Tag Archives: death

Jefferson Airplane’s Paul Kantner dies at 74

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Jefferson Airplane. White Rabbit. Live Woodstock 1969. Original video

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Jefferson Airplane – Somebody To Love (Live at Woodstock Music & Art Fair, 1969)

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The musician had been in ill health in recent years, with Kantner suffering a heart attack in March 2015, according to the paper.

 With Jefferson Airplane, Kantner helped pioneer the oft-imitated psychedelic sound: simple, fuzzy guitar lines steeped in dreamlike reverb. The group formed in 1965 and, within a few years, scored hits with “Somebody to Love” and “White Rabbit.” In their first run, five of the band’s seven albums went gold, including 1967’s Surrealistic Pillow and 1968’s Crown of Creation.

Verging on a breakup in the early Seventies, Kantner recorded a solo album, Blows Against the Empire, with Jefferson Airplane singer Grace Slick, crediting it to Paul Kantner and Jefferson Starship. The album was nominated for a Hugo Award presented to the best science-fiction and fantasy works. After formalizing the band Jefferson Starship, the band went on to greater commercial success than Jefferson Airplane, scoring platinum and gold records, including the double-platinum 1975 record Red Octopus. Kantner quit the group in 1984, but would rejoin in 1992 and continue to play with them until his death.

“Our condolences go out to the friends, family and fans of Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane on the news of his passing,” members of the Doors wrote on their Facebook page. “Music would not be the same without the sounds of The Doors and Jefferson Airplane, which both contributed so heavily to the signature sound of the Sixties and Seventies.”

Paul Lorin Kantner was born on March 17th, 1941 in San Francisco. His father was a traveling salesman, according to the Chronicle, and he was sent to military school after his mother’s death. He found inspiration in science-fiction books and folk music, dropping out of college to pursue music.

Jefferson Airplane came together after Kantner began playing in a folk group with former actor turned singer and guitarist Marty Balin and vocalist Signe Toly Anderson. The group subsequently brought in guitarist Jorma Kaukonen and bassist Jack Casady. Balin plucked Skip Spence, a guitarist, for drums because he “looked like a drummer,” and with the first lineup complete they commenced playing rock reminiscent of early Beatles, folk, blues and ballads. The year they formed, they became the first San Francisco band to sign to a major label.

The group’s 1966 debut, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, was a modest hit, charting in the lower half of the Top 200, but their fortune would change when lineup changes would welcome model-turned-singer Grace Slick, who’d been playing with the Great Society, into the fold.

With her powerful voice, the band recorded their breakthrough hits and became one of the defining bands of acid rock’s free-love movement, printing bumper stickers that read “Jefferson Airplane Loves You.” Their 1967 album, Surrealistic Pillow – which marked a turn toward more understated guitar playing with overtones of jazz and even Indian sensibility – brought the “San Francisco sound” to the mainstream. Later that year, they’d score a lesser hit with “The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil,” a harder-rocking song that Kantner wrote that would become the lead track on their After Bathing at Baxter’s album.

Kantner’s writing would become more politicized toward the end of the Sixties, and as Jefferson Airplane became falling apart – with Kaukonen and Casady forming Hot Tuna – and Balin leaving, the guitarist stepped into a larger role. He and Slick collaborated with several other San Francisco musicians.

After putting out Blows Against the Empire, which featured members of Crosby, Stills and Nash and the Grateful Dead, Kantner and Slick formed Jefferson Starship. Balin returned to the fold in time for Red Octopus, a Number One album, and the group’s mainstream rock ambitions came into focus. The album’s lush “Miracles” earned them a Number Three hit, and their next two albums – 1976’s Spitfire and 1978’s Earth – would also earn them Top 10 singles. By 1980, though, Kantner was the only original Jefferson Airplane member left in the lineup. He suffered a cerebral hemorrhage that year but recovered and continued with the band.

In 1984, he left the group and formed a legal agreement with the other members that they could not use the “Jefferson” name without the approval of all respective members. Slick kept her band’s momentum with Starship, which earned a big hit with “We Built This City,” without Kantner.

Kantner and Jefferson Airplane would reform in 1989, when they put out a self-titled album, and again in 1996, when they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Kantner put together Jefferson Starship – The Next Generation in 1992, which led to a trademark infringement suit with his former bandmates. He would continue to play with them, eventually dropping the Star Trek-y part of their name and putting out two albums, until his death.

