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AMERICANA -Top 10 Foods Only America Could Have Invented

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Top 10 Foods Only America Could Have Invented

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The American could have excelled in many other ways and fields. They may very well be the best nations in the world but frankly speaking when it is about the foodies and the food that is being served, American stands no place to certain other nations. The Americans cannot actually boast of a single cuisine or some kind of food that is completely theirs. Most of the recipes are from some other land. Nevertheless, America is also known for some of the greatest experiments with foods. There are certain cheesy and wheezy food items that can only be created by the people of America. So, We are going to enlist up the top 10 food only America could have invented.

1. Corn Dog

Corn Dog

There is no doubt of the fact that Americans are very good innovators. Thai is very well proved when a man named Neil Fletcher, came up with his brand new idea of smearing up the hot dog with some cornflower and then frying them deep. This gave the hot dog the look of rich Gold, enough to attract the eyes of the people and at the same time feeding them the same hot dog with a layer of corn on it. According to the Americans, it is something that is quite good but hey after all it is a Hot Dog and the main credit is of somebody else.

2. Philly Cheese steak

Philly Cheese steak

This is yet another food that we would surely want the Americans to take the credit for it. The Philly Cheese steak is a combination of all the things that are surely going to change you over to some bulky fellow provided you take this thing every day without fail. It is prepared with the meat with the highest possible content of fats in it. To add to it, there is a hell lot of Cheese to counter. Whatever it may be, the Philly Cheese steak does taste great and the people of Philadelphia are proud of it!

3. Chinese Food

Chinese Food

The most interesting thing is that the Americans also have the quality to design a food that is literally not of somebody but named after that country. In any case, all the Chinese food that we know of is the modified version of some simple noodles that the Chinese have. However, the Americans have had the time and pleasure to give it a complete makeover and have made it their own. Anyways, As far As I have known, the people from the east are more in favor of Rice cakes that Hakka noodles.

4. S’mores

S’mores: Top 10 Foods only America could Have Invented

If you g take a look at it, you will surely wonder that what is actually the fuss about s’mores. This is nothing but a food that is extremely deep-fried near about burnt and then some kind of a cream are applied over it to decorate. I do not understand what is there that makes it so very much famous but s’mores are some hit amidst the American people. Most of the foreign people find it extremely difficult to understand the reason behind the eating and liking fors’mores but it is as it is!

5. Reuben Sandwich

Reuben Sandwich

This is by far one of the most beautiful looking dishes that the Americans are given the credit for the invention. This thing surely looks like some sort of a dish prepared by some international chef but hey this solely belongs to America. What is not there in this dish? It has Chocolate, Strawberry flavor to the best possible extent, some sort of Orange flavor and some cheese as well. This unique blend of colors and taste is rarely found in any other American dish!

 6. Cobb Salad

Cobb Salad

This Salad will completely make you realize that why the majority of the fat people belong to the land of America only. The Americans seem to have a tendency to put in everything in the middle of Cheese and all sorts of Fatty stuffs. In general, what do we refer to as Salad? Something that is healthy and delicious at the same time but here in this case, the Cobb Salad is that stuffed salad that will fill in the entire space that you have. To add to that, it will surely lend you the most undesired body weight that you can even imagine to have in your lifetime! In spite of all this, the Cob salad is one of the most favored dishes to the Americans.

7. Baked Alaska

Baked Alaska

I seriously do not have any Idea what is so great on this thing. This thing looks utterly fat and disgusting to me but make sure that you do not say this to any American. The Baked Alaska is something that no great chef has ever dreamt of it. It is actually a dessert. A Pie has been baked. I am personally a huge fan of Pie and I do not wish to have a pie that is baked but the people of America love it. Obviously, they have created it.

8. Buffalo Wings

Buffalo Wings

I am a huge fan of the Chicken wings that they serve as KFC counters but it is good till chicken. Firstly, it is illegal to kill a Buffalo in here and secondly, I am not in favor of eating such a huge animal But is seems that the Americans love it. The Buffalo wings are kind of Chicken wings with the meat that belongs to a chicken. They love it being served hot and steamy with some cheese. Meat and cheese is yet another combination that is 100 percent pure Americans.

9. Turducken

Turducken

The Name is in itself the acronym for the things that are in the recipe for the food. The Turducken is one of the healthiest foods ever credited to the Americans and yet it surely has some great features. There is no doubt of the fact that the Turdumcken is a quite interesting but let me tell you, the blend of Turkey with a duck stuffing plus mashed chicken with deep fried is absolutely fantastic to eat. All you need is a simple layer of cheese. It is ready to be devoured.

10. Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream

This is an Ice cream of sorts and yet at the same time it has many things that will help the cause of your hunger in the mean time. This is buttery and has a great taste to it considering the fact that there are stuffing’s like cookies and all in it. Originally, this is somebody else’s idea but the Americans have actually devised a great way to ensure that it is better that the original one!

#americana#food#american_food#invented#beatnikhiway.com

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HIGHWAY AMERICA-29 Surreal Places In America You Need To Visit Before You Die

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29 Surreal Places In America You Need To Visit Before You Die

If you live in the U.S., you don’t need a passport to see what mother nature has to offer.

Mendenhall Glacier Caves, Alaska

AER Wilmington DE / Flickr: 25949441@N02 / Creative Commons

AER Wilmington DE / Flickr: 25949441@N02 / Creative Commons

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In Mendenhall Valley of Juneau stands this 12-mile glacier that is home to some incredibly surreal ice caves. If you follow the West Glacier trail, you can get a chance to see these whimsical ice clouds for yourself.

2. Antelope Canyon, Arizona

Antelope Canyon, Arizona

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Located near Page, Ariz., this brilliant slot canyon is split into two different sections, commonly referred to as “The Crack” and “The Corkscrew.” The natural canvas of color and unique structure is an Instgrammer’s dream.

3. Oneonta Gorge, Oregon

Oneonta Gorge, Oregon

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zschnepf / shutterstock.com

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The Oneonta Gorge is in the Columbia River Gorge with a unique set of aquatic and woodland plants. The ferns and moss make the walls look like a fairy tale, and visitors can walk through the creek on a warm summer day.

4. Skagit Valley Tulip Fields, Washington

Skagit Valley Tulip Fields, Washington

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Located in Washington state, hundreds of thousands of visitors come to the tulip fields between April 1–30 to see these gorgeous flowers in bloom. The festival is designed as a driving tour since there is no one designated “site.”

5. Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, Colorado

Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, Colorado

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This wilderness area is located in the Elk Mountains of central Colorado and has over 100 miles of trails. The closest city in reach is Aspen and the entire area spans over 181,000 acres.

6. Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

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This isolated island of bliss sits roughly 70 miles west of Key West in the Gulf of Mexico, surrounded by clear waters and an abundance of sea life. The area is only accessible by boat or seaplane, so leave your phone at home and enjoy a day off the grid.

7. Zion National Park, Utah

Zion National Park, Utah

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Located near Springdale, Utah, this incredible 146,000-acre park is a popular destination for nature enthusiasts. A prominent feature is the Zion Canyon, which is 15 miles long and a half-mile deep. Other spots to visit while you’re here is “The Subway”(pictured on the left) and “The Narrows” (pictured on the right).

8. Watkins Glen State Park, New York

Watkins Glen State Park, New York

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We all know Niagara Falls is a sight to see, but located south of Seneca Lake in the Finger Lakes region lies a lesser-known fantasy-like area called Rainbow Bridge and Falls. It will make you feel like you’re in Lord of the Rings.

