Tag Archives: heroin

HIWAY AMERICA – LIFE ON THE STREETS OF L.A.

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16 IMAGES OF LIFE ON THE STREETS IN LA

Street Outreach programs have afforded me a rare glimpse into the lives of those who sleep on the streets. Rife with addiction and mental illness, this community is hard to penetrate and even harder to document. Approaching subjects on the streets of LA has become a delicate art. I had to be well versed on all topics of incarceration, addiction, and health. I had to navigate the streets with care, having a few close encounters with gangs and people out of control on cocktails of hard drugs. An acute street knowledge helped me get on the level of the people I was photographing, and dismantled any apprehensions they had about me taking photos. In an attempt to get more candid and intimate photos, I never shoot a person before having a friendly chat and getting to know them a little better.

I hope these photos afford some insight into the reality of being homeless.

1

A homeless teen panhandles on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. This photo was taken on assignment with the PATH Street Outreach team, just after sunrise on a cold spring morning in Hollywood.

2

Street Outreach plays a huge role in getting people into housing. The man and woman in this photo have been married for seven years, and homeless for six. When I approached them with a Street Outreach team, they were cuddling each other on the sidewalk in the front of a dilapidated theater in Hollywood.

3

This shot was taken on the Hollywood Walk of Fame out front of the Chinese Theatre. This 20-year-old homeless girl dresses, talks, and walks like a boy to deter unwanted attention on the streets.

4

A dog is a man’s best friend. This homeless teen has been moving his way down the West Coast of America with his skateboard and his dog Charlie.

5

This photo was taken right after sunrise in the ghetto of East Hollywood. These teens have a small window of time right before rush hour to pack up their encampment, or run the risk of an arrest or fine from the LAPD.

6

Heroin is the drug of choice in Hollywood. This drug den is set up under the 101 freeway next to the Hollywood Bowl. The ground was strewn with used needles, and the stench of human decay permeated the air for 100ft in either direction.

7

Susan had been homeless for two weeks when this photo was taken while a Street Outreach team from PATH give her a hygiene kit and packed lunch. She is a long-term heroin addict, having lost her apartment whilst spiraling into addiction. She is now living on the footpath with her three chihuahuas and all her possessions stuffed into shopping carts.

8

Courtney and Reggie head out every morning to cultivate relationships with the ‘help resistant’ homeless population. It can sometimes take years of work to establish a strong enough relationship with people to pull them off the streets and into temporary housing.

9

Taken before sunset, this image shows a homeless man who has locked himself into a ‘utility cupboard’ to keep himself safe from attacks overnight.

10

Children’s toys are hung in a depraved artistic expression in a Hollywood heroin den under the 101 freeway.

11

“When the rich wage war, it’s the poor that die.” 75% of the homeless population in Hollywood are under the age of 25.

12

Margret has been living out front of this condemned building in Hollywood for more then a decade. She supposedly has quite substantial wealth, but chooses to live alone on the streets with her mental illness.

13

PATH Street Outreach director Courtney attempts to calm a homeless women who is high on crack. Paranoia and erratic behavior compound the symptoms of mental illness associated with hard-drug addiction.

14

Rife with gangs, loan sharks, and thieves, Skid Row is a dangerous place to live. Homeless veteran Slayer shows me his only form of protection.

15

This woman posed for a portrait in my local bus shelter in Mid-City LA. Bus shelters provide shade and protection from the elements, but it is illegal to occupy them for long periods of time.

16

Panhandling in LA is illegal, but the sheer numbers of homeless people that rely on the generosity of passersby make it hard for the LAPD to control or regulate.

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Herbert Huncke, the Hipster Who Defined ‘Beat,’

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Herbert Huncke, the Hipster Who Defined ‘Beat,’

HERBERT HUNCKE AT THE CHELSEA HOTEL NEW VIDEO

 

Herbert Huncke

By Levi Asher on Wednesday, August 24, 1994 08:33 am

In his autobiographical novel ‘Junky,’ William S. Burroughs introduces himself into New York’s heroin underworld by selling a gun and a supply of morphine to two men named Roy and Herman. He describes Herman:

Waves of hostility and suspicion flowed out from his large brown eyes like some sort of television broadcast. The effect was almost like a physical impact. The man was small and very thin, his neck loose in the collar of his shirt. His complexion faded from brown to a mottled yellow, and pancake make-up had been heavily applied in an attempt to conceal a skin eruption. His mouth was drawn down at the corners in a grimace of petulant annoyance.

This was Herbert Huncke, who was born into a middle-class family in Greenfield, Massachusetts on January 9, 1915 and grew up in Chicago. As a teenager he was drawn to the underbelly of city life, and quickly began learning how to support himself as a professional drifter and small-time thief. A small and unthreatening lawbreaker, he embodied a certain honest-criminal ethic so purely that Burroughs and his friends came to love him for it. Jack Kerouac wrote adoringly of him (as Elmer Hassel) in On The Road, and Allen Ginsberg shared his New York City apartment with him, even though he realized Huncke and his junkie friends were storing stolen goods there. This phase ended in a dramatic police bust on Utopia Parkway in Bayside, Queens, during which Ginsberg frantically phoned Huncke and told him to “clean out the place” before the cops got there. Ginsberg arrived at his apartment moments ahead of the cops to find that Huncke had taken him literally. He’d tidied up and swept the floor, but the stolen goods were not moved. Ginsberg might not have been amused at the time, but there’s a certain Zen purity to this kind of thing that makes it clear why Burroughs, Ginsberg and Kerouac all liked Huncke so much.

Huncke was said to have introduced Kerouac to the term ‘beat,’ which Kerouac then used to describe his generation to John Clellon Holmes. Huncke does seem to have a way with words, because he later attempted to become a writer, and a story called ‘Elsie John,’ reprinted in ‘The Beat Reader,’ is surprisingly good. Still, I think it’s pushing it a bit that Huncke taught writing workshops at Ginsberg’s Naropa Institute poetry school. I wouldn’t go to Herbert Huncke to learn how to write anymore than I’d go to Allen Ginsberg to learn how to be a thief.

But his prose can be effective and fascinating, and there has been an increasing interest in Huncke as a writer in recent years. A superb collection of Huncke’s best writings, ‘The Herbert Huncke Reader,’ was published by William Morrow in September 1997, and filmmaker Laki Vazakas’s cinema verite documentary ‘Huncke and Louis‘ records for history the paradoxical life of a celebrated literary drug addict in old age. This film includes some heartbreaking scenes of the breakdown and death of Huncke’s longtime friend and companion Louis Cartwright, who was unable to walk the line of the addict’s life as gracefully as Huncke, and dies a lonely death. Huncke, the survivor, sits on the edge of a bed and sobs — and then goes on surviving.

I was never introduced to Herbert Huncke but I did see him “around town” a bit before he died on August 8, 1996 in a New York City hospital. Whenever I saw him, the first thought that would come to my mind was always “this is Elmer Hassel”.

 

 

Herbert Huncke, the Hipster Who Defined ‘Beat,’ Dies at 81

By ROBERT McG. THOMAS Jr.
Published: August 9, 1996

Herbert Huncke, the charismatic street hustler, petty thief and perennial drug addict who enthralled and inspired a galaxy of acclaimed writers and gave the Beat Generation its name, died yesterday at Beth Israel Hospital. He was 81.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said Jerry Poynton, his friend and literary executor.

Mr. Huncke had lived long enough to become a writer himself and a hero to a new generation of adoring artists and writers, not to mention a reproach to a right-thinking, clean-living establishment that had long predicted his imminent demise.

In an age when it was hip to be hip, Mr. Huncke (whose name rhymes with junkie) was the prototypical hipster, the man who gave William S. Burroughs his first fix, who introduced Jack Kerouac to the term beat and who guided them, as well as Allen Ginsberg and John Clellon Holmes, through the nether world of Times Square in the 1940’s.

 

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Herbert Huncke, the Hipster Who Defined ‘Beat,’
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They honored him in turn by making him an icon of his times. He became the title character (Herbert) in Mr. Burroughs’s first book, ”Junkie” (1962). He was Ancke in Mr. Holmes’s 1952 novel, ”Go.” He appears under his own name in innumerable Ginsberg poems, including ”Howl” (1956) with its haunting reference to ”Huncke’s bloody feet.”

And if it was the fast-talking, fast-driving Neal Cassady who became Mr. Kerouac’s chief literary obsession, as the irrepressible Dean Moriarty in Mr. Kerouac’s 1957 breakthrough classic, ”On the Road,” Mr. Huncke (who was Elmo Hassel in ”On the Road”) was there first.

As Junkey, he was the dominant character in the urban half of Mr. Kerouac’s first book, ”The Town and the City,” and made later appearances as Huck in ”Visions of Cody” and ”Books of Dreams.”

All this for a teen-age runaway who said he was using drugs as early as 12, selling sex by the time he was 16, stealing virtually anything he could get his hands on throughout his life and never once apologizing for a moment of it.

”I always followed the road of least resistance,” he said in a 1992 interview. ”I just continued to do what I wanted. I didn’t weigh or balance things. I started out this way and I never really changed.”

Actually, he didn’t quite start out that way. Born into a middle-class family in Greenfield, Mass., on Dec. 9, 1915, he moved with his family to Detroit when he was 4 and two years later to Chicago, where his father ran his own machine-parts distributing company.

By his own accounts he seems to have had an uneventful early childhood, but his parents divorced, and by the time he was in his early teens he was on the street, acquiring a lifelong passion for drugs and discovering the joys — and lucrative possibilities — of sex with men. He was also beginning a life of crime, first as a runner for the Capone gang and later as a burglar and thief.

Hitting the road early, he served for a time with the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps. He traveled around the country until 1939, when he arrived in Manhattan and found a psychic home in Times Square.

Making his base of operations the Angle bar at 42d Street and Eighth Avenue, he sold drugs at times and himself at others, not always with notable success. Mr. Huncke once confided to a friend that he had not been a successful hustler: ”I was always falling in love,” he said.

It was in 1945 that an elegantly dressed man in a Chesterfield coat knocked on the door of an apartment where Mr. Huncke was living. The visitor, who was in search of Mr. Huncke’s roommate in the hope of selling him a sawed-off shotgun, was Mr. Burroughs. Mr. Huncke would recount that he took one look and told his roommate to get rid of him. ”He’s the F.B.I.,” he said.

Mr. Burroughs proved anything but, and within days Mr. Huncke had introduced him to heroin and sealed a lifelong friendship that included a 1947 visit to a marijuana farm Mr. Burroughs had started in Texas.

It was through Mr. Burroughs that Mr. Huncke soon met Mr. Ginsberg, then a Columbia undergraduate, and Mr. Kerouac, a recent Columbia dropout who became so enchanted with Mr. Huncke’s repeated use of the carny term ”beat,” meaning tired and beaten down, that he later used it as his famous label for the Beat Generation. (Mr. Kerouac later clouded things by suggesting it was derived from ”beatific.”)

An aspiring, Columbia-centered literary crowd was soon learning at Mr. Huncke’s feet. Among other things, he introduced them to the sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, who after meeting Mr. Huncke at the Angle had interviewed him about his colorful sex life and hired him to recruit other subjects.

Though it seemed strange to some people that such a wide array of literary figures found Mr. Huncke so enchanting, he was always more than he seemed. For all his disreputable pursuits, he had elegant, refined manners and a searing honesty. He was also uncommonly well read for someone who had never been to high school, and such a natural and affecting storyteller that he could keep a table of admirers enthralled until the wee hours.

He also had a code of honor. Yes, he might steal from his friends if he needed a fix, but did not inform on them, something he proved on a number of occasions when the police sought his help in developing charges against his celebrity friends.

Mr. Huncke, who spent a total of 11 years in prison, including almost all of the 1950’s, was unrepentant, a man whose acceptance of crime as his fate bolstered his friends’ views that he was a victim of a rigid, unfeeling society.

If his friends saw him as fodder for their literary work, Mr. Huncke, as he later claimed, saw them as marks. There is, perhaps, a certain paradox in Mr. Huncke’s use of his literary friends as literary fodder. Mr. Huncke himself began writing in the 1940’s, locking himself in a stall in the men’s room in the subway. He described it as the only place he could work in peace, scribbling away in his notebooks.

Taking the Kerouac idea of writing nearly automatic prose even further than Mr. Kerouac did, Mr. Huncke turned out a series of memoirs that have been praised for their unaffected style. Those who heard him regale listeners say his books read as if he were telling a spontaneous anecdote around a table at the Angle.

”Huncke’s Journal” (1965) was followed by ”Elsie John and Joey Martinez” (1979), ”The Evening Sun Turned Crimson” (1980) and ”Guilty of Everything” (1990, Hanuman Books).

The books and Mr. Huncke’s role in a brash new literary movement made him famous to a younger generation, and he had several successful lecture tours in recent years.

His books did not make much money, but they didn’t need to. Friends contributed willingly to the upkeep of Mr. Huncke, who seemed proud that he had no talent for regular work.

It was a reflection of his continued standing among self-styled counterculturists that one of his most generous benefactors was a man who had never met him: Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead, who is said to have helped with his rent at Manhattan’s Chelsea Hotel, where Mr. Huncke lived for the last several years.

Mr. Huncke, whose longtime companion, Louis Cartwright, was killed in 1994, is survived by his half brother, Dr. Brian Huncke of Chicago.

Photo: Herbert Huncke, hustler, drug addict and inspiration for Beat writers. (Brian Graham)

 

 

IN 1998 AT A DINER IN NEW HAMPSHIRE MY HUSBAND AND I WERE HAVING BREAKFAST IN A DINER. WE WERE ATTENDING A CELEBRATION OF KEROAUC IN LOWELL, MA. HERBERT HUNCKE WHO WAS SITTING AT ANOTHER TABLE GAVE ME A BLURB FOR MY BOOK OF POETRY “REAL JUNKIES DON’T EAT PIE” HE WROTE “IT IS TRUE REALY JUNKIES DON’T EAT PIE”

PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN

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http://edition.cnn.com/2014/02/02/showbiz/philip-seymour-hoffman-appreciation/

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PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN IN “DEATH OF A SALESMAN”

PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN IN “CAPOTE”

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‘JUNKIE’: WILLIAM BURROUGHS TALKS ABOUT HIS HEROIN HABIT, 1977

06.18.2013
04:44 pmTopics:
Books
Drugs
LiteratureTags:
William Burroughs
Heroin

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Uncle Bill ‘fesses up about his heroin habit.

This interview from 1977 begins with William Burroughs replying to a question as to whether he had any regrets in using heroin?

A writer can profit from things that maybe just unpleasant or boring to someone else, because he uses those subsequently for material in writing. And I would say that the experience I had, that’s described in Junkie, later led to my subsequent books like Naked Lunch. So I don’t regret it. Incidentally, the damage to health is minimal—no matter what the American Narcotics Department may say.

Burroughs may have been clean at the time, but he returned to using Methadone in later life, which makes parts of this interview rather poignant.

For a fascinating article on Burroughs and the history of heroin, check out the Reality Studio.

WILLIAM BURROUGHS VIDEO

http://youtu.be/DnxweVAvE5w

Posted by Paul J. Gallagher

‘JUNKIE’: WILLIAM BURROUGHS TALKS ABOUT HIS HEROIN HABIT, 1977

eiknujshguorrubmw.jpg

Uncle Bill ‘fesses up about his heroin habit.

This interview from 1977 begins with William Burroughs replying to a question as to whether he had any regrets in using heroin?

A writer can profit from things that maybe just unpleasant or boring to someone else, because he uses those subsequently for material in writing. And I would say that the experience I had, that’s described in Junkie, later led to my subsequent books like Naked Lunch. So I don’t regret it. Incidentally, the damage to health is minimal—no matter what the American Narcotics Department may say.

Burroughs may have been clean at the time, but he returned to using Methadone in later life, which makes parts of this interview rather poignant.

For a fascinating article on Burroughs and the history of heroin, check out the Reality Studio.

Posted by Paul J. Gallagher

WILLIAM BURROUGHS TALKS ABOUT HIS HEROIN HABIT

NAKED LUNCH BY WILLIAM BURROUGHS

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Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1959 publication of William S. Burroughs’ Naked LunchHome • About • Contact • RSS • Updates • Press  

Naked Lunch @ 50

“I can feel the heat closing in . . .”

Welcome to nakedlunch.org, the resource for admirers and fans, scholars and students and afficianados ofNaked Lunch, and for all those who wish to find out more about Burroughs’ most influential work.

Special features on the history, reception, and influence of Naked Lunch, and testimonials and critiques will appear on this site as well as previously unseen photographs and artworks. We welcome critical and creative contributions, and questions and insights from readers of Naked Lunch, as part of the creation of an archive on the difficulties and delights of Burroughs’ mysterious and terrifying masterpiece — a book unlike any other.

“‘Disgusting,’ they said . . . ‘Pornographic’ . . . ‘Un-American trash’ . . . ‘Unpublishable’ . . . Well, it came out in 1959, and it found an audience . . . Town meetings . . . Book burnings . . . And an Inquiry by the State Supreme Court . . . That book made quite a little impression . . .” — William Burroughs

Anniversary Homage

Rue Git-le-coeur sign
Home of the Beat Hotel where Burroughs completed Naked Lunch.

2009 marks the 50th Anniversary of the first edition of Naked Lunch, which was published in Paris in July 1959 by Olympia Press. To celebrate, Southern Illinois University Press has just published Naked Lunch@50: Anniversary Essays, edited by Oliver Harris and Ian MacFadyen. The book, the first ever dedicated entirely to the study of Naked Lunch, includes contributions by over twenty writers, scholars, musicians and artists.

In addition to the publication of Naked Lunch@50: Anniversary Essays, a series of homages is being held in locations around the world. Participants in the events include: John GIORNO, Anne WALDMAN, Eric ANDERSEN, Barry MILES, Peter WELLER, Terry WILSON, Penny LANE, Michael MCCLURE, James GRAUERHOLZ, Thurston MOORE, Genesis P-ORRIDGE, Barney ROSSET, Hal WILLNER, Harold CHAPMAN, RADIO JOY, Davis SCHNEIDERMAN, RB MORRIS, Bradford MORROW, and many others.

For information on these festivities, you can refer to the Events page or jump directly to the city of your interest:

Nakedlunch.org will continue beyond the homage festivities, creating not a critical consensus or a litany of panegyrics, or an historical record for its own sake, but a presentation of the disparate ways in which the book is read and understood right now, in our own separate but connected spaces, through our own unique yet shared experiences of time, to bring together the fractured and intermittent possibilities of this magical and discomfiting text.

As a homage to Naked Lunch and its fifty-year history, the site features material about the text itself, the scenes of its writing in Tangier and Paris, the music which runs through the book, attempts to film the novel in the 1960s and 70s, as well as an open space for tributes and comments from readers.

Burroughs in Rothschild suitWilliam Burroughs, Paris, 1959. Burroughs is wearing what he called his “Rothschild suit”. One of a number of images taken of Burroughs by Brion Gysin in the streets of Paris. Gysin told writer Terry Wilson that the series was an ironic magical operation intended to procure Burroughs’ entry into the French Academy. Note the ripped, torn and detourned posters calling for a lasting peace agreement in Algiers, and the peeling upper walls in which the image of Africa serendipitously appears.

Naked Lunch On and Off Film — An essay on the attempts of William Burroughs, Tony Balch and Brion Gysin to realise their collective vision ofNaked Lunch through the medium of film. Based upon documents, letters and screenplay manuscripts from the collection of writer Terry Wilson, a close friend of Burroughs, Balch and Gysin, Ian MacFadyen’s detailed documentary essay corrects existing notions about the failure of the original Naked Lunch movie project and re-addresses the “doomed attempt” to “film the un-filmable” by looking in detail at Gysin’s different versions of the screenplay and by examining the historical context and the finance and operation of cinema during that time. Illustrated with previously unseen manuscript pages and images.

Naked Lunch Discography: A Musical Guide — Burroughs loved Hoagy Carmichael’s Stardust (1927), and it was the music of the Jazz Age which touched him, and to which he was nostalgically attached. This was Burroughs’ true musical era — the era of sheet music, piano rolls, and the phonograph, vaudeville theatres and nightclubs, radio broadcasts, player pianos and song lyrics projected on cinema screens to piano, organ and orchestral accompaniment. Complementing Ian MacFadyen’s important chapter on this music in Naked Lunch@50: Anniversary Essays, nakedlunch.org will feature a series of pieces on the music actually referenced, detourned, mocked and ridiculed in Naked Lunch, with detailed historical and musicological information on those songs and tunes which constitute the book’s significant and omnipresent soundtrack.

Space-Time Travel: Tangier Posts — Oliver Harris goes in search of Tangier, one of the great historic cities transformed by Burroughs into the phantasmagoric Interzone. Through photographs, postcards, maps and texts, this is an attempt to explore the links between the documentary and the topographic and the territory that lies beyond the map.

Naked Lunch: A Bibliographic Reference And Guide — Naked Lunch is an extraordinarily referential text though Burroughs most often does not cite his sources in the text and was sometimes reluctant to admit his influences. This section of the site will create a reference guide with key textual annotations and will include both identifiable and felt connections. Works by Henry Miller, David Maurer, David Lindsay, Charles Hoy Fort, Herbert Asbury, Henri Michaux, Frazer, Eliot, Rimbaud, Celine, Fitzgerald, Bowles and many more will be featured, as well as film noir, pulp and magazine sources.

Guide Bleu : William Burrough Et Paris — This guide to the French capital and France in the 1950s and early 1960s gives a flavour and savour of a vanished milieu and moment in time. It includes archive photographs of Paris and the bohemian scene, and places Naked Lunch in its social-historical context. In French and English.

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