Tag Archives: oklahoma

HIWAY AMERICA -Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park, Foyil,Oklahoma

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Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park
Foyil, Oklahoma

Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park
courtesy of Betty Harris

Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park is the oldest and largest example of a folk art environment in Oklahoma; its construction lasting from 1937 to 1961.  Totem Pole Park contains the original, highly decorated creations of Galloway, one of Oklahoma’s premier folk artists and significant in the “visionary art” movement. The park is located just 3.5 miles off the Mother Road.  All of the art objects are made of stone or concrete, reinforced with steel rebar and wood.  Galloway incised and carved the objects in bas-relief and applied paint to decorations that generally include representational and figurative images of birds and Native Americans of Northwest Coast/Alaska and Plains cultures arranged facing the four cardinal directions.Nathan Edward Galloway was born in 1880 in Springfield, Missouri and began wood carving as a boy.  He became proficient in woodworking and blacksmithing and obtained employment at Sand Springs Home, teaching manual arts to orphan boys.  In 1937, he retired to live on the property now known as the Totem Pole Park.  He constructed a vernacular Craftsman residence, a smokehouse, and a workshop (which no longer exists).  He began to make violins, furniture, and decorative wall art. Galloway became interested in Native Americans and found inspiration in post cards and National Geographic magazinesto construct totem poles in the park.Between 1937 and 1948, he created a 90-foot tall main totem pole heavily carved with bas-relief designs, the largest art object on the property.  This totem pole is made of red sandstone framed with steel and wood with a thick concrete skin and sits on a large three-dimensional turtle.  The turtle forms the base and is carved from a broad, flat outcrop of sandstone in place on the site. The totem pole is hollow and ascends nine “floors,” with the ground floor measuring nine feet in diameter.  The plastered interior depicts painted murals of mountain-and-lake scenes and bird totems. Native American shields and arrow points line the tops of the murals.  At the very top, the cone is open to the sky.

Ed Galloway’s Residence and Smokehouse
National Park Service
Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program

Other totems include a pre-1955 Arrowhead Totem, a c.1955 Birdbath Totem, and a Tree Totem dating c. 1955-1961.  The park also includes two sets of concrete totem picnic tables with seats, a concrete totem barbeque/fireplace, small bird gateposts, as well as the Fish-Arch gates designed by Galloway to look like a gar-like fish with bird images facing east and west.

A museum stands on the property called the “Fiddle House” which houses Galloway’s fiddles and other creations. The eleven-sided building resembles a Navajo hogan, decorated with totemic columns and Native American portraits.

In 1961, Galloway died and the park fell into disrepair until the Rogers County Historical Society acquired it in 1989.  In a restoration effort conducted from 1988-1998 by the Rogers County Historical Society and the Kansas Grassroots Arts Association, art conservators and engineers studied the site and repainted, replaced, and replicated materials in disrepair.

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LET’S LEGAILIZE IT EVERYWHERE.

#Marijuana Helped Stop Child’s Seizures

https://youtu.be/bx6niSTzm3o

COOL PEOPLE- WOODIE GUTHRIE- BIO, MUSIC AND SUCH

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COOL PEOPLE- WOODIE GUTHRIE- BIO, MUSIC AND SUCH

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 THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND was written at a small boarding house on 43rd Street. His autobiography BOUND FOR GLORY and many of his most popular songs were written in various locations around town; JESUS CHRIST, TOM JOAD, VIGILANTE MAN, and RIDING IN MY CAR are among the 600 songs he composed here.

http://youtu.be/XaI5IRuS2aE

My Name Is New York – Deluxe Audio Book

http://youtu.be/HFYpdbrKEOA

Now, for the first time, you’ll actually be able to hear these stories told by those who knew him best, in many different ways and through various encounters and circumstances; music partners Pete Seeger, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Sonny Terry, and Bess Lomax Hawes, Woody’s first wife Mary Guthrie, Woody’s merchant marine buddy Jimmy Longhi, Bob Dylan, Woody’s second wife Marjorie Guthrie, Arlo Guthrie, Nora Guthrie and many others share their memories with you first-hand.

With this new audio tour, we invite you to walk the streets, ride the buses and subways, or sit down and relax on some of the stoops, park benches, or beaches where Woody Guthrie did — always strumming away on his guitar, always working on a new song.

 http://youtu.be/HFYpdbrKEOA

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Woody Guthrie Biography

Singer, Guitarist, Songwriter (1912–1967)
Woody Guthrie was a singer-songwriter, and one of the legendary figures of American folk music.
Woody Guthrie – Centennial Birthday Festival at City Winery (TV-14; 03:04) American folk musician Woody Guthrie’s songs and legacy continue to influence music and politics. To celebrate his 100th birthday, City Winery in New York City held a three day festival of concerts celebrating his life and work.Synopsis
Woody Guthrie wrote more than 1,000 songs, including “So Long (It’s Been Good to Know Yuh)” and “Union Maid.” After serving in WWII, he continued to perform for farmer and worker groups. “This Land Is Your Land” was his most famous song, and it became an unofficial national anthem. His autobiography,Bound for Glory (1943), was filmed in 1976. His son Arlo also achieved success as a musician.Woody Guthrie Photo Gallery: Woody was warmly embraced by leftist artists, union organizers and folk musicians.
Born on July 14, 1912 in Okemah, Oklahoma, Woody Guthrie was the second son of Charles and Nora Belle Guthrie. The future folk hero was born just weeks after Woodrow Wilson was nominated as the Democratic candidate for president in 1912; as his namesake later told a crowd of concertgoers, “My father was a hard, fist-fighting Woodrow Wilson Democrat, so Woodrow Wilson was my name.”Both parents were musically inclined and taught young Woody a wide array of folk tunes, songs that he soon learned to play on his guitar and harmonica. Tragedy and personal loss visited the budding musician early and often throughout his childhood, providing a bleak context for his future songs and supplying him with a wry perspective on life.In short order, Guthrie experienced the accidental death of his older sister Clara, a fire that destroyed the family home, his father’s financial ruin, and the institutionalization of his mother, who was suffering from Huntington’s disease. At the age of just 14, Guthrie and his siblings were left to fend for themselves while their father worked in Texas to repay his debts. As a teenager, Guthrie turned to busking in the streets for food or money, honing his skills as a musician while developing the keen social conscience that would later be so integral to his legendary music.When Guthrie was 19, he married his first wife, Mary Jennings, in Texas, where he had gone to be with his father. Eventually, Woody and Mary would have three children, Gwen, Sue and Bill. The Great Depression hit the Guthrie family hard, and when the drought-stricken Great Plains transformed into the infamous Dust Bowl, Guthrie left his family in 1935 to join the thousands of “Okies” who were migrating West in search of work. Like many other “Dust Bowl refugees,” Guthrie spent his time hitchhiking, riding freight trains, and when he could, quite literally singing for his supper.With his guitar and harmonica, Guthrie sang in the hobo and migrant camps, developing into a musical spokesman for labor and other left-wing causes. These hardscrabble experiences would provide the bedrock for Guthrie’s songs and stories, as well as fodder for his future autobiography, “Bound for Glory.” It was also during these years that Guthrie developed a taste for the road that would never quite leave him.Folk Revolutionary
In 1937, Guthrie arrived in California, where he landed a job with partner Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman as a radio performer of traditional folk music on KFVD in Los Angeles. The duo soon garnered a loyal following from the disenfranchised “Okies” living in migrant camps across California and it wasn’t long before Guthrie’s populist sentiments found their way into his songs.In 1940, Guthrie’s wanderlust led him to New York City, where he was warmly embraced by leftist artists, union organizers and folk musicians. Through fruitful collaboration with the likes of Alan Lomax, Leadbelly, Pete Seeger and Will Geer, Guthrie’s career blossomed. He took up social causes and helped establish folk music not only as a force for change, but also as a viable new commercial genre within the music business. Guthrie’s success as a songwriter with the Almanac Singers helped launch him into the popular consciousness, garnering him even greater critical acclaim. The ensuing fame and hardships of the road led to the end of Guthrie’s marriage in 1943. A year later, he would go on to record his most famous song, “This Land is Your Land,” an iconic populist anthem which remains popular today and is regarded by many as a kind of alternative national anthem.During World War II, the singer/songwriter joined the Merchant Marine and began composing music with a more strident antifascist message. (Guthrie was famous for performing with the slogan, “This Machine Kills Fascists,” scrawled across his acoustic guitar.) While he was out of the Merchant Marine on furlough, he married Marjorie Greenblatt Mazia, and after the war the couple made their home in Coney Island, New York, eventually filling the house with four children: Cathy, Arlo, Joady and Nora. This period in Guthrie’s life would prove to be his most musically prolific, as he continued to produce political anthems while also writing children’s classics like, “Don’t You Push Me Down,” “Ship In The Sky” and “Howdi Doo.”

Highway 66 Blues

BEEN ON THIS ROAD FOR A MIGHTY LONG TIME

TEN MILLION MEN LIKE ME

YOU DRIVE US FROM YO’ TOWN, WE RAMBLE AROUND

I GOT THEM 66 HIGHWAY BLUES

Hard Travelin’ by Woody Guthrie. With Depression Era photos by the great Farm Security Administration photographer John Vachon. Created in honor of Woody’s 100th birthday.

http://youtu.be/yI9OJ6PIbso

Play MIDI

Highway 66 Blues
(Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger)

There is a Highway from coast to the coast,
New York to Los Angeles,
I'm a goin' down that road with troubles on my mind
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Every old town that I ramble' round,
Down that Lonesome Road,
The police in yo' town they shove me around,
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Makes me no difference wherever I ramble
Lord, wherever I go,
I don't wanna be pushed around by th' police in yo' town,
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Been on this road for a mighty long time,
Ten million men like me,
You drive us from yo' town, we ramble around,
And got them 66 Highway Blues.

Sometimes I think I'll blow down a cop,
Lord, you treat me so mean,
I done lost my gal, I aint got a dime,
I got them 66 Highway Blues.

Sometimes I think I'll get me a gun,
Thirty eight or big forty fo',
But a number for a name and a big 99,
Is worse than 66 Highway Blues.

I'm gonna start me a hungry man's union,
Ainta gonna charge no dues,
Gonna march down that road to the Wall Street Walls
A singin' those 66 Highway blues.

Copyright Stormking Music, Inc.

HIWAY AMERICA – COWBOYS, AND THE NATIONAL COWBOY MUSEUM, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK

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HIWAY AMERICA – COWBOYS, AND THE NATIONAL COWBOY MUSEUM, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK

Cowboys

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I had nothing to look forward to in civilization, I was crazy about guns.
Frank Mayer, buffalo hunter
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In 1865 thirteen million buffalo roam the Great Plains. This vast untouched wilderness divides America but the rail road cuts through the continent. And on the trains come a million unemployed Civil War veterans.

Their targets are the 900 kilo buffalo, each capable of stampeding at 55km an hour and crushing man and beast before them. So hunters shoot from 180m. A good shot aims for the lungs and drops the target without the rest of the herd even noticing. In this way, 8,000 buffalo a day are slaughtered. And they’re all killed just for their hides. Worth $3 each, one million are shipped out in 1872 from Kansas alone. The long strips of buffalo leather are used in Northern factories as drive belts, and other pieces become coats and shoes.

The Native American tribes on the Plains had depended on the buffalo.

“The buffalo were our strength. From whence we came, and at whose breast we suck as babies all our lives.” Black Elk

The buffalos’ sinews become bow strings, bones become cups and spoons, and its skin is used for clothing, tepees and coffins. Native Americans have co-existed with them since the last Ice Age. In just a few decades, the source of their entire culture is destroyed. In 1865, thirteen million buffalo roamed. By 1889, just 85 wild buffalo exist in the whole of the United States.

COWBOYS AND FARMERS

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“For a brief moment the cowboy was king of the West…(He) was created and sustained by the railroad.” Hugh Brogan

Cattle replace buffalo. In Texas, there’s six million. Worth only $4 there, they’re worth ten times that back east. But in 1868, the rail-road stops 1600km short of the herds. To transport them across the west, the cowboy is born. After the civil war, 60% of the South’s population lives in rural poverty. You could either farm, or try to find work as one of the 35,000 cowboys around which now iconic towns like Dodge City are born. For a dollar a day they need to be skilled horseman enough to guide wild herds prone to stampede through even wilder lands: And good enough with a gun to fight off rustlers after their $200,000 herds. In 1873, Colt releases the six shooter, Colt 45, also known as ‘The Peacemaker’. It costs $17, half a cowboy’s monthly salary, with its six bullets costing half a day’s pay.

“Abe Lincoln may have freed all men, but Sam Colt made them equal” Post Civil War slogan

One out of three cowboys is Hispanic or African Americans. Many, such as Nat Love, go from slavery to a dangerous, but undeniable freedom:

The buffalo and other game, the Indians, the delight of living, and the fights against death that caused every nerve to tingle, and the everyday communion with men, whose minds were as broad as the plains they roamed, and whose creed was every man for himself and every friend for each other, and with each other till the end.

But barbed wire signals the end of the cowboy’s way of life. In just twenty years, two and a half million settlers have covered over 2 million square km of open range with farms, setting cattle rancher against homesteader. In the same year Colt releases the gun that will make the ‘Wild West’ famous, an unknown farmer invents something that will end forever the cowboy. In autumn 1873, Joseph Glidden, using a coffee grinder, crudely fashions some steel bars, and binds some barbs between two lengths of wire. His barbed wire design divides the plains into farms and ranches and blocks the cattle trails. Within 10 years, Glidden sells enough barbed wire to go around the world, 25 times. The open plains end forever.

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The Last Cowboy Song-Ed Bruce

http://youtu.be/GKeDcF1v_Y4 

“When you call me that, smile,” the hero said to the bad man in that first of thousands of cowboy novels, Owen Wister’s “The Virginian.” Even before that book’s publication in 1902, the cowboy had become a part of the American psyche. Something there was about him—tall in the saddle, alone, facing danger, one man against nature’s vast, treeless plains and humanity’s outlaws—that appealed to people and made the cowboy a folk hero, a half-real, half-mythological symbol of the American West.

NationalCowboy.jpg - © Adam Knapp, Licensed to About.com, Inc.

 © Adam Knapp, Licensed to About.com, Inc.

Billy the Kid : Documentary on the Outlaw Billy The Kid (Full Documentary)

http://youtu.be/peMYV393xLQ 

THE COWBOY MUSEUM

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Background:

Established in 1955 with the purpose of honoring the American cowboys, what was then called the Cowboy Hall of Fame has become today’s National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. The 200,000 square foot facility features Western and Native American artifacts, sculptures, art and historical galleries. It is one of Oklahoma City’s more popular attractions and one of the most respected museums of its kind in the United States.

MUSEUM OF OSTEOLOGY OKLAHOMA OK.

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MUSEUM OF OSTEOLOGY, OKLAHOMA,CITY,OK.                                            http://www.museumofosteology.org/

AFTER WATCHING A SHOW ON THE MUSEUM I FOUND IT FASINATING,YOU MAY FIND IT GRUESOME, BUT IT’S WORTH WATCHING. I THINK IF I WERE NOT A WRITER I MIGHT HAVE BEEN A FORENSIC PATHOLOGIST! I WATCH FORENSIC SHOWS WHENEVER I CAN AND LOVE THEM. YES THAT’S RATHER WEIRD AND MAYBE SCARY, BUT HECK THAT’S WHAT I AM INTERESTED IN.I AM STILL A HARMLESS HIPPIE WITH UNDERLYING PSYCHOLICAL ISSUES, JUST KIDDING!
SO GO AHEAD AND WATCH THE VIDEOS AND ENJOY THE BUGS AND THE BLEACH! HOBO HIPPIE.

Party Like an Osteologist!slideshow_10 (2)

Book your Birthday party, Bar and Bat Mitzvah, Quinceañera, Baby Shower, even your Wedding at the Museum! Click here for details.

VISIT THE MUSEUM FROM THE COOL SHOW “MODERN MARVELS”
http://www.skullsunlimited.com/videos/8/Modern-Marvels-Built-by-Hand.htm
VIRTUAL VISIT TO THE MUSEUM

MORE VIDEO
http://www.skullsunlimited.com/videos/9/Skeleton-Inc-3net-3D.htm

Museum Exhibits

ABOUT SKULLS

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CLEANING A SKULL
http://www.skullsunlimited.com/videos/1/Dirty-Jobs-with-Mike-Rowe.htm

What is a Skeleton?

Invertebrates are animals with no vertebral column or “backbone”. There are millions of animal species with exoskeletons; including insects, arachnids, crustaceans, and snails.

Vertebrates are animals that possess a vertebral column or “backbone”. Vertebrate animals include mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many species of fish.

Museum Environment

From comparative anatomy to classification to adaptation and locomotion, The Museum of Osteology has been designed with learning in mind. Currently displaying nearly 300 skeletons from all corners of the world, visitors have a unique opportunity to compare and contrast many rare species normally not seen in museum exhibits.

Explorer’s Corner

Get up close and personal for a hands on experience with over a dozen real animal skulls. A one of a kind experience for kids to handle and examine various North American species.

Comparative Anatomy1602

Comparative anatomy is the study of similarities and differences in the anatomy of organisms. Compare the specimens on display in this exhibit and you may notice that they all have the same basic design including a skull, 4 limbs, a spinal column, a torso, and a pelvis.

Adaptation & Locomotion

Adaptation is a process of nature in which an organisim becomes better suited to it’s habitat. Adaptations can be found throughout nature. This exhibit features several different types of locomotion found in the animal kingdom.

Forensic Pathology

The pathology of a skull can tell you what may have caused an animals death. Pathology is damage that may be the result of trauma, disease or infection.

Primates: Monkey & Apes

The order Primates, meaning “prime or first rank”, contains approximately 431 species of lemurs, lorises, tarsiers, monkeys and apes. Most primates are arboreal and live in tropical or subtropical regions of the Americas.

Reptiles & Amphibians

There are over 6300 species belonging to the class Amphibia including frogs, toads, salamanders, newts and caecilians. Amphibians are cold-blooded animals whose skin is covered in a layer of mucus which helps to keep them moist.

Members of the Class Reptilia are characterized as air-breathing, egg-laying, cold-blooded (poikilothermic) animals whose skin is usually covered by scales.

Marsupials

Marsupials are pouch-bearing mammals who give birth to underdeveloped offspring. These offspring complete their development within the mother’s pouch. There is great diversity within this order.

Carnivora

Carnivore means “flesh-eater”, and although this may refer to any mammal dining exclusively on other animals, is also the order assigned by taxonomists to include dogs, cats, bears and weasels.

Aves

The class Aves includes all birds. These warm-blooded vertebrates have feathered covered bodies, give birth to egg-bound young and most have two limbs modified for flight.

Flightless Birds

There are many species of flightless birds ranging from rails to penguins to the ostrich. Flightless birds evolved from birds that could fly but

Oklahoma Wildlife

You guessed it, species found and collected solely in the Sooner state. If it’s a species that makes Oklahoma it’s own, you’ll probably find it in Oklahoma Wildlife. View the scissor-tail flycatcher skeleton, the American bison, Beaver, Squirrels, Muskrat, Box turtle, Mice, and Fox!

HIWAY AMERICA-ROUTE 66 OKLAHOMA CITY KS. ROUTE 66 PART 3

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FUN FACTS ABOUT OKLAHOMAimages2jo4tr2t-2

Fact 1
The city got its name from a kind of yellow grass that grows in the area. Earlier, the city used to be called Oneida.

Fact 2
Amarillo residents call it the Helium capital of the world because most of the world’s supply of this gas can be located within two hundred and fifty miles of this Texas City.

Fact 3
Amarillo is home to the largest canyon within the state of Texas. Palo Duro Canyon is second only to the Grand Canyon.

Fact 4
Amarillo has a long standing record of being America’s cattle shipping capital. This is partly due to the fact that there are some many large cattle ranches located in this area in the center of Texas.

Fact 5
One of the largest nuclear weapons assembly plants in the United States is located in this city.

Fact 6
The city and the surrounding landscape have been used as a filming location in many popular movies like Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Fact 7
Amarillo has inspired many country singers to write and sing songs about the city.

Fact 8
When the cattle industry sued actress and television personality Oprah Winfrey the case took place in Amarillo.

Fact 9
Famous country singer Lacey Brown calls this city home.

Fact 10
Amarillo is home to the Big Texan steakhouse. The Big Texan serves a 72 ounce steak and they promise that anyone that can eat the dinner completely in less than one hour can have the dinner for free.

“OKLAHOMA” FROM THE MUSICAL OKLAHOMA

More Fun Facts about Oklahoma

I thought it would be fun to share some interesting facts about our great state. Some of these I knew, but a lot of them I didn’t. I do know that there is nothing to be ashamed about when you say you are an Okie!

  1. The bread twist tie was invented in Maysville, OK.
  2. The shopping cart was invented in Ardmore in 1936.
  3. The nation’s first parking meter was installed in Oklahoma City in 1935.
  4. The first Girl Scout Cookie was sold in Muskogee in 1917.
  5. Cimarron County, located in the Oklahoma Panhandle, is the only county in the U.S. bordered by 4 separate states — Texas, New Mexico, Colorado & Kansas . (I’ve actually stood on all those state lines!)
  6. The Oklahoma State Capital is the only capital in the U.S. with working oil wells on its grounds.
  7. Boise City , OK, was the only city in the United States to be bombed during World War II. On Monday, July 5, 1943, at 12:30am., a B-17 Bomber based at Dalhart Army Air Base, Texas, dropped six practice bombs on the sleeping town, mistaking the city lights as target lights.
  8. WKY Radio in Oklahoma City was the first radio station transmitting west of the Mississippi River .
  9. The nation’s first “tornado warning” was issued March 25, 1948 in Oklahoma City minutes before a devastating tornado. Because of the warning, no lives were lost.
  10. Oklahoma has the largest Native American population of any state in the U.S.
  11. The name ‘ Oklahoma ‘ comes from two Choctaw words — okla meaning “people” and homa meaning “red.” So the name means, “Red People.” The name was approved in 1890.
  12. Oklahoma has produced more astronauts than any other state.
  13. Oklahoma has more man-made lakes than any other state.
  14. During the “Land Rush,” Oklahoma City and Guthrie went from vast, open prairie to cities of over 10,000 in a single day.
  15. The nation’s first “Yield” traffic sign was erected in Tulsa on a trial basis.
  16. The Pensacola Dam on Grand Lake is the longest multi-arched dam in the world at 6,565 feet.
  17. The Port of Catoosa (just north of Tulsa ) is the largest inland port in America.
  18. The aerosol can was invented in Bartlesville.
  19. Per square mile, Oklahoma has more tornadoes than any other place in the world.
  20. The highest wind speed ever recorded on earth was in Moore Okla. , on May 3, 1999 during the Oklahoma City F-5 tornado. Wind speed was clocked at 318 mph. (My husband almost lost his cousin and cousin’s two girls in this tornado.)
  21. The Will Rogers World Airport and the Wiley Post Airport are both named after two famous Oklahomans, both killed in the same airplane crash.

Oklahoma City

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

State Capital

City of Oklahoma City
Oklahoma City is the capital of the U.S. state of Oklahoma and its largest city. The county seat of Oklahoma County,[3] the city ranks 29th among United States cities in population.[4] As of the 2012 census, the population was 599,199.[5] In 2010 the Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,252,987,[6] and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,322,249 residents,[7] making it Oklahoma’s largest metropolitan area. Oklahoma City’s city limits extend into Canadian, Cleveland, and Pottawatomie counties, though much of those areas outside of the core Oklahoma County area are suburban or rural (watershed). The city ranks as the eighth-largest city in the United States by land area (including consolidated city-counties; it is the second-largest city in the United States by land area whose government is not consolidated with that of a county).

Oklahoma City features one of the largest livestock markets in the world.[8] Oil, natural gas, petroleum products and related industries are the largest sector of the local economy. The city is situated in the middle of an active oil field and oil derricks dot the capitol grounds. The federal government employs large numbers of workers at Tinker Air Force Base and the United States Department of Transportation’s Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (these two sites house several offices of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Transportation Department’s Enterprise Service Center, respectively).

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97 YEAR OLD MAN CHARGED WITH KILLING GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER

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97-year-old Oklahoma man charged with killing granddaughter

www.tulsaworld.com Published: December 6, 2013

CUSHING — The Tulsa World reports that a 97-year-old Payne County man was charged Friday with fatally shooting his great-granddaughter at their home.

Russell Eugene Dawes told a deputy on Thursday that he “got tired of her carrying on and I shot her,” according to an affidavit filed in Payne County District Court on Friday.

The affidavit says Dawes was the grandfather of the victim, 30-year-old Sonja James, but both Payne County District Attorney Tom Lee and Dawes’ attorney Cheryl Ramsey said he was her great-grandfather. Read the rest of this story at TulsaWorld.com.

EVERYTHING ABOUT WOODIE GUTHRIE

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WOODIE GUTHRIE SONGS

BIOGRAPHY



CHILDHOOD (1912-1931)
Okemah, Oklahoma
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From left: Woody, Nora, Charley, & George Guthrie at their home in Okemah, Oklahoma, 1924.

WOODY SEZ…

“Okemah was one of the singingest, square dancingest, drinkingest, yellingest, preachingest, walkingest, talkingest, laughingest, cryingest, shootingest, fist fightingest, bleedingest, gamblingest, gun, club and razor carryingest of our ranch towns and farm towns, because it blossomed out into one of our first Oil Boom Towns.”

Woodrow Wilson Guthrie was born on July 14, 1912, in Okemah, Oklahoma. He was the second-born son of Charles and Nora Belle Guthrie. His father – a cowboy, land speculator, and local politician – taught Woody Western songs, Indian songs, and Scottish folk tunes. His Kansas-born mother, also musically inclined, had an equally profound effect on Woody.

Slightly built, with an extremely full and curly head of hair, Woody was a precocious and unconventional boy from the start. Always a keen observer of the world around him, the people, music and landscape he was exposed to made lasting impressions on him.

During his early years in Oklahoma, Woody experienced the first of a series of immensely tragic personal losses. With the accidental death of his older sister Clara, the family’s financial ruin, and the institutionalization and eventual loss of his mother, Woody’s family and home life was forever devastated.

In 1920, oil was discovered nearby and overnight Okemah was transformed into an “oil boom” town, bringing thousands of workers, gamblers and hustlers to the once sleepy farm town. Within a few years, the oil flow suddenly stopped and Okemah suffered a severe economic turnaround, leaving the town and its inhabitants “busted, disgusted, and not to be trusted.”

From his experiences in Okemah, Woody’s uniquely wry outlook on life, as well as his abiding interest in rambling around the country, was formed. And so, he took to the open road.

Go back to the top of the page


THE GREAT DUST BOWL (1931-1937)
Pampa, Texas
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Woody in Pampa, Texas, 1931.

WOODY SEZ…

“If there was anybody around there that did not play some instrument I did not see them… We played for rodeos, centennials, carnivals, parades, fairs, just bustdown parties, and played several nights and days a week just to hear our own boards rattle and our strings roar around in the wind. It was along in these days I commenced singing, I guess it was singing.”

In 1931, when Okemah’s boomtown period went bust, Woody left for Texas. In the panhandle town of Pampa, he fell in love with Mary Jennings, the younger sister of a friend and musician named Matt Jennings. Woody and Mary were married in 1933, and together had three children, Gwen, Sue and Bill.

It was with Matt Jennings and Cluster Baker that Woody made his first attempt at a musical career, forming The Corn Cob Trio and later the Pampa Junior Chamber of Commerce Band. It was also in Pampa that Woody first discovered a love and talent for drawing and painting, an interest he would pursue throughout his life.

If the Great Depression made it hard for Woody to support his family, the onslaught of the Great Dust Storm period, which hit the Great Plains in 1935, made it impossible. Drought and dust forced thousands of desperate farmers and unemployed workers from Oklahoma, Kansas, Tennessee, and Georgia to head west in search of work. Woody, like hundreds of “dustbowl refugees,” hit Route 66, also looking for a way to support his family, who remained back in Pampa.

Moneyless and hungry, Woody hitchhiked, rode freight trains, and even walked his way to California, taking whatever small jobs he could. In exchange for bed and board, Woody painted signs and played guitar and sang in saloons along the way, developing a love for traveling the open road-a lifelong habit he would often repeat.

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KFVD RADIO YEARS (1937-1940)
Los Angeles, California
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Woody and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Dempsey in Los Angeles, CA.

WOODY SEZ…

“I hate a song that makes you think that you’re not any good. I hate a song that makes you think that you are just born to lose. Bound to lose. No good to nobody. No good for nothing. Because you are either too old or too young or too fat or too slim or too ugly or too this or too that….songs that run you down or songs that poke fun of you on account of your bad luck or your hard traveling. I am out to fight those kinds of songs to my very last breath of air and my last drop of blood.”

By the time he arrived in California in 1937, Woody had experienced intense scorn, hatred, and even physical antagonism from resident Californians, who opposed the massive migration of the so-called “Okie” outsiders.

In Los Angeles Woody landed a job on KFVD radio, singing “old-time” traditional songs as well as some original songs. Together with his singing partner Maxine Crissman, aka “Lefty Lou,” Woody began to attract widespread public attention, particularly from the thousands of relocated Okies gathered in migrant camps. Living in makeshift cardboard and tin shelters, Woody’s program provided entertainment and a nostalgic sense of the “home” life they’d left behind; despite their desperate circumstances, it was a respite from the harsh realities of migrant life.

The local radio airwaves also provided Woody a forum from which he developed his talent for controversial social commentary and criticism. On topics ranging from corrupt politicians, lawyers, and businessmen to praising the compassionate and humanist principles of Jesus Christ, the outlaw hero Pretty Boy Floyd, and the union organizers that were fighting for the rights of migrant workers in California’s agricultural communities, Woody proved himself a hard-hitting advocate for truth, fairness, and justice.

Woody strongly identified with his audience and adapted to an “outsider” status, along with them. This role would become an essential element of his political and social positioning, gradually working its way into his songwriting; “I Ain’t Got No Home”, “Goin’ Down the Road Feelin’ Bad”, “Talking Dust Bowl Blues”, “Tom Joad” and “Hard Travelin'”; all reflect his desire to give voice to those who had been disenfranchised.

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NEW YORK TOWN (1940-1941)
New York City, New York
PDF


From left: Woody, Millard Lampell, Bess Lomax, Pete Seeger, Arthur Stern, and Sis Cunningham. The Almanac Singers in 1941.

WOODY SEZ…

“There’s several ways of saying what’s on your mind. And in states and counties where it ain’t any too healthy to talk too loud, speak your mind, or even to vote like you want to, folks have found other ways of getting the word around. 

One of the mainest ways is by singing. Drop the word ‘folk’ and just call it real old honest to god American singing. No matter who makes it up, no matter who sings it and who don’t, if it talks the lingo of the people, it’s a cinch to catch on, and will be sung here and yonder for a long time after you’ve cashed in your chips.

If the fight gets hot, the songs get hotter. If the going gets tough, the songs get tougher.”

Never comfortable with success, or being in one place for too long, Woody headed east for New York City, arriving in 1940. He was quickly embraced for his Steinbeckian homespun wisdom and musical “authenticity” by leftist organizations, artists, writers, musicians, and progressive intellectuals. That same year, folklorist Alan Lomax recorded Woody in a series of conversations and songs for the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Woody also recorded “Dust Bowl Ballads” for RCA Victor, his first album of original songs, and throughout the 1940s he continued to record hundreds of discs for Moses Asch, founder of Folkways Records. The recordings from this early period continue to be touchstones for folk music singer-songwriters everywhere.

In New York City, Lead Belly, Cisco Houston, Burl Ives, Pete Seeger, Will Geer, Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee, Josh White, Millard Lampell, Bess Hawes, Sis Cunningham, among others, all became Woody’s close friends and musical collaborators. Forming a loosely knit folk group called The Almanac Singers, they took up social causes such as union organizing, anti-Fascism, strengthening the Communist Party, peace, and generally fighting for the things they believed in the best way they could: through songs of political protest and activism. Woody became one of the prominent songwriters for the Almanac Singers.

The Almanacs helped to establish folk music as a viable commercial genre within the popular music industry. A decade later, original members of the Almanacs would re-form as the Weavers, the most commercially successful and influential folk music group of the early 1950s. It was through their tremendous popularity that Woody’s songs would become known to the larger public.

With increasing popularity, prosperity and critical success from public performances, recordings, and even his own radio show, Woody could afford to bring his struggling family to New York to enjoy his new found success.

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COLUMBIA RIVER (1941)
Portland, Oregon
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Woody in the Pacific Northwest.

WOODY SEZ…

“The Pacific Northwest is one of my favorite spots in this world, and I’m one walker that’s stood way up and looked way down acrost aplenty of pretty sights in all their veiled and nakedest seasons.

The Pacific Northwest has got mineral mountains. It’s got chemical deserts. It’s got rough run canyons. It’s got sawblade snowcaps. It’s got ridges of nine kinds of brown, hills out of six colors of green, ridges five shades of shadows, and stickers the eight tones of hell.

I pulled my shoes on and walked out of every one of these Pacific Northwest Mountain towns drawing pictures in my mind and listening to poems and songs and words faster to come and dance in my ears than I could ever get them wrote down…”

Despite his success, Woody became increasingly restless and disillusioned with New York’s radio and entertainment industry. Feeling the heat of censorship he wrote: “I got disgusted with the whole sissified and nervous rules of censorship on all my songs and ballads, and drove off down the road across the southern states again.”

Leaving New York, with his wife and three young children in tow, Woody headed out to Portland, Oregon where a documentary film project about the building of the Grand Coulee Dam sought to use his songwriting talent. The Bonneville Power Administration placed Woody on the Federal payroll for a month and there he composed the Columbia River Songs, another remarkable collection of songs that include “Roll on Columbia,” “Grand Coulee Dam,” and “The Biggest Thing That Man Has Done.” When his contract expired, Woody moved his family back to Pampa, Texas.

Hoping to get back to New York City, and on the radio, he hitchhiked his way across the country. Woody’s constant traveling, performing, and lack of regular work throughout the early 1940s took a hard toll on his family. Together with his increasing interest and involvement with progressive “radical” politics helped bring about the end of his first marriage.

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WORLD WAR II (1942-1945)
New York City, New York
PDF


Woody with his iconic guitar. Photo by Al Aumuller.

WOODY SEZ…

“This machine kills fascists.”

Back in New York, Woody met and courted a young dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company named Marjorie (Greenblatt) Mazia. Sharing humanist ideals and activist politics, Woody and Marjorie were married in 1945 and over the years had four children: Cathy, (who died at age four in a tragic home fire), Arlo, Joady, and Nora.

This relationship provided Woody a level of domestic stability and encouragement which he had previously not known, enabling him to turn out a staggering number of original songs, writings, drawings, paintings, poems and prose pieces. His first novel, Bound for Glory , a semi-autobiographical account of his Dust Bowl years was published in 1943 to critical acclaim.

During World War II, moved by his passion against Fascism, Woody served in both the Merchant Marine and the Army. Shipping out to sea on several occasions with his buddies Cisco Houston and Jimmy Longhi, Woody’s tendency to write songs, tell stories and make drawings continued unabated. He composed hundreds of anti-Hitler, pro-war, and historic ballads to rally the troops, such as “All You Fascists Bound To Lose”, “Talking Merchant Marine,” and “The Sinking of the Reuben James.” He began to work on a second novel, Sea Porpoise, and was enlisted by the army to write songs about the dangers of venereal diseases, which were published in brochures distributed to sailors. His capacity for creative self-expression seemed inexhaustible, whether on land or sea.

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CONEY ISLAND (1946-1954)
New York City, New York
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Woody performing for children on New York City Street, 1943. Photo by Eric Schaal/TIMEPIX

WOODY SEZ…

“Watch the kids. Do like they do. Act like they act. Yell like they yell. Dance the ways you see them dance. Sing like they sing. Work and rest the way the kids do.

You’ll be healthier. You’ll feel wealthier. You’ll talk wiser. You’ll go higher, do better, and live longer here amongst us if you’ll just only jump in here and swim around in these songs and do like the kids do.

I don’t want the kids to be grownup. I want to see the grown folks be kids.”

Following the war, in 1946, Woody Guthrie returned to settle in Coney Island, New York, with his wife Marjorie and their children. The peace he had fought so hard for seemed finally within his reach. It was during this time that Woody composed and recorded Songs to Grow On For Mother and Child and Work Songs To Grow On , considered children’s classics which won him success and recognition as an innovative writer of children’s songs.

Woody’s unique approach was to write songs that dealt with topics important to children written in language used by children such as; friendship (“Don’t You Push Me Down”), family (“Ship In The Sky”), community (“Howdi Doo”), chores (“Pick It Up”), personal responsibility (“Cleano”) and just plain fun (“Riding In My Car”).

During these years, Woody was exposed to Coney Island’s Jewish community through his mother-in-law, Aliza Greenblatt, a Yiddish poet. Inspired by this new relationship, he wrote a remarkable series of songs reflecting Jewish culture, such as “Hanuka Dance,” “The Many and The Few” and “Mermaid’s Avenue.”

Toward the late 1940s, Woody’s behavior started to become increasingly erratic, moody and violent, creating tensions in his personal and professional life. He was beginning to show symptoms of a rare, neurological disease, Huntington’s Chorea, a hereditary, degenerative disease that gradually and eventually robbed him of his health, talents and abilities. At the time, little was known about Huntington’s Chorea. It was later discovered to be the same disease which thirty years earlier had caused his mother’s institutionalization and eventual death.

Shaken by inexplicable volatile physical and emotional symptoms, Woody left his family once again, taking off for California with his young protégé, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott.

Arriving at his friend Will Geer’s property, Woody met Anneke Van Kirk, a young woman who became his third wife and with whom they had a daughter, Lorina.

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HOSPITAL YEARS (1954-1967)
Huntington’s Disease
PDF


Woody at Greystone Hospital, New Jersey, 1958.
Photo by Lou Gordon.

WOODY SEZ…

“The note of hope is the only note that can help us or save us from falling to the bottom of the heap of evolution, because, largely, about all a human being is, anyway, is just a hoping machine.”

The late 1940’s and early 1950’s saw a rise in anti-Communist sentiments. Leftist and progressive-minded Americans were subjected to Red-scare tactics such as “blacklisting”. Many people, particularly in the arts and entertainment fields, either lost their jobs or were prevented from working in their chosen careers. The Weavers, along with Woody, Pete Seeger and others from their circle, were targeted for their activist stances on such issues as the right to unionize, equal rights, and free speech.

Woody headed south to Florida, where friend and fellow activist Stetson Kennedy offered blacklisted artists living space on his property. While in the South at Kennedy’s “Beluthahatchee”, Woody worked on a third novel, Seeds of Man , and composed songs inspired by a heightened awareness of racial and environmental issues.

Becoming more and more unpredictable during a final series of road trips, Woody eventually returned to New York with Anneke, where he was hospitalized several times. Mistakenly diagnosed and treated for everything from alcoholism to schizophrenia, his symptoms kept worsening and his physical condition deteriorated. Picked up for “vagrancy” in New Jersey in 1954, he was admitted into the nearby Greystone Psychiatric Hospital, where he was finally diagnosed with Huntington’s Chorea, the incurable degenerative nerve disorder now known as Huntington’s Disease or HD.

During these years, Marjorie Guthrie, family and friends continued to visit and care for him. A new generation of musicians took an interest in folk music bringing it into the mainstream as yet another folk music revival. Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, The Greenbriar Boys, Phil Ochs, and many other young folksingers visited Woody in the hospital, bringing along their guitars and their songs to play for him, perhaps even to thank him.

Woody Guthrie died on October 3, 1967 while at Creedmoor State Hospital in Queens, New York. His ashes were sprinkled into the waters off of Coney Island’s shore.

A month later, on Thanksgiving 1967, Woody’s son Arlo Guthrie released his first commercial recording of “Alice’s Restaurant”, which was to become the iconic anti-war anthem for the next generation.

In his lifetime, Woody Guthrie wrote nearly 3,000 song lyrics, published two novels, created artworks, authored numerous published and unpublished manuscripts, poems, prose, and plays and hundreds of letters and news article which are housed in the Woody Guthrie Archives in New York.

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LEGACY
“I Ain’t Dead Yet”
PDF


Woody with his iconic guitar
Photograph by Robin Carson

WOODY SEZ…

“There’s a feeling in music and it carries you back down the road you have traveled and makes you travel it again. Sometimes when I hear music I think back over my days – and a feeling that is fifty-fifty joy and pain swells like clouds taking all kinds of shapes in my mind. 

Music is in all the sounds of nature and there never was a sound that was not music – the splash of an alligator, the rain dripping on dry leaves, the whistle of a train, a long and lonesome train whistling down, a truck horn blowing at a street corner speaker – kids squawling along the streets – the silent wail of wind and sky caressing the breasts of the desert.

Life is this sound, and since creation has been a song. And there is no real trick of creating words to set to music, once you realize that the word is the music and the people are the song.”

Having lived through some of the most significant historic movements and events of the Twentieth-Century –the Great Depression, the Great Dust Storm, World War II, the social and the political upheavals resulting from Unionism, the Communist Party and the Cold War– Woody absorbed it all to become a prolific writer whose songs, ballads, prose and poetry captured the plight of everyman. While traveling throughout the American landscape during the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s, Woody’s observations of what he saw and experienced has left for us a lasting and sometimes haunting legacy of images, sounds, and voices of the marginalized, disenfranchised, and oppressed people with whom he struggled to survive despite all odds. Although the corpus of original Woody Guthrie songs, or as Woody preferred “people’s songs” are, perhaps, his most recognized contribution to American culture, the stinging honesty, humor, and wit found even in his most vernacular prose writings exhibit Woody’s fervent belief in social, political, and spiritual justice.

In 1996, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and Case Western Reserve University presented a ten day celebration honoring Woody Guthrie, entitled Hard Travelin’. It was the first major conference on the legacy of Woody Guthrie complete with a photo exhibition, lectures, films, and two benefit concerts, which were held in support of the Woody Guthrie Archives.

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HONORS & AWARDS

Woody Guthrie has been recognized for his monumental contributions and achievements in American culture. He has been the recipient of prestigious awards both from governmental departments and private arts organizations.

  • Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, Pioneer Award 2012
  • U.S. Department of the Interior, Conservation Service Award 1966
  • The National Songwriters’ Hall of Fame inductee 1970
  • The Nashville Songwriters’ Hall of Fame inductee 1977
  • The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum inductee 1988
  • The North American Folk Alliance Lifetime Achievement Award 1996
  • National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Lifetime Achievement Award 1999
  • The Oklahoma Hall of Fame inductee 2006

-written by Jorge Arevalo / Woody Guthrie Archives

Aside

man shot in the back while hunting for Bigfoot

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man shot in the back while hunting for Bigfoot!

HIWAY AMERICA – COW CHIP CAPITAL OF THE WORLD-BEAVER OKLAHOMA

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Cow Chip Throwing Capital of the World

Field review by the editors.

Beaver, Oklahoma

 

The town of Beaver should be proud of its undisputed title: Cow Chip Throwing Capital of the World. It is here that the World Championship Cow Chip Throw is held each April.

King Cow Chip, a leering cartoon of a dried bovine fecal wad wearing a tilted crown, is the town’s registered trademark. This “Dried-in-the-Sun King” has brought notoriety — and prosperity — to Beaver. But, as with any long, unchallenged reign, the populace has become inured to their own charm. King Cow Chip’s royal entourage keeps the claim alive, cranking out commemorative gift boxes of cow chips, entertaining foreign dignitaries, and dragging the beaver trailer around town for parades.

In 1994, Randy Campbell, then mayor of Beaver, was obligated to greet us with open arms, not to mention some gift-boxed cow chips. He assured us he has only tossed a chip once before, yet his mean curve pitch at our Sony Handicam betrayed a suspiciously-practiced skill. He tossed underhand, a Frisbee-flick, bounding off the bumper of a car on the opposite side of the wide, paved main street.

“I think that’s my mother-in-law’s car,” he said.

Cow Chip Moment in History

King Cow Chip.

July 8, 1994, CBS This Morning: Post-trip we popped in on a network TV morning show.Host Paula Zahn tossed Roadside America’s gift cow chip at co-host Harry Smith. The throw was a 6-meter power lateral — Harry attempted to block, but the chip partially fragmented into his face. The moment was replayed endlessly on the best ofTalk Soup that year…

 

Cow Chip Throwing Capital of the World

Address:
Douglas Ave., Beaver, OK
Directions:
Statue is on wheels, and moves to various locations up and down Douglas Ave./US 270. We last saw it parked near Pizza Hut at corner of US 270 and Fifth St.
Phone:
580-625-4726
Admission:
Free.
RA Rates:
Worth a Detour
 Save to My Sights