9. Yosemite Valley, California

Yosemite Valley, California

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This 8-mile glacial valley is covered in pine and surrounded by granite summits like Half Dome and El Capitan. The California beauty is a hot spot for tourists and photographers and it also offers scenic trails for hikers.

10. Grand Prismatic Spring, Wyoming

Grand Prismatic Spring, Wyoming

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This natural pool of rainbow-like colors is the largest hot spring in the U.S. and the third largest in the world. It’s located in Yellowstone National Park, which also has other great sights to see such as Morning Glory Pool, Old Faithful, and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

11. Haiku Stairs of Oahu, Hawaii

Haiku Stairs of Oahu, Hawaii

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This “Stairway to Heaven” is a steep hiking trail that is technically closed to the public, but many people continue to climb despite the “No Trespassing” signs. Sometimes breaking the law is worth it, right?

12. Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico

Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico

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In this National Park beneath the rocky land lies more than 119 known caves, formed from limestone and sulfuric acid. Visitors can take the natural entrance (pictured on the right) or ride down the elevator 750 feet below ground.

13. Whitaker Point, Arkansas

Whitaker Point, Arkansas

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Bernie Jungkind / CJRW of Little Rock / buffaloriver.com

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In the heart of the Buffalo River country lies this incredible crag, a popular spot for proposals, scenic photographs, and pretty killer views. The best time to snap a pic is at 6:15 a.m. (as pictured above on the left).

14. Hamilton Pool, Texas

Hamilton Pool, Texas

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Flickr: dawilson / Creative Commons

Flickr: dawilson / Creative Commons

Located just outside of Austin, this natural pool is a popular spot for tourists and residents in the summer. Hamilton Pool was created when the dome of an underground river collapsed due to massive erosion thousands of years ago.

15. Horseshoe Bend, Arizona

Horseshoe Bend, Arizona

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Named after its horseshoe-like shape, this famous meander is located just outside Page, Ariz., and offers a wicked view of the Colorado River.

16. Northern Lights, Alaska

Northern Lights, Alaska

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The Northern Lights is one of the most beautiful wonders of the world, and a trip to Alaska will give you a front-row seat. The best places to see the lights are in Fairbanks and Anchorage from about September–April 20.

17. Bryce Canyon, Utah

Bryce Canyon, Utah

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This collection of large natural amphitheaters is famous for its hoodoos, geological structures formed by frost weather and stream erosion. The orange, red, and white rocks are a beautiful sight and only roughly 50 miles from Zion National Park.

18. Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada

Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada

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Bordering California and Nevada, this freshwater lake is the largest alpine lake in North America. The clear waters and surrounding trees make it an ideal vacation spot.

19. Smoky Mountains, North Carolina/Tennessee

Smoky Mountains, North Carolina/Tennessee

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A subrange of the Appalachian Mountains, the Smokies are a mountain range along the North Carolina–Tennessee border. It’s the most visited national park in the U.S., with 9 million-plus visitors per year.

20. Niagara Falls, New York

Niagara Falls, New York

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Located along the United States–Canada border is the famous Niagara Falls, a popular spot for tourists.

21. The Wave, Arizona

The Wave, Arizona

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Located in Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border lies The Wave, a sandstone rock formation that looks look a painting. The sight is known for its vibrant colors and the trackless hike to reach it.

22. Sequoia National Park, California

Sequoia National Park, California

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Sequoia National Park is known for its giant sequoia trees, including the General Sherman Tree, one of the largest in the world. It stands at 275 feet tall and is believed to be roughly 2,500 years old.

23. Thor’s Well, Oregon

Thor's Well, Oregon

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Along Cape Perpetua lies Thor’s Well, a saltwater fountain driven by the power of the ocean tide. The best time to see it in action is an hour before high tide to an hour after high tide. While it’s a beautiful sight, it’s also highly dangerous and visitors should proceed with caution.

24. Badlands National Park, South Dakota

Badlands National Park, South Dakota

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The red and orange rocky mountains bring in nearly 1 million visitors per year to the Badlands National Park. Native Americans used this area for hunting grounds for roughly 11,000 years.

25. Savannah, Georgia

Savannah, Georgia

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The oldest city in the state of Georgia, Savannah has a charming personality and fairy tale-like array of Spanish moss trees.

26. Palouse Falls, Washington

Palouse Falls, Washington

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Located in Washington state, this enchanting scene almost came to an end in 1984 when the Franklin County Public Utility District proposed to build a dam to allow hydroelectric power generation. Ratepayers decided to preserve the falls.

27. Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park, Montana

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Glacier National Park is located near Kalispell, Mont., and borders parts of Canada. The park encompasses more than 1,000,000 acres and attracts roughly 2 million people per year.

28. Nā Pali Coast State Park, Hawaii

Nā Pali Coast State Park, Hawaii

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The Na Pali Coast is inaccessible by car but can be seen over land by helicopter or hiking. The Kalalau Trail provides the only land access, but there are also caves you can explore along the coast.

29. Devils Tower, Wyoming

Devils Tower, Wyoming

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Devils Tower is a giant igneous intrusion that rises 5,000-plus feet above sea level. According to Native American folklore, a few girls went out to play and were discovered by several bears who began to chase them. The girls tried to escape by climbing a rock and praying to the Great Spirit to save them, and their prayers were answered when the rock rose from the ground toward the heavens and away from danger. When the girls reached the sky, they were turned into the star constellations. There are also several othertheories and stories regarding the Devils Tower.

#ana_christy#america#beauty#beatnikhiway.com

10 #Buildings that Changed America

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10 Buildings that Changed America

10 Buildings that Changed America premiered May 12, 2013.

 

Full Episode

Full Episode

10 trend-setting works of architecture that aren’t just historic structures by famous architects. These buildings have dramatically influenced our built environment in many ways — and in one case, for over two centuries.

       Watch

ALLEN #GINSBERG “AMERICA

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GINSBERG

America

Allen Ginsberg

America I’ve given you all and now I’m nothing.
America two dollars and twenty-seven cents January 17, 1956.
I can’t stand my own mind.
America when will we end the human war?
Go fuck yourself with your atom bomb
I don’t feel good don’t bother me.
I won’t write my poem till I’m in my right mind.
America when will you be angelic?
When will you take off your clothes?
When will you look at yourself through the grave?
When will you be worthy of your million Trotskyites?
America why are your libraries full of tears?
America when will you send your eggs to India?
I’m sick of your insane demands.
When can I go into the supermarket and buy what I need with my good looks?
America after all it is you and I who are perfect not the next world.
Your machinery is too much for me.
You made me want to be a saint.
There must be some other way to settle this argument.
Burroughs is in Tangiers I don’t think he’ll come back it’s sinister.
Are you being sinister or is this some form of practical joke?
I’m trying to come to the point.
I refuse to give up my obsession.
America stop pushing I know what I’m doing.
America the plum blossoms are falling.
I haven’t read the newspapers for months, everyday somebody goes on trial for
murder.
America I feel sentimental about the Wobblies.
America I used to be a communist when I was a kid and I’m not sorry.
I smoke marijuana every chance I get.
I sit in my house for days on end and stare at the roses in the closet.
When I go to Chinatown I get drunk and never get laid.
My mind is made up there’s going to be trouble.
You should have seen me reading Marx.
My psychoanalyst thinks I’m perfectly right.
I won’t say the Lord’s Prayer.
I have mystical visions and cosmic vibrations.
America I still haven’t told you what you did to Uncle Max after he came over
from Russia.

I’m addressing you.
Are you going to let our emotional life be run by Time Magazine?
I’m obsessed by Time Magazine.
I read it every week.
Its cover stares at me every time I slink past the corner candystore.
I read it in the basement of the Berkeley Public Library.
It’s always telling me about responsibility. Businessmen are serious. Movie
producers are serious. Everybody’s serious but me.
It occurs to me that I am America.
I am talking to myself again.

Asia is rising against me.
I haven’t got a chinaman’s chance.
I’d better consider my national resources.
My national resources consist of two joints of marijuana millions of genitals
an unpublishable private literature that goes 1400 miles and hour and
twentyfivethousand mental institutions.
I say nothing about my prisons nor the millions of underpriviliged who live in
my flowerpots under the light of five hundred suns.
I have abolished the whorehouses of France, Tangiers is the next to go.
My ambition is to be President despite the fact that I’m a Catholic.

America how can I write a holy litany in your silly mood?
I will continue like Henry Ford my strophes are as individual as his
automobiles more so they’re all different sexes
America I will sell you strophes $2500 apiece $500 down on your old strophe
America free Tom Mooney
America save the Spanish Loyalists
America Sacco & Vanzetti must not die
America I am the Scottsboro boys.
America when I was seven momma took me to Communist Cell meetings they
sold us garbanzos a handful per ticket a ticket costs a nickel and the
speeches were free everybody was angelic and sentimental about the
workers it was all so sincere you have no idea what a good thing the party
was in 1835 Scott Nearing was a grand old man a real mensch Mother
Bloor made me cry I once saw Israel Amter plain. Everybody must have
been a spy.
America you don’re really want to go to war.
America it’s them bad Russians.
Them Russians them Russians and them Chinamen. And them Russians.
The Russia wants to eat us alive. The Russia’s power mad. She wants to take
our cars from out our garages.
Her wants to grab Chicago. Her needs a Red Reader’s Digest. her wants our
auto plants in Siberia. Him big bureaucracy running our fillingstations.
That no good. Ugh. Him makes Indians learn read. Him need big black niggers.
Hah. Her make us all work sixteen hours a day. Help.
America this is quite serious.
America this is the impression I get from looking in the television set.
America is this correct?
I’d better get right down to the job.
It’s true I don’t want to join the Army or turn lathes in precision parts
factories, I’m nearsighted and psychopathic anyway.
America I’m putting my queer shoulder to the wheel.

HIWAY AMERICA – Some Of the Best food trucks in America And Their History

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Best food trucks in America

 

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 “The Original Food Truck,” Haven Brothers: Legacy of the American Diner – Official Movie Trailer 

https://youtu.be/AR91WoNGJAE

video

http://player.history.com/pservice/embed-player/?siteId=hist&tPid=23927773

taco27 taco29 taco30taco5taco7taco9taco8taco10

taco12taco13taco15taco17taco18taco19taco20taco21taco15taco13taco17taco22taco25taco24taco23

pictures by ana christy

  • Eric Shin

  • Facebook/The Cinnamon Snail

  • Jane Bruce

  • Facebook/Wafels & Dinges

  • The Grilled Cheese Truck

  • The Chairman

  • The Lime Truck

  • Senor Sisig

  • Lobsta Truck

There’s no denying it: we are living in a golden age of food trucks.

Once synonymous with sketchy, generic foods like hot dogs and chicken kebabs, over the past few years food trucks have grown evermore varied and exciting, and for the third year in a row, we’re taking a deep dive into the very best of America’s food truck scene.

From grilled cheese and pizza to tacos, lobster rolls, and some of the most creative fusion dishes on the planet, these are the best food trucks in America.

Operating a food truck isn’t easy. While there’s certainly lower overhead than with a traditional brick-and-mortar establishment, operators are forced to brave (mostly) outdated municipal restrictions, random (or worse, targeted) police ticketing, and the misdirected ire of insecure brick-and-mortar restaurants who often stir up trouble. Food trucks are far from the latest food trend, but when it comes to great food made quickly (and by the “little guy”), they’re one of the best things to happen to the American culinary scene.

In order to compile our ranking of America’s best food trucks, we started with the more than 450 food trucks from more than 40 cities that were considered for last year’s ranking and added 50 to the list, mostly new trucks and ones suggested by readers. We factored Twitter followers, Yelp reviews, and Yelp stars into a weighted algorithm, rounded out by an originality score that took into account menu innovation, overall concept, and geography.

A few notes: Only trucks were considered. If it was a trailer or a cart, if it wasn’t on four wheels and couldn’t move on its own power from parking ticket to parking spot, it wasn’t considered. Some cities (especially much-beloved Portland, Ore.) pained us: many of their food “trucks” didn’t make the cut because they weren’t well, trucks. Also, this is a list of food trucks. Trucks that just make cupcakes or coffee are cupcake or coffee trucks, not food trucks. Dessert trucks were also not considered.

It’s clear that not only is the national food truck scene still booming, but more and more truck operators are pushing the boundaries of what can be served from a truck, and more big names, like Andrew Zimmern and José Andrés, are throwing their hats into the food truck ring as well.

Several of last year’s highest-ranking trucks, like D.C.’s Fojol Bros., San Francisco’s Nom Nom Truck and Spencer on the Go, Los Angeles’ Ludo Truck, and New York’s Big Gay Ice Cream Truck, have all ceased operation. For all intents and purposes these were highly successful trucks, but it seems as if for many food truck operators, running a food truck is a means to an end, not an end in itself. The Fojol Bros. are working on a new line of products, Spencer on the Go’s owners decided to focus full-time on their restaurant, The Ludo Truck’s Ludo Lefebvre has become one of Los Angeles’ most in-demand chefs, and Big Gay Ice Cream now operates two brick-and-mortar locations, with two more in the works. The takeaway here isn’t that the food truck trend is dying down, it’s that running a food truck can be a stepping stone to bigger and (some say) better things.

So from a ramen truck in Oklahoma City to a fry bread truck in Phoenix, from a pierogi truck in Chicago to a lobster truck in Los Angeles, read on for our list of the  Best Food Trucks in America for 2014.

  • 1. Kogi BBQ (Los Angeles)

    Eric Shin

    “Thanksgiving of 2008, Kogi BBQ had first rolled out as the little Korean-taco-truck-that-could, peddling $2 Korean barbecue tacos on the streets of LA. Little did they know that within… months, they would become an icon of LA street food. Kogi set off a flavor bomb that would shake up the foundations of the industry so that street food would never be looked at the same way.” That’s from Kogi’s site. What’s the saying? It ain’t bragging if it’s true? So it goes with chef Roy Choi’s truck, which you can credit (or at this point, blame) for the proliferation of Asian tacos across the U.S. Korilla, TaKorean, Jogasaki, these guys, among many others, should be paying Choi royalties. After appearing at number one on our 101 Best Food Trucks list in 2012 and at number two last year, the truck continues to be an icon in the food truck world. Serving delicious Asian tacos at an incredibly reasonable price, this truck has made headlines and was named the fifth-best restaurant by Jonathan Gold in 2013. The company now has four trucks (one specifically for catering events). The group has also opened two restaurants, Alibi Room and Chego. With more than 128,000 Twitter followers, it is clear that this truck as reached celebrity status.

    TWITTER: @kogibbq
    FOLLOWERS: 128,805

  • 2. The Cinnamon Snail (New York)

    Facebook/The Cinnamon Snail

    “Has a 1991 Grumman / Chevy P30 become a Buddha?” asks The Cinnamon Snail’s website. No, you don’t have to prepare to get into chaturanga, but this is a full-on vegan and organic food truck — right down to the grill, which, when the truck was gutted, was replaced with “a brand-new commercial grill which had never touched animal flesh.” So what food inspires centeredness and bliss? What kind of menu serves “food to help you transform into a being of pure light who can serve all living creatures simultaneously and eternally”? Well, a seasonal one to start. But the truck, a longtime dream of Adam Sobel (who previously ran a vegan catering service in New Jersey), has a menu that features breakfast, raw food, sandwiches, and pastries. There are burritos with scrambled tofu and refried beans, blue corn or fresh plum pancakes with pine nut butter and chamomile blood orange syrup, and sandwiches featuring seitan burgers, tempeh, and grilled tofu. Despite being vegan, this truck clearly caters to a pretty universal crowd, which explains it winning the 2012 Vendy Award and Mobile Cuisine magazine’s “America’s Favorite Vegetarian Food Truck,” making New York Post’s top trends of 2012, earning first place on the Best of Yelp NYC Restaurant list of 2012, in addition to coming in eighth place on last year’s 101 Best Food Trucks list.

    TWITTER: @VeganLunchTruck
    FOLLOWERS: 18,376

  • 3. Red Hook Lobster Pound (New York)

    Jane Bruce

    What started at Ralph Gorham’s and Susan Povich’s kitchen table (yes that Povich — she’s the daughter of former A Current Affair host and daytime TV star Maury Povich), has turned into a hugely successful multi-city lobster roll truck. The truck, “Big Red,” opened in 2010 in New York City, bringing “Maine-style” lobster rolls to the masses. The Red Hook Lobster Truck has a variety of seafood indulgences to offer. There are shrimp rolls, a lobster BLT, lobster bisque, and New England and shrimp and corn chowder, but let’s face it, it’s about the lobster roll: lobster, served cold with celery, spices, a touch of homemade mayonnaise and on a J.J. Nissen split-top bun (or Connecticut-style, warm and buttered). Save for Pearl Oyster Bar’s version, many folks (including Time Out New York, Zagat, and us) agree that it’s one of the best lobster rolls in New York; it appeared in the top spot in last year’s list of the 101 Best Food Trucks in America.

    The team recently opened a shop in Montauk, N.Y., with partner Sweet’tauk Lemonade. In addition to their new ventures, the truck is still driving around New York. The lunch move? The Hookup: a lobster roll with Cape Cod chips and a choice of Maine Root Sodas (root beer, ginger brew, mandarin orange, blueberry, sarsaparilla, or lemon-lime).

    TWITTER: @lobstertruckny
    FOLLOWERS: 11,917

  • 4. Wafels & Dinges (New York)

    Facebook/Wafels & Dinges

    In 2007, Thomas DeGeest quit his job at IBM, bought a yellow 1968 Chevy box truck, and parked on a corner of Broadway in SoHo to sell his first Liege waffle. He made $84 that first shift and never looked back. Some six years and several trucks and carts later, DeGeest helms one of the most iconic, lauded (they were at number 13 in last year’s 101 Best Food Trucks list), and beloved trucks in the city, not to mention carts as well as an East Village brick and mortar outpost.

    Wafels, whether Brussels (rectangular, doughier, and saltier) or Liege (usually more ovoid, chewy, and sweet), come with your choice of dinges (sides) that include dulce de leche, Belgian chocolate fudge, maple syrup, whipped cream, walnuts, bananas, butter, Nutella, strawberries, and perhaps one of the most underrated toppings of our time, speculoos. Imagine Golden Grahams cereal in dessert sauce form. It’s sweet, it’s salty, it actually originates from a thin, crunchy cookie typically made using butter, sugar, and a combination of spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, cloves, and sometimes ginger), and if it’s your first topping, it’s free (for $2 you can load your wafels with every topping in the truck).

    While a dessert truck, there are definitely some elusive savory options worth investigating (they’re not available at the carts), including the seasonal “pulled pork wafel”: BBQ pulled pork, coleslaw with a coolickle (yes, the Kool Aid pickle), and sweet BBQ sauce.

    TWITTER: @waffletruck
    FOLLOWERS: 38,522

  • 5. The Grilled Cheese Truck (Los Angeles)

    The Grilled Cheese Truck

    What started for Michele Grant and chef Dave Danhi as a weekend activity entering their Cheesy Mac and Rib melt into LA’s seventh annual Grilled Cheese Invitational became the inspiration for The Grilled Cheese Truck. Their calling? “Not just the classic bread, butter, and cheese,” notes their site, “but amazing creations that are constructed with the best ingredients, local produce, and made with nothing but love.”

    The menu features no fewer than six savory melts (the Plain and Simple melt, the Cheesy Mac and Rib, the Brie melt, the Buffalo Chicken melt, the Three Cheese melt, the Goat Cheese melt) most with a variety of complementing ingredients. But the menu goes beyond classic and clever combinations; there are also additions:15 savory (among them, BBQ smoked pork, mac and cheese, bacon, avocado, and smoked turkey) and six sweet, including Nutella, toasted marshmallows, roasted banana purée, candied pecans, peanut butter, and graham crackers.

    They made it to last year’s 101 Best Food Trucks in America list at number 22.

    TWITTER: @grlldcheesetruk
    FOLLOWERS: 77,025

  • 6. The Chairman (San Francisco)

    The Chairman

    You might not remember this, but San Francisco’s Chairman Bao Bun Truck really stuck in the craw of New York City restaurateur turned food and pop culture commentator Eddie Huang. Apparently, it was a bit much that another business serving Asian food took the word “bao” and deigned use it in the name of their food truck. “I’m 28 years old, I opened the restaurant last year, I did it all with my own money,” Huang told SF Weekly’s BuzzMachine. “Street trucks are like independent businesses, many times ethnic. To co-opt something like this reeks of corporations.” Then he started talking about suing them, too. If that’s the case, Roy Choi should basically have sued every food truck across the country.

    Regardless, the Chairman Bao Bun Truck did change its name to “The Chairman,” and still draws lines for its simple menu of steamed and baked buns, which are known for having featured pork belly with pickled daikon, crispy garlic tofu with miso greens, and red sesame chicken with pickled carrots and cucumber. It’s a San Francisco favorite and has been honored as one of San Francisco’s best food trucks by San Francisco Magazine.

    TWITTER: @chairmantruck
    FOLLOWERS: 16,238

  • 7. The Lime Truck (Los Angeles)

    The Lime Truck

    Brash and cocky, the trio behind the Orange County, California-based Lime Truck (owner Daniel Shemtob, with Jason Quinn and Jesse Brockman) wore lime-green headbands in the fast lane through much of season two of Food Network’s The Great Food Truck Road Race, winning the show. The three founders, who launched the truck in June 2010, pride themselves on “local, organic, and sustainably sourced fresh ingredients, paired with hip, inventive recipes.” The truck offers a variety of Mexican-inspired items with a fun twist, from their ahi tuna poke nachos to carnitas fries. To keep up with their growing fan base, the truck now has merchandise available online.

    TWITTER: @thelimetruck
    FOLLOWERS: 10,842

  • 8. Senor Sisig (San Francisco)

    Senor Sisig

    What’s sisig? It’s a Filipino dish made from pig’s head and liver, often seasoned with calamansi and chili peppers, and at San Francisco’s Señor Sisig, it’s obviously the star of the show, except that as SF Weekly noted, chef Gil Payumo makes the trucks version with pork shoulder instead of offal, “for a cleaner and meatier sisig.” Payumo launched the truck in 2010 with high-school friend Evan Kidera and the two have been slinging sisig on tacos, fries, nachos, and in burritos ever since. You have basically five options at Señor Sisig, with your choice of protein being pork, chicken, or tofu. There are tacos with onions, lettuce, and cilantro cream sauce. A Señor Sisig burrito takes those toppings minus the onions and adds adobo rice, pinto beans, and salsa, but their signature is probably the California Sisig Burrito featuring fries, shredded cheese, sour cream, guacamole, and salsa. If that’s not out there enough, “Silog it” for $1 more and add an egg to your sisig.

    TWITTER: @senorsisig
    FOLLOWERS: 8,736

  • 9. Lobsta Truck (Los Angeles, San Francisco)

    Lobsta Truck

    Does the lobster roll at the Lobsta Truck (whose inspiration comes from what has to be considered one of the best, if not the best lobster roll in the country) serve as much lobster as its muse Red’s Eats in Wiscasset, Maine? No. But the Lobsta Truck is also serving $12 rolls on the road, all the way across the country in Los Angeles, where Maine lobster doesn’t come quite as easily as out of the traps from the water nearby Red’s, and they certainly have the right idea in mind that it doesn’t get much better than Red’s.

    Former seafood distributor and truck owner Justin Mi was inspired by the idea to start an LA lobster roll truck after doing a lobster roll tour through Maine (something that can practically inspire you to just move there). He flies in fresh lobsters from Maine and Canada several times a week (and those famous top-loading buns), and offers a simple menu that has been a hit in LA, and now also in San Francisco. There’s little more than the lobster roll (clam chowder, lobster bisque, chips, whoopie pie, and an ice cream sandwich), but they’ve added one West Coast item that’s likely to make many East Coast seafood lovers jealous enough to start thinking how they can get their own version: a fresh Dungeness crab roll.

    TWITTER: @lobstatruck
    FOLLOWERS: 21,679

  • 10. Grill ‘Em All (Los Angeles)

    Twitter/Grill ‘Em All

    “Steadfast in the belief that the heavy metal and culinary worlds were bound to collide one day in a victorious marriage of massive meat and riffage,” buddies and bandmates chef Ryan Harkins and Matthew Chernus won it all in 2010 with their over-the-top burgers when they beat fellow Los Angeles food truck Nom Nom during Food Network’s The Great Food Truck Race.

    You’ll be tempted to order the Molly Hatchet (fennel sausage gravy, bacon, and maple syrup), the Dee Snider (peanut butter, jelly, bacon, and Sriracha), and the Witte (pronounced “Wit-e,” a burger topped with cream cheese, deep-fried bacon, beer and Sriracha onions, and malt vinegar aioli), but you haven’t “grilled ‘em all” until you’ve tackled the Behemoth: two grilled cheese “buns” with Cheddar, bacon, beer-soaked onions, pickles, and “Grandma’s Mosh Pit BBQ Sauce” and a side of hand-rolled tater tots.

    Last year, Grill ‘Em All also opened a stationary location on Alhambra, Calif.’s Main Street. If not entirely unique in its menu (they have some truck favorites including “Napalm Death”), then it certainly is for its mural depicting a wizard “cavorting” with medieval burger trolls. They’ve moved a lot of their operation to the stationary location, but still bring the truck to the streets. Be sure to check their schedule ahead of time.

camel

HIWAY AMERICA -AMERICA’S STRANGEST RESTAURANTS

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HIWAY AMERICA -AMERICA’S STRANGEST RESTAURANTS

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 America’s Strangest Restaurants

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America's Strangest Restaurants: Magic Restroom Café

Daniel Chyan of Magic Restroom Cafe

“I am probably the only restaurateur in the entire world who is unapologetically telling you that my food is bad for you, and that you should stay away from it,” Heart Attack Grill’s Jon Basso recently said after one of his regulars suffered (you guessed it) a massive heart attack on his post-meal bus ride home.

With waitresses dressed as sexy nurses and a Guinness World Record for “Most Calorific Burger,” this Las Vegas attraction is surely an only-in-America experience. But in a country that birthed the bloomin’ onion, it’s not the only weird eatery America has to offer. Strange restaurants abound from coast to coast, from a toilet-themed café in the suburbs of Los Angeles to ninja villages in New York City and an actual cave in the Midwest.

“Part of the appeal of a themed or a weird restaurant is that it may not live or die based on how good the food is,” explains Doug Kirby, author of Roadside America, a byway bible to America’s strangest pit stops. “I hear a lot of locals say they would never go to the nearby weird restaurant, but they’d totally take whoever was visiting from out of town.”

On your next trip, here’s where to let your foodie freak flag fly.

COOL PEOPLE -JOHN LENNON’S ROLLS ROYCE

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JOHN LENNON’S ROLLS ROYCE

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On June 3, 1965, a brand new Rolls-Royce was delivered to John Lennon. The Phantom V model had been fitted with a limousine body and was finished in Valentines black. The car’s license plate was FJB111C. A guarantee was issued to John on June 10, 1965. The car was 19 feet long and weighed three tons.
A notoriously bad driver himself, John seldom drove the plush car himself, instead preferring to employ a chauffeur. John had two different chauffeurs during his Beatle years- Bill Corbett and (more frequently) Les Anthony.
John and his fellow Beatles were driven in the vehicle to the premiere of their second movieHelp! in July of 1965. On October 26, ’65, a very ambivalent John and his three comrades were chauffeured in the car to Buckingham Palace to receive their MBE medals from the Queen. While being driven, John loved to lie on his back and play with the car’s various control buttons with his feet.
In 1966, John had the back seat converted to a double bed. Later, a Sony television, a portable refrigerator, and telephone were installed. A “floating” record player (with perfect balance so it could be used without being effected by stops and bumps while driving) was also fitted inside. An interior and exterior sound system was included. John added blacked-out windows and was the first person in England to have this feature in his car.
In September of ’66, when John went to Spain to film his first solo movie How I Won the War, he had his beloved Rolls driven to Spain. “We were in Almeira, which was very sandy, and the local kids would write ‘el Beatle’ on the car,” recalled Les Anthony.
On January 7, 1966, a mileage check on the car showed 6,673 miles on the odometer. On March 28th, another check revealed it to have clocked 11,181 miles. By February 4, 1967, the total had risen to 29,283 miles.
In early 1967, Ringo Starr suggested to John that he should have the car painted in psychedelic colors. “We were passing the fairground one day,” remembered Les, “and they were admiring the fairground decorations and gypsy caravans. Ringo said why not have the Rolls painted the same way. John thought it was a great idea. It was painted all yellow first, then hand painted (with bright blue and red flowers and psychedelic designs). The first time i drove it, I was followed by hordes of photographers and Pathe news.”
John later told a story of a woman rushing at him and attacking him with her umbrella when she saw his car, shouting, “You swine! You swine! How dare you do that to a Rolls-Royce!”
The psychedelic paint job was done by a group of Dutch artists who called themselves “The Fool”. John had previously employed The Fool to paint a gypsy caravan he kept on the grounds of his home. The paint job cost around $4,200 (U.S. dollars).
On November 25, 1969, John decided to return his MBE medal. “I drove it (the Rolls-Royce) to Buckingham Palace in 1969″, said Les, “to hand back his MBE (medal). Well, not actually take it into Buckingham Palace. I had to take it to Lord Chamberlain’s office nearby.”
In 1970, after John had married Yoko Ono, the couple moved to the United States and had the car shipped to America. John loaned the car out to several rock stars, including the Rolling Stones, the Moody Blues and Bob Dylan. John hardly ever used the car himself anymore and eventually had it put in storage.
In 1977, when John and Yoko were having some tax problems, it was handed over to the nation -in the form of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum at the Smithsonian Institute- in lieu of the $250,000.00 tax owed. A year later, the museum produced postcards of it. John sent one of these postcards to his uncle Norman in 1979. (“Dear Norman, Happy ’79. Cheers, love, John & family.”)
In 1985, the Smithsonian decided to sell the car to Sotheby’s for auction. It fetched $2.3 million dollars, making it the most expensive car in history. It was bought by the owner of the Ripley’s Believe It or Not Museum in South Carolina. By 2011, it was being exhibited at a museum in British Columbia.

HIWAY AMERICA -6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

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6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

#3. Everything You Know About Columbus Is a Calculated Lie

The Myth:

Columbus discovered America thanks to a daring journey across the Atlantic. His crew was about to throw him overboard when land was spotted. Even after he landed in America, Columbus didn’t realize he’d discovered an entire continent because maps of America were far less reliable back then. In one of the great tragedies of history, Columbus went to his grave poor, believing he’d merely discovered India. Nobody really “got” America’s potential until the pilgrims showed up and successfully settled the country for the first time. Nearly 150 years might seem like a long time between trips, but boats were really slow back in those days, and they’d just learned that the Atlantic Ocean went that far.


“Pile into a tiny boat with dozens of filthy people for months on end” isn’t the world’s most attractive sales pitch.

The Truth:

First of all, Columbus wasn’t the first to cross the Atlantic. Nor were the vikings. Two Native Americans landed in Holland in 60 B.C. and were promptly not given a national holiday by anyone. Columbus didn’t see the enormous significance of his ability to cross the Atlantic because it wasn’t especially significant. His voyage wasn’t particularly difficult. They enjoyed smooth sailing, and nobody was threatening to throw him overboard. Despite what history books tell kids (and the Internet apparently believes), Columbus died wealthy, and with a pretty good idea of what he’d found — on his third voyage to America, he wrote in his journal, “I have come to believe that this is a mighty continent which was hitherto unknown.”


“Unknown” in this context means “inhabited by tens of millions.”

The myths surrounding him cover up the fact that Columbus was calculating, shrewd and as hungry for gold as the voice over guy in the Cash4Gold ads. When he couldn’t find enough of the yellow stuff to make his voyage profitable, he focused on enslaving Native Americans for profit. That’s how efficient Columbus was — he discovered America and invented American slavery in the same 15-year span.

There were plenty of unsuccessful, mostly horrible attempts to settle America between Columbus’ discovery and the pilgrims’ arrival. We only hear these two “settling of America” stories because history books and movies aren’t huge fans of what white people got up to between 1492 and 1620 in America — mostly digging for gold and eating each other.

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When people talk about traditional American values, this is what they mean.

They also show us white Europeans being unable to easily defeat a native population that hadn’t yet been ravaged by plague. It wasn’t coincidence that the pilgrims settled America two years after New England was emptied of 96 percent of the Indians who lived there. According to James W. Loewen’s Lies My Teacher Told Me, that’s generally how the settling process went: The plague acted as a lead blocker for white European settlers, clearing the land of all the natives. The Europeans had superior weapons, but they also had superior guns when they tried to colonize China, India, Africa and basically every other region on the planet. When you picture Chinese or Indian or African people today, they’re not white because those lands were already inhabited when the Europeans showed up. And so was America.

American history goes to almost comical lengths to ignore that fact. For instance, if your reading comprehension was strong in middle school, you might remember the lost colony of Roanoke, where the people mysteriously disappeared, leaving behind only one cryptic clue: the word “Croatan” carved into the town post. As we’ve covered before, this is only a mystery if you are the worst detective ever. Croatan was the name of a nearby island populated by friendly Native Americans. In the years after the people of Roanoke “disappeared,” genetically impossible Native Americans with gray eyes and an “astounding” familiarity with distinctly European customs began to pop up in the tribes that moved between Croatan and Roanoke islands.


“It must be written in a cypher of some sort. Let’s just go ahead and call it alien abduction.”

#2. White Settlers Did Not Carve America Out of the Untamed Wilderness

The Myth:

The pilgrims were the first in a parade of brave settlers who pushed civilization westward along the frontier with elbow grease and sheer grizzled-old-man strength.

The Truth:

In written records from early colonial times, you constantly come across “settlers” being shocked at how convenient the American wilderness made things for them. The eastern forests, generally portrayed by great American writers as a “thick, unbroken snarl of trees” no longer existed by the time the white European settlers actually showed up. The pilgrims couldn’t believe their luck when they found that American forests just naturally contained “an ecological kaleidosocope of garden plots, blackberry rambles, pine barrens and spacious groves of chestnut, hickory and oak.”

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“We have hours of weeding ahead of us, but by the grace of God, we will persevere.”

The puzzlingly obedient wilderness didn’t stop in New England. Frontiersmen who settled what is today Ohio were psyched to find that the forest there naturally grew in a way that “resembled English parks.” You could drive carriages through the untamed frontier without burning a single calorie clearing rocks, trees and shrubbery.

Whether they honestly believed they’d lucked into the 17th century equivalent of Candyland or were being willfully ignorant about how the land got so tamed, the truth about the presettled wilderness didn’t make it into the official account. It’s the same reason every extraordinarily lucky CEO of the past 100 years has written a book about leadership. It’s always a better idea to credit hard work and intelligence than to acknowledge that you just got luckier than any group of people has ever gotten in the history of the world.


“Holy crap, it’s already wired for Wi-Fi!”

Nobody’s role in settling America has been quite as overplayed as the pilgrims’. Despite famous sermons with titles like “Into the Wilderness,” the pilgrims cherry-picked Plymouth specifically because it was a recently abandoned town. After sailing up and down the coast of Cape Cod, they chose Plymouth Rock because of “its beautiful cleared fields, recently planted in corn, and its useful harbor.”

We’re always told that the pilgrims were helped by an Indian named Squanto who spoke English. How the hell did that happen? Had he taken AP English in high school? The answer to that question is the greatest story your history teachers didn’t bother to teach you. Squanto was from the town that would become Plymouth, but between being born there and the pilgrims’ arrival, he’d undergone an epic journey that puts Homer’s Odyssey to shame.


And at the end, instead of bangin’ his hot wife, he had to teach white people how to bury dead fish with corn kernels.

Squanto had been kidnapped from Cape Cod as a child and sold into slavery in Spain. He escaped like the boy Maximus he was, and spent his better years hoofing it west until he hit the Atlantic Ocean. Deciding that swimming back to America would take too much time, he learned enough English to convince someone to let him hitch a ride to “the New World.” When he finally got back home, he found his town deserted. The plague had swept through two years before, taking everyone but him with it.

when the pilgrims showed up, instead of being pissed at the people from the Continent who had stolen his ability to grow up with his family, he decided that since nobody else was using it, he might as well show them how to make his town work.

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“And this is the sea. I’d recommend bathing in it, because you people smell like the inside of my asshole.”

This is especially charitable of him when you realize that, while the pilgrims were nicer than past settlers, they weren’t exactly sensitive to Squanto’s plight. According to a pilgrim journal from the days immediately after they arrived, they raided Indian graves for “bowls, trays, dishes and things like that. We took several of the prettiest things to carry away with us, and covered the body up again.” And yet Squanto taught them how to make it through a winter without turning to cannibalism — a landmark accomplishment for the British to that point.

Compare that to Jamestown, the first successful settlement in American history. You don’t know the name of the ship that landed there because the settlers antagonized the natives, just like the vikings who came before them. The Native Americans didn’t have to actively kill them. They just sat back and laughed as the English spent the harvest seasons digging holes for gold. The first Virginians were so desperate without a Squanto that they went from taking Indian slaves to offering themselves up as slaves to the Indians in exchange for food. Enough English managed to survive there to make Jamestown the oldest successful colonial settlement in America. But it’s hard to turn it into a religious allegory in which white people are the good guys, so we get the pilgrims instead.

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If this were accurate, the settlers would be shitting in bushes while the Indians told them which leaves were safe to wipe with.

#1. How Indians Influenced Modern America

The Myth:

After the natives helped the pilgrims get through that first winter, all playing nice disappeared until Dances with Wolves. Even the movies that do portray white people going native portray it as a shocking exception to the rule. Otherwise, the only influence the natives seem to have on the New World and the frontiersmen is giving them moving targets to shoot at, and eventually a plot outline for Avatar.

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It’s pretty much just this and Kevin Costner until Wounded Knee.

The Truth:

The fake mystery of Roanoke is a pretty good key for understanding the difference between how white settlers actually felt about American Indians and how hard your history books had to ignore that reality. Settlers defecting to join native society was so common that it became a major issue for colonial leaders — think the modern immigration debate, except with all the white people risking their lives to get out of American society. According to Loewen, “Europeans were always trying to stop the outflow. Hernando De Soto had to post guards to keep his men and women from defecting to Native societies.” Pilgrims were so scared of Indian influence that they outlawed the wearing of long hair.

Ben Franklin noted that, “No European who has tasted Savage Life can afterwards bear to live in our societies.” While “always bet on black” might have been sound financial advice by the time Wesley Snipes offered it, Ben Franklin knew that for much of American history, it was equally advisable to bet on red.

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“It’s this, or powdered wigs and sexual repression.”

Franklin wasn’t pointing this out as a critique of the settlers who defected — he believed that Indian societies provided greater opportunities for happiness than European cultures — and he wasn’t the only Founding Father who thought settlers could learn a thing or two from them. They didn’t dress up like Indians at the Boston Tea Party ironically. That was common protesting gear during the American revolutions.

For a hundred years after the American Revolution, none of this was a secret. Political cartoonists used Indians to represent the colonial side. Colonial soldiers dressed up like Indians when fighting the British. Documents from the time indicate that the design of the U.S. government was at least partially inspired by native tribal society. Historians think the Iroquois Confederacy had a direct influence on the U.S. Constitution, and the Senate even passed a resolution acknowledging that “the confederation of the original thirteen colonies into one republic was influenced … by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself.”


If we’d incorporated their fashion sense, C-SPAN would be more interesting.

That wasn’t just Congress trying to get some Indian casino money. The colonists came from European countries that had spent most of their time as monarchies and much of their resources fighting religious wars with each other. They initially tried to set up the colonies exactly like Western Europe — a series of small, in-fighting nations stacked on top of each other. The idea of an overarching confederacy of different independent states was completely foreign to them. Or it would have been. But as Ben Franklin noted in a letter about the failure to integrate with one another:

“It would be a strange thing if six nations of ignorant savages should be capable of forming a scheme for such a union and be able to execute it in such a manner as that it has subsisted ages and appears insoluble; and yet that a like union should be impracticable for 10 or a dozen English colonies.”


Join, or die (or plagiarize from the Indians).

In 1987, Cornell University held a conference on the link between the Iroquois’ government and the U.S. Constitution. It was noted that the Iroquois Great Law of Peace “includes ‘freedom of speech, freedom of religion … separation of power in government and checks and balances.”

Wow, checks and balances, freedom of speech and religion. Sounds awfully familiar.

One of the strangest legacies of America’s founding is our national obsession with the apocalypse. There’s a new JJ Abrams show coming this fall called The Revolution about a post-apocalyptic America, and of course The Hunger Games. We go to a gift shop in Arizona and see dug-up Indian arrowheads, and never think “this is the same thing as the stuff laying around in Terminator or The Road or that part in The Road Warrior where the feral kid finds a music box and doesn’t know what it is.”

We love the apocalypse as long as nobody acknowledges the truth: It’s not a mythical event. We live on top of one.

Jack O’Brien is the Editor in Chief of Cracked.com. You can follow him on Twitter.

Read more: http://www.cracked.com/article_19864_6-ridiculous-lies-you-believe-about-founding-america_p2.html#ixzz36btmmXh3

What was the word hobo derived from?

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What was the word hobo derived from?

mike1999

JOHN PRINE “A HOBO SONG”

 

ENGLISH HOBOS
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What was the word hobo derived from?

Answer:
For two centuries, in both England and America, homeless wanderers from place to place had been known as tramps. Then an unknown American came up with a new word for them: hobo. Researcher Barry Popik has found it used in a http://www.answers.com/topic/breezy letter from New York City in the New Orleans Picayune of August 19, 1848: “Well, here I am once more in Gotham, after three years’ absence–three years which have passed as http://www.answers.com/topic/agreeably-2 as time usually passes with people in this digging world. During that period I have floated about and circulated round to some considerable extent…. a year’s bronzing and ‘ho-boying’ about among the mountains of that charming country called Mexico, has given me a slight dash of the Spanish.”
Where this odd word came from nobody knows for sure, but the “slight dash of the Spanish” gives a hint. It could be borrowed from the Spanish hobo, or jobo, a word which appeared in print as far back as 1516. This word, in turn, comes from the Taino Indian language spoken in the West Indies and refers to a tree that grows there. How could a tree become a http://www.answers.com/topic/tramp? Well, over the centuries Spanish jobo acquired other more relevant meanings. In Mexico jobo can refer to a Guatemalan; in Cuba, correr jobos means “to play http://www.answers.com/topic/truant.” So to avoid the http://www.answers.com/topic/taint of the term tramp, an American wanderer might be happy to adopt the exotic hobo.

In American English, it has continued to imply relatively higher status than vagrant or tramp. The exact definition has depended on who was using the word, but hobo has generally meant “a wanderer who is willing to work.”
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THE HOBO CODE

An ethical code was created by Tourist Union #63 during its 1889 National Hobo Convention in St. Louis Missouri. This code was voted upon as a concrete set of laws to govern the Nation-wide Hobo Body; it reads this way:

1.
Decide your own life, don’t let another person run or rule you.

2.
When in town, always respect the local law and officials, and try to be a gentleman at all times.

3.
Don’t take advantage of someone who is in a vulnerable situation, locals or other hobos.

4.
Always try to find work, even if temporary, and always seek out jobs nobody wants. By doing so you not only help a business along, but ensure employment should you return to that town again.

5.
When no employment is available, make your own work by using your added talents at crafts.

6.
Do not allow yourself to become a stupid drunk and set a bad example for locals’ treatment of other hobos.

7.
When jungling in town, respect handouts, do not wear them out, another hobo will be coming along who will need them as bad, if not worse than you.

8.
Always respect nature, do not leave garbage where you are jungling.

9.
If in a community jungle, always pitch in and help.

10.
Try to stay clean, and boil up wherever possible.

11.
When traveling, ride your train respectfully, take no personal chances, cause no problems with the operating crew or host railroad, act like an extra crew member.

12.
Do not cause problems in a train yard, another hobo will be coming along who will need passage through that yard.

13.
Do not allow other hobos to molest children, expose all molesters to authorities, they are the worst garbage to infest any society.

14.
Help all runaway children, and try to induce them to return home.

15.
Help your fellow hobos whenever and wherever needed, you may need their help someday.

16.
If present at a hobo court and you have testimony, give it. Whether for or against the accused, your voice counts!

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HOBO TERMS

Accommodation car the caboose of a train
Angellina a young inexperienced child
Bad Road a train line rendered useless by some hobo’s bad action or crime
Banjo (1) a small portable frying pan; (2) a short, “D” handled shovel
Barnacle a person who sticks to one job a year or more
Beachcomber a hobo who hangs around docks or seaports
Big House prison
Bindle stick a collection of belongings wrapped in cloth and tied around a stick
Bindlestiff a hobo who carries a bindle
Blowed-in-the-glass a genuine, trustworthy individual
‘Bo the common way one hobo referred to another: “I met that ‘Bo on the way to Bangor last spring.”
Boil Up specifically, to boil one’s clothes to kill lice and their eggs; generally, to get oneself as clean as possible
Bone polisher a mean dog
Bone orchard a graveyard
Bull a railroad officer
Bullets beans
Buck a Catholic priest good for a dollar
Burger today’s lunch
C, H, and D indicates an individual is Cold, Hungry, and Dry (thirsty)
California blankets newspapers, intended to be used for bedding on a park bench
Calling in using another’s campfire to warm up or cook
Cannonball a fast train
Carrying the banner keeping in constant motion so as to avoid being picked up for loitering or to keep from freezing
Catch the Westbound to die
Chuck a dummy pretend to faint
Cover with the moon sleep out in the open
Colt Freese one who rummages for discarded food at restaurants before his meal
Cow crate a railroad stock car
Crumbs lice
Docandoberry anything that grows on the side of a river that’s edible
Doggin’ it traveling by bus, especially on the Greyhound bus line
Easy mark a hobo sign or mark that identifies a person or place where one can get food and a place to stay overnight
Elevated under the influence of drugs or alcohol
Flip to board a moving train
Flop a place to sleep, by extension, “Flophouse”, a cheap hotel
Glad rags one’s best clothes
Graybacks lice
Grease the track to be run over by a train
Gump a chicken[9]
Honey dipping working with a shovel in the sewer
Hot (1) a fugitive hobo; (2) a decent meal: “I could use three hots and a flop”
Hot Shot a train with priority freight, stops rarely, goes faster; synonym for “Cannonball”
Jungle an area off a railroad where hobos camp and congregate
Jungle buzzard a hobo or tramp who preys on his own
Knowledge bus a school bus used for shelter
Maeve a young hobo usually a girl
Main drag the busiest road in a town
Moniker / Monica a nickname
Mulligan a type of community stew, created by several hobos combining whatever food they have or can collect
Nickel note a five-dollar bill
On the fly jumping a moving train
Padding the hoof to travel by foot
Possum belly to ride on the roof of a passenger car (one must lie flat, on his/her stomach, to avoid being blown off)
Pullman a railroad sleeper car; most were made by George Pullman company
Punk any young kid
Reefer a compression of “refrigerator car”
Road kid a young hobo who apprentices himself to an older hobo in order to learn the ways of the road
Road stake the small amount of money a hobo may have in case of an emergency
Rum dum a drunkard
Sky pilot a preacher or minister
Soup bowl a place to get soup, bread and drinks
Snipes cigarette butts “sniped” (e.g., in ashtrays)
Spare biscuits looking for food in garbage cans (also see “Colt Freese”, above)
Stemming panhandling or begging along the streets
Tokay blanket drinking alcohol to stay warm
Yegg a traveling professional thief, or burglar

Many hobo terms have become part of common language, such as “Big House”, “glad rags”, “main drag”, and others.

PREVIOUS PUZZLER: The Confederate Soldiers Who Left Home
When the Civil War ended, soldiers returned home to find the lives they knew were gone. Many left again in the hopes of rebuilding their lives, and they were carrying something. What was the name for these men?

RAY: Here’s the answer. The Confederate soldiers returning home were called a name that arose out of a tool they were carrying. A hoe.

TOM: Farm hoes!

RAY: Exactly. The soldiers were walking the back roads, riding and jumping on trains, and sleeping out in the countryside hoping to find some kind of work.

They were called hoe boys, which came to be called hobos.

SOME INTERESTING LITERATURE ON HOBOS
English Literature Dissertation: A Study into Hobo Literature
by Nial Anderson, University of Glamorgan, UK

Index

2 – Introduction: Some Background on the Hobo
7 – A Working Life?
10 – Money
12 – To hobo or not to hobo: Choice or Curse?
15 – Rail Life
18 – Hobo: Getting into Character
22 – Writers and Tall Tales
24 – End of the Road: Conclusion
29 – References

“The imaginative young vagabond quickly loses the social instincts that make life bearable for other men. Always he hears voices calling in the night from far-away places where blue waters lap strange shores. He hears birds singing and crickets chirping a luring roundelay. He sees the moon, yellow ghost of a dead planet, haunting the earth.”

Jim Tully – Beggars of Life


“Oh ridin’ on the rattlers, a-ridin’ all the day,
And nuthin’ in yer belly all along the way;
No ‘baccy in yer pocket, and no jack for to spend,
And old John Law a-waitin’ at the next division end.”

Anonymous

 

 

HIWAY AMERICA-IS THIS THE SCARIEST ROAD IN AMERICA? WEST MILFORD N.J.

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HIWAY AMERICA-IS THIS THE SCARIEST ROAD IN AMERICA?     WEST MILFORD N.J.

Is this the scariest road in America?

Is this the scariest road in America?

Ghost sightings, KKK meetings, Witches, and even Druidic ceremonies? Is this the scariest road in America?

Named for the now-vanished settlement of Clinton, Clinton Road in West Milford, Passaic County, New Jersey has scared the hell out of people for decades. Cut through a heavily wooded area with almost no houses, this road lets your creepy imagination run wild. You’ll have plenty of time to muster the courage to travel north on Clinton Road as the traffic light at Route 23 & Clinton Road also holds the record for being the longest light in America. Once onto Clinton Road, get ready to be freaked out.

The Ghost Boy Bridge

Is this the scariest road in America?

Near the Clinton Reservoir you’ll find a bridge and a sharp “dead man’s curve”. Legend says if you toss a coin into the water a boy will toss it back. That’s not terrifying at all. People claim they’ve also seen the boy’s reflection in the water. Other claim to have been pelted with coins.

The Iron Smelter/Druidic Temple

Is this the scariest road in America?

Ok, so it’s not really a Druidic Temple, but rather an iron smelter left over from the 18th century. The temple story stuck though, and today it’s fenced off to keep all you ghost hunters from getting hurt. Still, it’s little creepy at night and reports of oddballs having ceremonies around it are not uncommon.

Cross Castle

Is this the scariest road in America?

Although nothing but the foundation remains today, a three-story castle-like structure once stood in these eerie woods. When the stone walls still stood the place was a hotbed for the Satanic and the occult. Our guess is it still is, so maybe don’t go there after dark.

If the little boy throwing your change back at your face or the Satan worshipers dancing around the Cross Castle haven’t scared you off yet, let the Ku Klux Klan send you on your way. Clinton Road has long been known as a hangout for the Klan ever since the German American Bund held their little hate-camps in the area.

Is this the scariest road in America?

Lastly, don’t forget all the other creepy things people claim to have seen on this road. Mythical cross-bred creatures (supposedly the result of Jungle Habitat’s closing in the 1970s…), people dressed in strange outfits disappearing, and ghost vehicles chasing cars off the road… All in a lovely trip down Clinton Road.

Can you think of a creepier road?

(Black & White photos credit: Reely Bored Horror)

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