Tag Archives: free

can you live without money? Here’s how one man does it

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The Power Of Mhee – Living Without Money (Documentary Pilot)

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https://youtu.be/CKl9V7TV_cA

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FREE #BOOKS ONLINE

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Free Books Online

Free Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don’t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.

Ernest Hemingway’s Very First Published Stories, Free as an eBook

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Ernest Hemingway’s Very First Published Stories, Free as

an eBook

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“I like the early stuff”: the classic masculine comment to make about the work of a well-known creator, demonstrating as it does the cultural consumer’s dedication, purism, judgmental rigor, and even endurance (given the relative accessibility, in the intellectual as well as the collector’s senses, of most “early stuff”). Now you have a chance to say it about that most ostensibly masculine of all 20th-century American writers, Ernest Hemingway. Above, see the cover of a coveted edition of the then-young “Papa”‘s very first book, 1923’s Three Stories & Ten Poems. The print run numbered only “300 copies, put out by friend and fellow expatriate, the writer- publisher Robert McAlmon,” writes Steve King at Today in Literature. “Both had arrived in Paris in 1921, Hemingway an unpublished twenty-two-year-old journalist with a recent bride, a handful of letters of introduction provided by Sherwood Anderson, and a clear imperative: ‘All you have to do is write one true sentence.’”

Aside

6 fascinating people who own almost nothing

These people have rejected the stuff-cluttered life for something more meaningful.

Joshua Fields Millburn (left) and Ryan Nicodemus are the Minimalists. They have employed the principles of minimalism to focus on what’s important in life, and to focus on living meaningful lives. (Photo: Facebook)

Most of us can only handle stacking, storing and stepping over our stuff for so long before we start to feel claustrophobic. We go on a cleaning spree and give (or sell) it all away. But that’s only a temporary fix. Living small requires a more permanent shift. You might find it hard to believe, but there is a growing demographic of people convinced that no person needs a house full of possessions to survive. These aren’t tent-dwelling hippies, but successful, intelligent individuals and families who have rejected the stuff-cluttered life for something more meaningful. Here are some of our favorites.
On the brink of turning 30, Millburn and Nicodemus (pictured above) discovered that working 70-80 hours a week for a corporation and buying more stuff didn’t fill the void. “In fact, it only brought us more debt and stress and anxiety and fear and loneliness and guilt and depression,” writes the duo. So, they quit their jobs and took back control using the principles of minimalism to focus on what’s important in life. Since then, they’ve written hundreds of articles aimed at helping others embrace a life that’s free from material and emotional cumbersomeness. Millburn claims to own around 288 things (even though he doesn’t really count his stuff).
Dave Bruno
Photo courtesy of guynameddave.com
Dave Bruno – Author and entrepreneur
Bruno is the author of “The 100 Thing Challenge,” the chronicle of one man’s efforts to come to terms with his own consumerist nature and pare back his possessions to the essential (and then live that way for a year). Along the way he discovered some interesting things about why he felt driven to acquire things, along with the interesting negotiations that we conduct with ourselves when contemplating an unnecessary purchase. Now, Bruno’s radical downsizing challenge has become a grassroots movement embraced by thousands around the world. He calls it “a way to stop participating in irresponsible consumerism and start living a more meaningful lifestyle that is economically secure and that blesses people.”
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Heidemarie Schwermer – 69-year-old grandma
We often dismiss lifestyles of few possessions as something reserved for college kids and bohemians, but who ever said age sentences us to a prison of clutter? For more than 16 years, Schwermer, a former schoolteacher and psychotherapist, has lived without money. After running a successful swap and barter shop, she quit her job in 1996, giving away all of her possessions except what could fit into a single suitcase and backpack, and moving out of her rental home. Since then, she has been a nomad, trading gardening, cleaning and even therapy sessions for food and a place to sleep. She’s written several books about her adventures, giving all advances and profits away on the street, or to charity.
Andrew Hyde
Photo: Andrew-Hyde/Flickr
Andrew Hyde – Author and vagabond
Andrew Hyde is passionate about community, writing, travel and startups. He’s started three companies, circumnavigated the globe and written an incredibly successful book about travel. He is a self-professed vagabond and minimalist, and as of this time last year, the owner of a mere 15 material possessions (not counting socks or underwear, thank goodness). “Minimalism is equally easy as it is boring to do,” he writes on his blog. “What shirt today? The one I didn’t wear yesterday. Once you get used to simplicity, the complex normality others have becomes the audacious thing.”
Adam Baker and family
Photo: ManVsDebt.com
Adam Baker – Founder of Man vs. Debt
In 2008, Adam Baker and his wife, Courtney, decided to sell everything they owned, pay off $18,000 in consumer debt and travel the world as a family. They began sharing their journey publicly in early 2009, and that’s when ManVsDebt.com was founded. The Bakers reduced their possessions to what fit in two backpacks, and spent more than a year traveling in Thailand, Australia and New Zealand. Then, they came back to America, and started helping others learn how to do the same thing. He also helped produce “I’m Fine, Thanks,” a new, feature-length documentary that’s a collection of stories about life, the choices we make, and the paths we ultimately decide to follow.

 

6 fascinating people who own almost nothing

sunday funnies

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http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/AspRkR/www.pmslweb.com/the-blog/sunday-funnies-time-for-some-dominical-giggles/?_nospa=trueImageImage

ANDY WARHOL WAS RIGHT-A TRIBUTE

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http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/4moA3M/:M!q7pPe!:Q-+6gl67/www.youtube.com/watch?v=fw-YjucRm00/Image

 

this is my 700th post! fab. photos of rock legends- gifs by ana chisty

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http---makeagif.com--media-10-20-2013-AIghrW http---makeagif.com--media-10-20-2013-mYxpSVhttp://www.wired.com/rawfile/2011/11/photo-book-shows-a-new-side-of-rock-legends/?viewall=true

 

HOW I BECAME HOMELESS

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homeless

http://www.webring.org/l/rd?ring=streetring;id=3;url=http%3A%2F%2Fartofsurvivinghomelessness%2Eblogspot%2Ecom%2F

READ AN EXTRAORDINARY PLACE TO LIVE -SLAB CITY COLORADO DESERT CA.

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Portraits From Slab City: ‘The Last Free Place On Earth’

by JORDAN G. TEICHER

October 03, 201210:21 AM

People come to Slab City, a squatter campsite in the Colorado Desert in southeastern California, for many reasons. But one sentiment seems to unite many of them: They want to avoid people like photojournalist Jessica Lum. That is: City people. Taxpayers. Media types.

Which is a tough situation, if you happen to be Lum and you hope to document the people of this community.

  • Neil Mallick. A musician.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Atreyu. A young traveler.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Ryan. Makes moccasins and leather goods.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Cookie. Snowbird landed.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Jordan. In pursuit of an idea.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Bobbie and Sara. Came to Slab City to start a life together.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Wille Lane. With his dog Jack Russell.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Allie Neill. The big sister who takes care of five younger siblings.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Leonard Knight. An artist. Seen at his 80th birthday celebration.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum
  • Salvation Mountain, located near the main road to Slab City, was built by Leonard Knight out of adobe clay. At the center, Knight sculpted the words "God Is Love" — what he says is a simple message he wanted to share with the world.
     
    Photos courtesy of Jessica Lum

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“People feel they can determine their level of isolation or engagement,” Lum says.

Since its establishment in the 1950s on the grounds of an abandoned World War II Marine barracks, Slab City has become known as a haven for snowbirds looking to live an independent lifestyle. It’s often called “The Last Free Place on Earth.”

Lately, it has also become a destination for journalists and film crews looking for a good story. And though the residents of Slab City don’t have trash collection or a sewage system, they have Internet access, and they follow the news about their home closely.

“A lot of people felt there were misrepresentations floating around. A lot of past articles focused more on people who were fleeing the recession or dealing with drug or alcohol abuse,” says Lum. “There are people who struggle with that, but they felt the coverage was taking on a minority and representing them as majority. “

So when Lum, a 25-year-old graduate of UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism and a blogger for PetaPixel, started going to Slab City last year for her ongoing multimedia thesis project, Slab City Stories, she met a population that was seeking privacy but whose privacy was being consistently breached.

During a visit last August, she was taking photos with friends when she heard shouting down the road.

“We just kind of jumped in our car and left,” she says. “Maybe they were just saying hello. I don’t know.”

Guilt about her flight accounted partly for Lum’s return in October. She was also driven, as a journalist, by a desire to understand why anyone would want to live in a place like Slab City.

Cuervo. Travels by mule.

Courtesy of Jessica Lum

Then, this December, she found out for herself. She rented an RV and parked it in Slab City for three weeks. That’s when she started to build trust with her subjects, including a retired social worker turned balloon artist, the owner of a solar-powered Internet cafe, and a former carnival worker who built his own skate park.

“I think once I became a recognizable face, it sort of gave me a bit of legitimacy,” she says.

Residents let her photograph them bathing nude in the hot springs, and let her enter the social club whose sign proclaimed “No Media.” They liked that she wasn’t from a major news organization and that she’s young; they even gave her a nickname – “Berkeley.”

Unlike journalists under pressure to make deadlines and find news hooks, Lum could take her time, searching for stories on the fringe of the fringe.

“Most journalists, especially local ones, spend a couple days there, so they don’t really penetrate the community all that much,” Lum says. “They get the same characters, the same types of quotes. There was one family that was living right in front of what’s called Low Road, and that family basically got in almost every news article that I’ve read about Slab City.”

Index card by Cuervo. The text reads: “Cuervo and my Mules Houseless on Muleback for 15 years Settling down maybe here in winter ….”

Courtesy of Jessica Lum

Talking with residents about media coverage informed her journalistic process. Lum didn’t narrate her documentary videos, instead allowing the subjects to narrate their own stories. She even gave them index cards so they could describe themselves, photos of which she published alongside her portraits online.

So what’s to like about Slab City? It’s not the safest or most comfortable — it gets cold in the winter and pitch dark at night. But Lum says she didn’t mind her time living there.

“There are people who might want to rob or steal some stuff. But I never felt threatened.