Tag Archives: Nashville Tennessee

THANKSGIVING DINNER GOES HORRIBLY WRONG

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Culleoka man: Wife slain in self-defense

Staff photo by Chris Fletcher A mobile home at 4531 Moore Lane in Culleoka is the scene of a Thanksgiving night slaying. James L. Cothran told officers he shot his wife in self-defense.

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Staff photo by Chris Fletcher A red truck is parked in the driveway of a Culleoka home where a domestic shooting was investigated by deputies Thursday night.

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Staff photo by Chris Fletcher A mailbox built out of an old milk jug marks the home on Moore Lane in Culleoka where authorities said a woman was shot by her husband Thursday night.

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By VANESSA CURRY
vcurry@c-dh.net

A Thanksgiving Day dispute over a pair of shoes ended with a Culleoka man fatally shooting his wife after she allegedly threatened him with a kitchen knife, a Maury County official said.

Sheriff’s deputies responding to a 911 call found Patricia M. Cothran, 59, still breathing but unresponsive inside the couple’s Moore Lane home between 8-9 p.m. Thursday. She stopped breathing while emergency health workers attempted to render aid, according to a deputy’s report.

The woman’s husband, 70-year-old James L. Cothran, told deputies he shot his wife with a .22 magnum revolver after she retrieved a large knife from the kitchen and threatened him with it, Capt. Jimmy Tennyson said.

Investigators questioned James Cothran at the criminal investigation department office, but he was later released based on a self-defense claim, Tennyson said. No charges were filed.

James Cothran told investigators the couple had been sitting alone in their living room watching television when his wife asked him to take off the shoes he was wearing. The shoes had belonged to her father, who died 30 years ago, according to the report.

When he refused to take off the shoes, James Cothran said his wife went into the kitchen, grabbed a knife and began walking toward where he was sitting.

“Ms. Cothran told Mr. Cothran that she should just knock his eye balls out and leave him sitting there,” according to the deputy’s report.

The couple continued to argue for about 30 minutes and James Cothran said he got between two chairs and that his wife “had a crazy look in her eyes.” He then grabbed the revolver, which had been on the floor next to his chair and fired it at her, according to the report.

Investigators recovered a knife located on the floor in front of where Mrs. Cothran was found sitting and a revolver located on top of a kitchen cabinet, according to the report.

Tennyson said sheriff’s deputies had been called to the couple’s home at least a dozen times within the past year for domestic disturbance issues, but no arrests or injuries were ever reported.

He said evidence collected at the scene and information obtained from James Cothran will be turned over to the Maury County District Attorney’s office for further review. Mrs. Cothran’s body was taken to Nashville for an autopsy.

– See more at: http://columbiadailyherald.com/news/local-news/culleoka-man-wife-slain-self-defense#sthash.DzVHa9Iz.dpuf

 

Aside

HIWAY AMERICA-“MUSIC CITY” NASHVILLE TN.

imageimageTHE GRAND OLE OPRYimage

                                                  HANK WILLIAMS ON THE GRAND OLE OPRY

Nashville

City: Nashville, TN
Region: Middle Tennessee
Subregion: Nashville & Surrounding Areas

There’s a place where music lives. A place where music hangs its hat and puts its feet up on the furniture. A place where people don’t just talk about songs and CDs and lyrics, but live them night and day. That place is Nashville. Music City.

But, while music is the lifeblood of Nashville, visitors will also find a city of culture and history, of haute cuisine, of pro sports, outstanding academics, natural beauty and pure Southern charm. Nashville is a place where the past and the future peacefully coexist and build, one on the other, to create a destination that appeals to the interests of every visitor. This city is alive. You can feel its pulse when you walk down its sidewalks. And, fortunately, you can also hear it almost anywhere you go.

Early WSM advertising postcard, late 1920s
“That circle is the most magical thing when you’re a performer,” says Brad Paisley, “to stand there and get to sing on those same boards that probably still contain dust from Hank Williams’ boots.”

Many things about the Opry have changed over the years – its members, the sound of its music, even its home. But there’s always that oak-solid center to remind every singer or musician who steps inside that they take part in something much larger than themselves, that wherever they go they have a connection to the legends and the giants who came before them.

As that wooden circle is the heart of the stage, the Opry’s heart is its music and its members – a broad scope of styles by a wide range of artists.

“The Grand Ole Opry celebrates country music’s diversity,” says Opry general manager Pete Fisher. “In addition, the Opry presents the many generations of artists who have formed country music’s legacy and continue to forge its future course.”

This early Opry souvenir features founder
George D. Hay (center) and Opry cast
members from the 1930s.

Early WSM advertising postcard, late 1920s

“That circle is the most magical thing when you’re a performer,” says Brad Paisley, “to stand there and get to sing on those same boards that probably still contain dust from Hank Williams’ boots.”

Many things about the Opry have changed over the years – its members, the sound of its music, even its home. But there’s always that oak-solid center to remind every singer or musician who steps inside that they take part in something much larger than themselves, that wherever they go they have a connection to the legends and the giants who came before them.

As that wooden circle is the heart of the stage, the Opry’s heart is its music and its members – a broad scope of styles by a wide range of artists.

“The Grand Ole Opry celebrates country music’s diversity,” says Opry general manager Pete Fisher. “In addition, the Opry presents the many generations of artists who have formed country music’s legacy and continue to forge its future course.”

This early Opry souvenir features founder
George D. Hay (center) and Opry cast
members from the 1930s.
AND WATCH>
HANK WILLIAMS SR. THE GRAND OLE OPREY “IM SO LONESOME I COULD DIE”
Check out this video on YouTube:http://youtu.be/lSiXv2_k

HIWAY AMERICA -MUSIC CITY – NASHVILLE TN. LOCATED AT ROUTE 24,65s,40. ALSO THE MAGNIFICENT GRAND OLE OPREY