Tag Archives: Brooklyn

World’s oldest person dies in NYC, aged 116 Reuters

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World’s oldest person dies in NYC, aged 116

Reuters

Susannah Mushatt Jones, the world’s oldest person, has died at the age of 116 years, 311 days.The supercentenarian died at 8:26 p.m. Thursday evening at her senior home in Brooklyn, the Gerontology Research Group’s Robert Young told the Daily News.She was the last known American to have been born in the 1800s, and there is currently only one more person in the world verified as having taken breath in the 19th century.

Susannah Mushatt Jones (right), the world's oldest woman, has died at age 116 in Brooklyn.

Susannah Mushatt Jones (right), the world’s oldest woman, has died at age 116 in Brooklyn.

(DEBBIE EGAN-CHIN/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

New York’s Oldest celebrated in Queens, offer tips for long life

GRG, which works with the Guinness Book of World Records, said that the oldest person is now Emma Morano-Martinuzzi, an Italian born on Nov. 29, 1899.

Jones celebrated her 116th birthday last July with family and friends.(BYRON SMITH FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
Her cake paid tribute to her love of chicken drumsticks and bacon.(BYRON SMITH FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

Jones celebrated her 116th birthday last July with family and friends. Her cake paid tribute to her love of chicken drumsticks and bacon.

The queen of King’s County inherited the title of world’s oldest person from Jerlean Telley, a Michigan woman who died last year at the age of 116.

Jones, known to loved ones as “Miss Susie,” told the Daily News last year that she credited her long life to getting sleep, not smoking and not drinking, though she admits that she loves and often eats bacon.

First 100-year-old model to appear in June issue of British Vogue

Her one marriage lasted only briefly, but the woman — born during the McKinley administration — has more than 100 nieces and nephews.

Italy's Emma Morano Martinuzz is now believed to be the world's oldest person and the last person born in the 19th century.

Italy’s Emma Morano Martinuzz is now believed to be the world’s oldest person and the last person born in the 19th century.

(ANTONIO CALANNI/AP)

Young said that he had met her in April, but that he had only heard her say she was tired.

Jones was the third American in a row to be able to call the every one else on the planet a whippersnapper.

Jones said she avoided smoking and drinking. Above, Jones in her youth.

Jones said she avoided smoking and drinking. Above, Jones in her youth.

(DEBBIE EGAN-CHIN/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

103-year-old blind woman stunned by mugging in Bronx

The oldest American is now Goldie Michelson, a 113-year-old in Massachusetts originally from Russia, according to the GRG.

Follow on Twitter @CKozalBrennan.

 

#worlds-oldest-person#susannah_mushatt_jones#age116#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com#brooklyn#death

5 Inexplicable Events from New York City’s Eerie Past

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Watch the series premiere of Damien, Monday, March 7 at 10/9c on A&E.

With its dark alleys, underground tunnels, and shadowy figures, New York City is no stranger to strangeness.

Here are five mysterious events that actually took place in New York City; they remain unresolved and unexplained to this day.

Martha Wright Disappearance From Lincoln Tunnel

In 1975, Jackson Wright and his wife Martha were driving through the Lincoln Tunnel from New Jersey to New York City when Jackson pulled the car over inside the tunnel to wipe condensation from the car’s windshield. To speed things along, he took to the front windshield while Martha worked on the rear window. Moments later, Jackson turned around to find his wife had vanished without a trace. Jackson reported no other cars in the tunnel at the time of her disappearance, and nowhere she could have run to or been snatched away in such a short amount of time. A police investigation ensued, but Martha was never found.

Manhattan’s Mole People

Beneath the hustle and bustle of the city lives an underworld of Gothamites known as the Mole People. The true and harrowing existence of New York’s homeless sub-population of pallor complexioned underlings has been documented by journalist Jennifer Toth in the book, “The Mole People: Life In The Tunnels Beneath New York City.” Based on her research and reporting, it’s believed that the Mole People have lived their lives in secret hovels in the undercarriage of the city’s subway system since the early 90s, free to do as they please away from the New York that rejects them above ground. Toth’s account is grim and shocking – these underground inhabitants forage, eat rats, and even take on creature-like physical appearances due to their sun starved plight, a la sci-fi populations like H.G. Wells’ Morlocks in “Time Machine.”

Toynbee Tiles

These messages of unknown origin are embedded in the streets of Manhattan (there are over 50), a flummoxing conspiracy that’s had curious followers scratching their heads for decades. Buried beneath the asphalt the tiles surface over time with wear and tear, becoming a naturally strange part of the landscape. The linoleum tiles, which have mysteriously cropped up in busy intersections in various cities across the world, all bear strange messages along the lines of:
TOYNBEE IDEA
IN KUBRICK’S 2001
RESURRECT DEAD
ON PLANET JUPITER
What does it mean? It’s a little philosophical, a little sci-fi, tiles touting bizarre political theories and ideologies, possibly referencing British historian Arnold Toynbee, or Ray Bradbury’s “The Toynbee Convector,” as well as Stanley Kubrick’s film, “2001: A Space Odyssey.” There are theories, but no one knows for certain who is behind the tiles and what they mean. There’s even a documentary dedicated to the lore of the tiles, called ‘Resurrect Dead.’

Mystery Booming Noise In The Sky

Starting around 2011, multiple New York City residents across the boroughs have reported hearing unidentifiable “booming” or “rumbling” noises from the sky, and they all insist it is not thunder, construction work, or any other explainable phenomena. One man who uploaded a video to YouTube of the mystery noises in his Brooklyn neighborhood reported that people he knew “across the water in Jersey, and in other parts of Brooklyn,” had heard the very same booming noise where they were. It is uncertain what might be causing these sounds, leaving residents unsettled and determined to find answers. Is it UFOs? Sonic booms? No one is quite sure what the noises are or what they mean, and cases of these strange noises have still been reported as recently as June 2015.

Columbia University Tunnel Network & A Slain Security Guard

A vast underground tunnel system exists beneath Columbia University’s Morningside Heights campus connecting several school buildings. The tunnels beneath Buell Hall measure only a few feet wide, and it is speculated that the building was formerly an insane asylum. Under Pupin Hall, scientists once used the tunnels as a meeting place in the beginning stages of the Manhattan Project. In an effort to keep rogue and nefarious tunnel travelers off the campus, use of the tunnels is now largely forbidden, with ramped up security to dissuade would be tunnel journeymen from stirring up trouble. One such security guard, Garry Germain, was slain execution style in 1988 while on his standard night security shift. Thorough investigations revealed no forensic evidence, no weapon, no discernible motive, and no viable entrance or exit for the killer. One of the only possible explanations is that the perpetrator might have entered the campus undetected via the tunnel system. To this day, Garry’s murder remains unsolved.

Set in New York City, Damien is a follow-up to the classic horror film, The Omen. The show follows the adult life of Damien Thorn, the mysterious child from the 1976 motion picture, who has grown up seemingly unaware of the satanic forces around him. Haunted by his past, Damien must now come to terms with his true destiny – that he is the Antichrist.
Watch the series premiere of Damien Monday, March 7 at 10/9c on A&E. View a sneak peek now at aetv.com/shows/damien.
#strange#new_york#past#mysterious#history#underground_tunnel#colunbia_university#mole_people#messages#streets#lincoln_tunnel#sky#noise

HIWAY AMERICA -THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD, BROOKLYN N.Y.

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New York Navy Yard, colloquially known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard, is located on Wallabout Basin, Brooklyn, less than two miles north of the Battery. It is accessed by the East River, which separates Manhattan and Brooklyn. The channel is 40 feet deep to the south and 35 feet to the north. Access from the south requires passing under the Brooklyn Bridge, which has a vertical clearance of 127 feet, and the Manhattan Bridge.Following the British occupation of New York during the American Revolution, Wallabout Bay was the mooring site for prison hulks, aboard which thousands of American prisoners were incarcerated and died.In 1801, the United States government established a navy yard, which continued in operation for 160 years. Important vessels built here ranged from Robert Fulton’s steam frigate Fulton(1815) to World War II-era battleships North Carolina, Iowa and Missouri and aircraft carriers Bennington,Bon Homme Richard, Kearsarge, Oriskany and Franklin D. Roosevelt. With so much other activity, the yard built only two destroyers,Farragut-class Hull and Dale but was a key base where many others fitted out.After closing in 1966, the yard was converted to private manufacturing and commercial activity. Today, the site has over 200 tenants, including a major motion picture and television studio complex completed in 2004, and is managed by the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation.

Brooklyn Man Upcycles a Dumpster, Beats the System

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Brooklyn Man Upcycles a Dumpster, Beats the System

Brooklyn Man Upcycles a Dumpster, Beats the System

Posted by Yasha Wallin on August 15, 2013 at 3:00 AM

In New York City, if your apartment is larger than 300 square feet, then you’ve made it. The city is notorious for big rents and small spaces. That may be precisely why Brooklyn-based artist Gregory Kloehn took matters into his own hands when he purchased a dumpster for $2,000, and turned it into the most creative garbage container you’ve ever seen. The green-hued living space took Kloehn six months to trick out with a toilet, stove, sink, and a roof that can double as a deck for seating. It also has a barbecue, a mini bar, and a shower that sticks off the side of the dumpster and gives outdoor showering a whole new meaning.

Not only does this self-contained green living space have all the amenities of a regular apartment, but it’s also mobile, allowing Kloehn to roll it to new locations around Brooklyn when he needs a change of scenery. The whole thing is pretty quirky, yes, but as rents continue to rise in Brooklyn and Manhattan, kudos to Kloehn for finding a creative way to beat the system.

WHERE DID THE TERM “HAPPY HOUR” COME FROM?

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Where Did The Term “Happy Hour” Come From?

IMAGE CREDIT:
THINKSTOCK

There’s nothing better after a hard day’s work than kicking back with some friends and downing a few cocktails. For bars, pubs, and restaurants, the practice of happy hour specials—typically held between the hours of 4pm and 8pm—has become a commonplace way to boost sales on slow weekdays and to let their customers relax to make them “happy” before dinner. But the concept of the “Happy Hour” isn’t merely a marketing strategy, and the history of hitting the sauce at half price has a surprisingly strong—if not varied—connection to American history.

Happy hour these days is clearly linked to getting slightly intoxicated without making too big a dent in your wallet, but the term itself comes from American Naval slang in the 1920s following the First World War. A “Happy Hour” was an allotted period of time on a ship where sailors engaged in various forms of entertainment to relieve the monotonies of the seafaring life. Most of the time, this meant wrestling or boxing matches, but it still could include other athletic activities intending to boost morale.

At the same time, the U.S. was going through the darkest—not to mention driest—period in the history of getting hammered: Prohibition, the failed experiment given legal standing by the infamous Volstead Act. From 1920 to 1933, the manufacture, transport, and sale of certain intoxicating beverages was prohibited. (Sacramental wines and cider fermented by farmers were given exemptions.)

But instead of abiding by the newly enacted teetotal tenet, Americans became as alcoholic as ever, and would gather together in secret speakeasies or at home to consume some tantalizingly illegal cocktails to wet their whistle before dinner. “Happy Hour” as an expression was soon picked up, either directly or secondhand, from the Naval slang and merged to describe these outlawed gatherings.

Though Prohibition was later repealed, the concept stuck around. Some think that aSaturday Evening Post article from 1959 that mentioned the happy hour in regards to military life introduced the expression to the public, but other sources, like the OED, cite later examples—such as a 1961 Providence Journal article referencing Newport policemen “deprived of their happy hour at the cocktail bar”—as informally spreading it into the general vernacular over time. Eventually, in the ’70s and ’80s, it was co-opted by the service industry as the food and drink specials we know today.

The happy hour isn’t a universal concept, however. Currently, 23 states have banned restaurants and bars from selling “alcoholic beverages during a fixed period of time for a fixed price,” including Massachusetts, which was the first state to do so, in 1984—no small feat when you consider that Boston was recently named the drunkest city in America. Yet some states, like Pennsylvania—which extended the minimum happy hour period to four hours in 2011—encourage a restaurant’s ability to schedule their specials however they please. Internationally, the happy hour was banned in Ireland and very specific restrictions were put in place in the rest of the UK in an effort to curb culturally acceptable binge drinking, while in Canada the term “Happy Hour” in regards to drink specials is banned inOntario [PDF], and in Alberta regulations strictly limit drink prices and happy hours until 8pm.

December 6, 2013 – 9:30am

Sean Hutchinson lives in the wilds of Brooklyn, NY. He’s got a couple of them fancy schmancy academic degrees in English literature, is a big World War II buff, counts Carl Sagan and Harry Nilsson among his personal heroes, and he’s also a huge movie fan. When he’s not coming up with strange and interesting things to write about on Mental Floss, he’s writing movie reviews and news at Latino Review and CriterionCast.

Read the full text here: http://mentalfloss.com/article/54050/where-did-term-happy-hour-come#ixzz2mohSBpoE

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