Tag Archives: FILM

New York is Now – (2010) Art Documentary FULL MOVIE – Noah Becker (dir)

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New York is Now – (2010) Art Documentary FULL MOVIE – Noah Becker (dir)

Published on Jan 15, 2014

Artist and Whitehot Magazine publisher Noah Becker hosts a fast-paced trip through the contemporary art scene in New York – now. Becker talks with major artists, auction houses, curators and dealers who put forth their views on issues of art world decentralization, the art market climate, and the clash between real and virtual art worlds via social media and the internet. Featuring Lee Ranaldo, Richard Phillips, Bill Powers, Bibbe Hansen, Gerry Visco, Michael Anderson, Spencer Tunick, Michael Halsband, Richard Butler, Todd Levin, Nic Rad, Ryan Schultz, Jill Conner, James Salomon, Ned Smyth, Noah Becker and many more icons of the current art scene. Including performances by Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth and original soundtrack by Noah Becker featuring hip-hop legend Moka Only, Jules Chaz and guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel – New York is Now! **PRODUCED BY NOAH BECKER AND STEVEN LANE FOR RDY? FILMS

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HIWAY AMERICA- THE DRIVE IN MOVIE

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THE HISTORY OF THE DRIVE IN MOVIE THEATRE

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“WAY BACK WHEN” COLLAGE #ANA CHRISTY

 

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History of Motion Pictures 
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Drive-In Theater Ads
Gallery of old drive-in theater movie advertisements
drive-in theater.com History and trivia f drive-in theaters.
Virtual Tour Drive-In Theater History
Many drive-in theatres have come and gone since the great boom in the fifties. Browse over 150 drive-ins arranged by state. 
Find a drive-in with Drive-In Movie.com

Advertising Ideas – Snack Bar Rico’s Nachos (Vintage Drive-In Movie Ad) – 1970s

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Drive-In Movie Ads : Drive in Intermission 1960’s

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By Mary Bellis

Richard Hollingshead was a young sales manager at his dad’s Whiz Auto Products, who had a hankering to invent something that combined his two interests: cars and movies.

Richard Hollingshead’s vision was an open-air movie theater where moviegoers could watch from their own cars. He experimented in his own driveway at 212 Thomas Avenue, Camden, New Jersey. The inventor mounted a 1928 Kodak projector on the hood of his car, projected onto a screen he had nailed to trees in his backyard, and used a radio placed behind the screen for sound.

The inventor subjected his beta drive-in to vigorous testing: for sound quality, for different weather conditions (Richard used a lawn sprinkler to imitate rain) and for figuring out how to park the patrons’ cars. Richard tried lining up the cars in his driveway, which created a problem with line of sight if one car was directly parked behind another car. By spacing cars at various distances and placing blocks and ramps under the front wheels of cars that were further away from the screen, Richard Hollingshead created the perfect parking arrangement for the drive-in movie theater experience.

The first patent for the Drive-In Theater (United States Patent# 1,909,537) was issued on May 16, 1933. With an investment of $30,000, Richard opened the first drive-in on Tuesday June 6, 1933 at a location on Crescent Boulevard, Camden, New Jersey. The price of admission was 25 cents for the car and 25 cents per person.

The design did not include the in-car speaker system we know today. The inventor contacted a company by the name of RCA Victor to provide the sound system, called “Directional Sound.” Three main speakers were mounted next to the screen that provided sound. The sound quality was not good for cars in the rear of the theater or for the surrounding neighbors.

The largest drive-in theater in patron capacity was the All-Weather Drive-In of Copiague, New York. All-Weather had parking space for 2,500 cars, an indoor 1,200 seat viewing area, kid’s playground, a full service restaurant and a shuttle train that took customers from their cars and around the 28-acre theater lot.

The two smallest drive-ins were the Harmony Drive-In of Harmony Pennsylvania and the Highway Drive-In of Bamberg, South Carolina. Both drive-ins could hold no more than 50 cars.

An interesting innovation was the combination drive-in and fly-in theater. On June 3, 1948, Edward Brown, Junior opened the first theater for cars and small planes. Ed Brown’s Drive-In and Fly-In of Asbury Park, New Jersey had the capacity for 500 cars and 25 airplanes. An airfield was placed next to the drive-in and planes would taxi to the last row of the theater. When the movies were over, Brown provided a tow for the planes to be brought back to the airfield.

The drive-in theater movie experience cannot be beat.

all artwork Mary Bellis – (original photo source LOC)

COOL PEOPLE-MARLON BRANDO

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Marlon Brando, 1924-2004: One of the Greatest Actors of All Time

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I’m Faith Lapidus.

And, I’m Steve Ember with PEOPLE IN AMERICA in VOA Special English. Today, we tell about actor Marlon Brando. Many critics say he was the greatest actor of all time. And many actors say he influenced them more than any other person in the film industry.

There was no public service to honor Marlon Brando when he died in two thousand four at the age of eighty. The actor’s sister, Jocelyn Brando, said he would have hated such an event. The family held a small private ceremony instead.

Brando did not seek public attention when he was alive. He protected his private life. But he was a huge star. This, combined with his personal tragedies and his politics, made him a special target of the press.

Marlon Brando was born in Omaha, Nebraska in nineteen twenty-four. He was named after his father, a salesman, but his family called him Bud. His mother, Dorothy, was an actress in the local theater. He had two older sisters.

Marlon Brando’s childhood was not happy. His parents drank too much alcohol and argued often. Dorothy Brando blamed her husband for the failure of her acting career. The older Marlon Brando did not have a good relationship with his son. In a book about his life, the actor wrote that his father never had anything good to say about his son.

The Brandos moved many times when Marlon was young. His parents separated when he was eleven, but they re-united after two years. Young Marlon was always getting into trouble at school. His father decided to send him to a military school in Minnesota. Marlon did not do well in classes there. But he did find support for his interest in theater. A drama teacher urged him to begin acting in plays there and he did. But he was expelled from the school for getting into trouble.

Marlon Brando moved to New York City when he was nineteen years old in nineteen forty-three. He took acting classes at the New School for Social Research. One of his teachers was Stella Adler, who taught the “Method” style of realistic acting. The Method teaches actors how to use their own memories and emotions to identify with the characters they are playing.

#Marlon Brando learned the Method style quickly and easily. Critics say he was probably the greatest Method actor ever. One famous actress commented on his natural ability for it. She said teaching Marlon Brando the Method was like sending a tiger to jungle school.

Marlon Brando appeared in several plays. He got his first major part in a Broadway play in nineteen forty-seven, at the age of twenty-three. He received great praise for his powerful performance as Stanley Kowalski in the Tennessee Williams play, “A Streetcar Named Desire.”

His fame grew when he acted the same part in the movie version, released in nineteen fifty-one. Brando plays an angry working-class man. His wife’s sister, Blanche, comes to visit them in New Orleans, Louisiana. Blanche’s family used to be rich landowners but they lost all their property. Now she is mentally unstable. Stanley treats Blanche unkindly and insults her. Here, he tells Blanche what he thinks about women.

STANLEY: “I don’t go in for that stuff.”

BLANCHE: “What stuff?”

STANLEY: “Compliments to women about their looks. I never met a dame yet didn’t know if she was good-lookin’ or not without bein’ told. And there’s some of them that give themselves credit for more than they’ve got. I once went out with a dame who told me, ‘I’m the glamorous type’…she says ‘I am the glamorous type.’ I says ‘so what?'”

BLANCHE: “And what did she say then?”

STANLEY: “She didn’t say nothin’. I shut her up like a clam.”

“Streetcar” was Brando’s second film. He was nominated for an Academy Award for the performance. He was nominated for Oscars for his next two films as well. In nineteen fifty-two he played Mexican revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata in the movie “Viva Zapata.” The following year he played Marc Antony in “Julius Caesar.”

Marlon Brando did not win an Oscar for Best Actor until nineteen fifty-four for the movie “On the Waterfront.” Many critics consider it his finest performance. The film’s director, Elia Kazan, said it was the best performance by a male actor in the history of film.

Brando plays Terry Malloy, a failed boxer. He informs on organized crime leaders, including his brother, Charlie. His brother had made him lose fights on purpose so Charlie could make money gambling on the fights. But now, Terry expresses his regrets about losing the fights.

TERRY MALLOY: “You don’t understand. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody instead of a bum which is what I am. Let’s face it.”

Marlon Brando acted in about forty movies. He was nominated for a total of eight Academy Awards. In his movies, he played a Japanese translator, a German Nazi military officer and the father of Superman. He even sang in a movie musical called “Guys and Dolls.”

His real life was as colorful as his many movie characters. His love life was especially active. He married actress Anna Kashfi in nineteen fifty-seven. The marriage had problems from the start. Their child, a son named Christian, was born a few months after they married. They separated the next year.

In nineteen sixty, Brando married Movita Castenada, a Mexican-American actress. They had two children before they separated in nineteen sixty-two. The same year, he married a Tahitian actress, Tarita. The two had met while filming the movie “Mutiny On the Bounty.”

Brando’s marriage to Tarita lasted ten years. But his love of Tahiti never ended. In nineteen sixty-six, he bought a small island near Tahiti. Brando divided his time between his island and his home in California for the rest of his life.

Critics say Marlon Brando began to suffer professionally during and after his work on “Mutiny on the Bounty.” Hollywood directors and producers considered him difficult to work with. Some critics said the actor appeared to be tired of acting.

But that changed in nineteen seventy-two when Brando appeared in “The Godfather.” At first, the film studio officials did not want Brando in the movie. But the director, Francis Ford Coppola, chose him for the part. The film was a major critical and financial success. Brando was praised for his performance as the Godfather, Vito Corleone, the powerful head of a criminal organization in New York City. He speaks to a man who wants the Godfather to have someone killed.

VITO CORLEONE: “If you’d come to me in friendship then this scum that ruined your daughter would be suffering this very day. And if by chance an honest man like yourself should make enemies, then they would become my enemies. And then they would fear you.”

Marlon Brando won the Best Actor Oscar for “The Godfather.” But he rejected it. He sent a woman named Sasheen Littlefeather to speak for him at the Academy Awards ceremony. She said that Brando could not accept the award because of the way the American film industry treated Native Americans. The people at the Academy Awards ceremony did not like the speech. But some experts think the action helped change the way American Indians were shown in movies.

Marlon Brando was also active in the civil rights movement. He spoke out against racism often and forcefully. He marched in demonstrations. And he gave money to civil rights groups.

Marlon Brando had two family tragedies. In nineteen ninety, his son, Christian, shot and killed a Tahitian man at the family’s home in California. The victim, Dag Drollet, was the boyfriend of Brando’s daughter, Cheyenne. Christian Brando said the killing was accidental. He was found guilty of responsibility in the death and served almost five years in prison.

During the trial, Marlon Brando told the court that he and Anna Kashfi had failed Christian as parents. He also apologized to the Drollet family and said he wished he could trade places with their son.

In nineteen ninety-five, Marlon Brando’s daughter Cheyenne killed herself. She had struggled with mental problems and was still depressed about the killing of her boyfriend.

Marlon Brando never made public statements about the death of his daughter. But reports said he blamed himself. He did not attend his daughter’s funeral in Tahiti.

In the following nine years, he made just four more movies. And the parts he played were small. But his influence on the American film industry was huge. When Marlon Brando died, many famous actors expressed regret. One of them said simply: “He was the best.”

This program was written and produced by Caty Weaver. I’m Steve Ember. And I’m Faith Lapidus. Join us again next week for another PEOPLE IN AMERICA in VOA Special English.

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DOCUMENTARY-MARLON BRANDON

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A SCENE FRO A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE 1951

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Marlon Brando Wins Best Actor: 1955 Oscars

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MARLON BRANDO – OSCAR FOR THE GODFATHER

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Sacheen Littlefeather refusing to accept the Best Actor Oscar® on behalf of Marlon Brando for his performance in “The Godfather” – the 45th Annual Academy Awards® in 1973. Liv Ullmann and Roger Moore presented the award.

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Apocalypse Now (6/8) Movie CLIP – Colonel Kurtz (1979) HD 

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COOL PEOPLE- UMA THURMAN

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Uma Thurman Biography

Film Actress (1970–)

 QUICK FACTS
NAME
Uma Thurman
OCCUPATION
Film Actress
BIRTH DATE
April 29, 1970 (age 44)
PLACE OF BIRTH
Boston, Massachusetts
FULL NAME
Uma Karuna Thurman
ZODIAC SIGN
Taurus
Uma Thurman is an actress known for roles in such films as Kill Bill and its sequel and Pulp Fiction.
After appearing in a number of marginally successful Hollywood movies, Uma Thurman appeared in Pulp Fiction (1994). For her performance as a underworld moll, she was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award. After starring in such films as The Avengers and Batman and Robin, in 2003, she starred in Tarantino’s two-volume epic Kill Bill as a vengeful sword-slashing assassin.

Early Life and Career

Actress Uma Thurman was born on April 29, 1970, in Boston, Massachusetts. Named for a Hindu deity, Thurman made her film debut in Kiss Daddy Goodnight (1987), a low budget thriller. Her first well-known role was as Venus in Terry Gilliams’s The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988). Wearing only hair extensions in her brief performance as the Roman goddess of love, the alluring young actress went on to take a number of sexually charged roles over the next few years.

At age 18, she bared all in Dangerous Liasons (1988), a big-budget period piece starring John Malkovich and Glenn Close, and in 1989 starred in Henry and June, the first film to be released with an NC-17 (No Children Under 17) rating.Big Break

After appearing in a number of marginally successful Hollywood movies, she stepped off the beaten track to appear in Pulp Fiction (1994), the second movie by acclaimed independent director Quentin Tarantino. For her nuanced performance as a glamorous underworld moll, she was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award.Thurman capitalized on the popular success of Pulp Fiction by appearing in a series of big-budget productions including Gattaca (1997), Batman and Robin(1997), Les Miserables (1998) and The Avengers (1998).

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FILM CAREER

After a series of big budget projects, Thurman took a more “independent” tack, favoring a series of riskier projects including Woody Allen’s Sweet and Lowdown(1999), a Merchant/Ivory production of Henry James’ The Golden Bowl (2000) and Chelsea Walls (2001), directed by then-husband Ethan Hawke.

In 2003, she starred in Quentin Tarantino’s two-volume epic Kill Bill as a vengeful sword slashing assassin. The actress will also starred with Ben Affleck in the sci-fi thriller Paycheck. With 2005’s The Producers, Thurman took on musical comedy with Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick.

But her humor missed its mark with My Super Ex-Girlfriend (2006), which proved to be a commercial and critical disappointment. Directed by Griffin Dunne, 2008’s The Accidental Husband also explored love and revenge. It featured Thurman as a radio talk show host who convinces a woman to break up with her boyfriend.

In recent years, Thurman has taken on a variety of roles, from playing a mythic monster in Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief(2010) to a powerful Parisian woman in Bel Ami (2012). In Bel Ami, Thurman plays one of Robert Patterson’s love interests. She also had a recurring television role around this time, appearing on the musical drama Smash.

Personal Life

Thurman married British actor Gary Oldman in 1990. They divorced in 1992. In 1998, she married Gattaca co-star Ethan Hawke, and in the same year they welcomed their first child, Maya Ray Thurman-Hawke. In 2001, the couple had a son, Roan. Thurman and Hawke split up two years later and divorced in 2004. Thurman and boyfriend Arpad Busson welcomed a daughter on July 15, 2012.

COOL PEOPLE – HARRY DEAN STANTON

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Harry Dean Stanton Biography

Film ActorTelevision Actor (1926–)
HARRY DEAN STANTON INTERVIEW FOR SPIN MAGAZINE
Actor Harry Dean Stanton is known for early appearances in iconic films such as Cool Hand Luke (1967) and Repo Man (1984) as well as for his present-day roles. Here are some images from his movies.
Born in 1926 in Kentucky, Harry Dean Stanton has had one of the longest and most diverse acting careers in Hollywood. He is known for early appearances in iconic films such as Cool Hand Luke (1967) and Repo Man (1984) as well as for his present-day roles in television series such as Big Love.

Profile

Film actor. Born on July 14, 1926 in West Irvine, Kentucky, USA, indie film star Harry Dean Stanton served in the navy during World War II. He studied at the University of Kentucky and the Pasadena Playhouse.

A solid supporting actor, Stanton appeared in numerous feature films, many of them Westerns, before starring in 1984’s Paris, Texas and the cult classic Repo Man. Later films include The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), Hostages(1992), The Green Mile (1999), The Straight Story(1999), and The Pledge (2000).

Stanton also is credited with many television appearances over his long career fromGunsmoke during the late 1950s-60s, to the popular recent series Two and a Half Men. Since 2006, Harry Dean Stanton also has starred on the HBO series Big Love as Roman Grant, the manipulative leader of a polygamous sect.

Harry Dean Stanton. (2014). The Biography.com website. Retrieved 03:36, Jun 23, 2014, fromhttp://www.biography.com/people/harry-dean-stanton-9492224.

22 of the greatest movie opening lines of all times

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25 Great Psychological Thrillers That Are Worth Your Time

23 April 2014 | Features, Film Lists | by Andrew Lowry

6. The Night of the Hunter

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Based on the novel of the same title, Night of the Hunter casts Robert Mitchum in the lead role as Harry Powell, an unethical preacher cum murderer. Alongside Shelley Winters, the film is loosely based on a true story, as he attempts to romance the unsuspecting widow and steal the hidden money. It was to be the last film directed by Charles Laughton.

Set in 1930’s West Virginia, Harry Powell is a self-labelled preacher who has been travelling the country attracting widows, then killing and robbing them, all the while convinced that this is what God wants him to do. Arrested for driving a stolen car and temporarily jailed, he meets prisoner Ben Harper, a convicted killer and bank robber facing execution. Despite not being able to convince Ben to disclose where the loot is hidden, Powell hatches a plan to target his next widow, Willa Harper (Shelley Winters). However, with the two Harper children being the only ones who know where the spoils are, Powell certainly won’t have things his own way.

With Mitchum giving such a skin crawling and menacing performance, Night of the Hunter is now known to be one of the most frightening movies around, for its time. Containing possibly the most notoriously twisted, on-screen villain in cinematic history, this is a film you will either LOVE or HATE.

5. The Innocents

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Directed by Jack Clayton and starring Deborah Kerr, The Innocents is a gothic horror released in 1961. Without showing any gory or graphic images, this film relies simply on the setting, direction and the viewer’s own perception. Based on the novel, The Turn of the Screw, The Innocents is open ended, leaving several interpretations of which all are unsettling and thought provoking.

Miss Giddens (Kerr) agrees to become the new governess to two orphaned children, named Flora and Miles who are currently in the care of their wealthy but disinterested uncle. After arriving at their beautiful country estate, Miss Giddens immediately connects with Mrs Grose, the likeable housekeeper, and meets Flora, a bubbly, cheerful young girl with a pet tortoise. With Miss Giddens still settling in to her new headquarters, a letter is received from Miles’ boarding school, advising that he has been sent home early and subsequently expelled. Upon meeting Miles for the first time, the governess finds him extremely charming, almost flirtatious. However, coinciding with the boy’s arrival, sinister and peculiar events begin to arise. With Miss Gidens demanding to know more about the past residency, sickening secrets are revealed, secrets that lead to a horrifying and ghastly culmination of events.

Whatever rationale you may come up with, the result is a breathtakingly disturbing translation of a classic ghost story, written by Henry James.

4. Don’t Look Now

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Based on Daphne Du Maurier’s short story, Don’t Look Now, is a frightening film that shows the psychological weight, the death of a loved one can bring. In this case Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie play husband and wife, John and Laura, who experience the heart-breaking tragedy of losing their young daughter, after she drowned in their pond. The film presents the different styles of grief we can suffer.

Fast forward to the future and John and Laura are currently in Venice after John decided to restore an old church. After meeting a blind psychic woman in a restaurant, Laura’s mood changes when told that their daughter is happy. However, John, being the absolute non-believer in clairvoyance, is not nearly as excited. But when they both start to witness strange sightings, particularly the same red-coated figure, (similar to how their daughter last appeared) desperation overcome grief, to haunting consequences

Director Nicolas Roeg creates an extremely chilling atmosphere with the tension building up to a ghastly, grotesque climax.

3. Rosemary’s Baby

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The most acclaimed in ‘the apartment trilogy’, Rosemary’s Baby stars Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes as husband and wife who have just moved into an old fashioned New York City apartment.

Thrilled with their new surroundings, Rosemary (Farrow) and Guy (Cassavetes) decide that having a baby is the next step in their relationship. With her interfering, yet supportive neighbours (Minnie and Roman), she embarks on her journey through pregnancy and is somewhat shoved in the direction of Dr Sapirstein, who insists that Rosemary drink a concoction that her helpful neighbour will bring her daily.

However, after burrowing deeper into the bizarre behaviour of those all around her, including her husband Guy; she speculates that they all have very sinister intentions for the unborn child. Can Rosemary unravel the plot in time to save her baby AND her sanity? Or has this all been a cruel illusion of mind tricks?

Mia Farrow produces the performance of a lifetime in Polanski’s brilliant psychological horror. Released in 1968, this truly terrifying film effortlessly stands the test of time.

2. Les Diaboliques

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Directed by Henri-George Clouzot, this 1955 black and white French-masterpiece, features on many top horror film lists.

The film revolves around a boarding school, owned by the vulnerable Christina, (Vera Clouzot) but controlled by her repressive husband Michel (Paul Meurisse) with his mistress, teacher Nicole (Simone Signoret) in tow.With both women possessing a closeness and confidentiality in each other, due to the abusive Michel, they formulate a plan to take care of this tyrant. However, between an intrusive private investigator, incorruptible schoolboys and a missing corpse, things take a mysterious turn for the worse.

Legend has it that Alfred Hitchcock was first approached to direct Les Diaboliques, however, when the deal came to nothing, Henri-Georges Clouzot was the inheritor.

1. Vertigo

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Widely regarded as director Alfred Hitchcock’s best, Vertigo is a complex, psychological thriller starring James Stewart and Kim Novak. Proudly sitting atop of the much celebrated Sight and Sound Poll (in 2012), this masterpiece is a movie filled with suspense that unfolds in an extraordinarily haunting climax.

John ‘Scottie’ Ferguson (Stewart) is a retired San Francisco police detective. After being involved in a rooftop chase, resulting in the death of a policeman, Scottie has been battling vertigo. When approached by an old college friend to secretly pursue the man’s wife Madeline (Novak), he begrudgingly accepts. As Madeline proves exceedingly difficult to follow, he eventually tracks her down and rescues her as she attempts to leap into San Fran Bay. With both Madeline and Scottie spending more and more time together they ultimately confess their love for each other, whilst in the surroundings of an old Mission. Out of nowhere, Madeline runs into the church and climbs the bell tower. With Scottie powerless to run after her, we are left with a breathtakingly daring act of cinematic genius that only the master of suspense could compose.

With a fantastic backdrop of San Francisco, this fable of romance and obsession is a stunning piece of work that should be ranked as highly in another 50 years’ time, as it is today.

Author Bio: Andrew Lowry lives in Bangor, Northern Ireland. He is a government worker by day, and cinephile by night.

Read more at http://www.tasteofcinema.com/2014/25-great-psychological-thrillers-that-are-worth-your-time/4/#Cps8Has64pHiIi6p.99

The 22 Greatest Movie Opening Lines Of All Time

02 January 2014 | Features, Other Lists | by David Zou

movie opening lines

The first line can make or break a movie.

And some of the best films also boast superb opening gambits that suck you in, make you think, have you laughing or just tease you. Some have over 100 words, some have only a few words, but they have the same effect.

We’ve rounded up some of our favorites – let us know yours in the comments…

22. Mallrats (1995)

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The Line: “One time my cousin Walter got this cat stuck up his ass. True story. He bought it at our local mall, so the whole fiasco wound up on the news.

“It was embarrassing for my relatives and all, but next week, he did it again. Different cat, same results, complete with another trip to the emergency room.

“So, I run into him a week later in the mall and he’s buying another cat. And I says to him, ‘Jesus, Walt! What are you doing? You know you’re just gonna get this cat stuck up your ass too. Why don’t you knock it off?’

“And he said to me, ‘Brodie, how the hell else am I supposed to get the gerbil out?’ My cousin was a weird guy.

21. Fight Club (1999)

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The Line: “People are always asking me if I know Tyler Durden…”

20. Four Weddings And A Funeral (1994)

Four Weddings And A Funeral

The Line: “Oh, f**k! F**k!”

19. The Big Lebowski (1998)

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The Line: ”Way out west there was this fella I wanna tell ya about. Goes by the name of Jeff Lebowski. At least that was the handle his loving parents gave him, but he never had much use for it himself. See, this Lebowski, he called himself ‘The Dude’”

18. The Jerk (1979)

The Jerk

The Line: “I am not a bum. I’m a jerk. I once had wealth, power, and the love of a beautiful woman. Now I only have two things: my friends and… uh… my thermos.

“Huh? My story? Okay. It was never easy for me. I was born a poor black child. I remember the days, sittin’ on the porch with my family, singin’ and dancin’ down in Mississippi.”

17. Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas (1998)

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The Line: “We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold.”

16. LA Confidential (1997)

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The Line: “’Come to Los Angeles! The sun shines bright, the beaches are wide and inviting, and the orange groves stretch as far as the eye can see. There are jobs aplenty, and land is cheap.

“Every working man can have his own house, and inside every house, a happy, all-American family. You can have all this, and who knows… you could even be discovered, become a movie star… or at least see one.

“Life is good in Los Angeles… it’s paradise on Earth.’ Ha ha ha ha. That’s what they tell you, anyway.”

15. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

Read more at http://www.tasteofcinema.com/2014/the-22-greatest-movie-opening-lines-of-all-time/#6dGQvwLK0xI6Fusb.99

COOL PEOPLE-GARY BUSEY

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COOL PEOPLE-GARY BUSEY

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GAREY BUSEY’S CONTROVERSIAL INTERVIEW WITH HOWARD STERN

GARY BUSEY MUSIC VIDEO “ALL THESE YEARS”

GAREY BUSEY -HOW TO INTERVIEW BY HUNTERS.THOMPSON ON FILM

 

GREATEST MOMENT OF GARY BUSEY ON FILM

 

Gary Busey

Birth Name: Gary Busey
Born: 06/29/1944
Birth Place: Goose Creek, Texas, USA

Gary Busey was born in the east coast Texas town of Goose Creek (now Baytown) on June 29, 1944 and grew up in Tulsa, OK, where his father worked in construction. A born entertainer, Busey’s first outlet was music, and he constructed a drum set out of oatmeal canisters before driving his family truly crazy with a set of Ludwigs. He also sang at the Christian camp where he spent summers and broadened his interests to include acting after he was mesmerized by a matinee of Cecil B. DeMille’s “Samson and Delilah” (1949). As a teen, Busey cultivated an athletic build while working on local ranches and excelled at football, landing an athletic scholarship to Pittsburg State University in Kansas. When a serious knee injury sidelined his sports aspirations, Busey turned his attention to drama, eventually joining the theater department at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. While a student there in 1966, Busey co-founded a bluesy rock band called Carp. After several years of playing local parties and biker bars, they headed to Hollywood in search of a record deal, landing one with Epic and releasing a self-titled album in 1969. When Carp failed to generate much commercial success, most of the band’s members went on to become studio musicians, while Busey took advantage of his new locale to revive his earlier acting efforts.

Busey landed his first small screen role in a 1970 episode of the Western “The High Chaparral” (NBC, 1967-1971) and the following year made his big screen debut as a hippie in the low budget Roger Corman biker flick “Angels Hard as They Come” (1971). In 1972, he returned to Tulsa, where he became a regular performer on a local sketch comedy show and appeared in the locally filmed “Dirty Little Billy” (1972) before snaring a high profile role alongside Jeff Bridges in “The Last American Hero” (1973), about NASCAR racer Elroy Jackson, Jr. That same year he earned the unusual pop culture distinction of being the last character ever to die on “Bonanza” (NBC, 1959-1973). Busey joined the fine supporting cast (including Bridges, again) of Michael Cimino’s feature directing debut “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974) before enjoying a brief stint as series regular Truckie Wheeler of “The Texas Wheelers” (ABC, 1974-75). Busey returned to the music business in 1975 touring as drummer for Oklahoma songwriter Leon Russell, who had first become a fan of Busey through his popular Tulsa TV character Teddy Jack Eddy. Busey also played drums on Russell’s classic album Will o’ the Wisp that year, in addition to recording with The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Kinky Friedman, and contributing the song “Since You’ve Gone Away” to Robert Altman’s epic film “Nashville” (1975).

Busey’s music background proved key to truly igniting his film career. His turn as the road manager who keeps Kris Kristofferson in line in “A Star Is Born” (1976) brought him his first widespread attention, though his title role in “The Buddy Holly Story” (1978) made him a star. Busey had always felt a special spiritual kinship with the iconic Texas songwriter-guitarist who died tragically young in an icy plane crash, and his spot-on portrayal of the man and his music earned Busey a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his efforts. Despite his highly acclaimed leading role, Busey’s ensuing career consisted mainly of charismatic supporting roles, his potential possibly compromised by a new cocaine addiction that he would battle for decades. He was convincing as a small time carnival hustler in the atmospheric road movie “Carny” (1980) and provided able country boy-support as the protégé of a legendary outlaw (Willie Nelson) in the well-received “Barbarosa” (1982). In one of his rare appearances in a comedy Busey played one of a crew of misfit taxi drivers in “D.C. Cab” (1983) and also contributed the song, “Why Baby Why” to the soundtrack.

His sports prowess and ability to crank up the high-drama masculine energy made for strong performances as Alabama State football coach Paul Bryant in “The Bear” (1984), and as a baseball playing icon in “Insignificance” (1985), Nicolas Roeg’s gloriously cinematic examination of fame in America. But Busey’s highest profile role of the era was as a nasty drug dealing Vietnam vet in “Lethal Weapon” (1988). His Mr. Joshua had ice in his veins, and though the ruthless albino killer was the actor’s first screen villain, it would certainly not be his last. Busey would go on to make a name for himself with supporting characters that were truly terrifying. His career was interrupted, however, by a motorcycle accident in 1988 that fractured his skull. The actor received a lot of press during his recovery for defending his choice not to wear a helmet and for his claim of a roadside, near-death experience. Doctors feared Busey had suffered brain damage, and his increasingly strange ramblings and pseudo-philosophy while making public appearances seemed to support that theory.

Busey returned to the screen to co-star with Danny Glover in the minor sc-fi hit “Predator 2” (1990) and the absurd but blockbusting caper/extreme sports hybrid “Point Break” (1991) starring Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves. He was a little too good as the disturbed former psychiatric patient in the routine thriller “Hider in the House” (1991) and continued his villainous run as the evil thug plotting to steal nuclear weapons in Steven Seagal’s mega-hit actioner “Under Siege” (1992). Busey enjoyed a supporting role as a private investigator in the legal thriller “The Firm” (1993) before returning to the sports genre with a co-starring role as an aging pro baseball player in the light “Rookie of the Year” (1993). Busey’s role as a former DEA agent in John Badham’s 1994 actioner “Drop Zone” was ironic, as the actor was shortly thereafter arrested for drug possession, suffered a drug overdose, and spent time in rehab at the Betty Ford Center. Newly sober, Busey became an enthusiastic born-again Christian and ordained minister active with the Promise Keepers men’s group. But just as the unpredictable actor seemed to be gaining a new lease on life, he averted disaster yet again when he was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor in his sinus cavity.

After recuperating from surgery and radiation treatment, Busey seemed poised to resume his improved Hollywood standing, landing in a remake of the TV series “Hawaii Five-O” (CBS, 1968-1980), but the show’s pilot was reportedly a disaster and the project never moved forward. Busey rebounded with a starring role in the well-received Spanish-American war miniseries “Rough Riders” (TNT, 1997) and enjoyed cameos in art house flicks “Lost Highway” (1997) and “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” (1998) before a pair of arrests for domestic violence charges filed by ex-wife Tiani Warden and a string of dismal low-budget films reduced Busey’s name to a pop culture curiosity, known more for the mug shot seen ’round the world than for the promise he had once shown as an actor. Embracing his new reputation, Busey began to appear as an oddball artifact on “The Man Show” (Comedy Central, 1999-2004) and Howard Stern’s radio show before cementing his tarnished image as the center of Comedy Central’s “I’m with Busey” reality show (2003). Over 13 uncomfortable episodes, Busey shared his off-kilter wisdom of the world with alleged fan and buddy Adam de la Pena. It was unclear whether Busey’s bizarre philosophical outbursts and explosive behavior were due to a mental unraveling or whether he was amping up the crazy factor for audience benefit.

The show did not paint a flattering portrait of the star but it raised his profile enough to land a recurring role (as himself) on HBO’s hot Hollywood drama “Entourage” (HBO, 2004- ). Busey’s personal life was back in the headlines in 2004 when he was taken to court for failing to pay rent on his rented Malibu home and arrested for not showing up at a hearing related to alleged millions owed his ex-wife. In 2005, Busey claimed his prayers for a fitness opportunity were answered when he was asked to join the cast of the VH1 weight loss chronicle “Celebrity Fit Club 2,” during which he allegedly lost 50 pounds. Busey’s film career was busier than ever regardless of his reputation, with the actor headlining over 20 low-budget and direct-to-DVD titles from 2004-06. He made gossip column headlines in February of 2008 for a red carpet appearance at the Academy Awards that sent nervous stars including Jennifer Garner – whose neck he appeared to either bite or kiss – and E! host Ryan Seacrest looking for the exit. Busey next appeared on the second season of “Celebrity Rehab” (VH1, 2008- ). He claimed to appear on the show not as an addict, but as an inspirational figure for the other patients, which initially confused the show’s star, Dr. Drew Pinsky, Busey nonetheless went through an enormously successful transformation. Following a cameo appearance in the hit comedy “Grown Ups” (2009), starring Adam Sandler, David Spade and Chris Rock, Busey joined the season four cast of the celebrity version of “The Apprentice” (NBC, 2004- ), playing for charity against the likes of model Niki Taylor, former “Survivor” winner Richard Hatch, and rap star Lil Jon.

https://beatnikhiway.wordpress.com/wp-admin/paid-upgrades.php

GAREY BUSEY FILMOGRAPHYd
http://www.aceshowbiz.com/celebrity/gary_busey/filmography.html

Daniel Radcliffe, Allen Ginsberg and the Beat Darlings reblogged from LIterary KIcks by Levi Asher

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Daniel Radcliffe, Allen Ginsberg and the Beat Darlings reblogged from LIterary KIcks by Levi Asher

killyourdarlings..

Literary Kicks
Intellectual Curiosities and Provocations
Daniel Radcliffe, Allen Ginsberg and the Beat Darlings

Levi Asher on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 11:29 pm

Beat Generation, Biography, Film, Indie, Jazz Age, Love, New York City, Reviews, Transgressive
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There are two great cinematic jokes in the new film Kill Your Darlings, two sly references to the dilemma of self-consciousness that this movie about the Beat Generation struggles to overcome. First, it must overcome the suffocating celebrity of Daniel Radcliffe, who plays the poet Allen Ginsberg, and the movie smartly tackles the “hey, there’s Harry Potter” problem right away. The movie opens with teenage Allen cleaning up his parents’ house, jamming to a song on the Victrola, and dancing merrily with a broom.

Kill Your Darlings toys with its literary legacy as well. As several people pitch in to help a mischievous and manipulative Columbia University student named Lucien Carr write a paper about the historian Oswald Spengler, we see a typewriter tapping out immortal words that remind us of another recent Hollywood film: “On … the …”. But then instead of “On The Road”, the words turn out to be “On the Decline of the West”.

Directed by John Krokidas and written by Austin Bunn, Kill Your Darlings is a clever, knowing film about the early exploits of Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs. It’s lively in the same way that Baz Lurhmann’s Great Gatsby was (though, of course, it’s nowhere near as bombastic), and it whips up a cinematic frenzy of literary inspiration that goes even deeper than Walter Salles’s On The Road or James Franco’s Howl into the ecstatic and Dionsyian mission of the early Beats. The movie has frustrating flaws, but perhaps succeeds mainly through the dedication of the excellent cast, which includes Jennifer Jason Leigh as Ginsberg’s schizophrenic mother, Dane DeHaan as Lucien Carr and Ben Foster as William S. Burroughs. Daniel Radcliffe’s Allen Ginsberg also works very well, which goes to show that Daniel Radcliffe is good at playing divinely inspired fervent innocents.

I like Radcliffe’s earnest, heartfelt Ginsberg — even though I don’t think he quite captures the weird, powerful presence the famous poet always had (James Franco and other recent Allen Ginsbergs have also failed to capture his strong vibe). Having met and talked to Allen several times, I’ve sometimes struggled to describe his presence and have ended up resorting to the word “froggy”. Allen Ginsberg had a croaking voice, bulging, peeking eyes, a jumpy, crouched stance. His improbable demeanor added to the considerable urgency of his presence. I wish some actor could capture his heavy presence, his odd charisma, but if Allen Ginsberg’s spirit animal is a frog, Daniel Radcliffe’s in this movie turns out to be more like a chameleon or a cute lizard. It’s not the same thing.

The movie is about the early Beats as students in upper Manhattan, and about a murder (Lucien Carr stabbed and drowned an ex-lover) that shook all their friendships and left them all feeling guilty of one crime or another. The murder is less interesting than the blooming friendships, though some long scenes of campus pranks become frivolous and phony (a long sequence involving a library break-in descends to cartoonish storytelling, for no good payoff). At a couple of bad moments, the movie feels like a “Little Archies” of the Beat Generation — familiar faces, but younger and chubbier, with bigger smiles.

But this movie isn’t afraid to be cute, and its brashness is appealing. Kill Your Darlings may someday become a popular midnight double feature with Little Darlings, which presented a parallel vision of teenage girls flirting with danger.

There is much excitement to this movie, but little suspense or revelation. Kill Your Darlings is certainly not a mystery or a thriller. It’s a good college drama like A Separate Peace or Hitchcock’s Rope, or Dead Poets Society or History Boys — like the amazing movie of Donna Tartt’s Secret History which never has been made but hopefully someday will.

The movie stretches too many historical facts in order to wrap up too many psychological angles too neatly. But some of the twists manage to score. Unlike Marc Olmstead in Sensitive Skin, I don’t mind that Kill Your Darlings shows William S. Burroughs and Lucien Carr going wild with cut-ups on a wall years before Burroughs supposedly discovered the cut-up method with Brion Gysin. I like the idea that the idea might have echoed in his head for years. Any historical movie has the right to cut a few facts up in the name of good cinema.

But I do agree with Brian Hassett that the actor who played young Jack Kerouac fails to do much with the role, and that it makes no sense for young Lucien Carr to say “I’ll go to jail for the rest of my life” when in the real life story Jack Kerouac was known to have said “You’ll get the hot seat for this”. Why substitute a boring line for a good one, especially if the good line was historically accurate?

Well — maybe just to piss off cranky old Beats like me. That’s fresh.

top-50-movie-moments-of-all-time

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top-50-movie-moments-of-all-time

the-majestic the-deer-hunter-robert-deniro-1978-c-universal-pictures-courtesy-everett-collection reservoir-dogsamerican-beauty (2) reservoir-dogs full-metal-jacketthe-shawshank-redemption

http://www.ranker.com/list/top-50-movie-moments-of-all-time/lotterman?ref=lzyrltdlsts&pos=1
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As the Oscars are coming down on us this Sunday and I prepare to watch with “laughing cow” cheese triangles smeared on crackers and tea, I Will not comment on the posing actresses in their borrowed floor length gowns and dripping diamonds. I will wait to see which movies got an award this year. Yes I like Captain Phillips and The Wolf of Wall street, Leonardo is spectacular and Tom Hanks is spectacular as always. I couldn’t stand the movie “Her” of “Gravity” and moldy enjoyed “Twelve Years a Slave”.” “Gravity” bored me to death-a lot of floating around in space caught on this and that I have yet to see Nebraska or American Hustle.

So the best picture goes to “The Wolf of Wall Street” and I guess the runner is “Captain Phillips” (Phillips can be spelled so many ways,I just picked one-sorry if I am wrong)

Here are the top 50 movie moments of all time, hope you enjoy!

Please check out my previous last three postings as you got no notifications about them-thanks hobo hippie

“if you can pronounce these words”
“Gregory COrso
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