Outside of his main bands, Kantner recorded two albums with Slick and a 1983 solo record, Planet Earth Rock and Roll Orchestra. He also recorded with the KBC Band, which featured fellow Airplane members Balin and Casady.

In 1970, Rolling Stone asked Kantner why it was important for him to play live. “[We’re] trying to make consciousness,” he said. “Pointing things out. Just make people enjoy themselves. We didn’t even know what we were doing when we started doing it. Looking back, all we were saying was, ‘Look, we’re having a good time.’ And nothing else. Just sitting around having a good time with all this shit going on around us. Pretty soon people start filtering in, saying, ‘Hey, they’re having a good time.'”

Kantner is survived by three children: Gareth, Alexander and China.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/jefferson-airplane-guitarist-paul-kantner-dead-at-74-20160128#ixzz3yqGgsrwT
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Togetherness

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Togetherness

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Louisa_May_Alcott.jpg  little

 

Louis May Alcott’s father suffered a stroke in 1888, and she arrived at his bedside on March 2, just two days before he died.

She said, “Father, here is your Louy, what are you thinking as you lie here so happily?”

He said, “I am going up. Come with me.

She said, “Oh, I wish I could.”

She did: She died four days later, on March 6.

#louis_may_alcott#author#writer#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com#little_woman

John Lennon’s Ex-Wife, Cynthia Lennon, Dead at 75

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John Lennon’s Ex-Wife, Cynthia Lennon, Dead at 75

John Lennon’s Ex-Wife, Cynthia Lennon, Dead at 75

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LONDON (AP) — Cynthia Lennon, the first wife of former Beatles guitarist John Lennon, has died of cancer at her home in Spain. She was 75.

The news was announced Wednesday on the website and Twitter account of her son, Julian Lennon, and was confirmed by his representative.

Cynthia Lennon died at her home in Mallorca “following a short but brave battle with cancer,” a statement from the representative said. It said Julian Lennon was at his mother’s bedside throughout.

The family is “thankful for your prayers. Please respect their privacy at this difficult time.”

Julian Lennon also posted a tribute video to his late mother with a song he had written in her honor. The lyrics thanked her for giving up her life for him.

Cynthia Lennon – In Loving Memory

JULIAN LENNON

https://youtu.be/fsyYqJxf9Qk

John Lennon Wife – Cynthia Lennon EXCLUSIVE 30 Minute BBC Interview & Life Story

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Cynthia and John Lennon met at art school in Liverpool and married shortly before the Beatles shot to fame. Early on, the fact that Lennon was married was concealed to protect his image as a teen idol.

They divorced in 1968 after John Lennon started his relationship with Japanese artist Yoko Ono.

Author Hunter Davies, who wrote the only authorized Beatles biography in 1968, described Cynthia as a “lovely woman” who was ill-treated by her famous husband. He said that unlike John, she was “quiet and reserved and calm” and “not a hippy at all.”

He said their friends at art school never thought the relationship would last because they were so different.

In her book, Cynthia described being mistreated by John. Julian was their only child together.

The Lennon Companion: Twenty-five Years of Comment

Front Cover
Elizabeth Thomson, David Gutman
Da Capo Press, 1987 – Biography & Autobiography304 pages
John Lennon lives on. Forty years after the Beatles invaded America in 1964, and more than twenty years after Lennon’s death, his work is perennially popular and continues to appeal across the generations. A man shrouded in myth and controversy, Lennon led a complex, enigmatic life. The Lennon Companion is a luminous and multifaceted exploration of John Lennon’s life and work, a collection of over fifty articles from a stellar list of writers including Pauline Kael, Tom Wolfe, Martin Amis, Gloria Steinem, and Philip Larkin-a remarkably multidimensional look at Lennon’s music, myth, and mystique.

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Where Death Shaped the Beats

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Where Death Shaped the Beats

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The Beat writers, from left, Jack Kerouac, Lucien Carr and Allen Ginsberg in 1959. More Photos »

  • THE scene of the crime, Riverside Park at the foot of West 115th Street, is in full spring bloom, carpeted in the butter-colored flowers of lesser celandine. It was here 68 years ago, on a slope descending to the moonlit Hudson River, that Lucien Carr, 19, the Beat Generation’s charismatic, callow swami, buried a knife in the heart of David Kammerer, 33, his besotted, dauntless hometown stalker.
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A map of the Columbia University area with key locations involved in David Kammerer’s death. More Photos »

Carr is often characterized as muse to the Beats, but he was more than that. Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg were acolytes, captivated by Carr’s profane rants about bourgeois culture and the path to transcendence through pure creative expression — his “New Vision,” after “A Vision” by Yeats.

Carr’s “honor slaying” of Kammerer, as The Daily News called it, served as an emotional fulcrum forthe group a decade before Kerouac, Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs published their seminal works; the violent death in their midst lent credibility to the tortured-soul narrative they yearned for.

Columbia University was critical to that narrative, and its Beaux-Arts campus is featured in a film now in production, “Kill Your Darlings,” starring Daniel Radcliffe as Ginsberg. The university stood as a kind of crucible for the Beats, who were emerging “like a wild seed in a city garden,” wrote the Beat historian Bill Morgan. Many of their haunts in Morningside Heights remain (all within a few blocks of the 116th Street subway station on Broadway), including the venerable dorms where they lived — Hartley and what is now Wallach. Any pilgrim’s archeological Beat tour, inspired by the movie or not, must begin with the university itself, a useful antagonist in the iconoclasts’ quest for artistic self-actualization.

“They all loved to feel they were sleeping in the camp of the enemy somehow,” said Ben Marcus, a novelist and associate professor at Columbia’s School of the Arts. “As much as universities should be cauldrons of creativity and breeding grounds for new creative activity, the Beats needed to feel that they were being stifled by forces at the university.”

They seemed to enjoy the idea, he added, “that these forces were straitjacketing them, whether it was true or not.”

“Kill Your Darlings,” from Killer Films, an independent production company, tells a version of the story that can also be found in “And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks,” a roman à clef written in 1945 by Kerouac and Burroughs but unpublished until 2008. (The title was derived from an apocryphal story concerning a radio newscast about a zoo fire.) In addition to Mr. Radcliffe, shedding his Harry Potter guise to play Ginsberg, the film stars Michael C. Hall, the agreeable serial killer Dexter on Showtime, as Kammerer; Jack Huston, from HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire,” as Kerouac; and a relative unknown, Dane DeHaan, as Carr.

Kammerer’s pederastic interest in Carr began when Kammerer was Carr’s Boy Scout leader in St. Louis, where both came from privileged backgrounds, according to Mr. Morgan’s “I Celebrate Myself: The Somewhat Private Life of Allen Ginsberg.”

Carr was a boy Aphrodite. In “Hippos” Kerouac called the Carr character “the kind of boy literary fags write sonnets to, which start out, ‘O raven-haired Grecian lad….’ ”

Kammerer, a whiskered redhead, taught physical education and English at Washington University. In about 1940, when Carr was 15, his mother, Marion, discovered a cache of “desperate” letters from the older man, according to James Campbell’s “This Is the Beat Generation.” She sent him to boarding school in Chicago, but Kammerer trailed him there — and then to Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass.; Bowdoin College in Maine; and, finally, Columbia.

The Beats began to form during Carr’s first semester there. He and Ginsberg, a freshman from New Jersey, lived in an overflow dorm at the nearby Union Theological Seminary. At Christmastime in 1943, according to Mr. Campbell’s book, Ginsberg heard Brahms wafting from Carr’s room and knocked to find out who was listening to the music he loved. Ginsberg was smitten. In his journal, he called Carr his first love and “sweet vision.”

That winter Carr introduced Ginsberg to Kammerer and Burroughs, who had been schoolmates in St. Louis and were neighbors in Greenwich Village.

Kerouac, another Columbian, was ushered in a few months later when he met Carr at the West End, the saloon at 2911 Broadway, a 60-yard dash away from Columbia’s College Walk. (Kerouac initially found Carr to be pretentious and obnoxious, although he used a more vulgar description in “Vanity of Duluoz,” another of Kerouac’s gauzy autobiographical novels.)

By then Ginsberg and Carr were living at Lucien Carr  at 404 West 115th Street (now a parking lot). Kammerer was an occasional visitor, sometimes stealing in through the fire escape to watch Carr sleep, according to an often-repeated anecdote in Beat biographies, including Mr. Morgan’s “Beat Generation in New York: A Walking Tour of Jack Kerouac’s City.” Kerouac stayed with his girlfriend, Edie Parker, in Apartment 62 at 421 West 118th Street, a plaster-frosted walkup off Amsterdam Avenue.

In August 1944 Kerouac and Carr schemed a Merchant Marine adventure to France, where — in the midst of war — they had an irrational plan to retrace the Paris footsteps of the 19th-century poet Arthur Rimbaud, whom Carr regarded as a doppelganger.

The plan fell apart on Aug. 13, when they got drunk and were late getting to their ship, and the men rued their broken dream that night at the West End (now called Havana Central at the West End). Kerouac left Carr at midnight and crossed paths on campus near St. Paul’s Chapel with Kammerer, Carr’s relentless birddog.

Kammerer asked his usual question: “Where’s Lucien?”

Kerouac sent him to the West End.

“And I watch him rush off to his death,” Kerouac wrote in “Duluoz.”

Kammerer and Carr left the bar at 3 a.m. New York was sweltering, and they toddled downhill to Riverside Park for cool air.

An account of the crime in The New York Times at the time explained that Kammerer made “an offensive proposal.” The article continued:

“Carr said that he rejected it indignantly and that a fight ensued. Carr, a slight youth, 5 feet 9 tall and weighing 140 pounds, was no match for the burly former physical education instructor, who was 6 feet tall and weighed about 185 pounds.”

“In desperation,” the account added, “Carr pulled out of his pocket his Boy Scout knife, a relic of his boyhood, and plunged the blade twice in rapid succession into Kammerer’s chest.”

Had Carr run to the police, he probably would have been hailed as a hero against a pervert. But he did something quite different.

He rolled the body to the river’s edge, bound the limbs with shoe laces, stuffed rocks in the pockets, and watched his longtime lurker sink.

Carr hurried to Greenwich Village and reported his deed to Burroughs, who advised him to tell the police he was the victim of a sex fiend. Instead Carr woke Kerouac, who recounted that eye-opener in “Duluoz”:

“Well,” Carr said, “I disposed of the old man last night.”

He didn’t seem nettled. As much as anything, Carr seemed satisfied, by all accounts, that he had finally done something noteworthy. The two men walked up West 118th Street to Morningside Park, where Carr buried Kammerer’s eyeglasses, which he had pocketed as evidence of his feat.

He and Kerouac traipsed about Manhattan, dropping the Boy Scout knife in a subway grate on 125th Street. They visited the Museum of Modern Art, a hot dog stand in Times Square and a cinema where they watched “The Four Feathers.”

Carr finally walked into the district attorney’s office and announced the killing. Prosecutors thought he was crazy — “the imaginings of an overstrained mind,” The Times wrote. Carr sat there reading Yeats, to the bewilderment of police officers and crime reporters.

The police were convinced only when Carr led them to the buried glasses the next day, at about the time Kammerer’s body bobbed up off West 108th Street.

A week after the killing Ginsberg wrote the poem “Hymn to the Virgin,” which hinted at a complex relationship. Written to Carr in Kammerer’s voice, it begins, “Thou who art afraid to have me, lest thou lose me.” (Two months after the death Ginsberg took an apartment at 627 West 115th Street, about a hundred paces from the death site.)

Carr pleaded guilty to manslaughter. A judge had mercy on “young, good-looking Lucien,” as The Times called him, and sent Carr to the Elmira Reformatory, not prison. (Burroughs and Kerouac were confined briefly as accessories. While he was jailed Kerouac was escorted by the police to his courthouse wedding with Parker, and the newlyweds later moved to another Morningside Heights Beat pad, at 419 West 115th Street.)

Carr returned to New York after 18 months away and joined United Press (later United Press International), beginning a 47-year career there. (He had three sons with his first wife, Francesca von Hartz, including the novelist Caleb Carr.) He remained close to Ginsberg and Kerouac, even as he tried to scrub himself from Beat history. He insisted that Ginsberg remove his name from the dedication of “Howl,” and the publication of “Hippos” waited until after Carr died in 2005.

An archive of letters and postcards to Carr at Columbia’s Butler Library shows that Kerouac and Ginsberg continued to solicit his approval long after they became famous writers — Ginsberg in intimate, lyrical letters and Kerouac in wisecracking postcards.

Yet in his journal (published in his “Book of Martyrdom and Artifice”) Ginsberg wrote of Carr: “He must prove that he is a genius. He cannot do so in creative labor — for he has not the patience, says he, nor the time, says he, nor the occasion, says he. None of these reasons is correct. He seems not to have the talent.”

Carr certainly was a talented editor. A 2003 history of United Press International called him “the soul of the news service.” He did not talk about his life among the Beats or his crime, and former colleagues say Carr would have been livid about “Kill Your Darlings.”

Joseph A. Gambardello, a longtime newspaper editor, was a protégé of Carr’s at U.P.I. in the mid-1970s, when the news service was based in the Daily News Building on East 42nd Street.

“When I met him he was a hard-drinking, hardworking journalist,” Mr. Gambardello said. “He did not come across as a pretentious jackass at all.” He added, “The person I had read about with Kerouac and Ginsberg didn’t exist anymore.”

Carr occasionally sent Mr. Gambardello to Louie’s East, an adjacent bar, to fetch a “Lou Carr Special” — a lot of vodka, a little Coke.

He had gotten over Rimbaud.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: April 11, 2012

An article on Friday about the 1944 killing of David Kammerer by the Beat Generation figure Lucien Carr misspelled the given name of Carr’s mother, who discovered “desperate” letters from Kammerer to her son, according to “This Is the Beat Generation” by James Campbell. She was Marion Gratz Carr, not Marian. And a correction in this space on Saturday misspelled the surname of one of the two authors of a screenplay, “Kill Your Darlings” that is based on the killing. He is John Krokidas, not Krokidis. (Austin Bunn is his co-writer.)

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: April 7, 2012

An article on Friday about the 1944 killing of David Kammerer by the Beat Generation figure Lucien Carr misidentified the source of a screenplay based on the killing. The screenplay, “Kill Your Darlings,” now in production, was written by John Krokidas and Austin Bunn. They did not adapt it from “And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks,” a roman à clef written in 1945 by Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs that tells a similar version of the killing.

COOL PEOPLE- JOE COCKER DIES AT 70 YEARS OLD

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  Joe Cocker Dies at 70

BIOGRAPHY

JOE COCKER

 

The legendary British born, Grammy award winning singer, renowned for his unique voice and passionate delivery, Joe Cocker,  returns with his 23rd studio album.

Following on from the resounding success of his platinum selling number one 2010 album ‘Hard Knocks’,  Joe Cocker has returned to Matt Serletic’s Californian Emblem studios to deliver an outstanding follow up album due for release this winter.

Serletic, producer (Matchbox Twenty, Rob Thomas, Collective Soul, Carlos Santana) and Cocker have produced ‘Fire It Up’, an album of eleven songs recorded over the 2011 winter and spring of 2012.

On working again with Joe Cocker, Serletic explains: “We took it to the next level.  I’m excited to hear all the different elements that we brought to this album, we got great classic soul records, big power ballads, high energy tracks, and they all have their place in this album ”.  Cocker shares that creative direction:  “Making an album, to me, is a bit like making a painting, you know, you’ve got 12 songs, and it’s colour – I don’t like everything to be one mood”.

Diverse album tracks include ‘Eye On The Prize’ written by Marc Broussard from New Orleans, who also wrote the song ‘Hard Knocks’;  ‘I’ll Walk In The Sunshine Again’ written by the platinum selling singer-songwriter Keith Urban. Cocker describes it as: “It’s country but it isn’t”; ‘The Letting Go’ written by the trio of Charlie Evans with renowned young British blues/soul singer Joss Stone, and Grammy award winning Graham Lyle; and the irresistible title track ‘Fire It Up’ written by Alan Frew, Johnny Reid, and Marty Dodson, with the anthemic lyric, and rapturous chorus sung with Cocker’s signature passion.

Cocker: “Fire It Up is a special kind of tune, and it set up the whole album”. Serletic: “There’s this whole energy which we captured”. ‘Fire It Up’, the first single taken from the album, will be released 12th October prior to the album release.

JOE COCKER -With A Little Help From My Friends- 1969 Woodstock..

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Joe Cocker Greatest hits full album | Best songs of Joe Cocker

http://youtu.be/M5FepuOeohY

RIP

john lennon tribute

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john lennon tribute
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IMAGE: MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Monday marks the 34th anniversary of the tragic death of John Lennon, killed outside his apartment building in New York at the age of 40.Lennon’s gift for songwriting was one of the many reasons that the music of the Beatles remains so influential across the entire music industry. And while The Fab Four’s original recordings are not available on Spotify yet — they took a long time to arrive on iTunes, too — there is a wealth of incredible Beatles covers that show just how big an influence Lennon and the group had on the entire music world.

In honor of Lennon, we assembled the best Beatles covers into a Music Monday playlist. So enjoy this playlist full of artists paying homage to the masters.

He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why… He Broke Into Tears.

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He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why… He Broke Into Tears.

He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why… He Broke Into Tears.

Normally, cats and dogs don’t really care for each other. But Charlie and Scout aren’t like most cats and dogs. They’ve formed a loving bond from the first day they met and held it even after Charlie passed away. I’ll admit, when I first saw their pictures and read their story I got a little teary eyed.  It’s just so beautiful and touching. See it for yourself, take a look below.

 

He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why... He Broke Into Tears.
He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why... He Broke Into Tears.
He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why... He Broke Into Tears.

He Found His Cat Strangely Sitting On His Laptop But When He Figured Out Why... He Broke Into Tears.

Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74. The man of giantesque stature was best known for his iconic role of Jaws in the Bond movies.

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Actor Richard Kiel has died at the age of 74. The man of giantesque stature was best known for his iconic role of Jaws in the Bond movies.

Richard Kiel, with his wife Diane and children Richard and Jennifer

Despite his remarkable height, colleagues dubbed Kiel “a gentle giant”. The actor had four children with his second wife, Diane, pictured here at the Cannes Film Festival in 1978 with son Richard and baby daughter Jennifer.

Richard Kiel, as Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me

Kiel’s iconic turn as Jaws in the 1977 Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me secured his place in the pantheon of movies’ most memorable villains. In fact, producers were so impressed by his performance that they altered the screenplay so Jaws survived and was able to return two years later in Moonraker.

Richard Kiel as Jaws, in the film Moonraker

Kiel reprised the role of Jaws in the 1979 film Moonraker. The film culminated with Jaws changing sides and joining forces with Bond to save the world. It also saw romance blossom between Jaws and Dolly, a small, pig-tailed blonde with braces, comically played by Blanch Ravalec.

(l-r) Christopher Lee, Kiel, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens

Kiel joined fellow Bond baddies, Sir Christopher Lee, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens, at a Bafta tribute to the Bond films in 2002. He reportedly said: “It is always more fun to play a bad guy than to be yourself as you can create a character unlike your own and be someone you are not for a change.”

Richard Kiel,  May 2000

Kiel had been in frail health for some years, following a serious car accident in the early nineties which affected his balance. He regularly used a walking stick or a mobility scooter, but retained an upbeat disposition.

(l-r) Britt Ekland, Tania Mallet, Richard Kiel and Eunice Gayson

Richard Kiel was reunited with former Bond girls Britt Ekland (The Man with the Golden Gun), Tania Mallet (Goldfinger) and Eunice Gayson (From Russia With Love) in London for the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Bond franchise in 2012.

Richard Kiel and Roger Moore

Sir Roger Moore and Kiel were last together just a week ago, when they recorded the BBC Radio 4 show The Reunion, with Britt Ekland. Sir Roger said he was “totally distraught to learn of my dear friend Richard Kiel’s passing”. The pair will forever be linked in the minds of 1970s film-goers – with Moore’s Bond squaring up to Kiel’s steel-toothed villain.

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COOL PEOPLE -IN MEMORIAM Eli Wallach Dies at 98: Early Method Actor and Lifelong Scene-Stealer

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IN MEMORIAM ELI WALLACH

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a tribute video

http://youtu.be/65n5sh8DTXE

ELI WALLACH INTERVIEW

Eli Wallach Dies at 98: Early Method Actor and Lifelong Scene-Stealer

#some Eli Wallach movies

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Half a century later, Eli Wallach is still probably best remembered for stealingThe Good, the Bad, and the Ugly from Clint Eastwood. Then again, Wallach, who acted well into his nineties, stole scenes from generations of performers, from Clark Gable and Henry Fonda to Ben Stiller and Kate Winslet. The premier character actor of the postwar era, whose work on Broadway, TV and film earned him a Tony, an Emmy, and a lifetime achievement Oscar, died Wednesday at age 98.
Born Eli Herschel Wallach in 1915 in Brooklyn, he majored in history at the University of Texas, but he also got his first taste of acting at the university, where his fellow drama troupe members included future Texas Governor John Connally and Walter Cronkite. He continued acting in the Army during World War II, when, in France, he and his unit wrote and performed a play to cheer up recuperating soldiers called This Is the Army? Wallach played a variety of roles, including Adolf Hitler.Back in New York, Wallach became an early proponent of the Method, studying at the Actors Studio with Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, Sidney Lumet, and Anne Jackson, who’d become his wife in 1948. The couple would have three children and remain married for more than 65 years, until his death.Wallach flourished on Broadway, so much so that he was reluctant to leave for a starmaking film role. He recalled that he was up for the role of Maggio in 1953’sFrom Here to Eternity but turned it down to do a Tennessee Williams play. (He earned a Tony in Williams’ The Rose Tattoo and also starred in the playwright’sCamino Real.) Frank Sinatra, who took the part and won an Oscar for it, used to greet Wallach with jokey gratitude, addressing him as “you crazy actor.”Wallach was 41 when he finally made his first movie, but it was a doozy: Elia Kazan’s Baby Doll (1956), in which vengeful cotton mogul Wallach seduces his rival’s still-virginal bride (Carroll Baker) was the rare picture that was approved by Hollywood’s own censors but condemned by the Catholic Legion of Decency. Though the movie was banned in many cities, it did all right at the box office and earned Wallach aBAFTA for Most Promising Newcomer. “It’s one of the most exciting, daring movies ever made,” Wallach said in 2007, though he acknowledged, “People see it today and say, “What the hell was all the fuss about?’ ”

Clint Eastwood and Wallach in The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly.
BY SILVER SCREEN COLLECTION/MOVIEPIX

Wallach’s movie and TV career continued for another six decades, rarely with lead roles, but often with colorful character parts, as in The Magnificent Seven(where he played bandit leader Calvera) and The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.(He was scheming outlaw Tuco, “the Ugly,” though he didn’t realize he’d be designated as such until he saw the film.) On TV, in the mid-’60s, Wallach made a memorable Mr. Freeze on Batman (the role he said that earned him the most fan mail) and won an Emmy for his work in the anti-drug movie The Poppy Is Also a Flower. He’d earn another Emmy nomination 40 years later for his guest spot as a once-blacklisted TV writer onStudio 60 on the Sunset Strip. His last Emmy nod came for his 2009 guest role on Nurse Jackie as a dying patient. In his later decades, Wallach played countless wily, prickly oldtimers on film, from the psychologist in Barbra Streisand’s Nuts to a candy-loving Mafia don inThe Godfather Part III, to a wise rabbi in Keeping the Faith, to a liquor store owner in pal Eastwood’s Mystic River, to a veteran Hollywood screenwriter who charms decades-younger Kate Winslet in The Holiday. In 2010, the year he turned 95, he finally got an honorary Oscar, as well as taking roles in Roman Polanski’s Ghost Writer and Oliver Stone’s Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps. Despite a stroke that robbed him of the sight in his left eye, Wallach never seemed to want to slow down. While promoting his 2005 memoir, The Good, The Bad, and Me, he said, “I never lost my appetite for acting. I feel like a magician. Some people would ask, ‘How do you do a play every evening?’ One thing changes every evening: It’s the audience, and I’m working my magic. I’m always learning from it.”

Richie Havens’ ashes scattered across 1969 Woodstock site

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Richie Havens’ ashes scattered across 1969 Woodstock site

Richie Havens plays at the opening night ceremony during the 61st Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France, on May 1, 2008.  AP PHOTO/JEFF CHRISTENSE

The ashes of Richie Havens have been scattered across the site of the 1969 Woodstock concert.

Havens was the first act at Woodstock and his performance of “Freedom” was a highlight of the event. He died in April of a heart attack at age 72.

The Times Herald-Record of Middletown reports that Havens’ ashes were scattered from a plane as it flew over the upstate New York field during a ceremony on Sunday. About 30 family members attended the event, which drew more than a thousand fans. Actors Danny Glover and Louis Gossett Jr. were among the speakers.

“Though he traveled throughout the world for decades visiting and returning to countless locations, Max Yasgur’s field in the Town of Bethel, Sullivan County, New York always remained the location where Richie felt his deepest connection,” noted a statement from his family.

 

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, the venue built on the Woodstock site, hosted the tribute on the 44th anniversary of the final day of the famous three-day concert.

 

Scenes from the Richie Havens event, on Aug. 18, 2013, with Havens’ daughter, right, and grandson, center.
ROLAND MARCONI/CBS NEWS

 

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