Tag Archives: COOL PEOPLE

COOL PEOPLE -# CARROL O’CONNER AND ALL IN THE FAMILY

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Carroll O’Connor Biography

Film Actor, Television Actor (1924–2001)

 Quick Facts

Carroll O’Connor was born on August 2, 1924, in New York City. He served in World War II as a merchant marine. He became a stage actor and appeared regularly as a character actor on TV in the 1960s, but it was his portrayal of Archie Bunker in the 1970s sitcom All in the Family that made him a star. He won four Emmy Awards for the role. He died on June 21, 2001.

Early Career

Carroll O’Connor was born on August 2, 1924 to a lawyer and a school teacher. His family moved from the Bronx to Elmhurst and then Forest Hills, Queens, where young O’Connor developed a strong interest in baseball. He entertained the idea of becoming a sportswriter and attended college at Wake Forest University in North Carolina in 1941.

He left college and returned to New York after the start of World War II and volunteered for the Naval Air Corps. The Navy rejected him partly because of his poor college grades, and he joined the United States Merchant Marine Academy instead as a midshipman. He was called out by officers for having a bad attitude and dropped out to join the National Maritime Union and become a merchant seamen.

After World War II, O’Connor returned to New York and worked for an Irish newspaper run by his family. He considered a career in journalism and returned to Wake Forest in 1948 and then took courses at Montana State University where he met another student, Nancy Fields, whom he married in 1951.

Still unsure about his career path, he took a trip to Dublin in 1950 and enrolled at the University College where he began to act, using the stage name George Roberts. He appeared in productions at the Dublin’s Gate Theater and performed Shakespeare at the Edinburgh Festival and throughout Ireland. He graduated in 1952 and wanted to pursue an acting career.

But when he returned to New York, he couldn’t find acting jobs so he worked as a New York City school teacher until he auditioned for a stage production of James Joyce’s Ulysses, produced by the actor Burgess Meredith. O’Connor won that role and then starred in an Off Broadway production of Clifford Odet’s Big Knife. O’Connor’s portrayal of a greedy studio boss drew attention and his acting career began to take off.

Television CareerIn 1960, O’Connor broke into television, playing the role of the prosecutor in the Armstrong Circle Theater production of The Sacco-Vanzetti Story. Over the next decade, he worked as a character actor in television shows includng The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Bonanza and The Outer Limits, as well as movies such as Cleopatra (1963), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Otto Preminger’s World War II epic In Harm’s Way (1965) and the 1970 war comedy Kelly’s Heroes. He had also been up for the role of the Skipper in the TV show Gilligan’s Island, but lost the part to Alan Hale. However, another role was about to define him as one of the greatest TV actors of all time.

All in the Family

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All in the Family / Archie Bunker’s Place Opening Credits  

https://youtu.be/0d8FTPv955I

The “N” Word Unbleeped, All in the Family/ The Jeffersons

https://youtu.be/NuznDnDlTuI

All in the Family S3 E17 – Archie Goes Too Far

https://youtu.be/uDeNxdjh7tg

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O’Connor was offered the role of the working-class bigot Archie Bunker in Norman Lear’s All in the Family, but he wasn’t confident it would be a success. He was living in Rome at the time and asked producers to buy a round-trip ticket so he could return when the show was cancelled. But the show became one of the highest-rated on television from 1971 to 1979 with a spin-off Archie Bunker’s Place that remained on the air until 1983.

O’Connor, who was a political liberal, took on the controversial role of the conservative bigot Archie Bunker when other actors, including Jackie Gleason and Mickey Rooney, had turned it down. His portrayal of Archie showed the character’s humanity with humor that connected to audiences and earned him four Emmy Awards.

Later Career & Death

After his award-winning portrayal of Archie Bunker, O’Connor starred in another hit series In the Heat of the Night, based on the 1967 movie. O’Connor played a tough Mississippi police chief from 1988 until 1992. He starred alongside his real-life son Hugh O’Connor, who played Officer Lonnie Jamison.

Tragically, Hugh, who had struggled for years with drug addiction, committed suicide in 1995. O’Connor dealt with the tragedy of losing his son by appearing in several public service announcements to raise awareness about drug addiction. He also lobbied the State of California to pass the 1997 Drug Dealer Civil Liability Act, also known as The Hugh O’Connor Memorial Law, which makes drug dealers civilly liable to families whose lose a child to illegal drugs and others injured by illegal drugs.

While dealing with the loss of his son, O’Connor underwent heart surgery in 1998 to clear blockage in a cardiac artery, and in June 2001, O’Connor suffered a fatal heart attack. Actor Martin Sheen delivered the eulogy at his funeral which was attended by hundreds of actors and fans who gave him a final standing ovation as 76 doves were released to represent every year of the actor’s life.

All in the Family

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Premise

All in the Family revolves around Archie Bunker (Carroll O’Connor), a working-class World War II veteran living in Queens, New York. He is an outspoken bigot, seemingly prejudiced against everyone who is not a U.S.-born, politically conservative, heterosexual White Anglo-Saxon Protestant male, and dismissive of anyone not in agreement with his view of the world. His ignorance and stubbornness seem to cause his malapropism-filled arguments to self-destruct. He often responds to uncomfortable truths by blowing a raspberry. He longs for better times when people sharing his viewpoint were in charge, as evidenced by the nostalgic theme song “Those Were the Days,” the show’s original title. Despite his bigotry, he is portrayed as loveable and decent, as well as a man who is simply struggling to adapt to the changes in the world, rather than someone motivated by hateful racism or prejudice.

By contrast, Archie’s wife, Edith (Jean Stapleton), is a sweet and understanding, if somewhat naïve, woman who usually defers to her husband. On the rare occasions when Edith takes a stand she proves to be one of the wisest characters, as evidenced in the episodes “The Battle of the Month” and “The Games Bunkers Play“. Archie often tells her to “stifle” herself and calls her a “dingbat”.  Despite their different personalities they love each other deeply.

They have one child, Gloria (Sally Struthers) who, for the most part, is kind and good natured, like her mother, but who also on occasion displays traces of her father’s stubbornness; she becomes more of an outspoken feminist as the series progresses. Gloria is married to college student Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner). Michael is referred to as “Meathead” by Archie and “Mike” by nearly everyone else. Mike is a bit of a hippie, and his morality is influenced and shaped by the counterculture of the 1960s. He and Archie represent the real-life clash between the Greatest Generation and the Baby Boomers. They constantly clash over religious, political, social, and personal issues. For much of the series, the Stivics live in the Bunkers’ home to save money, providing even more opportunity for the two men to irritate each other. When Mike finally finishes graduate school and the Stivics move out, it turns out to be to the house next door. The house was offered to them by George Jefferson, the Bunkers’ former neighbor, who knows it will irritate Archie. In addition to calling him “Meathead”, Archie also frequently cites Mike’s Polish ancestry, referring to him as a “dumb Polack.”

The show is set in the Astoria section of Queens, one of New York City’s five boroughs, with the vast majority of scenes taking place in the Bunkers’ home at 704 Hauser Street (and later, frequently, the Stivics’ home). Occasional scenes take place in other locations, most often (especially during later seasons) Kelsey’s Bar, a neighborhood tavern where Archie spends a good deal of time and which he eventually buys. The house seen in the opening is at 89-70 Cooper Avenue near the junction of the Glendale, Middle Village, and Rego Park sections of Queens. According to the US Postal Service, the official address is: 8970 COOPER AVE, REGO PARK NY 11374-

Cast

Main character

The Bunkers & the Stivics: standing, Gloria (Sally Struthers) and Michael (Rob Reiner); seated, Archie (Carroll O’Connor) and Edith (Jean Stapleton) with baby Joey.

  • Carroll O’Connor as Archie Bunker. Frequently called a “lovable bigot”, Archie was an assertively prejudiced blue-collar worker. Former child actor Mickey Rooney was Lear’s first choice to play Archie, but Rooney declined the offer because of the strong potential for controversy and, in Rooney’s opinion, a poor chance for success. Scott Brady, formerly of the western series Shotgun Slade, also declined the role of Archie Bunker, but appeared four times on the series in 1976 in the role of Joe Foley.
  • Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker, née Baines. It was Stapleton who developed Edith’s recognizable voice. Stapleton remained with the show through the original series run but decided to leave before the first season of Archie Bunker’s Place had wrapped up. At that point Edith was written out as having suffered a stroke and died off-camera, leaving Archie to deal with the death of his beloved “dingbat”. Stapleton appeared in all but four episodes of All in the Family and had a recurring role during the first season of Archie Bunker’s Place. In the series’ first episode, Edith is portrayed as being less of a dingbat and even sarcastically refers to her husband as “Mr. Religion, here…” after they come home from church, something her character wouldn’t be expected to say, later.
  • Sally Struthers as Gloria Stivic, née Bunker. The Bunkers’ college-age daughter was married to Michael Stivic. Gloria frequently attempted to mediate Archie’s and Michael’s arguments. The roles of the Bunkers’ daughter and son-in-law (then named “Dickie”) initially went to Candice Azzara and Chip Oliver. However, after seeing the show’s pilot, ABC, the original production company, requested a second pilot expressing dissatisfaction with both actors. Lear later recast the roles of “Gloria” and “Dickie” with Struthers and Reiner. Penny Marshall (Reiner’s wife, whom he married in April 1971, shortly after the program began) was also considered for the role of Gloria. During the earlier seasons of the show, Struthers was known to be discontented with how static her part was, frequently coming off as irritating and having only a few token lines. As the series continued Gloria’s character became more developed, satisfying Struthers. Struthers appeared in 157 of the 202 episodes during the first eight seasons—from January 12, 1971 to March 19, 1978. She later reprised the role in the spin-off series Gloria, which lasted for a single season in 1982-83.
  • Rob Reiner as Michael Stivic. Gloria’s Polish-American hippie husband was part of the counterculture of the 1960s. He constantly sparred with Archie (in the original pilot, he was Irish-American). Michael was, in many ways, as stubborn as Archie, even though his moral views were generally presented as being more ethical and his logic somewhat sounder. Though this was true, he was generally portrayed in a more negative light than Archie; Archie was portrayed in a more sympathetic sense, while Michael was portrayed as loudmouthed and at times, demanding. He consistently tried to prove himself correct (as evidenced in the episode “The Games Bunkers Play”) and seemed desperate to convince people that his way was the right way to go all the time, even more than Archie, who gave up giving advice about his way when there was no point. This would occasionally, if not often, end him up in conflict with his friends and wife. For his bullheadedness, Stivic was sometimes criticized for being an elitist. He also struggled with assumptions of male superiority. He spoke of believing in female equality, but often tried to control Gloria’s decisions and desires in terms of traditional gender roles. While Archie was a representative of supposed bigotry and demonstrated the lion’s share of the hypocrisy, Michael, on many occasions, showed his own. As discussed in All in the Family retrospectives, Richard Dreyfuss sought the part but Norman Lear was convinced to cast Reiner. Reiner appeared in 174 of the 202 episodes of the series during the first eight seasons—from January 12, 1971 to March 19, 1978. Reiner is also credited with writing three of the series’ episode1]
  • Danielle Brisebois as Edith’s 9-year-old grandniece, Stephanie Mills, who is a regular throughout the 9th season. The Bunkers take her in after the child’s father, Floyd Mills, abandons her on their doorstep in 1978 (he later extorts money from them to let them keep her). She remained with the show through its transition to Archie Bunker’s Place, and appeared in all four seasons of the latter show.
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COOL PEOPLE-KEVIN SPACEY

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Kevin Spacey Escaped a Sexually and Physically Abusive Father to Become an Amazing Actor

 Everyone knows Kevin Spacey for being an extremely talented actor with an extensive resume. You can see his amazing acting talents on ‘The Usual Suspects,’ ‘American Beauty’ and the extremely popular, ‘House of Cards’.

However, what many people may not know is that Kevin Spacey grew up in an extremely difficult and different household. Kevin Spacey’s father was an American-Nazi who physically and sexually abused him.

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According to Fox News, Kevin Spacey’s father, Thomas Geoffrey Fowler, was a failed writer and was a Nazi-extremist who enjoyed dressing up and looking like Adolf Hitler. He collected Nazi memorabilia and claimed that the Holocaust never happened.

Kevin Spacey

Spacey’s brother, Randall Fowler, has spoken out about his father. Fowler, claims his father sexually abused him and another female relative, while leaving Kevin Spacey alone. Despite not being sexually abused, Kevin Spacey tried to escape the trauma his father created in his life. He also changed his last name to Spacey, his mother’s maiden name, as a means to distance himself from his horrific father.

Kevin Spacey had tried to succeed as a comedian for several years, before attending the Juilliard School, one of the most elite acting schools in the world in New York City, where he studied drama.

Kevin Spacey

Kevin Spacey is an extremely private man, who has managed to use these painful experiences to help him create deeply interesting characters. In most of his interviews he diverts questions relating to his private life, hoping to help people believe in his characters instead of who he really is. In an interview with Gotham Magazine, Spacey said, “I’ve just never believed in pimping my personal life out for publicity. I’m not interested in doing it. Never will do it. They can gossip all they want; they can speculate all they want. I just happen to believe that there’s a public life and there’s a private life. Everybody has a right to a private life no matter what their profession is.”

House of Cards

Since Kevin Spacey has become an A-List actor, he has given back to the community. He supports Cancer for College, Elton John Aids Foundation, and UNICEF.

Kevin Spacey may have grown up in a difficult hom, but he didn’t let that affect his future. He created a better life for himself and others, showing that it doesn’t matter where you com from but working hard to get to where you want to be.

What do you think? Discuss this story with fellow Project Casting fans on Facebook. On Twitter, follow us at @projectcasting.

COOL PEOPLE-DOING COOL THINGS

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COOL PEOPLE-DOING COOL THINGS

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People Are Not Only Awesome They Are Amazing When Caught On Tape…See The Most Amazing and Awesome People Doing Thing You Would Only Imagine In Your Dreams Of Doing…The Most Awesome Amazing Epic People of the Year..

http://youtu.be/L-PKQq-yXMI

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COOL PEOPLE- CHE GUEVARA

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COOL PEOPLE- CHE GUEVARA

Che Guevara, Social Activist –

ccmn 7uyimages qoiimages bb67 download (33) iomimagesChe Guevara Quotes

Random

We cannot be sure of having something to live for unless we are willing to die for it.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Hasta la Victoria Siempre. [Until Victory, Always]
Ernesto Che Guevara’s complimentary closing for his letters and speeches

If you tremble indignation at every injustice then you are a comrade of mine.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Words that do not match deeds are unimportant.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Cruel leaders are replaced only to have new leaders turn cruel!
Ernesto Che Guevara

I know you’ve come to kill me. Shoot, coward, you’re only going to kill a man.
Ernesto Che Guevara (just before he was shot and murdered)

Revolutionary

At the risk of seeming ridiculous, let me say that the true revolutionary is guided by a great feeling of love. It is impossible to think of a genuine revolutionary lacking this quality.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Our every action is a battle cry against imperialism, and a battle hymn for the people’s unity against the great enemy of mankind: the United States of America. Wherever death may surprise us, let it be welcome, provided that this, our battle cry, may have reached some receptive ear, that another hand may be extended to wield our weapons, and that other men be ready to intone our funeral dirge with the staccato singing of the machine guns and new battle cries of war and victory.
Ernesto Che Guevara

We must carry the war into every corner the enemy happens to carry it: to his home, to his centers of entertainment; a total war. It is necessary to prevent him from having a moment of peace, a quiet moment outside his barracks or even inside; we must attack him wherever he may be, make him feel like a cornered beast wherever he may move.
Ernesto Che Guevara

Why does the guerrilla fighter fight? We must come to the inevitable conclusion that the guerrilla fighter is a social reformer, that he takes up arms responding to the angry protest of the people against their oppressors, and that he fights in order to change the social system that keeps all his unarmed brothers in ignominy and misery.
Ernesto Che Guevara

The guerrilla fighter needs full help from the people of the area. This is an indispensable condition.
Ernesto Che Guevara

 The handsome Argentine doctor with an aristocratic heritage who ended up a revolutionary, a guerrilla leader, a diplomat, Fidel Castro’s right-hand man, and a dominant figure in the United Party of the Cuban Socialist Revolution, ranks ahead of other towering activists such as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., due to his immense popularity among teenagers and students around the world. His incredibly famous photo, Guerrillero Heroico, which appears on this list, has been cited by the Maryland Institute College of Art and Time magazine as the most famous photograph in the world and has simultaneously made Che Guevara a global symbol of rebellion and popular culture. A strange combination, indeed.

 - Public Domain Image

Che Guevara.  Public Domain Image
BIOErnesto Guevara de la Serna (1928-1967) was an Argentine physician and revolutionary who played a key role in the Cuban Revolution. He also served in the government of Cuba after the communist takeover before leaving Cuba to try and stir up rebellions in Africa and South America. He was captured and executed by Bolivian security forces in 1967. Today, he is considered by many to be a symbol of rebellion and idealism, while others see him as a murderer.

Early Life

Ernesto was born into a middle class family in Rosario, Argentina. His family was somewhat aristocratic and could trace their lineage to the early days of Argentine settlement. The family moved around a great deal while Ernesto was young. He developed severe asthma early in life: the attacks were so bad that witnesses were occasionally scared for his life. He was determined to overcome his ailment, however, and was very active in his youth, playing rugby, swimming and doing other physical activities. He also received an excellent education.

Medicine

In 1947 Ernesto moved to Buenos Aires to care for his elderly grandmother. She died shortly thereafter and he began medical school: some believe that he was driven to study medicine because of his inability to save his grandmother. He was a believer in the human side of medicine: that a patient’s state of mind is as important as the medicine he or she is given. He remained very close to his mother and stayed fit through exercise, although his asthma continued to plague him. He decided to take a vacation and put his studies on hold.

The Motorcycle Diaries

At the end of 1951, Ernesto set off with his good friend Alberto Granado on a trip north through South America. For the first part of the trip, they had a Norton motorcycle, but it was in poor repair and had to be abandoned in Santiago. They traveled through Chile, Peru, Colombia and Venezuela, where they parted ways. Ernesto continued to Miami and returned to Argentina from there. Ernesto kept notes during his trip, which he subsequently made into a book named The Motorcycle Diaries. It was made into an award-winning movie in 2004. The trip showed him the poverty and misery all throughout Latin America and he wanted to do something about it, even if he did not know what.

 Guatemala

Ernesto returned to Argentina in 1953 and finished medical school. He left again almost immediately, however, heading up the western Andes and traveling through Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and Colombia before reaching Central America. He eventually settled for a while in Guatemala, at the time experimenting with significant land reform under President Jacobo Arbenz. It was about this time that he acquired his nickname “Che,” an Argentine expression meaning (more or less) “hey there.” When the CIA overthrew Arbenz, Che tried to join a brigade and fight, but it was over too quickly. Che took refuge in the Argentine Embassy before securing a safe passage to Mexico.

Mexico and Fidel

In Mexico, Che met and befriended Raúl Castro, one of the leaders in the assault on the Moncada Barracks in Cuba in 1953. Raúl soon introduced his new friend to his brother Fidel, leader of the 26th of July movement which sought to remove Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batistafrom power. The two hit it right off. Che had been looking for a way to strike a blow against the imperialism of the United States that he had seen firsthand in Guatemala and elsewhere in Latin America. Che eagerly signed on for the revolution, and Fidel was delighted to have a doctor. At this time, Che also became close friends with fellow revolutionary Camilo Cienfuegos.

To Cuba

Che was one of 82 men who piled onto the yacht Granma in November, 1956. The Granma, designed for only 12 passengers and loaded with supplies, gas and weapons, barely made it to Cuba, arriving on December 2. Che and the others made for the mountains, but were tracked down and attacked by security forces. Less than 20 of the original Granma soldiers made it into the mountains: the two Castros, Che and Camilo were among them. Che had been wounded, shot during the skirmish. In the mountains, they settled in for a long guerrilla war, attacking government posts, releasing propaganda and attracting new recruits.

 

The True Story of Che Guevara – The Documentary 

The Argentinian doctor; joined Castro in Mexico in 1954; a leader of the 1956-59 Cuban Revolution. Che served as president of Cuba’s national bank and as Cuba’s minister of industry in the period immediately following the Cuban Revolution.

 http://youtu.be/g-ZJAS_ZzKU

 Che Guevara in New York, USA 1964 –interview

http://youtu.be/qRuH_8W1bwY

COOL PEOPLE- ONE LINERS FROM GROUCHO MARX

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Groucho Marx – 30 great one-liners

Groucho Marx in 1933

Groucho Marx (1890-1977):

‘I never forget a face, but in your case I’d be glad to make an exception.’

50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

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50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

6 time Golden Globe winner Paul Newman boating in Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

Source: reddit.com

Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

A young Harrison Ford

Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

Source: twitter.com

Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip at the horse races (1968)

Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

Jimi Hendrix backstage at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

323kPeople Sharing
Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

6 time Golden Globe winner Paul Newman boating in Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

Source: reddit.com

Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

Cosmos host and astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson at a college wrestling match

Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

Source: twitter.com

Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip at the horse races (1968)

Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

Jimi Hendrix backstage at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

COOL PEOPLE – Ernest Hemingway Trivia

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Ernest Hemingway Trivia


“The first draft of anything is shit.” – Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway’s favorite bars: Ritz, Paris; Harry’s Bar, Venice; Costello’s, New York; Sloppy Joe’s, Key West; and La Floridita, Cuba.

“The whiskey warmed his tongue and the back of his throat, but it did not change his ideas any, and suddenly, looking at himself in the mirror behind the bar, he knew that drinking was never going to do any good to him now. Whatever he had now he had, and it was from now on, and if he drank himself unconscious when he woke up it would be there.” —To Have and Have Not, 1937

Ernest Hemingway once dubbed Key West, Florida, the “St. Tropez of the poor.”

COOL PEOPLE -Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

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#50 Classy People From The Past Who Remind Us What “Cool” Really Means!

Jake Heppner
Our society has come a long way in the past few decades but we’ve completely forgotten what it’s like to be classy. Let’s take a lesson from these masters of “old school cool.”

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People Sharing

6 time Golden Globe winner #Paul Newman boating in #Venice during a film festival (1963)

Elspeth Beard, shortly after becoming first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle. The journey took 3 years and covered 48,000 miles.

reddit.com

#Marlon Brando’s screen test in “Rebel Without A Cause” (1955).

An old family photo from the early 1900s

A young boy stealing the show, back when middle school kids knew how to dance (1950)

Cosmos host and astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson at a college wrestling match

#Clint Eastwood with actresses Olive Sturgess and Dani Crayne in San Francisco, 1954

A young #Sean Connery relaxing on the couch

#Caroline Kennedy walks ahead while her father, the most powerful man in the world, carries her doll. (1960)

Teenagers and their first car (1950s)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre #Trudeau and his cabinet – 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.

twitter.com

#Diana Rigg (Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones) in 1967

#Sophia Loren, one of the only actresses to win an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe awards.

A famous quote of hers: “Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”

#Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.

Three boys pose for a camera on the streets of #Jamaica

#Queen Elizabeth and #Prince Phillip at the horse races #(1968)

#Paul McCartney and #Mick Jagger sit opposite each other on a train to Bangor. (1967)

A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)

#Brigitte Bardot visits #Pablo Picasso at his studio near #Cannes in 1956

A couple dancing in a 1950’s “#Be Bop” theater as everyone looks on.

#Jimi Hendrix backstage at #Monterey Pop Festival, 1967

#Ernest Hemingway’s striking passport photo (1923)

The people we aspired to be decades ago are much different than the celebrities we look up to today. The values of our past have nearly vanished, but I’m hoping that if everyone sees this, they might be convinced to get back to our roots. Please share and remind everyone what “cool” used to be like!

AMERICAN COOL -THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

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AMERICAN COOL -THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

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Introduction

What do we mean when we say someone is cool? To be cool means to exude the aura of something new and uncontainable. Cool is the opposite of innocence or virtue. Someone cool has a charismatic edge and a dark side. Cool is an earned form of individuality.

Each generation has certain individuals who bring innovation and style to a field of endeavor while projecting a certain charismatic self-possession. They are the figures selected for this exhibition: the successful rebels of American culture.

The legendary jazz saxophonist Lester Young created the modern usage of “cool” in the 1940s. At first it meant being relaxed in one’s environment against oppressive social forces, but within a generation it became a password for stylish self-control.

This exhibition does not reflect our opinion of who’s cool. Each cool figure was considered with the following historical rubric in mind and possesses at least three elements of this singular American self-concept:

  • 1.) an original artistic vision carried off with a signature style
  • 2.) cultural rebellion or transgression for a given generation
  • 3.) iconic power, or instant visual recognition
  • 4.) a recognized cultural legacy

Every individual here created an original persona without precedent in American culture. These photographs capture the complex relationship between the real-life person, the image embraced by fans and the media, and the person’s artistic work.

What does it mean when a generation claims a certain figure as cool? What qualities does this person embody at that historical moment? “American Cool” explores these questions through photography, history, and popular culture. In this exhibition, cool is rendered visible, as shot by some of the finest art photographers of the past century.

Cool and the Counterculture: 1960–79

In the 1960s and 1970s, to be cool was to be antiauthoritarian and open to new ideas from young cultural leaders in rock and roll, journalism, film, and African American culture. Cool was a badge of opposition to “the System,” by turns a reference to the police, the government, the military-industrial complex, or traditional morality. Using drugs such as marijuana or even LSD was an indicator of risk taking and expanding one’s consciousness; not experimenting with drugs suggested a fear of opening one’s mind or perspective, of being “uptight” or “square.” The same was true of sexual exploration, social protest, and ethnic politics. The aesthetic of stylized understatement still held power, yet cool itself morphed under the era’s social upheavals. The counterculture valued being authentic and emotionally naked: being cool meant a person was “out-front” with others and comfortable in his or her own skin. For African Americans, what had once been suppressed under the mask of cool transformed into defiant civic engagement in music, sports, and politics. “Cool” meant to communicate a set of emotions without losing control, and rock and roll was the art form (and forum) best suited for this shift, especially for women. Patti Smith, Bonnie Raitt, Deborah Harry, and Chrissie Hynde all carved out new iconic stances, styles, and voices for independent women who were sexy on their own terms. Cool became the supreme compliment for creative public figures who broke new cultural ground and maintained their personal integrity over time.


Alt-100

Who is on your cool list?
Who is not?
Let us know what you think.

       Exhibition sponsor:

HISTORY logo

 

Cick for enlargementMuddy Waters 1913–1983
Charles H. Stewart (born 1927)
Gelatin silver print, c. 1960
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Cick for enlargementSteve McQueen 1930–1980
William Claxton (1927–2008)
Gelatin silver print, 1962
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Cick for enlargementJimi Hendrix 1942–1970
Linda McCartney (1942–1998)
Platinum print, 1967 (printed later)
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Cick for enlargementJoan Didion born 1934
Julian Wasser (born 1943)
Gelatin silver print, 1970
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Cick for enlargementDeborah Harry born 1945
Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989)
Gelatin silver print, 1978

American Cool has been made possible by the generous support of HISTORY®.
Additional support provided by Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Watson, Jr. and by Peter and Rhondda Grant