorless cafes and basement bars of the folk scene. It is the hub of New York University’s campus and many of the bars, falafel joints and pizza houses are priced for students, with $2 beers thrown in.

But several older venues still exist, including the Bitter End, which staged folk “hootenannies” every Tuesday and now calls itself New York’s oldest rock club”. The White Horse Tavern, built in 1880, still stands on the corner of Hudson Street and 11th. It was used by New York’s literary community in the 1950s – most notably Welsh bard Dylan Thomas. It was here, myth has it, that the writer had been drinking in November 1953, before he was rushed to hospital from his room at the Chelsea Hotel, and died a few days later.

Dave Van Ronk
Folk singer Dave Van Ronk, the inspiration for the Llewyn Davis character. Photograph: Kai Shuman/Getty Images
The original Cafe Wha? remains at 115 MacDougal Street, on the corner of Minetta Lane. In the bitter winter of 1961, when the Coen brothers movie is set, cash-strapped artists similar to Davis would take their chances at the open mic. It was here that Bob Dylan made his New York debut, and Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac performed. Cafe Wha? continued to attract artists and musicians long after the Village folk scene gave way to rock’n’roll. A notice on the door catalogues a few of the famous names who played here: Jimi Hendrix, Ritchie Havens, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard and the Velvet Underground. It is still a popular music venue, with a house band playing five nights a week.

The real centre of the folk scene back then, however, was Washington Square, where musicians would gather on Sundays to swap ideas, learn new material and play. According to folk singer and historian Elijah Wald, the ballad and blues singers who sat around the fountain in the park created sounds that would influence artists from Joni Mitchell and Joan Baez to folk-rock groups the Lovin’ Spoonful, the Byrds and the Mamas and the Papas. The hero of the Coens’ film is not Van Ronk, according to Wald, but he does sing some Van Ronk songs and shares his working-class background.

When I visited on a sunny but cold December day, there was only one musician, a saxophonist, playing under Washington Square’s stone arch, but at weekends the park fills with rap and jazz musicians playing to tourists and students. Bikes are not officially allowed inside the square, but there are Citibike stations around it, so it’s easy to park and walk around.

A block north of the park, on West 8th Street, is a historic 107-room property once known as Marlton House and home to many writers and poets, who were attracted by relatively cheap rates and the bohemian neighbourhood. Jack Kerouac wrote The Subterraneans and Tristessa while living here and, in a darker episode, Valerie Solanas was staying in room 214 in 1968, when she became infamous for stalking and then shooting Andy Warhol.

The Marlton Hotel
The new Marlton Hotel
Sean MacPherson, who owns the stylish Bowery and Jane hotels nearby, has just reopened the building as the Parisian-inspired Marlton Hotel (marltonhotel.com). I popped in to its very comfortable lobby for coffee and a flick through its copy of John Strausbaugh’s The Village: 400 years of Beats and Bohemians, Radicals and Rogues. And I caught up with Strausbaugh later, to ask him about the village in the early 1960s, when young idealists were living hand to mouth and sleeping on friends’ couches.


“In 1961, if you were in any way an artistic person in America, in that vast American landscape, you were a lonely figure,” said Strausbaugh. “You heard about San Francisco, you heard about Greenwich Village, and you went there. You didn’t play there to make money; you went there to be heard. Like Dylan, who played at the Cafe Wha?, then got another entry-level gig, then began playing at the biggest places.”

There were others, Strausbaugh said, like Van Ronk, who were talented, but whose ambitions were more modest than those of Dylan and Baez. The unique thing about the Village, he added, is that it survived so long as a bohemian enclave, from the early 1850s, when it attracted poets such as Walt Whitman, to the beatniks and folk revivalists of the 1950s and later.

“The left bank [in Paris] did not last 100 years, but the Village did,” he said.

Many of the buildings and sometimes entire streets in the Village have been preserved and are now home to some of the most expensive real estate in Manhattan and sought-after for their distinctive, old Greenwich Village look. A struggling folk artist might find a cheap meal in one of the student cafes around MacDougal Street, but they would never be able to afford to live in the area – or anywhere in Manhattan, realistically.

“It has not been completely finished off,” said Strausbaugh. “There are still a lot of theatres. But the people who make the music have not been able to live there for 20 or 30 years.”

Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a Generation Q&A at DOC NYC 2012


Bleecker Street: Greenwich Village in the ’60s traces and tributes the bohemian Mecca’s part in the emergence of singer/songwriters and the folk revival during the ’60s. The initial passion and sense of discovery in this music remains undimmed, as politically and emotionally conscious songs by Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Tom Paxton, Tim Buckley, Judy Collins, and Paul Simon are reinterpreted by contemporary artists like Chrissie Hynde, Ron Sexsmith, Beth Nielsen Chapman, and many others.

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“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was written and released in June 1967 to promote the Monterey Pop Festival




“San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was written and released in June 1967 to promote the Monterey Pop Festival.


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dave and myself in San Francisco

Posted: 10/15/2012 2:20 pm EDT Updated: 10/16/2012 2:21 pm EDT
  A stroll down Haight Street today will undoubtedly evoke a certain 1960s nostalgia.

Live guitar music still warbles from street corners, tie-dyed t-shirts are hawked by the handful, the smell of pot permanently wafts, colorful peace signs adorn windows of businesses like the Red Victorian Bed & Breakfast — institutions better suited to an earlier time.


But said nostalgia is often overshadowed by the sad realities of a neighborhood that has long since evolved from the remnants of a revolution: the wayward teenagers, the tourist traps, the vagabonds, the $6 corporate ice cream cones sold at precisely San Francisco’s most famous intersection.

During its heyday, which culminated in 1967’s infamous Summer of Love, young dreamers converged in the Haight by the thousands. Historians deem the neighborhood the birthplace of the hippie movement, marked by peaceful protests and psychedelic experimentation. The era’s greatest luminaries, from Jerry Garcia to Allen Ginsberg to Jimi Hendrix, all lived nearby.

Then the movement waned, and the area began to decay along with it. “By the fall of 1967, Haight-Ashbury was nearly abandoned, trashed, and laden with drugs and homeless people,” blogger Jon Newman wrote in his essay Death of the Hippie Subculture. “With the Haight in ruins and most of its residents gone, it was simply unable to operate as a hub for music, poetry and art.”

Of course, the Haight still has a certain appeal. There’s no better jazz-and-pizza combo in the city than at Club Deluxe, Amoeba Music offers a truly epic collection, a parklet just popped up in front of Haight Street Market and the 12-piece band that assembles in front of American Apparel on Sunday mornings always move crowds to dance in the street.

Yet we can’t help but heave a sigh while pushing past gaggles of gawking tourists or stepping over the man sleeping on the sidewalk at noon. While a stroll down Haight Street today certainly evokes nostalgia, it also makes us yearn for a place that was once the epicenter of peace and love and youth in revolt, a place we never had the chance to experience ourselves but will be forever engrained in San Francisco’s complex, progressive history.

A History Of Hippies

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 This collection is part of a new HuffPost SF partnership with the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center, “Tales From The City,” which features various images from throughout the city’s past. Visit the San Francisco History Center in person to view original photographic prints and negatives as well as tour other relics from SF’s earlier days.


This is a short documentary about the Haight Street kids living in San Francisco.


Come To London! (1966)

Come To London! (1966)

Come To London! (1966)




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An original 1966 British Pathe video about some of London’s quirks and the reason people are attracted to the city. Initially called “London” the title has been changed to differentiate it from other clips in the archive. [Edited – 07/06/2012]


A look at various attractions in the Capital – more historical than swinging!

Panning shot down busy market in Berwick St. M/S of a salesman selling china to a crowd in Gravesend Market with cheeky cockney banter (synchronised sound).

High angled shot of Trafalgar Square. M/S of a man and woman feeding pigeons in the Square. C/U of the girl with pigeons landing on her hand. High angled shot of a barge going up a canal, pan to busy London street nearby. Panning shot of smartly dressed people riding through Hyde Park. Two deer are seen feeding from the hand of a fisherman by pond.

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M/S of a calm lake, pan to a red double decker riding past. The bus is seen passing the National Gallery with St. Martin’s in the Fields in the background. Low angled shot of St. Martin’s spire. Various shots of Church spires and towers around London. L/S of the exterior of the Law Courts.

Low angled shot of a scaffolding covered dome of St. Paul’s. Various shots of different parts of the cathedral, workmen are seen chipping and sanding off thick crusts of soot from St. Paul’s. Panning shot follows a young couple in an M.G. car driving into the Barbican. Various shots of workmen on scaffolding cleaning old buildings, good views of the Capital from the scaffolding.

M/S of men in Cavalier and Roundhead costumes marching in the Lord Mayor’s show. Low angled shot of children in the crowd waving Union Jacks. M/S of the famous gold carriage passing a platform of dignitaries. M/S of vintage cars passing in the procession.


M/S of the car themed, ‘Two Hoots’ restaurant in Bishopsgate. The couple (seen in the M.G.) are seated at a table, a waiter in driving goggles shows them the menu. Various shots of car related artefacts on the walls. Various shots of diners being served. More shots of the cockney market salesman entertaining the crowd with his banter. Various shots of a Pan American airliner landing at an airport. Passengers are seen coming down aeroplane steps, other planes are seen taking off.

M/S of the M.G. coming under Admiralty arch, point view shot from inside the car as it drives down the Mall. Various shots of Household Cavalry riding into their barracks. M/S of a horse and cart riding by the Thames. M/S of the couple looking over the Thames at the Houses of Parliament. Some shots of a water scooter on the Thames (see note in record c). The couple get back into their M.G. and drive past Parliament.

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M/S of an Evening Standard van parking. M/S of press photographers. Various shots of a chef icing a giant cake. Britt Ekland is escorted into shot, she climbs a ladder and cuts into the cake. As she cuts, Peter Sellers bursts out of the cake driving a Mini (her present). More shots of the press, Brit and Peter lean on the car posing for photographs. M/S of Frank Ifield in a pub in Fleet St., he is being interviewed by Pat Doncaster. M/S of journalists around a pub table, pan to Frank’s table. George Casey, sports journalist, eating a pub sandwich. C/U of the back to front sign for the ‘Gentlemen’s’ – a printer’s joke! Various shots of theatrical and historical artefacts on the pub walls.


Various shots of a Sherlock Holmes theme pub in Baker Street that looks like the detective’s study, the landlord wears a deerstalker. Various shots of a pub in Covent Garden where Barrow boys from the market mix with “baritones of the Opera House”. Some shots of vegetable deliveries at Covent Garden.

More shots of the cheeky cockney barrow boy selling china to an eager crowd – he throws a pile of china in the air and catches them. Several ‘plants’ in the audience start the bidding – very ‘Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels’!


Note: this story is a bit of an odd mixture – it appears to use material from other Colour Pictorials: the water scooter is in AMPHIBIOUS WATER SCOOTER in CP 574, it also revisits places previously featured – the Sherlock Holmes pub is in SHERLOCK HOLMES PUB in CP 162. Other sequences may also have been reused or revisited.


Your Top 40s Songs of the Sixties Decade


Your Top 40s Songs of the Sixties Decade 

according to your vote

  60s decade Top 40 Music CountdownThe votes are in and your votes have been counted. Which song is the number one song of the decade according to your vote? Did your songs you voted on make these top 40? You can now listen to the most popular songs that our visitors enjoy the most. Where were you when these songs were being played on the radio for the very first time? What are your memories when that special song or songs are played? Well now is the time to grab your favorite beverage and your favorite partner and listen as we once again go back to the 60s to listen to the greatest music ever recorded. Neal Stevens plays these songs you voted as your favorites from the 60s decade. Enjoy listening to this great music excursion back to the 60s as they are counted down according to how you voted.

Click Here to play the greatest music ever recorded.

Peter Fonda’s Iconic ‘Easy Rider’ Chopper Headed to Auction Block

'Easy Rider'
Courtesy Everett Collection
‘Easy Rider’
Courtesy Everett Collection
Peter Fonda’s Iconic ‘Easy Rider’ Chopper Headed to Auction BlockRead more: http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/news/peter-fondas-iconic-easy-rider-chopper-headed-to-auction-block-20140917#ixzz3DsICVKC9
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook
BY RYAN REED | September 17, 2014
Easy Rider, meet Big Spender: The tricked-out, Captain America Harley-Davidson driven by Peter Fonda in that 1969 film is headed to the auction block on October 18th, and it’s expected to secure a hefty price tag. According to The Associated Press, auction house Profiles in History estimates that the iconic American flag chopper will bring between $1 million and $1.2 million at the sale, which will be held online and at their galleries in Calabasas, California.RELATED alice in wonderland
Where Does ‘Easy Rider’ Fall on Rolling Stone’s List of the 10 Best Movie Drug Trips?
The bike’s seller is California businessman Michael Eisenberg, who previously co-owned an L.A.-based, motorcycle-themed restaurant with Fonda and Easy Rider co-star/director Dennis Hopper. Eisenberg acquired the chopper in 2013 from Grizzly Adams star Dan Haggerty, who was responsible for maintaining the custom Harley during filming for the classic counterculture road flick.

Easy Rider stars Fonda and Hopper as two drug-smuggling hippies on a psychedelic – and, ultimately, tragic – cross-country trek to Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Fonda’s panhead chopper, which comes with three letters of authenticity (one signed by the actor himself), features “forward-angled front wheel and handlebars, fishtail exhaust pipes and a teardrop-shaped gas tank.”

While four bikes were created for the film, Haggerty told The Associated Press that the other three were stolen “even before the movie was released,” demonstrating the cultural significance of Easy Rider itself. This particular Harley could be the most significant: It was used during the movie’s literally explosive crash scene climax – which finds Fonda’s character, Wyatt, flying off to his death after being shot at during a drive-by confrontation in Florida.

Eisenberg might rope in a nice chunk of change for his milestone memorabilia, but he also plans to donate “a significant amount” to the American Humane Association in Fonda’s honor.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/news/peter-fondas-iconic-easy-rider-chopper-headed-to-auction-block-20140917#ixzz3DsHoihjV

Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

60’S ADS


ads of the 60’s


[Click to enlarge]

Yes, our product is number one among insane vegan fashionistas!

From Woman’s Day for April 1962.


Ads from the space age With the consumerist euphoria of the fifties still going strong and the race to the moon at its height, the mood of advertising in the sixties was cheerful, optimistic, and at times, revolutionary. The decade’s ads touted perceived progress (such as Tang-?just add water?) while striving to reinforce good old American values. Stars like Raquel Welch, Sean Connery, Woody Allen, and Sammy Davis Jr. endorsed everything from sunglasses to bourbon to handmade suits in an attempt by Madison Avenue to urge Americans to open their wallets and participate in one giant consumer binge. Social change at the end of the era brought psychedelic swirls and liberated women and minorities to a newly conscious public. From forgotten cars such as the Studebaker Avanti, to cigarettes (?Marlboro… a man’s world of flavor?) to food, clothing, consumer products, furniture, travel, and much more, this colorful collection of print ads explores the wide, wonderful world of 60s Americana.


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Rare early 60s tv commercial for Mattel’s Tommy Burst submachine gun detective set. This was my favorite toy of all time. Load in some fresh caps, pull the bolt back, and it made a God-awful noise and it produced a small cloud of smoke around the barrel tip. It was fantastic!! Guaranteed to take your friends & relatives down, one at a time. ^_^


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a compilation of commercials from the 60’s. Cars, cigarettes, aspirin, pickles, the whole nine!


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The commercials from the ’60s and ’70s were just about as memorable as the shows. From the Frito Bandito to Old Iron Eyes Cody with that unforgettable tear in his eye, these were the classic TV spots I remember most.


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‘Playboy’ Ads From 1967 Remind Us Of The ‘

Mad Men’ Era

Posted: 04/26/2013 2:05 pm EDT Updated: 04/26/2013 2:05 pm EDT


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Though Playboy might have been slightly more classy back in the day than it is now, the general premise of the magazine seems to have remained the same over time: convincing men that they’re worthy of good-looking girls, and plastering such girls all over their editorial pages.

Redditor mixedveggies posted some of the pages from the April 1967 issue of Playboy. Particularly notable is this Vivitar Super 8 Movie Camera ad, which compares the features of the camera model to the features of the actual model:

playboy ad 1967

“Head tilts, pans, swivels and nods.” “This model not for sale.” “Control center.” Always good to see women being treated like human beings.