Tag Archives: the beatles

The Beatles – All You Need Is Love 50th at Our Galleries – June 2 – 11.

Standard

The Beatles – All You Need Is Love 50th at Our Galleries – June 2 – 11.

Come see this show in our Soho, NYC and Sunset Marquis, West Hollywood galleries June 2 – 11. Admission is Free. All prints available for sale.

The Beatles sang “All You Need Is Love” across the world and these beautiful never-before-seen images by David Magnus show their global satellite broadcast in 1967.
Here’s are a few more details of that day 50 years ago…
On June 25, 1967, performers representing 19 countries from around the world appeared on Our World, the first international television production broadcast by satellite. An estimated 400 million viewers watched the two-and-a-half hour program, which featured talent including Pablo Picasso and Maria Callas and was closed out by a performance of “All You Need Is Love” by The Beatles. The photographer David Magnus, a friend of and regular collaborator with the band, was on hand to take pictures of the historic gig.
Watch some of this amazing time on YouTube

  • The Beatles, 1967
  • George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and Brian Epstein, 1967
  • The Beatles, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • The Beatles, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • The Beatles and Cello Player, London, 1967
  • The Beatles with George Martin, 1967
  • The Beatles, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • George Harrison, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • Mick Jagger and John Lennon, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • Paul McCartney and John Lennon  Contact Sheet, London, 1967
  • Paul McCartney, Triptych,  Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • The Beatles, Live Broadcast Contact Sheet, London, 1967
  • The Beatles, Triptych, Abbey Road Studios, 1967
  • The Beatles Tea Break, London, 1967
  • The Beatles Tea Time, London, 1967
  • George Harrison and John Lennon,  Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • John Lennon, London, 1967
  • Brian Epstein, George Martin, and Geoff Emmrick, 1967
  • Brian Epstein, Pattie Boyd and George Harrison, Abbey Road Studios, 1967
  • The Beatles, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967
  • The Beatles, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967

      

Advertisements

The Beatles And Ed Sullivan Combined To Make History

Standard

The Beatles And Ed Sullivan Combined To Make History

beatles1beatles2

#beatles#ana_christy

by Amy Gold

The Beatles
The Beatles arrive at John F. Kennedy International Airport, Feb. 7, 1964.

1963 TV Concert: ‘It’s The Beatles’ Live

https://youtu.be/brwmLjD-3Hw

Uploaded on Jul 4, 2011

Live, television: It’s The Beatles
3.45pm, Saturday 7 December 1963

Following their appearance on the BBC television show Juke Box Jury, The Beatles recorded a special concert appearance for the corporation at Liverpool’s Empire Theatre.

The performance took place in front of 2,500 members of The Beatles’ Northern Area Fan Club, between 3.45 and 4.30pm. It was filmed in its entirety by the BBC, and 30 minutes were broadcast that evening from 8.10pm to 8.40pm during a special programme entitled It’s The Beatles.

The group played a short version of From Me To You, followed by I Saw Her Standing There, All My Loving, Roll Over Beethoven, Boys, Till There Was You, She Loves You, This Boy, I Want To Hold Your Hand, Money (That’s What I Want), Twist And Shout, and another version of From Me To You.

Technical problems and lack of rehearsal times meant the sound balance for the concert recording was sub-standard. Both The Beatles and senior figures at the BBC later expressed concern at the often embarrassing nature of the footage, which included the absence of Ringo vocals during Boys and the director focusing on the wrong members of the group during key moments.

After the concert the BBC also recorded a two-minute interview with the group to use on the Christmas Day edition of Top Of The Pops.

The Beatles then made the short journey to the nearby Odeon Cinema on London Road where they gave two evening concerts. The police closed Pudsey Street to the public to allow the group to reach the venue unhindered.

The Beatles first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show remains one of the watershed moments in television history. At the time, nobody could have predicted the impact the four lads from Liverpool would have on American audiences and American television, and certainly few people would have imagined that former newsman Ed Sullivan would become indelibly linked to the history of rock and roll. But together, the two combined to create a moment no one could ever forget.

The Beatles historic first appearance on American television took place live on Sunday, February 9, 1964. It was a pivotal time in America. Just a few months earlier, the country had looked on in horror as President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. A mood of gloom and depression had taken hold and Americans were in desperate need of something to lift that black cloud.

Ever a shrewd businessman, Ed Sullivan found the perfect solution in the young group from Liverpool who were enjoying tremendous success in their native England. Eager to bring that buzz both to the country and to his show, Sullivan struck a deal with their manager, Brian Epstein, and soon Beatlemania was touching down on American soil.

It landed with a fury that few had ever witnessed before. Throngs of screaming teenage girls crowded Kennedy Airport and hovered outside the Plaza Hotel in downtown New York where the band was staying. CBS’ Studio 50, where the Ed Sullivan Show was filmed, was quickly sold out as the Beatles-Ed Sullivan first appearance became the hottest gig in town.

… Ladies and gentlemen, the Beatles! Let’s bring them on.

beatles3

By the time Ed Sullivan was introducing the band to the deafening shrieks of the live audience, a record setting 73,000,000 Americans (and I was one of them) were tuned in to watch the show. The group played two sets, with other entertainers appearing between them – but, of course, all eyes stayed focused on the main guests of honor. (To say that they were a tough act to follow, especially on that particular night, would truly be an understatement.) They opened their first set with “All My Loving,” followed by “Till There Was You” and “She Loves You.” For their second set, they performed  and “I Want To Hold Your Hand.”

After that historic night, everyone felt it would be nearly impossible to top that moment. The Beatles returned the following week, this time live from the Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach on February 16. The crowd was so rabid that the band had a difficult time just reaching the stage in the hotel’s ballroom where they were scheduled to perform. They eventually performed two sets amid screams so deafening you could barely hear them sing.

