Tag Archives: Manhattan

BEATNIK HIWAY – THE LOEW’S CANAL THEATRE MANHATTAN, N.Y.

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Loew’s back in the day.

According to an article in the NY Post, Comedian Jerry Stiller grew up going to the Loew’s Canal. Stiller is quoted as saying “We used to go on Saturday morning at the Loew’s Canal. At 9 in the morning, they’d show things like the Fitzpatrick Traveltalk, cartoons and serials like Flash Gordon. By the time you got to 10:30, they’d get to the double-header, two pictures in a row. What happened was, your mother or father would drop you off at 9, and they didn’t have to pick you up until 3. That’s where we got our education.” Eddie Cantor, who also grew up in the Lower East Side, had the world premiere of his film Forty Little Mothers at the theater in April 1940.

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Loew’s in 1978 (Courtesy of the Museum of the City of New York)

The theater closed in the late 1950s, and by the early 1960s the lobby was converted to retail space, while the auditorium was being as a warehouse. The terra cotta facade of the theater was designated a New York City Landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Committee in 2010. Later that year, the Committee to Revitalize and Enrich the Arts and Tomorrow’s Economy (CREATE) teamed up with the building’s owners to conduct a feasibility study to convert the space into a performance arts center. They received $150,000 from the Lower Manhattan Development Corp., but ultimately the project never came to fruition. The building’s owners planned on converting the space into an 11 story condo complex, but the plan was rejected by the NYC Department of Buildings.

Currently, the building sits empty, waiting for someone to restore it to its former glory.

AN ACT OF KINDNESS

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Cop who bought homeless man boots promoted

By Antonio Antenucci

November 26, 2013 | 4:26pm

The kind hearted cop who bought a pair of boots for a barefoot homeless man on a frigid night last year was promoted Tuesday to Detective.

Det. Larry DePrimo poses after the promotions ceremony at Police Headquarters.Photo: New York Post/Chad Rachman

Larry DePrimo, 26, made headlines in November for stopping to help Jeffrey Hillman, 54, in Times Square — buying him a pair of all-weather boots and thermal socks.

He was promoted to detective in an afternoon ceremony at 1 Police Plaza.

“It’s a dream come true, this shield is one of the most coveted shields I think in the country, maybe even the world.” DePrimo said. “I look down and it’s still unreal to me.”

DePrimo, who hasn’t seen Hillman since his act of kindness, would still like to meet up with him.

“Hopefully I’ll be able to meet him and see how’s he doing,” DePrimo said. “I’d shake his hand and ask him if he still wants to grab that coffee or some dinner.”

DePrimo was transferred from patrol in the 6th Precinct to the Queens Warrant Squad where the nick name “Boots” still sticks.

“The name tag in my office says, Larry Boots DePrimo, Queens Warrant Squad,” DePrimo said with a big smile.

Though he gained a lot of recognition for his good deed, his father, also Larry DePrimo, was quick to point out that his son’s charity wasn’t the only reason he was boosted up to detective.

“It’s important to remember Larry is not becoming detective today because he done something nice a year ago , his service record also speaks for itself too,” the senior DePrimo said.

His proud father also said that despite his son’s fame, he was just being a good person.

“He was arguably the most famous person in the world for 2 days,” the elder DePrimo said. “It still came down to Larry done something really nice for another person, that was the bottom line.”

DePrimo believes that even though he’s no longer in the public eye, he still has impacted people in a positive way.

“You know the attention has died down…I don’t think the effects it had on people has ever stopped,” DePrimo said. “I still will get ‘what you did inspired me to do a great thing for another person,’ that’s fantastic.“

Hillman, on the other hand, has been spotted as recently as March of this year still shoeless and having a sign on his back that reads “HOMELESS” while panhandling for money in the streets of Manhattan, even though he lives in a Bronx apartment.

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