Tag Archives: Academy Award

COOL PEOPLE – LEONARDO DICAPRIO

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LEONARDO DICAPRIO

The life and times of Leonardo DiCaprio

http://youtu.be/_UHqYoe3r8M

16-Year-Old Leonardo DiCaprio FIRST Interview!

http://youtu.be/RnycvPjB7Y0

Leonardo DiCaprio: ‘The Master of the Freak-Out’

http://youtu.be/p53CZtamFsU

BIOGRAPHY

Leonardo DiCaprio is one of Hollywood’s biggest stars and a keen environmentalist.

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 Born in Hollywood on November 11th 1974, Leonardo was an only child whose parents divorced when he was a baby. His mother signed her young son up with a talent agent and, aged five, Leonardo made his debut on a popular children’s television show before being removed for being too disruptive!

DiCaprio attended the John Marshall High School and the Centre for Enriched Studies but was, by his own admission, never destined for a career in academia (he is, however, fluent in German -DiCaprio spent a part of his childhood there with his maternal grandparents).

When he was 14 he signed to an agency and popped-up in a Matchbox cars commercial before landing acting roles in a few short-lived TV shows, most notably ‘Parenthood’ where he met Tobey Maguire and nominated for the ‘Young Artist Award for Best Young Actor.’

DiCaprio made his movie debut in 1991 with direct-to-video horror ‘Critters 3’ which indirectly led to a regular role in TV’s ‘Growing Pains’. Stardom beckoned when he was picked by Robert de Niro to play the lead in ‘This Boy’s Life’ (1993).

In the same year DiCaprio teamed up with Johnny Depp to play a teenager with learning difficulties in ‘What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?’ The film was a huge success and earned DiCaprio an Academy Award nomination.1995’s ‘The Quick and the Dead’ wasn’t met with such favour, DiCaprio was a controversial choice from the off as Sony weren’t convinced by his suitability for the role so co-star Sharon Stone paid the young actor out of her own pocket.

In the same year DiCaprio starred in the relatively successful ‘Total Eclipse’ playing poet Arthur Rimbaud opposite David Thewlis’ Paul Verlaine. A fictionalised, at times, graphic account of their homosexual relationship DiCaprio was lucky to get the part having been brought in to replace River Phoenix who’d died during pre-production.

Also in 1995 was Jim Carroll biopic ‘The Basketball Diaries’ and ‘Don’s Plum’ which wasn’t released until 2001 after DiCaprio and co-star Toby Maguire attempted to get the film blocked by court order. Also starring Kevin Connolly, ‘Don’s Plum’ is a largely improvised movie that, DiCaprio and Maguire claim, was a project for/by an aspiring film director and not intended for theatrical release. Ironically, its DiCaprio’s most critically acclaimed effort of that year.

 In 1996, DiCaprio starred in Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of ‘Romeo and Juliet’. Notable for retaining the ‘original’ Shakespearean dialogue the movie was a huge hit but financially eclipsed by 1997 blockbuster ‘Titanic’ which was, until 2010, the highest grossing film ever made, even if DiCaprio wasn’t happy about his character, Jack Dawson.

DiCaprio was now a bonafide star.

In 1998 he had a cameo role in Woody Allen’s ‘Celebrity’ (1998) and starred in ‘The Man with the Iron Mask’ that, despite negative criticism, was a box-office success. In 2000 he took the lead in ‘The Beach’, another critical flop but enormously successful at theatres worldwide.

In 2002, a change of fortune. DiCaprio starred in two critically acclaimed movies, Stephen Spielberg’s ‘Catch me if you Can’ (co-starring Tom Hanks, Martin Sheen and Christopher Walken) is based on the life of a confidence trickster who made a fortune in the 1960’s and Martin Scorsese’s ‘Gangs of New York’, a historically based feature set in NYC in the mid 1800’s. DiCaprio went on to work with Scorsese again in 2004 with the critically acclaimed ‘The Aviator’ and won a Golden Globe and an Academy Award nomination for his troubles.

DiCaprio’s third collaboration with Martin Scorsese was 2006 thriller, ‘The Departed’ with Matt Damon. The movie became one of the most acclaimed of the year but it was ‘Blood Diamond’ that earned DiCaprio his third Academy Award nomination playing a diamond smuggler opposite co-stars Jennifer Connelly and Djimon Hounsou.

Ridley Scott’s ‘Body of Lies’ (2008) visually aped the style and flavour of 1970s political films but received mixed reviews. In the same year he teamed up again with Kate Winslet in ‘Revolutionary Road’, directed by Winslet’s then husband Sam Mendes. The film is set in the 1950s and tells the story of a couple as their marriage collapses earning DiCaprio another Golden Globe nomination.

Scorsese and DiCaprio collaborated a third time for the hugely successful ‘Shutter Island’ in 2010 in which DiCaprio plays an unstable US Marshal investigating a psychiatric facility. The same year he played Dom Codd in Christopher Nolan’s sci-fi thriller ‘Inception’ and, again, the movie was received favourably by critics and public alike.

 Not quite as successful was Clint Eastwood’s biopic of J Edgar Hoover, ‘J Hoover’. Starring alongside Naomi Watts and Armie Hammer, DiCaprio’s role was well received but the critics turned on the finished article claiming the film lacked cohesion. The following year, 2012, DiCaprio received yet another Golden Globe nomination for his villainous role in Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Dango Unchained’.

In 2013 he worked again with Baz Lurhrmann for a big-screen adaptation of ‘The Great Gatsby’. As with ‘J Hoover’, the film had mixed reviews while DiCaprio was given the thumbs up by critics. That year he also starred in another Scorsese picture, ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’, based on the life of a stockbroker who was arrested in the late 1990’s for fraud. Another Golden Globe to add to his collection, a fourth Academy Award nomination and with other projects in the pipeline, it seems we’ve not heard the last of Leonardo DiCaprio just yet.

In addition to random acts of philanthropy, DiCaprio is a committed environmentalist and has been nominated for awards in his efforts to raise awareness of man’s impact on the planet. In January 2013 he announced he was going to take break from acting and ‘fly around the world doing good for the environment.’

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CHRISTOPHER WALKEN

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Christopher Walken: What I’ve Learned

The actor on golf as torture, the connection between funny and scary, and why he’s sick of playing messed-up characters

christopher walken with microscope in office

Peter Yang

Morning is the best time to see movies.

I remember once, years ago, I was walking out a door — I’d been having a conversation and I was walking out the door, and this guy said to me, “Chris,” and I stopped and I turned, and he said, “Be careful.” And I never forgot that. And it comes back to me often: Be careful. That was good advice.

That’s supposed to be a fact, that the question mark is originally from an Egyptian hieroglyph that signified a cat walking away. You know, it’s the tail. And that symbol meant — well, whatever it is when they’re ignoring you.

When I was a kid, there was someone in my family, an adult, and whenever I saw them, they would say, “You got a lotta nerve.” From the time I was a little kid, it was always like, “Heh, heh, heh — you got a lotta nerve.” I always thought, What does that mean? But then when I got older, I thought that it was an instruction. If you tell a kid something, it sticks. I think I do have a lot of nerve. But, I mean, I think I maybe got it from that person who said it to me.

My father was a lesson. He had his own bakery, and it was closed one day a week, but he would go anyway. He did it because he really loved his bakery. It wasn’t a job.

I used to love Danish. My father used to make a Boston cream pie. You never see that anymore. Very good.

Most of the jobs I get are basically very unwholesome people. There’s always something wrong with the guy, and sometimes something deeply wrong. I’m tired of that. I tell my agent I want a Fred MacMurray part. I want a part where I have a wife and kids and a dog and a house, and my kids say to me, “What do you think I should do, Dad?” and I say, “Be careful.”

I always figured that if I’m gonna be playing these people, that there should be this relationship to the audience that is very clear. “That’s Chris, and look at Chris having a good time, wanting to take over the world and sink California and shoot everybody in the room” — just so long as they understand that that’s Chris on the set having fun. And that Chris wouldn’t really do anything like that.

Golf. My God, that’s a mysterious occupation. I know people who are — good friends — who are absolutely smitten, practicing their swing and talking about it. I can understand some sort of sport where your body got a benefit, like marathon running or bicycle racing. That’s not golf. And not only that, but the whole business of standing in the sun — my God. That’s like torture.

I love spaghetti. And I like to cook spaghetti. And I used to eat it every day. I weighed thirty pounds more than I do now. You can’t — you can’t do that. Ice cream — I love to watch television and eat ice cream. But that’s like a ten-year-old. I can’t do that anymore. Beer. Beer, spaghetti, ice cream.

Professional dancers don’t go dancing.

When you’re onstage and you know you’re bombing, that’s very, very scary. Because you know you gotta keep going — you’re bombing, but you can’t stop. And you know that half an hour from now, you’re still gonna be bombing. It takes a thick skin.

I had an agent when I first got into the movies who said to me, “You’re gonna be in Los Angeles now once in a while. If somebody invites you to a party, don’t go. Stay in your room, go to the movies.” And I have a feeling I know sort of what he meant: Don’t show your face around too much. Let ’em be a little glad to see you.

It all happened when I did The Deer Hunter. Suddenly — I’d already been in show business for thirty years, and nothing much had happened. I mean, I really was laboring in obscurity, and then suddenly this movie. It was kind of infectious, and I really did become rather social. Gregarious. And that lasted, I don’t know, ten years.

Movie scripts are usually pretty loose — things usually change a lot. But not with Quentin. His scripts are absolutely huge. All dialogue. It’s all written down. You just learn the lines. It’s more like a play.

Sometimes I look at this watch and I think, There’s some guy that puts these little screws in there? There is something about it. I’m not into cars, either, but there is something about a really magnificent car.

Me and Dennis [Hopper], when we were doing that scene in True Romance, it was hilarious. It really was — including shooting him. All that laughing was real. He was killing me. And all the guys around us — that was a very cracking-up day.

I like to listen to radio interviews. I got a list of things that if I wasn’t so lazy, I would do something about, but the idea of having a radio show — two people talking on the radio is fascinating. I’ll bet you there’s some college around here — they all have radio stations. I get now that I don’t like to go anywhere, so if there was some place down the road — twenty minutes’ drive.

I don’t like zoos. Awful.

They say that the human smile is in fact one of those primordial things — that in fact it’s a showing of teeth, that it’s a warning. That when we smile, in a primeval way it has to do with fear.

There’s something dangerous about what’s funny. Jarring and disconcerting. There is a connection between funny and scary.

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JANE FONDA VIETNAM WAR ACTIVIST AND MORE

Synopsis

Jane Fonda is an American actress born on December 21, 1937, in New York City. The daughter of acclaimed actor Henry Fonda, Jane starred in the acclaimed films Klute and Coming Home, winning Oscars for both. Off screen, she was a civil rights and anti-war activist. In the 1980s, the actress found success launching a series of aerobic-exercise videos.

QUOTES

“It’s never too late—never too late to start over, never too late to be happy.”

– Jane Fonda
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Early Life

Born Lady Jayne Seymour Fonda on December 21, 1937, in New York City, Jane Fonda has enjoyed a tremendous career as an actress. She comes from a Hollywood dynasty of sorts. Her father Henry was one of the top actors of the 20th century. Her brother Peter and her niece Bridget have also had their share of success on the big screen.

Fonda faced some challenges growing up. Her father could be cold and distant. Her mother, socialite Frances Seymour Brokaw, committed suicide when Fonda was 12 years old. Not long after her mother’s death, Fonda developed an eating disorder, which she struggled with for years. She attended boarding school and then went to Vassar College. Leaving college, Fonda went to Paris to study art.

Fonda returned to New York and did a bit of modeling for a time. Before long, she decided to follow in her father’s footsteps. In 1954 she co-starred with her father, Henry Fonda, in a production of The Country Girl. Fonda began to study her craft with Lee Strasberg at the famed Actors Studio a few years later.

Career Beginnings

Fonda’s career seemed to really take off in 1960. She made her film debut Tall Story (1960) with Anthony Perkins. On Broadway, Fonda netted a Tony Award nomination for There Was a Little Girl. She continued to juggle theatrical and film work over the next few years. Working with director George Cukor, Fonda starred in the romantic comedy The Chapman Report (1962). She shared the Broadway stage with Celeste Holm in Invitation to a March and Dyan Cannon in The Fun Couple around this time.

In the late 1960s, Fonda recreated herself as a type of sex kitten under the direction of her French filmmaker husband Roger Vadim. This new look was most evident in the 1968 science fiction taleBarbarella

She soon shed this image for more serious dramatic roles. She scored her first Academy Award nomination for 1969’s They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?. Two years later, Fonda took home her first Academy Award for her work on Sydney Pollack‘s thriller Klute, which co-starred Donald Sutherland.

Film Actress and Activist

In addition to her acting, Fonda became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War. She traveled to North Vietnam in 1972—a visit that caused an uproar back at home. Many were particularly upset by Fonda’s decision to pose for photos while sitting on an antiaircraft gun, one used to shoot at American troops. She was given the nickname “Hanoi Jane” and seen as a traitor for her support of the North Vietnamese. Fonda also fought for social causes, serving as a spokesperson on issues of civil rights and women’s rights.

Unrepentant communist-supporter ‘Hanoi Jane’ Fonda will play Nancy Reagan in an upcoming film. In 1972 “Hanoi” Jane Fonda applauded an NVA anti-aircraft gun crew during her trip to North Vietnam. These guns were used to shoot down American planes and contributed to the deaths of American Airmen. To plug the film Jane Fonda wore a “Hanoi Jane”

Traitor Jane Fonda AKA Hanoi Jane Cast As Nancy Reagan in THE BUTLE

During the Vietnam war Jane Fonda betrayed her nation and it’s fighting men. CBS and NBC both claim it’s urban legend but of the many accounts I’ve read in my research it seems an undeniable fact. We all know the communist lapdog media will never admit to or ever tell the truth even if they were at the pearly gates.
Hanoi Jane is her name and she continues to demonstrate this everywhere she goes. Jane Fonda thumbs her nose at all things American, reveling in her notoriety as a traitor. Now she’s a progressive hero instead of a disgrace. Liberal progressives have no respect for institutions. They aim to destroy traditional culture, piece by piece.
This is beyond insulting. This movie really needs to flop. Liberals will probably give it an Oscar. Check it out: Jane Fonda’s turn as Nancy Reagan has outraged fans of the former first lady but the actress says “The Gipper’s” wife is happy she landed the role. “I don’t think that whatever differences there might be in our politics really matters…

JANE FONDA VIETNAM WAR ACTIVIST AND MORE