The Beatles performed again the next week, that performance having been taped before the actual Ed Sullivan-Beatles first appearance and held back for broadcast until then. They would come back one last time on September 12, 1965. This show was taped on August 14, a day before they kicked off their American tour. All told, their four appearances on the show attracted an audience of a quarter of a billion people. Their first two shows set a record and remain, by percentage of the population, the highest viewed regularly scheduled television programs of all time.

And, as they say, the rest is history. The Beatles would go on to rock superstardom, leaving a lasting impact on generations to come. But it was their collaboration with the staid Ed Sullivan that forever put them on the map. Together, this odd TV marriage made a historical impact that will likely never be matched. It was a once in a lifetime moment, with vibrations that can still be felt today.

5 Famous Hidden Song Meanings (That Are Total B.S.)

Standard

5 Famous Hidden Song Meanings (That Are Total B.S.)

Because songwriters worry more about catchy rhymes than deep meaning, song lyrics can be more abstract and esoteric than Jackson Pollock farting chalk dust into a napkin. The problem is that some fans swear that every nonsensical song has some deeper interpretation just waiting to be decoded. That’s why so many classic songs have mythical (and often dark and disturbing) alternate meanings that fans insist are true.They’re almost always wrong. For instance …

#5. “Hotel California” — It’s About Satanism, Right?

Whether you know “Hotel California” as “that weird Eagles song” or “that weird devil-worshiping song” probably depends on how religious your parents were.

When “Hotel California” was released in 1976, everyone heard it but no one really knew what it meant. The lyrics talked about trying to “Kill the beast” and “Stab it with their steely knives,” and included the ominous line, “You can check out anytime you like but you can never leave.” Honestly, it kind of sounds like they’re singing about using the reference section in a library full of giant monsters, since those are the books you can technically check out but aren’t permitted to remove from the building.

Getty
“Lookin’ it up in the local libraaaary!”

That was when someone noticed something odd about the album cover, which features a picture of the band in some luxury hotel courtyard with crowds of people in the background. Above the crowd, looking out from a balcony on the upper left, is a shape whose face you can’t fully see, but vaguely looks bald, goateed and threatening.

It Will Pass
“Hey, sorry everyone, but is the ice machine down there?”

Naturally, people came to the conclusion that the figure on the balcony was none other than Anton LaVey, founder of the Church of Satan, author of The Satanic Bible and proud parent of a son that he freaking named Satan.


He even had “Anton + Satan = BFFs” tattooed above his ass.

Now that Anton LaVey was found, the lyrics seemed to make sense: “The Beast,” “You can never leave” “This could be heaven or this could be hell.” “Hotel California” is a song about Anton LaVey converting people to his church of Satanism, from which they could “never leave.” The “truth” about the song persists to this day, found in Internet forums, an old issue of The Milwaukee Sentinel and the nothing-if-not-reputable website Jesus Is Savior.

Getty
They’re on to your globe-spanning Satanist conspiracy, Eagles.

Actually …

“Hotel California” has pretty much nothing to do with Satanism. The Eagles have admitted it was a way of speaking out against the greed and hedonism of the music industry in the 1970s (i.e., the drugs, money and women they themselves were drowning in). The photographer responsible for the album cover said the picture expressed “faded loss of innocence and decadence,” which is pretentious-speak for “a bunch of assholes standing in a lobby.”

“What about the face in the window?” you say. “I heard somewhere they didn’t even know it was there. Maybe it wasn’t Anton LaVey, but really … a ghost.” Unfortunately not. As Snopes points out:

“The shadowy figure was a woman hired for the photo shoot.”

centrosangiorgio.com
That is kind of a lot of hair for a bald man.

Yep. The person mistaken for a bald, goatee-sporting antichrist was, in fact, just some lady who had nothing to do with anything and wouldn’t even have been memorable were it not for the poor lighting of the photograph and the bafflingly deliberate decision to separate her from the rest of the group, presumably because she showed up late for the shoot and/or got Don Henley’s name wrong.

#4. Isn’t “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” About an Acid Trip?

Mention the Beatles song “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” to a group of people and inevitably one of them will start talking about LSD. And, in fact, we’re wagering that most of the people in our readership who know the song only know it as “That song that’s secretly about doing acid.” After all, it’s coded right there in the title, right? Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.


In 1967, John Lennon alone accounted for nearly 40 percent of the world’s LSD consumption.

And then you get lyrics like this:

“Follow her down to a bridge by a fountain/ Where rocking horse people eat marshmallow pies/ Everyone smiles as you drift past the flowers/ That grow so incredibly high.”

Getty
So incredibly high.

Clearly it’s alluding to an acid trip. And this isn’t exactly a stretch: The Beatles, remember, were a band that wrote songs about an octopus inviting people to the seabed to visit his garden, people who believe they are Arctic blueberry animals and general dick-twisting insanity.


Really, we’re not sure that most of what the Beatles did wasn’t about goddamned acid.

Actually …

Shockingly, “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” is about a girl called Lucy, in the sky, with some diamonds. See, John Lennon’s son Julian drew a picture of his best friend Lucy surrounded by diamonds in the sky, and John liked it enough to name the song after it.

Wonderlane
Although to be fair, the kid was clearly on acid when he drew it.

The Beatles freely admit to using drugs as inspiration for songs, and odds are LSD was one of them. But as for this particular song being a metaphor for the drug itself? Sorry, but no. John Lennon said, “It was purely unconscious that it came out to be LSD. Until someone pointed it out, I never even thought of it. I mean, who would ever bother to look at initials of a title? It’s not an acid song.”

This didn’t stop the BBC from banning the song, which, considering they were OK with a song about a child who murdered the fuck out of everyone around him with a goddamn hammer, seems a little hypocritical.

Getty
Don’t worry, folks. “I Am the Walrus” is still definitely about drugs. All the drugs.

#3. “Puff the Magic Dragon” Is Totally About Smoking Pot …

Hopefully, you don’t need to be told anything about “Puff the Magic Dragon” by Peter, Paul and Mary, but if you do, please click the link. Even for a children’s song, it seems overly bizarre and surreal, so of course it wasn’t long after its release in the early 1960s when people started trying to dissect the lyrics:

“Puff the magic dragon lived by the sea/ And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honah Lee/ Little Jackie Paper loved that rascal Puff/ And brought him strings and sealing wax and other fancy stuff.”


People don’t hug like that sober.

Remember, this was the ’60s, a time when pretty much everyone was smoking weed. So with “Puff the Magic Dragon,” aside from the obvious “chasing the dragon” metaphor, people figured that’s what the song was about. “Puff,” i.e., to smoke, “dragon,” as in “draggin[g]” or “to take a drag” and “autumn mist” being the fog of pot smoke.

“Little Jackie Paper,” the little rascal he was, was obviously a reference to rolling papers. Sealing wax, fancy stuff — bongs, clearly. People have managed to find meaning in pretty much every line in the song, and we must admit, it seems pretty convincing. And it makes sense that a folk rock trio like Peter, Paul and Mary would aim a song at the rapidly growing hippie movement.

BassPlyr23
Here they are in 2006, looking more like math teachers than doobed-up radicals.

Actually …

We’re sorry to drag you down to earth like this, but “Puff the Magic Dragon’s” writers never intended any hidden meanings. In fact, they were pretty upset about the rumors, claiming the song was about:

“… a loss of innocence and having to face an adult world … I find the fact that people interpret it as a drug song annoying. It would be insidious to propagandize about drugs in a song for little kids.”

Getty
But what about their 1970 hit, “Hops the Frothy, Full-Bodied Llama”?

“I can assure you, it’s a song about innocence lost … What kind of mean-spirited SOB would write a children’s song with a covert drug message?”

Mary goes on to say that if there were drugs to be mentioned, they’d be mentioned up front:

“Believe me, if he wanted to write a song about marijuana, he would have written a song about marijuana.”

Peter, Paul & Mary
We look forward to hearing from Peter, Paul and Peter’s bong soon.

Actually kind of hard to argue with that.

#2. The “Horse” in “Horse With No Name” HAS to be Heroin …

Even if you’ve only heard this song once, chances are you know the chorus by heart:

“I’ve been through the desert on a horse with no name/ It felt good to be out of the rain/ In the desert you can’t remember your name/ ‘Cause there ain’t no one for to give you no pain.”

Getty
“My name is Chuck, CHUCK dammit! Nobody fucking listens.”

Ridiculous grammar aside, obviously this means something, because nobody writes that kind of line unless there’s some deeper meaning behind it. And “horse” is a pretty old and well known slang term for heroin, so naturally that’s what a bunch of people figured the song was about. Back in the ’70s the song was even banned from several radio stations because of its supposed drug reference.

The most common beliefs are that the band (America) is either singing about doing heroin (hallucinations) or about the effects of heroin withdrawal (“After two days in the desert sun/ My skin began to turn red”). Honestly, it all fits together nicely if you think about it: The desert symbolizes the effects of the withdrawal, the horse symbolizes the heroin and the ocean/river at the end symbolizes the clarity of rehabilitation. Perhaps America are skilled wordsmiths that deserve more credit. After all, it’s not like their band name is trite and obvious.


AMERICAAAAA!

Actually …

This couldn’t be more pulled from the ass if it were literally torn from the anus of a donkey. Let’s save time here by going straight to Dewey Bunnell, the man who actually wrote the song:

“I wanted to capture the imagery of the desert, because I was sitting in this room in England, and it was rainy.”

Getty
“I fingerpainted this desert and then I wrote a song about it.”

“I had spent a good deal of time poking around in the high desert with my brother when we lived [in California]. And we’d drive through Arizona and New Mexico. I loved the cactus and the heat. I was trying to capture the sights and sounds of the desert, and there was an environmental message at the end. But … I see now that this anonymous horse was a vehicle to get me away from all the confusion and chaos of life to a peaceful, quiet place.”

So, back when he was a kid, Dewey was playing around in the desert, found it interesting and years later wrote a song about it with a message about the environment. No heroin-induced hallucinations or allegorical desert, but real, actual desert.

Getty
Dewey Bunnell, human cipher.

#1. But “Turning Japanese” Is Definitely About Masturbation, Right, Guys?

English band the Vapors released a song in 1980 called “Turning Japanese,” much to the chagrin of the current status quo. You see, in addition to being vaguely racist, “turning Japanese” is a slang phrase for masturbation, specifically referring to how one’s eyes become screwed up and narrow at the climax of a particularly feverish hand shandy. Now this could easily be a coincidence in name, but listen to the lyrics (or read them, your choice):

“I’ve got your picture of me and you/ You wrote ‘I love you’ I wrote ‘me too’/ I sit there staring and there’s nothing else to do.”

Getty
Not pictured: Jergen’s.

So he has a picture of his girlfriend and finds he has “nothing else to do.”

“I’ve got your picture, I’ve got your picture/ I’d like a million of you all round my cell/ I want a doctor to take your picture/ So I can look at you from inside as well.”

Getty
We’re still not seeing the Japanese.

He mentions a cell, so this must mean he’s in prison. Also, he seems to want an X-ray of her, for some reason. Or photos from her colonoscopy.

“No sex, no drugs, no wine, no women/ No fun, no sin, no you, no wonder it’s dark/ Everyone around me is a total stranger/ Everyone avoids me like a cyclone ranger/ That’s why I’m turning Japanese/ I think I’m turning Japanese/ I really think so.”

Getty
The Vapors, demonstrating every stage of the mullet life cycle.

It would seem that this trail of lyrical bread crumbs leads to but one place: Fistopolis. Population: This guy’s wiener. Just take a look at the people interviewed in this video, at about 2 minutes 20 seconds. It’s a pretty popular interpretation, and any sites mentioning the song on the Internet eventually come to the same conclusion.

Actually …

We really wanted this one to be true, but the only thing this song has in common with spanking it in a darkened room is that it’s about feelings of shame and loneliness. If you watch the end of that video linked above, the band finally tells us what it’s really about:


Hint: Nothing Japanese.

“The Americans seemed to think it was written about that. That it was an English phrase about masturbation. It wasn’t. The song was a love song about someone who had lost their girlfriend and was going slowly crazy — turning Japanese is just all the cliches of our angst… turning into something you never expected to.”

So no, the Vapors’ song isn’t about dick-whittling (masturbation/penis joke quota met). It’s simply about a man who has taped hundreds of pictures of a woman he’s obsessed with around his tiny room as he plots to see her insides, and whose emotions can apparently transform him into a Japanese man like the Incredible Hulk.

Getty
As illustrated here.

See? It makes perfect sense.dden

john lennon tribute

Standard
john lennon tribute
Ap101207127396
IMAGE: MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Monday marks the 34th anniversary of the tragic death of John Lennon, killed outside his apartment building in New York at the age of 40.Lennon’s gift for songwriting was one of the many reasons that the music of the Beatles remains so influential across the entire music industry. And while The Fab Four’s original recordings are not available on Spotify yet — they took a long time to arrive on iTunes, too — there is a wealth of incredible Beatles covers that show just how big an influence Lennon and the group had on the entire music world.

In honor of Lennon, we assembled the best Beatles covers into a Music Monday playlist. So enjoy this playlist full of artists paying homage to the masters.

COOL PEOPLE – See Paul McCartney Jam With Johnny Depp in ‘Early Days’ – Premiere

Standard
871825beatles7download (68) download (57)
Sir Paul shares the story behind the black-and-white clip for his “memory song” about growing up with John Lennon
JULY 7, 2014 10:00 AM

“Early Days” is one of the highlights of Paul McCartney’s most recent album, 2013’s New, but its music video — which you can watch exclusively here — might never have happened if it was left up to McCartney. “When I’ve got a song, I don’t think about the video,” the singer says. “I’m sure some people do, but I don’t. I just think about the song, first writing it, then recording it.”

Behind Beatlemania: Intimate Photos of Paul McCartney

Earlier this year, though, director Vincent Haycock sent over a video treatment for “Early Days” that caught his eye. “It’s a memory song for me, about me and John in the early days,” McCartney says. “But Vince came up with this great idea: Instead of having young lookalikes of me and John walking the streets of Liverpool, guitars slung over our backs, and literally acting out the song, what if it was any two aspiring musicians? I thought that was such a cool idea.”

Haycock spent a month scouting locations in Natchez, Mississipi, and Faraday, Louisiana, and casting local actors for the video’s main storyline, set in the American South in the 1950s. He also traveled to Los Angeles to film a jam session between McCartney and some special guests. “I happened to ring Johnny Depp,” McCartney says. “I said, ‘Come along and we’ll sit around and jam with these blues guys.’ He said, ‘Yeah, OK, count me in, man.’ I knew it was an offer he couldn’t refuse.” (Other musicians at the session included Roy Gaines, Al Williams, Dale Atkins, Henree Harris, Motown Maurice, Lil Poochie and Misha Lindes; see an exclusive photo from the video shoot below.)

 

Paul McCartney at Early Days music video shoot in Los Angeles, California.
MJ KIM/MPL Communications

“Early Days” marks the third McCartney video Depp has appeared in, after 2012’s “My Valentine” and 2013’s “Queenie Eye.” “It’s getting to be a running gag,” McCartney says. “He’s like the Alfred Hitchcock of my videos. And he’s good! He used to be a musician before he was an actor, you know. One of his old band mates actually organized getting me that cigar-box guitar that I played with Dave Grohl on ‘Cut Me Some Slack,’ that we ended up getting a Grammy for. So I knew he could play.”

Music and acting, McCartney notes, often go hand in hand. “They’re similar gigs, really. Ringo used to know Peter Sellers very well, and Peter wanted to be a drummer – that was his secret closet ambition. You run into a lot of guys who play who are actors. There a bunch you can think of. Bruce Willis does it. Then there are people who do both, like Jared Leto.”

As for himself, the former Beatle disavows any interest in taking up acting. “No, I don’t think it’s my thing,” he says. “I get self-conscious in front of a movie camera. Off-camera, I can impersonate, I can do this and that, and I’ll think, ‘I could be such a great actor.’ Then they say ‘Action!’ and turn the camera on, and I go uh-uh-uh-uh-uh…I just don’t think I’m a natural.

“But you know what?” he adds with a laugh. “I’ve got enough to do.”

 

 

COOL PEOPLE – THE BEATLES BIO AND IN PICTURES

Standard

THE BEATLES “IN MY LIFE”

http://youtu.be/T4C7nzceL8Q

BEATLES HITS

The Beatles

Biography

67_magical-mystery-tour_001
670519_01
Bruce McBroom/ ©Apple Corps Ltd.

No band has influenced pop culture the way the Beatles have. They were one of the best things to happen in the twentieth century, let alone the Sixties. They were youth personified. They were unmatched innovators who were bigger than both Jesus and rock & roll itself: During the week of April 4, 1964, the #Beatles held the first five slots on the Billboard Singles chart; they went on to sell more than a billion records; and 2000’s 1, a compilation of the Beatles Number One hits, hit Number One in 35 countries and went on to become the best-selling album of the 2000s.

Every record was a shock when it came out. Compared to rabid R&B evangelists like the Rolling Stones, the Beatles arrived sounding like nothing else. They had already absorbed Buddy Holly, the Everly Brothers and Chuck Berry, but they were also writing their own songs. They made writing your own material expected, rather than exceptional. As musicians, the Beatles proved that rock & roll could embrace a limitless variety of harmonies, structures, and sounds; virtually every rock experiment has some precedent on Beatles records. As a unit the Beatles were a synergistic combination: Paul McCartney’s melodic bass lines, Ringo Starr’s slaphappy no-rolls drumming, George Harrison’s rockabilly-style guitar leads, John Lennon’s assertive rhythm guitar — and their four fervent voices. As personalities, they defined and incarnated Sixties style: smart, idealistic, playful, irreverent, eclectic. Their music, from the not-so-simple love songs they started with to their later perfectionistic studio extravaganzas, set new standards for both commercial and artistic success in pop.

#Lennon was performing with his amateur skiffle group the Quarrymen at a church picnic on July 6, 1957, in the Liverpool suburb of Woolton when he met McCartney, whom he later invited to join his group; soon they were writing songs together, such as “The One After 909.” By the year’s end #McCartney had convinced Lennon to let Harrison join their group, the name of which was changed to Johnny and the Moondogs in 1958. In 1960 an art-school friend of Lennon’s, Stu Sutcliffe, became their bassist. Sutcliffe couldn’t play a note but had recently sold one of his paintings for a considerable sum, which the group, now rechristened the Silver Beetles (from which “Silver” was dropped a few months later, and “Beetles” amended to “Beatles”), used to upgrade its equipment.

##Tommy Moore was their drummer until Pete Best replaced him in August 1960. Once Best had joined, the band made its first of four trips to Hamburg, Germany. In December Harrison was deported back to England for being underage and lacking a work permit, but by then their 30-set weeks on the stages of Hamburg beer houses had honed and strengthened their repertoire (mostly #Chuck Berry, ##Little Richard, #Carl Perkins, and #Buddy Holly covers), and on February 21, 1961, they debuted at the #Cavern club on Mathew Street in #Liverpool, beginning a string of nearly 300 performances there over the next couple of years.

In April 1961 they again went to Hamburg, where Sutcliffe (the first of the Beatles to wear his hair in the long, shaggy style that came to be known as the Beatle haircut) left the group to become a painter, while McCartney switched from rhythm guitar to bass. The Beatles returned to Liverpool as a quartet in July. Sutcliffe died from a brain hemorrhage in Hamburg less than a year later.

The Beatles had been playing regularly to packed houses at the Cavern when they were spotted on November 9 by Brian Epstein (b. Sep. 19, 1934, Liverpool). After being discharged from the British Army on medical grounds, Epstein had attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London for a year before returning to Liverpool to manage his father’s record store.

The request he received for a German import single entitled “My Bonnie” (which the Beatles had recorded a few months earlier in Hamburg, backing singer Tony Sheridan and billed as the Beat Brothers) convinced him to check out the group. Epstein was surprised to discover not only that the Beatles weren’t German but that they were one of the most popular local bands in Liverpool. Within two months he became their manager. Epstein cleaned up their act, eventually replacing black leather jackets, tight jeans, and pompadours with collarless gray Pierre Cardin suits and mildly androgynous haircuts.

Epstein tried landing the Beatles a record contract, but nearly every label in Europe rejected the group. In May 1962, however, producer George Martin (b. Jan. 3, 1926, North London, Eng.) signed the group to EMI’s Parlophone subsidiary. Pete Best, then considered the group’s undisputed sex symbol, was asked to leave the group on August 16, 1962, and Ringo Starr, drummer with a popular Liverpool group, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, was added, just in time for the group’s first recording session. On September 11 the Beatles cut two originals, “Love Me Do” b/w “P.S. I Love You,” which became their first U.K. Top 20 hit in October. In early 1963 “Please Please Me” went to Number Two, and they recorded an album of the same name in one 10-hour session on February 11, 1963. With the success of their third English single, “From Me to You” (Number One), the British record industry coined the term “Merseybeat” (after the river that runs through Liverpool) for groups such as the Beatles and Gerry and the Pacemakers, Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas, and the Searchers.

By mid-year the Beatles were given billing over Roy Orbison on a national tour, and the hysterical outbreaks of Beatlemania had begun. Following their first tour of Europe in October, they moved to London with Epstein. Constantly mobbed by screaming fans, the Beatles required police protection almost any time they were seen in public. Late in the year “She Loves You” became the biggest-selling single in British history (in the years since, only six other singles have sold more copies there). In November 1963 the group performed before the Queen Mother at the Royal Command Variety Performance.

EMI’s American label, Capitol, had not released the group’s 1963 records (which Martin licensed to independents like Vee-Jay and Swan with little success) but was finally persuaded to release its fourth single, “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” and Meet the Beatles (identical to the Beatles’ second British album, With the Beatles) in January 1964 and to invest $50,000 in promotion for the then unknown British act. The album and the single became the Beatles’ first U.S. chart-toppers. On February 7 screaming mobs met them at New York City’s Kennedy Airport, and more than 70 million people watched each of their appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9 and 16. In April 1964 “Can’t Buy Me Love” became the first record to top American and British charts simultaneously, and that same month the Beatles held the top five positions on Billboard singles chart (“Can’t Buy Me Love,” “Twist and Shout,” “She Loves You,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” “Please Please Me”).

Their first movie,# A Hard Day’s Night (directed by Richard Lester), opened in America in August; it grossed $1.3 million in its first week. The band was aggressively merchandised – Beatle wigs, Beatle clothes, Beatle dolls, lunch boxes, a cartoon series — from which, because of Epstein’s ineptitude at business, the band made surprisingly little money. The Beatles also opened the American market to such British Invasion groups as the Dave Clark Five, the Rolling Stones, and the Kinks.

By 1965 Lennon and McCartney rarely wrote songs together, although by contractual and personal agreement songs by either of them were credited to both. The Beatles toured Europe, North America, the Far East, and Australia that year. Their second movie, #Help! (also directed by Lester), was filmed in England, Austria, and the Bahamas in the spring and opened in the U.S. in August. On August 15 they performed to 55,600 fans at New York’s Shea Stadium, setting a record for largest concert audience. McCartney’s “Yesterday” (Number One, 1965) would become one of the most often covered songs ever written.

In June the #Queen of England had announced that the Beatles would be awarded the MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire). The announcement sparked some controversy — some MBE holders returned their medal — but on October 26, 1965, the ceremony took place at Buckingham Palace. (Lennon returned his medal in 1969 as an antiwar gesture. Interestingly, even though he rejected the medal, the honor itself cannot be returned; Lennon technically remained an MBE.)

With 1965’s Rubber Soul, the Beatles’ ambitions began to extend beyond love songs and pop formulas. Their success led adults to consider them, along with #Bob Dylan, spokesmen for youth culture, and their lyrics grew more poetic and somewhat more political.

In summer 1966 controversy erupted when a remark Lennon had made to a British newspaper reporter months before was widely reported in the U.S. The quote — “Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue with that; I’m right and will be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now” — incited denunciations and Beatles record bonfires. The anti-Beatles backlash was particularly intense in the U.S., where the group was set to begin a tour just two weeks after the controversy erupted, and included death threats against the group. Largely out of concern for the safety of his fellow band members, Lennon apologized at a Chicago press conference.

The Beatles gave up touring after an August 29, 1966, concert at San Francisco’s #Candlestick Park and made the rest of their music in the studio, where they had begun to experiment with exotic instrumentation (“Norwegian Wood,” 1965, had featured sitar) and tape abstractions such as the reversed tracks on “Rain.” “Strawberry Fields Forever,” part of a double-sided single released in February 1967 to fill the unusually long gap between albums, featured an astonishing display of electronically altered sounds and hinted at what was to come. With “Taxman” and “Love You To” on Revolver, Harrison began to emerge as a songwriter.

It took four months and $75,000 to record #Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band using a then state-of-the-art four-track tape recorder and building each cut layer by layer. Released in June 1967, it was hailed as serious art for its “concept” and its range of styles and sounds, a lexicon of pop and electronic noises; such songs as “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” and “A Day in the Life” were carefully examined for hidden meanings. The album spent 15 weeks at Number One (longer than any of their others) and has sold over 8 million copies. On June 25, 1967, the Beatles recorded their new single, “All You Need Is Love,” before an international television audience of 400 million, as part of a broadcast called Our World.

On August 27, 1967 – while the four were in Wales beginning their six-month involvement with @##Transcendental Meditation and the Maharishi #Mahesh Yogi (which took them to India for two months in early 1968) — Epstein died alone in his London flat from an overdose of sleeping pills, later ruled accidental. Shaken by Epstein’s death, the Beatles retrenched under McCartney’s leadership in the fall and filmed #Magical Mystery Tour, which was aired by BBC-TV on December 26, 1967, and later released in the U.S. as a feature film. Although the telefilm was panned by British critics, fans, and Queen Elizabeth herself, the soundtrack album contained their most cryptic work yet in “#I Am the Walrus,” a Lennon composition.

As the Beatles’ late-1967 single “Hello Goodbye” went to Number One in both the U.S. and Britain, the group launched the Apple clothes boutique in London. McCartney called the retail effort “Western communism”; the boutique closed in July 1968. Like their next effort, Apple Corps Ltd. (formed in January 1968 and including Apple Records, which signed James Taylor, Mary Hopkin, and Badfinger), it was plagued by mismanagement. In July the group faced its last hysterical crowds at the premiere of Yellow Submarine, an animated film by Czech avant-garde designer and artist Heinz Edelmann featuring four new Beatles songs; a revised soundtrack featuring nine extra songs was released in 1999 (Number 15).

In August they released McCartney’s “Hey Jude” (Number One), backed by Lennon’s “Revolution” (Number 12), which sold over 6 million copies before the end of 1968 — their most popular single. Meanwhile, the group had been working on the double album The Beatles (frequently called the White Album), which showed their divergent directions. The rifts were artistic — Lennon moving toward brutal confessionals, McCartney leaning toward pop melodies, Harrison immersed in Eastern spirituality — and personal, as Lennon drew closer to his wife-to-be, Yoko Ono. Lennon and Ono’sTwo Virgins (with its full frontal and back nude cover photos) was released the same month as The Beatles and stirred up so much outrage that the LP had to be sold wrapped in brown paper. (The Beatles, went to Number One, Two Virgins peaked at Number 124.)

The Beatles attempted to smooth over their differences in early 1969 at filmed recording sessions. When the project fell apart hundreds of hours of studio time later, no one could face editing the tapes (a project that eventually fell to record producer Phil Spector), and “Get Back” (Number One, 1969) was the only immediate release. Released in spring 1970, Let It Be is essentially a documentary of their breakup, including an impromptu January 30, 1969, rooftop concert at Apple Corps headquarters, their last public performance as the Beatles.

By spring 1969 Apple was losing thousands of pounds each week. Over McCartney’s objections, the other three brought in manager Allen Klein to straighten things out; one of his first actions was to package nonalbum singles as Hey Jude. With money matters temporarily out of mind, the four joined forces in July and August 1969 to record Abbey Road, featuring an extended suite as well as more hits, including Harrison’s much-covered “Something” (Number Three, 1969). While its release that fall spurred a “Paul Is Dead” rumor based on clues supposedly left throughout their work, Abbey Road became the Beatles’ best-selling album, at 9 million copies. Meanwhile, internal bickering persisted. In September Lennon told the others, “I’m leaving the group. I’ve had enough. I want a divorce.” But he was persuaded to keep quiet while their business affairs were untangled. On April 10, 1970, McCartney released his first solo album and publicly announced the end of the Beatles. At the same time, Let It Be finally surfaced, becoming the group’s 14th Number One album (a postbreakup compilation would become their 15th in 1973) and yielding the Beatles’ 18th and 19th chart-topping singles, “Let It Be” and “The Long and Winding Road.”

Throughout the Seventies, as repackages of Beatles music continued to sell, the four were hounded by bids and pleas for a reunion. Lennon’s murder by a mentally disturbed fan on December 8, 1980, ended those speculations. In 1988 the Beatles were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. McCartney, citing business conflicts with the two other surviving members, did not attend. Relations between him and Harrison, in particular, had been strained for some time.

In January 1994 Goldmine magazine reported that McCartney, Harrison, and #Starr had begun recording music for a long-rumored Beatles documentary the previous August, with more secret sessions scheduled. There were other signs that the three band members were on the mend — when Lennon was inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist in 1994, for instance, McCartney did the honors (McCartney himself was inducted in 1999). Later in 1994 Live at the BBC was released, featuring 56 songs the Beatles performed on the British radio between 1962 and 1965. It debuted at Number One in the U.K.; in the U.S., it debuted and peaked at Number Three.

#The Beatles Anthology, the long-awaited six-hour television special, was broadcast over three nights in November 1995, coinciding with the release of the George Martin-compiled double-CD Anthology 1 (Number One), which featured alternate takes, demos, and rare tracks, and premiered the first new song by John, Paul, George, and Ringo since 1970. “Free as a Bird” (Number Six, 1995), a demo recorded by Lennon in 1977, was completed by the other three and produced by Jeff Lynne; it became the Beatles 34th Top 10 single. Lennon’s lyrics didn’t extend much beyond the title, and so Harrison and McCartney collaborated on lyrics for a new bridge.

Two additional double CDs, Anthology 2 and 3 (both Number One), followed in 1996, as well as an extended videotape version of the documentary. Anthology 2‘s “Real Love” (again a Lennon demo, from 1979, with modern additions by the others) reached Number 11 and became the group’s 23rd gold single (the most of any group).

The Liverpool juggernaut continued to roll on in 2000: the Beatles became the highest certified act of all time, with over 113 million albums sold in America (which grew to 170 million albums in 2008); a coffee table book, The Beatles Anthology, topped the New York Times bestseller list; and 1, a collection of the band’s Number One hit songs, became the Beatles’ 19th chart-topping album, selling 25 million copies by 2005.

On November 29, 2001, George Harrison, diagnosed with lung cancer in the late 1990s, became the second Beatle to pass away. Three years later Capitol Records released all of the Beatles’ U.S. albums (in both stereo and original mono versions) as two box sets, The Capitol Albums, Vols. 1 and 2. In 2006, George Martin and his son Giles produced a set of Beatles remixes, Love, for the soundtrack to Cirque du Soleil’s theater production of the same name. The following year, McCartney and Starr appeared on CNN’s Larry King Live to talk about the project; they joined Beatles widows Ono and Olivia Harrison in Las Vegas to celebrate the Love production’s first anniversary.

Until 2007, the Beatles’ #Apple Corp. was in legal limbo with the Apple, Inc. computer company over use of the name. Apple Corp. had sued Apple, Inc. after the computer company opened its online iTunes music store; one result of the suit was that the Beatles’ group and solo music was not made available for digital download. In February 2007, the two sides came to an agreement. Apple, Inc. would retain ownership of the name and license it back to the Apple Corp. record label. By October, all of the Beatles’ solo works were available on iTunes, but as of early 2010 the Beatles catalogue was still not available on iTunes.

September 9, 2009 was a day of 21st century Beatlemania: Apple/EMI released remastered versions of the band’s studio albums, with dramatically improved sound. (Mono versions were also available, though only as a box.) Also that day, The Beatles Rock Band video game hit shelves, featuring 45 Beatle songs; by the end of 2009, it had sold more than one million copies worldwide.

McCartney and Starr continued to tour and record throughout the 2000s. McCartney, who is reportedly a billionaire, released three solo albums during the decade as well as three live albums, including Good Evening New York City, which documented the inaugural concerts at New York’s Citi Field in 2009. Starr released three albums in the 2000s, as well as 2010’s Y Not. He appeared with McCartney at several events, including 2002’s Concert for George, a charitable event held on the first anniversary of Harrison’s death.

Portions of this biography appeared in The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll (Simon & Schuster, 2001).

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/the-beatles/biography#ixzz37Y1bRmQj
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

tumblr_mxfeguF4Bp1r7bg6wo2_400 tumblr_mx1lj1whzD1r7bg6wo2_r1_250 tumblr_mx1lj1whzD1r7bg6wo3_r1_250 tumblr_n4exudxKqq1r7bg6wo1_250 tumblr_n4ewfahdbY1r7bg6wo1_400 tumblr_n4ewfahdbY1r7bg6wo2_400 (1)beatles-o tumblr_ltuzerPIvT1qic1zfo1_500 beatles_cartoon2 tumblr_inline_mqgfwxKPwb1qz4rgp tumblr_lvfs5pBkhI1qg6rkio1_500_large giphy (3) beatles-singing tumblr_mcb6z1HLi31rgtohso1_500 250502vyov5yqyoj B_Beatles70 6F6 yellowsubmarine1024_768-vi sprite-losbitus 0053 -the-Beatles-gifs-the-beatles-23078938-492-274 3beatlesfaces graphics-beatles-787074 beatles3 images tumblr_n11f1pXBD61tsx8bgo1_400 17 BEATLES LINE-UP tumblr_muj8h3fCN51sdvq70o1_500 smile_and_wave_gif_by_beatlesbug-d4hai4g tumblr_n524kzJ7VI1tqzqyro1_500 tumblr_meceqncysm1qakjwho1_500 2beatleslastconcert band 871825beatles7 tumblr_mxfeguF4Bp1r7bg6wo2_400 tumblr_mx1lj1whzD1r7bg6wo2_r1_250 tumblr_mx1lj1whzD1r7bg6wo3_r1_250

The Beatle waxes on social change, the infamous Black Dwarf letter and Rolling Stone and never before seem photos of the beatles

Standard

The Beatle waxes on social change, the infamous Black Dwarf letter and Rolling Stone

<!– –>
February 7, 2014 9:50 AM ET
<!– –>

John Lennon

                             <!–

–>

John Lennon

Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

In 1968, Maurice Hindle, a college student at Keele University in England, wrote a letter to a Beatles fanzine requesting an interview with John Lennon. Remarkably, Hindle’s letter was answered by Lennon himself, who invited the student and others to his home in Surrey, England to discuss politics, social change and a possible 1969 Beatles tour, among many other topics.

Fab Finds: Check Out Never-Before-Seen Photos of the Beatles

The hours-long audio tapes of this interview were acquired by Hard Rock in 1987 and with the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ U.S. debut approaching, the company is releasing the tapes to the public for the first time. The full interview, alongside transcripts, analysis and a memorabilia gallery, are available on Hard Rock’s website, but to give you a sample, we’ve got two exclusive audio clips from the interviews below.

In the first, Lennon discusses how he can affect social change and references the infamous Black Dwarf letter. That letter, written by music critic John Hoyland in 1968 in the radical newspaper Black Dwarf, lambasts Lennon and the recently released track “Revolution” as being hostile to the growing disillusionment of youth toward authoritarian figures.

Rolling Stone’s John Lennon Album Guide

“I’ve changed a lot of people’s heads,” Lennon says in the clip below. “I believe in change. That’s what Yoko and my scene is, to change it like that…And you’re not preaching to the converted … Well, what are they doing? What can they do? [Referencing the Black Dwarf letter] All I’m saying is I think you should do it by changing people’s heads and they’re saying, ‘Well we should smash the system.’ Now, the system smashing scene’s been going on forever, y’know? What’s it done?”

John Lennon on Social Change

Quotes/excerpts provided courtesy of Hard Rock Cafe International (USA), Inc.

The second clip finds Lennon discussing the growing weariness of The Beatles toward each other and asking the interviewer if he’d heard of Rolling Stone, which published its first issue only one year before. “I’ve said it all, y’know, somewhere or other,” says Lennon. “It’s just a bit of a hassle to say it…Just read the Rolling Stone article. There’s quite a lot about it in there. Cause I went through it a bit, just about the album and different things. Have you heard of it? It’s a good paper.”

See Ringo Starr’s Lost Beatles Photo Album

Lennon notes that contrary to other publications, Rolling Stone accepted an ad for Lennon and Yoko Ono’s 1968 album Unfinished Music No. 1: Two Virgins featuring the couple standing naked. “International Times wouldn’t take the front cover photo unless we gave them an indemnity against it, y’know,” says Lennon. “They’re so established… Amazing. But [Rolling Stone] just took it, and this paper…was cooled by it, cause they’ve had the biggest circulation they ever had.”

John Lennon on Rolling Stone

Quotes/excerpts provided courtesy of Hard Rock Cafe International (USA), Inc.

In a 2009 interview with the Guardian, Hindle recalled traveling to Lennon’s house for the interview. “We students crammed into the back of the Mini and John drove us up the bumpy private road that led to his house, Kenwood,” said Hindle. “In a sitting room at the back of the house we sat down on thick-pile Indian carpets around a low table, cross-legged. Yoko said little, as we all knew this was primarily John’s day – and he said a lot. Apart from a short break, when Yoko fed us macrobiotic bread and jam she had made, Lennon talked continuously for six hours.”

On Sunday, CBS will air The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to The Beatles, an event that took place last month and featured a rare performance from Paul McCartney and Starr (who also played together during the Grammy Awards). The program will also show tributes from Stevie Wonder, Katy Perry, Dave Grohl, Pharrell, Alicia Keys, John Legend, Gary Clark, Jr., Joe Walsh and a reunited Eurythmics.

The Beatles’ momentous trip to America was the subjectyy of a recent Rolling Stone cover story, which details everything from the band’s early trepidation about the trip, the U.S. press’s early criticism of the group (“They look like shaggy Peter Pans,” Time initially wrote) and their generation-defining three-night stint on Sullivan

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/listen-to-never-before-heard-john-lennon-interviews-from-1968-20140207#ixzz2sf5RJpUW Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook