Tag Archives: Diner

HIWAY AMERICA At the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue in Los Angeles, California -THE FAMOUS DINER THAT DOESN’T SERVE FOOD

Standard

THE FAMOUS DINER THAT DOESN’T SERVE FOOD

At the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue in Los Angeles, California sits a restaurant you know. Not because you had a memorable meal there, although there’s a slight chance you did, but because you’ve seen it before … many times.Johnie’s Coffee Shop opened in 1956 as Romeo’s Times Square and, despite a few name changes, had served food and coffee to patrons until it closed its doors in 2000. And while the restaurant closed up shop 15 years ago, everything inside is still pristine. The lights are on, the tables are clean, the seats are polished. There’s just no one there.Johnie’s Coffee Shop is a Hollywood’s restaurant. One of the Hollywood restaurants. When a film director needs a diner, coffee shop, or restaurant with that 1950s California Googie vibe, he/she turns to Johnie’s. Where have you seen it? Here’s a short list:

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

The “family restaurant” where Walter starts going off about our basic freedoms is Johnie’s.

MIRACLE MILE

When Harry finds out nuclear war is about to erupt, he’s at Johnie’s.

RESERVOIR DOGS

Not that infamous opening scene, but when Mr. Orange meets with his superior, he’s meeting him at Johnie’s.

AMERICAN HISTORY X

Derek and Danny stop into Johnie’s toward the end of the film.

CITY OF ANGELS

When Nicolas Cage’s character finds out he can go from angel to human, he does so at Johnie’s.

VOLCANO

Johnie’s gets a brief cameo as firefighters battle a  volcano near the restaurant.

VERY BAD THINGS

Johnie’s served as the restaurant where Jeremy Piven’s character informed the crowd that he killed his brother.

“SWINGIN” – TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS

The majority of the music video features Tom Petty singing from a cushioned-seat in Johnie’s.

“BEAUTIFUL GIRLS” – SEAN KINGSTON

Back in 2007, Sean Kingston released this track which dominated Top 40 airways. The video is all filmed at Johnie’s.

HIWAY AMERICA – THE BUDD LAKE DINER, ROUTE 46 N.J. MY FAV. DINER AND THE AMERICAN DINER

Standard

ioloes cfcges dgrs xxxes tre 121ges dddd imagss ippges asasges imapps asa iddges ccages po puhages download (54) download (53) download (52) 10501759_816282815051103_8436212610869104451_n 10403324_825394147473303_464804668720741346_n 10551035_825677730778278_9208083265382871637_n 10441091_826040804075304_6372480293944486154_n

 Original clip of scene in truck stop diner with a very young Jack Nicholson. It just doesn’t get any better than this. A woosieproductions edit is attached to end of clip.One of the most famous scenes in film history.

“FIVE EASY PIECES” SIDE ORDER OF TOAST

download (58)

TRAILER FROM “DINER” 1982

diner

http://youtu.be/dGZZ-CLphCI

THE BUDD LAKE DINER,BUDD LAKE N.J.

1383326_10151880166965902_2038069821_n 1497517_10152059357910902_1507538533_n download (56)

 

I HAVE BEEN TO MANY DINERS IN MY TRAVELS BUT MY FAVORITE OF ALL IS THE

BUDD LAKE DINER,IN BUDD LAKE N.J.

I arrived in America when I just turned 18. I came here to start a new life and get married to my American boyfriend. We lived in New York for seven years, and I never went to a diner. We started a family and moved to rural New Jersey. On weekends we would take the kids to the diner. I was smitten! The Budd Lake diner became our favorite. Eating the Gyro was on the top of my list, following close behind was their Clam Chowder and Corn muffins. When the kids were in school and my husband at work I would take my notebook and pen, slid into my favorite booth order coffee and sit for hours daydreaming and writing poetry.

I was divorced 24 years later and remarried to my poetry publisher. When we went on our many poetry reading gigs on the road we explored diners across the country, we had the best time of our lives driving the cities and small towns of this wonderful country. Many of my “road” poems were inspired by our travels. Many diners were explored, but few equaled the BUDD LAKE DINER!

Nite Owls

This 1956 photograph was taken during the short time that two Nite Owls sat cheek-by-jowl in Fall River, MA. Soon the old lunch wagon was carted away and demolished, replaced by the gleaming diner. (Collection of Richard J.S. Gutman)

A Life Devoted to the American Diner

With a career spent chronicling the best of American diners, curator Richard Gutman

knows what makes a great greasy spoon

SMITHSONIAN.COM
JUNE 14, 2010
What Jane Goodall is to chimpanzees and David McCullough is to John Adams, Richard Gutman is to diners. “I was interviewed for a New Yorker article about diners when I was 23 years old,” he says over a meal at the Modern Diner (est. 1941) in downtown Pawtucket, Rhode Island, one recent sunny Monday. “And now, almost 40 years later, I’m still talking about diners.” He’s gradually grown into the lofty title “important architectural historian of the diner” that George Trow sardonically bestowed on him in that 1972 “Talk of the Town” piece, progressing from graduate of Cornell’s architecture school to movie consultant on Barry Levinson’s Diner and Woody Allen’s Purple Rose of Cairo and author of American Diner: Then and Now and other books. But his enthusiasm for his subject remains as fresh as a slab of virtue (diner lingo for cherry pie).

Gutman leaps out of the booth—he’s compact and spry, surprising in someone who’s spent decades not just talking about diners, but eating in them—to count the number of seats in the Modern (52). Weighing the classic diner conundrum—“should I have breakfast or lunch?” he asks the grease-and-coffee-scented air—he boldly orders one of the more exotic daily specials, a fresh fruit and mascarpone crepe, garnished with a purple orchid. Before taking the first bite, like saying grace, he snaps a photograph of the dish to add to the collection of more than 14,000 diner-related images archived on his computer. He tells me that his own kitchen, at the house in Boston where he’s lived with his family for 30 years, is designed diner-style, with an authentic marble countertop, three stools and a menu board all salvaged from a 1940s Michigan diner, along with a 1930s neon “LUNCH” sign purchased from a local antique store. “Nobody has a kitchen like this,” Gutman half-confesses, half-boasts over the midday clatter of dishes and silverware. “Nobody.”

We finish our breakfast/lunch—I highly recommend the Modern’s raisin challah French toast with a side of crispy bacon—and head to Johnson & Wales University’s Culinary Arts Museum in Providence, where Gutman has been the director and curator since 2005. The museum hosts more than 300,000 items, a library of 60,000 volumes and a 25,000-square-foot gallery, featuring a reconstructed 1800s stagecoach tavern, a country fair display, a chronology of the stove, memorabilia from White House dinners and more. But it’s the 4,000-square-foot exhibit, “Diners: Still Cookin’ in the 21st Century,” that is Gutman’s labor of love. Indeed, 250 items come from his own personal collection—archival photographs of streamlined stainless steel diners and the visionaries who designed them, their handwritten notes and floor plans, classic heavy white mugs from the Depression-era Hotel Diner in Worcester, Massachusetts, 77-year-old lunch wagon wheels, a 1946 cashier’s booth. “It’s just one slice of the food service business that we interpret here,” Gutman likes to say, but the diner exhibit is clearly the museum’s highlight.

This is fitting, since the history of the diner began, after all, right here in Providence—with a horse-drawn wagon, a menu and, as they say, a dream. In 1872, an enterprising man named Walter Scott introduced the first “night lunch wagon.” Coming out at dusk, the lunch wagons would pick up business after restaurants closed, serving workers on the late shift, newspapermen, theatergoers, anyone out and about after dark and hungry for an inexpensive hot meal. A fellow would get his food from the wagon’s window and eat sitting on the curb. Gaining popularity, the lunch wagons evolved into “rolling restaurants,” with a few seats added within, first by Samuel Jones in 1887. Folks soon started referring to them as “lunch cars,” which then became the more genteel-sounding “dining cars,” which was then, around 1924, shortened to the moniker “diner.”

One distinction between a diner and a coffee shop is that the former is traditionally factory-built and transported to its location, rather than constructed on-site. The first stationary lunch car, circa 1913, was made by Jerry O’Mahony, founder of one of the first of a dozen factories in New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts that manufactured and shipped all the diners in the United States. At their peak in the 1950s, there were 6,000 across the country, as far-flung as Lakewood, Colorado and San Diego, though the highest concentration remained in the Northeast; today, there are only about 2,000, with New Jersey holding the title for most “diner-supplied” state, at 600-plus. New ones are still made occasionally, though, by the three remaining factories, and old ones are painstakingly restored by people like Gutman, who has worked on some 80 diners and currently has a couple of projects going, like the Owl Diner in Lowell, Massachusetts, in the alley (on the side).

While Gutman is diplomatically reluctant to identify his favorite diner, one of his mainstays is Casey’s of Natick, Massachusetts, the country’s oldest operating diner. “They’ve supported five generations of a family on ten stools,” he says, gesturing to a photograph of the 10-by-20 ½ -half-foot, all oak-interior dining car, constructed as a horse-drawn lunch wagon in 1922, and bought secondhand five years later by Fred Casey and moved from Framingham to its current location four miles away. In the 1980s, when Gutman’s daughter Lucy was little, no sooner had they pulled up to the counter at Casey’s but Fred’s great-grandson Patrick would automatically slide a package of chocolate chip cookies down to Lucy, pour her a chocolate milk, and get her grilled cheese sandwich going on the grill. “If you go to a diner, yes, it’s a quick experience,” Gutman explains “But it’s not an anonymous experience.”

That intangible, yet distinctive sense of community captures what Gutman calls the ordinary person’s story. “Without ordinary people, how would the world run? Politicians have to go to diners to connect. What’s the word on the street? In diners, you get people from all walks of life, a real cross-section.” And while any menu around the country can be counted on for staples like ham and eggs and meatloaf—and, back in the day, pickled tongue and asparagus on toast—a region’s local flavor is also represented by its diners’ cuisine: scrod in New England, crab cakes in Maryland, grits down South.

The changing times are reflected on the diner menu, too: the Washington, D.C. chain Silver Diner introduced “heart-healthy” items in 1989 and recently announced that it would supply its kitchens with locally grown foods; the Capitol Diner, serving the working-class residents of Lynn, Massachusetts, since 1928, added quesadillas to its menu five years ago; today there are all-vegetarian diners and restored early 20th-century diners that serve exclusively Thai food.

If the essential diner ethos is maintained in the midst of such innovations, Gutman approves. But, purist that he is, he’ll gladly call out changes that don’t pass muster. Diners with kitsch, games, gumball machines or other “junk” frustrate him. “You don’t need that kind of stuff in a diner! You don’t go there to be transported into an arcade! You go there to be served some food, and to eat.”

And there you have the simplest definition of what, exactly, this iconic American eatery is. “It’s a friendly place, usually mom-and-pop with a sole proprietor, that serves basic, home-cooked, fresh food, for good value,” Gutman explains. “In my old age, I’ve become less of a diner snob”—itself a seeming contradiction in terms—“which, I think, is probably a good thing.”

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/a-life-devoted-to-the-american-diner-472278/#USef6V5otEpPimIO.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

AMERICANA-A SLICE OF AMERICAN LIFE-THE U.S. DINER

Standard

HEY

I WAS SITTING HERE ON MY SOFA AFTER A HARD DAYS (NIGHT!)  OF BLOGGING YESTERDAY, WHEN IT SUDDENLY IT OCCURRED TO ME WHY NOT ADD THE SUBJECT “AMERICANA” TO MY BLOG-

MY HUSBAND AND I DROVE ACROSS THE COUNTRY FOR 3 OF MY POETRY TOURS. WE TRAVELLED DOWN ROUTE 1 AND ROUTE 66. I WROTE MANY ROAD POEMS ACCOUNTING THE HISTORY OF AMERICA’S OLD AND FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS BI-WAYS AND HIGHWAYS THAT WE DISCOVERED ALONG THE WAY.

BEFORE THE INTERNET THERE WERE BOOK STORES FILLE WITH CUSTOMERS. ONE SUCH BOOKSTORE WAS  “FARLEY’S IN NEW HOPE PA. WHERE WE LIVED, WE WERE REGULAR VISITORS. DAVE MY LATE HUSBAND WOULD PERUSE THE POETRY SECTION AND I WOULD LOOK AT THE TRAVEL BOOKS.

ARMED WITH BOOKS AND MAPS WE VENTURED OUT ON OUR TRIPS. DAVE THE DRIVER,ME THE PASSENGER, MY LAP LOADED WITH INFO. NOTEBOOK AND PEN IN HAND I WOULD  RAPIDLY SCRIBBLE, TO DECIPHER LATER!

WE WERE MADLY IN LOVE FREE, UNINHIBITED AND SOMEWHAT LAWLESS. WE SMOKED AND SNORTED OUR WAY AROUND THE COUNTRY.  MY GOD WHAT A TIME WE HAD-IT WAS FABULOUS, DAVE AS MY POETRY EDITOR ME AS HIS NEWLY DISCOVERED POET.

SO BACK TO THE SUBJECT AT HAND “AMERICANA-ALONG THE HIWAY”  I WILL ENJOY POSTING ON THE SUBJECT-AND I KNOW AS I OFTEN DO WILL FEEL DAVE IS HERE WITH ME IN SPIRIT.

I WILL BE SHARING SOME OF MY “ROAD POEMS SOON AND MORE ABOUT MY LIFE WITH DAVE. AND REMEMBER “ONCE A HIPPIE ALWAYS A HIPPIE.”

ANA

Expat Aussie In NJ

 A slice of American life – the US Diner

Tick-Tock-Diner-New-Jersey

EXPAT LIFE: What’s as American as apple pie?

How about the American diner?

This may be an icon in the US but even people outside of America have been absorbing diner culture since the advent of ‘Happy Days’ and the Fonz, into our living rooms, way back when.

Since the late sixties, countless movies and TV series have catalogued a bevy of onscreen imagery that includes cozy booths, counter top breakfasts, waitresses with attitude, and lots of “caw-fee”, all in a familiar rectangular-shaped building.

American diners are so iconic that at least two have been purchased and shipped to the UK and Germany, where, no doubt, they provide a very different alternative to local eateries. At home in the USA, their cultural value is so esteemed that some have even been added to the US National Register of Historic Places.

Diners occur throughout the USA but are much more concentrated in the northeast, including New Jersey and New York. New Jersey may be small but it is chock full of diners, with an estimated 526 throughout the state – the largest number in the US. This is almost one diner for every township. It’s no wonder that the humble diner is part of everyday life in Jersey.

Diner-where-famous-Tony-Soprano-scene-filmed

Where did Diners begin?

The first true diner was a food wagon with walk up windows around the sides, introduced in 1872 in Rhode Island. This concept evolved into the Worcester Lunch Car Company which added seating to the wagon diner idea and sold their food in busy downtown areas.

It was in New Jersey where diners took off big time. Mass production of prefabricated diners was started by the Jerry O’Mahony Diner Company of Elizabeth. The concept of the modern diner was born. Shaped like a railway carriage with those shiny chrome and flashy looks that diners are known for. Amazingly, one of these original diners still operates today in Summit, New Jersey.

Summit-diner-Summit-New-Jersey

Since 1872, diners have attained a nationally acknowledged level of cultural significance. Michelin star material, they may not be. But diners are recognized more for their appeal as a place where people from all walks of life, can congregate to get a meal or coffee at almost any time of the day or night.

What are diners like today?

Early diners needed to be mobile so they could be moved around to set up for business in different places. The earliest modern diner designs maintained this ‘rail carriage’ look. The interiors were furnished with a counter bench with seats for patrons to sit at while eating, with waitresses behind the counter serving or preparing food. Booths were provided around the window-lined sides of the diner.

Since these early days, diner designs have diversified to include the addition of more showy interiors including chandeliers and candelabras. Designs of diner exteriors moved away from the traditional carriage look.

Millburn-diner-New-Jersey

Older diners were renovated to add on modern areas. Additionally, newer diners were built from scratch using a variety of different formats. The influx of new multicultural owners into the diner business helped diversify the ‘diner’ image.

Clinton-Station-diner-New-Jersey

New-and-old-diner-style-combined

Even though diner designs are far more varied than they were originally, retro-style diners, sometimes classified as Art Deco, with their shiny metallic exteriors, are still very popular.

Park-West-diner-at-Little-Falls-New-Jersey

Crystal-Diner-Toms-River-NJ

Diner-chrome-and-neons-New-Jersey

Counter-seats-inside-a-new-jersey-diner

Open-dining-area-in-New-Jersey-Diner

New-Jersey-diner-counter

Typical-diner-booths-New-Jersey

SkyLark-diner-Edison-New-Jersey

Diner-with-flashing-restroom-entrances-NJ

What sort of food do they serve?

Being classified as a diner today is more about the type of food and service offered than just appearance. They can offer almost any type of food with menus that often have multiple pages listing huge ranges of dishes.

A-diner-menu-example-New-Jersey

Diner-menu-New-Jersey

While some specialize in certain cuisines, the typical diner offers casual American food, usually in big proportions and at a lower price than many formal restaurants provide.

New-Jersey-Diner-lasagna-portion

Most dishes have a home-cooked style that appeals to the wider general public. Simple meals like breakfasts, burgers, fries and club sandwiches are common fare, served with “caw-fee”, of course! Diners have also been influenced by the influx of immigrants and different cultures. Menus now offer Greek, Jewish and Spanish (Tex-Mex) meals much more commonly than in the past.

Nachos-from-Tick-Tock-diner-Clifton-New-Jersey

And if you still have room after one of these sumptuous main meals, there is often a glass display case full of desserts to choose from.

Dessert-display-case-in-New-Jersey-diner

SkyLark-diner-dessert-window-NJ

No-one ever leaves a diner feeling hungry.

Highly Rated Diners in New Jersey

Here are some well-rated New Jersey diners, each with a very different style and offering:

  1. White Mana – Hackensack
  2. Tick Tock Diner – Clifton
  3. Summit Diner – Summit
  4. Skylark Diner – Edison
  5. Silver Diner – Cherry Hill
  6. Americana Diner – Shrewsbury
  7. Barnegat Diner – Barnegat
  8. Garden State Diner – Newark
  9. Tops Diner – East New Newark
hobohippie

counterculture,alternative news,art

euzicasa

Share something you learned everyday!

Under the Counterculture

Where dead fingers talk

Kenny Wilson's Web Site

The home page of musician, songwriter, blogger and photographer Kenny Wilson from Leicester U.K.

John Walters

thoughts on writing, travel, and literature

jsb: Getting Healthy

Holistic Wellness: Your Health, Your Life, Your Choice

Formentera Blues

Back to the island...

Revolutionary Musings

My everyday thoughts as they come to me

The Godly Chic Diaries

BY GRACE THROUGH FAITH

Allegra Sleep Fine Art

Taos, New Mexico

deep fotografie

deep fotografie

Be ▲rtist - Be ▲rt Magazine

GLOB▲L - M▲G▲ZINE

concretebologna

the world of art

Psychedelic Traveler

Your psychedelic travel guide around the globe

SherayxWeblog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Welcome To My World

A World Where Fantasies Are Real And Dreams Do Come True

PT Boat Red

The WWII US Navy career of my father, Red Stahley, PT boat radioman.

All Thoughts Work™ Outdoors 5

Hiking with snark in the beautiful Pacific Northwest 2014 - 2018

In the Zone

Photos, art, and a little bit of lit....

power of h Weblog

I wish I'd been born seven hours earlier

Paint Your Landscape

A Journey of Self-Discovery & Adventure

India Destinations

Exploring Best Indian Destinations for You

Before Sundown

remember what made you smile

Feuersteincomics

Comics und andere Werke des Künstlers Denis Feuerstein

rahulkumar961

Bit of this, bit of that

Rants, Raves and Random Thoughts

Diary of a Shipwrecked Alien

papergong

Music In The Key Of See

THE RUSTY PROJECT

Fe2O3.nH2O photographs

-GET YESTERDAY’S NEWS TODAY-

Jon Wilson’s 1920’s and 1930’s - a unique time in our history.

rabirius

photography and other things

Bohemian Butterfly

Beautiful gardens, garden art and outdoor living spaces

Art by Ken

The works and artistic visions of Ken Knieling.

Canadian Art Junkie

Visual Arts from Canada & Around the World

andrei plimbarici

Calatorind Descoperi

Edward R. Myers Photography

Captured moments of life as I see it

Kathy Waller

~ Telling the Truth, Mainly

TrappersWildWest

Historian. Artist. Gunmaker.

On The Road Again 2018

Touring the USA on a Moto Guzzi Breva 750.

Cavalcade of Awesome

All Pax. All Nude. All the Time.

phototexas

Welcome to My World......

johncoyote

Poetry, story and real life. Once soldier, busnessman, grandfather and Poet.

Gypsy Road Trip

Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

All Thoughts Work™ Outdoors

Hiking with snark in the beautiful Pacific Northwest 2011 - 2013

膜龍工坊

光華商場筆電,手機,翻譯機,遊戲機...等3C產品包膜專門店

%d bloggers like this: