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THE COUNTERCULTURE

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The Counterculture

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photo Janis Joplin and Big Brother and The Holding Company, Lagunitas, California, 1967. Joplin’s gritty, full-throttle blues-rock style offered a new, liberating image for women in the world of rock music.

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Unconventional appearance, music, drugs, communitarian experiments, and sexual liberation were hallmarks of the sixties counterculture, most of whose members were white, middle-class young Americans. To some Americans, these attributes reflected American ideals of free speech, equality, and pursuit of happiness. Other people saw the counterculture as self-indulgent, pointlessly rebellious, unpatriotic, and destructive of America’s moral order.

Authorities banned the psychedelic drug LSD, restricted political gatherings, and tried to enforce bans on what they considered obscenity in books, music, theater, and other media. Parents argued with their children and worried about their safety. Some adults accepted elements of the counterculture, while others became estranged from sons and daughters.

In 1967 Lisa and Tom Law moved to San Francisco, joining thousands of young people flocking to the Haight-Ashbury district. The counterculture lifestyle integrated many of the ideals and indulgences of the time: peace, love, harmony, music, mysticism, and religions outside the Judeo-Christian tradition. Meditation, yoga, and psychedelic drugs were embraced as routes to expanding one’s consciousness.

 


 

 

photo The “Freak-Out” show, Los Angeles, 1965. Rock music, colorful light shows, performance artists, and mind-altering drugs characterized the psychedelic dance parties of the sixties held in large halls in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

 

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A concert in the Panhandle, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo The Haight-Ashbury section of San Francisco, 1967. Students, hippies, musicians, and artists gravitated toward the community’s inexpensive housing and festive atmosphere.

 

 

photo Hell’s Angels motorcycle club members, the Panhandle in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 1967. While some people admired the Hell’s Angels’ audacious style, its members had an uneven and sometimes violent relationship with people in the counterculture.

 

photo Musician in the Panhandle, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo “Summer of Love,” the Panhandle, San Francisco, 1967

 

photo San Francisco, 1967

 

photo Easter Sunday Love-In, Malibu Canyon, California, 1968. This was a celebration of the counterculture movement.

 

photo Suzuki-Roshi, a Buddhist teacher, at the Human Be-In, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, January 14, 1967. Also known as “A Gathering of the Tribes,” the Human Be-In was an effort to promote positive interactions among different groups in society.

 

photo Poet Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In festival, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 1967. Ginsberg, known for his poem Howl, lived and symbolized the bohemian ideals of the Beat Generation of the 1950s and embraced the counterculture of the sixties.

 

It [the counterculture] was an attempt to rebel against the values our parents had pushed on us. We were trying to get back to touching and relating and living.

-Lisa Law, 1985

 

photo Monterey International Pop Festival, Monterey, California, 1967. Monterey Pop was one of the first large outdoor rock festivals in the 1960s. Lisa and Tom Law sheltered people who were having difficult psychedelic drug experiences in their “Trip Tent.”

 

photo Timothy Leary, the Harvard-trained psychologist who coined the phrase “Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out,” at the Human Be-In, San Francisco, 1967

 

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#counterculture#sexual liberation#rebellion#values#Haight-Ashbury#Timothy Leary#Monterey International Pop Festival#Allen Ginsberg#Suzuki-Roshi#love_in#summer_0f_love#sanfransisco#Hell’s Angels#The “Freak-Out” show#Janis Joplin and Big Brother and The Holding Company#nixon#sexual liberation#lsd

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Aside
JANE FONDA VIETNAM WAR ACTIVIST AND MORE

Synopsis

Jane Fonda is an American actress born on December 21, 1937, in New York City. The daughter of acclaimed actor Henry Fonda, Jane starred in the acclaimed films Klute and Coming Home, winning Oscars for both. Off screen, she was a civil rights and anti-war activist. In the 1980s, the actress found success launching a series of aerobic-exercise videos.

QUOTES

“It’s never too late—never too late to start over, never too late to be happy.”

– Jane Fonda
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Early Life

Born Lady Jayne Seymour Fonda on December 21, 1937, in New York City, Jane Fonda has enjoyed a tremendous career as an actress. She comes from a Hollywood dynasty of sorts. Her father Henry was one of the top actors of the 20th century. Her brother Peter and her niece Bridget have also had their share of success on the big screen.

Fonda faced some challenges growing up. Her father could be cold and distant. Her mother, socialite Frances Seymour Brokaw, committed suicide when Fonda was 12 years old. Not long after her mother’s death, Fonda developed an eating disorder, which she struggled with for years. She attended boarding school and then went to Vassar College. Leaving college, Fonda went to Paris to study art.

Fonda returned to New York and did a bit of modeling for a time. Before long, she decided to follow in her father’s footsteps. In 1954 she co-starred with her father, Henry Fonda, in a production of The Country Girl. Fonda began to study her craft with Lee Strasberg at the famed Actors Studio a few years later.

Career Beginnings

Fonda’s career seemed to really take off in 1960. She made her film debut Tall Story (1960) with Anthony Perkins. On Broadway, Fonda netted a Tony Award nomination for There Was a Little Girl. She continued to juggle theatrical and film work over the next few years. Working with director George Cukor, Fonda starred in the romantic comedy The Chapman Report (1962). She shared the Broadway stage with Celeste Holm in Invitation to a March and Dyan Cannon in The Fun Couple around this time.

In the late 1960s, Fonda recreated herself as a type of sex kitten under the direction of her French filmmaker husband Roger Vadim. This new look was most evident in the 1968 science fiction taleBarbarella

She soon shed this image for more serious dramatic roles. She scored her first Academy Award nomination for 1969’s They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?. Two years later, Fonda took home her first Academy Award for her work on Sydney Pollack‘s thriller Klute, which co-starred Donald Sutherland.

Film Actress and Activist

In addition to her acting, Fonda became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War. She traveled to North Vietnam in 1972—a visit that caused an uproar back at home. Many were particularly upset by Fonda’s decision to pose for photos while sitting on an antiaircraft gun, one used to shoot at American troops. She was given the nickname “Hanoi Jane” and seen as a traitor for her support of the North Vietnamese. Fonda also fought for social causes, serving as a spokesperson on issues of civil rights and women’s rights.

Unrepentant communist-supporter ‘Hanoi Jane’ Fonda will play Nancy Reagan in an upcoming film. In 1972 “Hanoi” Jane Fonda applauded an NVA anti-aircraft gun crew during her trip to North Vietnam. These guns were used to shoot down American planes and contributed to the deaths of American Airmen. To plug the film Jane Fonda wore a “Hanoi Jane”

Traitor Jane Fonda AKA Hanoi Jane Cast As Nancy Reagan in THE BUTLE

During the Vietnam war Jane Fonda betrayed her nation and it’s fighting men. CBS and NBC both claim it’s urban legend but of the many accounts I’ve read in my research it seems an undeniable fact. We all know the communist lapdog media will never admit to or ever tell the truth even if they were at the pearly gates.
Hanoi Jane is her name and she continues to demonstrate this everywhere she goes. Jane Fonda thumbs her nose at all things American, reveling in her notoriety as a traitor. Now she’s a progressive hero instead of a disgrace. Liberal progressives have no respect for institutions. They aim to destroy traditional culture, piece by piece.
This is beyond insulting. This movie really needs to flop. Liberals will probably give it an Oscar. Check it out: Jane Fonda’s turn as Nancy Reagan has outraged fans of the former first lady but the actress says “The Gipper’s” wife is happy she landed the role. “I don’t think that whatever differences there might be in our politics really matters…

JANE FONDA VIETNAM WAR ACTIVIST AND MORE