Tag Archives: Theatre

COOL PEOPLE-CATHY BATES

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Kathy Bates winning Best Actress

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Biography


KATHY BATES has been honored numerous times for her work on stage, screen and television. She won an Academy Award® and a Golden Globe for her portrayal of obsessed fan Annie Wilkes in Rob Reiner’s 1990 hit “Misery,” based on Stephen King’s novel. In 1999, she received Oscar®, Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations and won a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® and a Critics Choice Award for her performance in Mike Nichols’ “Primary Colors.” Bates more recently earned her third Oscar® nomination for her role in Alexander Payne’s “About Schmidt,” for which she also garnered Golden Globe and SAG Award nominations and won a National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actress. Her film work has also been recognized with Golden Globe and BAFTA Award nominations for Jon Avnet’s “Fried Green Tomatoes,” and she also shared in a SAG Award® nomination with the ensemble cast of James Cameron’s all-time, top-grossing blockbuster “Titanic” as well as a nomination for the ensemble of Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris”.

Bates currently stars as Harriet “Harry” Korn, a curmudgeonly ex-patent lawyer in the hit NBC television show “Harry’s Law” garnering her an Emmy® nomination for lead actress in a drama series. While the role was originally written for a man, it is a role Kathy now owns. She has been quoted as saying, “In my private life, I am just as curmudgeonly as Harriet and I share some of her disillusion. She doesn’t suffer fools gladly. She has a very irreverent sense of humor, which I do also. She tells it like it is. Sometimes I think David has been doing some kind of background research on me, the lines are so close.” “Harry’s Law” is written and executive produced by David E. Kelley.

Recently, Bates was seen in “Midnight in Paris”; “Valentine’s Day”; “The Blind Side”; Stephen Frears’ period drama “Cheri,” in which she starred with Michelle Pfeiffer; Sam Mendes’ acclaimed drama “Revolutionary Road,” which reunited her with Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet; the sci-fi remake “The Day the Earth Stood Still,” which opened at the top of the box office; and the independent drama “Personal Effects,” with Pfeiffer and Ashton Kutcher. Upcoming projects include the films “A Little Bit of Heaven”, the animated short “Cadaver” and the highly anticipated 3D release of James Cameron’s “Titanic”.

Among Bates’ long list of film credits are “P.S. I Love You,” “Fred Claus,” “Failure to Launch,” “Little Black Book,” “Dragonfly,” “American Outlaws,” “The Waterboy,” “The War at Home,” “Dolores Claiborne,” “A Home of Our Own,” “Prelude to a Kiss,” “Shadows and Fog,” “At Play in the Fields of the Lord,” “Dick Tracy,” “Men Don’t Leave,” “Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean,” “Straight Time” and “Taking Off.” Bates lent her voice to Jerry Seinfeld’s animated comedy “Bee Movie,” as well as “Charlotte’s Web” and “The Golden Compass.”

On television, in addition to her current projects, Bates appeared in the FX miniseries “Alice,” playing the Queen of Hearts, for which she earned an Emmy® Award nomination for her performance. She won a Golden Globe and a SAG Award® and earned an Emmy® Award nomination for the 1996 HBO film “The Late Shift.” Her television honors also include Emmy®, Golden Globe and SAG Award® nominations for her performance in the musical “Annie”; another SAG Award® nomination for her role in the telefilm “My Sister’s Keeper”; and four additional Emmy® Award nominations for her work on the projects “3rd Rock from the Sun,” “Six Feet Under,” “Warm Springs,” and “Ambulance Girl,” which she also directed. Most recently, she guest starred on both “The Office” and “Two and a Half Men”.

Bates has also been honored for her work behind the camera as a director. She helmed the A&E telefilm “Dash and Lilly,” starring Sam Shepard and Judy Davis, which earned nine Emmy® nominations, including one for Bates as Best Director. She also directed five episodes of the acclaimed HBO series “Six Feet Under,” earning a Directors Guild of America Award for the episode entitled “Twilight.” Her directing credits also include episodes of such series as “Oz,” “NYPD Blue” and “Homicide: Life on the Street.”

Bates first gained the attention of critics and audiences on the New York stage. She was nominated for a Tony Award for her portrayal of the suicidal daughter in the original Broadway production of Marsha Norman’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play “`night, Mother.” She has been honored with Obie Awards for her performance as Frankie in the original off-Broadway production of “Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune” as well as for her portrayal of Elsa Barlow in Athol Fugard’s “The Road to Mecca,” which Kathy also starred in when filmed.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Bates received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1970 from Southern Methodist University, which awarded her an honorary doctorate in 2002.

COOL PEOPLE -WILLIAM H. MACY

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COOL PEOPLE -WILLIAM H. MACY

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William H Macy

Alternate Name: W H Macy, William Hall Macy Jr, William Hall Macy Jr.

William H. Macy

Avik Gilboa/WireImage.com
  • Voice actor, Director, Actor, Screenwriter
  • Gender: Male
  • Born: March 13, 1950
  • Birthplace: Miami, Florida, USA
  • Nationality: United States

Full Biography

From All Movie Guide: William H. Macy came to acting by way of Bethany and Goddard Colleges. At the latter school, Macy studied under playwright David Mamet, with whom he would be frequently associated throughout his career. After college, Macy was a member of Mamet‘s theater troupe, the St. Nicholas Company. The actor performed in a number of productions, many of them written by Mamet, until 1978 when he left the company and headed to New York. Some of his earliest work there included commercial voice-overs, such as the now infamous “Secret: Strong enough for a man, but PH balanced for a woman.”

Macy also continued his theater work, forming the Atlantic Theatre Company with Mamet in 1985 and acting in Broadway and off-Broadway shows. In addition, he worked in television and began doing feature films, debuting in ’80s Foolin’ Around. He continued to act in supporting roles throughout the decade, appearing in such films as Mamet‘s directorial debut, House of Games (1987) and Woody Allen‘s Radio Days (1987). In 1991, he won a more substantial role, in Mamet‘s Homicide, and subsequently began to find work in more well-known films, including Benny and Joon and The Client.

Macy finally got a shot at a leading role with his turn in Mamet‘s Oleanna. He won positive notices and an Independent Spirit Award nomination for his portrayal of a professor accused of sexual harassment. More acclaim followed with his starring role as a hapless car salesman in Joel Coen and Ethan Coen’s Fargo (1996), for which he garnered a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination. The next year, Macy‘s star rose a little higher, thanks to his work in three high-profile films, Wag the Dog, Air Force One, and Paul Thomas Anderson‘s Boogie Nights. He was similarly lauded for his versatility through work in such films as Psycho and Pleasantville, and in 1999 he continued his winning streak as an unconventional superhero in Mystery Men, a gay sheriff in Happy, Texas, and a member of the ensemble cast of Paul Thomas Anderson‘s Magnolia.

Despite the fact that Macy drew praise for his turn as a reluctant hit man in the 2000 drama Panic, the film went largely unseen, and his next substantial role found him running from dinosaurs in Jurassic Park III. As always Macy continued to intercut his more commercial efforts with such decidedly non-mainstream fare as Focus and Stealing Sinatra. Surprisingly, it was just such work that netted Macy some of his most glowing reviews. Case in point was a memorable performance as a disabled traveling salesman in the 2003 drama Door to Door; a role that earned its convincing lead an Emmy. After sticking to the small screen with the Showtime miniseries Out of Order, Macy went wide with the theatrical hit Seabiscuit and the breathless Larry Cohen-scripted thriller Cellular. That same year, the actor would continue to nurture a succesful ongoing collaboration with famed writer/director David Mamet in the widely-praised but little-seen {/crime drama} Spartan. Macy has also continued to do television work, appearing on such series as Spencer, Law & Order, and ER. For his role in the 2004 made for television drama The Wool Cap (which also found him teaming with writer Steven Schachter to adapt a story originally written by Jackie Gleason), Macy was nominated for multiple awards including a Best Actor at the Golden Globe and an Emmys.

In 2005, Macy returned to home turf with the Mamet-scripted thriller Edmond, directed by Stuart “Reanimator” Gordon. The picture reunited the actor and director, who originally collaborated in the early eighties on the stage version of the playwright’s {+Sexual Perversity in Chicago}. Adapted from Mamet‘s 1982 one-acter, Edmond dramatizes the descent of a seemingly normal man (Macy) from sanity to unbridled psychosis. While Edmond didn’t exactly bomb critically or commercially after its July 14, 2006 premiere, it fell below the bar of previous Mamet efforts on two levels: first, the studio opened it to decidedly more limited release than Mamet‘s directorial projects over the previous several years (such as Spartan and Heist), thus ensuring that fewer would see it, and it also suffered from somewhat lackluster reviews. Surprisingly, those who did complain of the work attacked Mamet‘s script in lieu Gordon’s direction. Variety’s Scott Foundas observed, “The problem is that, too often, we don’t fully understand what motivates Edmond, and many of Mamet’s efforts toward explanation — that life is one big shell game, that we’re all latent racists at heart — feel like specious armchair philosophizing.”

Macy produced that same year’s Transamerica, and graced the cast of Jason Reitman’s hearty satire Thank You For Smoking, with a funny turn as senator and anti-tobacco promulgator Ortolan Finistirre. At around the same time, he also voiced a crooked, baseball bat-swiping security guard in that year’s family friendly animated feature Everyone’s Hero. Meanwhile, audiences geared up for Macy‘s contribution to the ensemble of actor-cum-director Emilio Estevez’s semi-fictional, Altmanesque docudrama Bobby, which recounts the events that preceded RFK’s assassination by Sirhan Sirhan at the Ambassador Hotel. As the hotel manager, Macy joins a line-up of formidable heavyweights: Helen Hunt, Elijah Wood, Harry Belafonte, Martin Sheen, Estevez himself, Anthony Hopkins,  Sharon Stone, and many others. The picture had journalists and moviegoers across America whispering ‘Oscar contender’ long before its initial release on November 22, 2006. Shortly after production wrapped, Macy made headlines in mid-late 2006 for a comment that involved his allegedly berating Bobby co-star Lindsay Lohan’s on-set behavior, in reference to her constant tardiness.

Meanwhile, the trades reported the everpresent Macy‘s involvement in two 2007 features: the animated Bee Movie (with a lead voice by Jerry Seinfeld), about a honeybee who decides to sue mankind for its use of honey, and Wild Hogs, a farce with Tim Allen, Martin Lawrence and John Travolta as a trio of Hell’s Angels. Over the coming years, Macy would appear in movies like Shorts, Dirty Girl, and The Lincoln Lawyer, as well as the critically acclaimed series Shameless.

In 1997, William H. Macy married Felicity Huffman, with whom he appeared in Magnolia. ~ Rebecca Flint Marx, Rovi

LAWRENCE FERLINGHETTI

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A Brief Biography of
Lawrence Ferlinghetti

A prominent voice of the wide-open poetry movement that began in the 1950s, Lawrence Ferlinghetti has written poetry, translation, fiction, theater, art criticism, film narration, and essays. Often concerned with politics and social issues, Ferlinghetti’s poetry countered the literary elite’s definition of art and the artist’s role in the world. Though imbued with the commonplace, his poetry cannot be simply described as polemic or personal protest, for it stands on his craftsmanship, thematics, and grounding in tradition.

Ferlinghetti was born in Yonkers in 1919, son of Carlo Ferlinghetti who was from the province of Brescia and Clemence Albertine Mendes-Monsanto. Following his undergraduate years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he served in the U.S. Navy in World War II as a ship’s commander. He received a Master’s degree from Columbia University in 1947 and a Doctorate de l’Université de Paris (Sorbonne) in 1950. From 1951 to 1953, when he settled in San Francisco, he taught French in an adult education program, painted, and wrote art criticism. In 1953, with Peter D. Martin, he founded City Lights Bookstore, the first all-paperbound bookshop in the country, and by 1955 he had launched the City Lights publishing house.

The bookstore has served for half a century as a meeting place for writers, artists, and intellectuals. City Lights Publishers began with the Pocket Poets Series, through which Ferlinghetti aimed to create an international, dissident ferment. His publication of Allen Ginsberg’s Howl & Other Poems in 1956 led to his arrest on obscenity charges, and the trial that followed drew national attention to the San Francisco Renaissance and Beat movement writers. (He was overwhelmingly supported by prestigious literary and academic figures, and was acquitted.) This landmark First Amendment case established a legal precedent for the publication of controversial work with redeeming social importance.

Ferlinghetti’s paintings have been shown at various galleries around the world, from the Butler Museum of American Painting to Il Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome. He has been associated with the international Fluxus movement through the Archivio Francesco Conz in Verona. He has toured Italy, giving poetry readings in Roma, Napoli, Bologna, Firenze, Milano, Verona, Brescia, Cagliari, Torino, Venezia, and Sicilia. He won the Premio Taormino in 1973, and since then has been awarded the Premio Camaiore, the Premio Flaiano, the Premio Cavour. among others. He is published in Italy by Oscar Mondadori, City Lights Italia, and Minimum Fax. He was instrumental in arranging extensive poetry tours in Italy produced by City Lights Italia in Firenze. He has translated from the Italian Pier Paolo Pasolin’s Poemi Romani, which is published by City Lights Books. In San Francisco, his work can regularly be seen at the George Krevsky Gallery at 77 Geary Street.

Ferlinghetti’s A Coney Island of the Mind continues to be the most popular poetry book in the U.S. It has been translated into nine languages, and there are nearly 1,000,000 copies in print. The author of poetry, plays, fiction, art criticism, and essays, he has a dozen books currently in print in the U.S., and his work has been translated in many countries and in many languages. His most recent books are A Far Rockaway of the Heart (1997), How to Paint Sunlight (2001), and Americus Book I (2004) published by New Directions.

He has been the recipient of numerous prizes, including the Los Angeles Times’ Robert Kirsch Award, the BABRA Award for Lifetime Achievement, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Award for Contribution to American Arts and Letters, the American Civil Liberties Union’s Earl Warren Civil Liberties Award. Ferlinghetti was named San Francisco’s Poet Laureate in August 1998, and he used his post as a bully-pulpit from which he articulated the seldom-heard “voice of the people.” In 2003 he was awarded the Robert Frost Memorial Medal, the Author’s Guild Lifetime Achievement Award, and he was elected to the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters.

FERLINGHETTI QUOTES

http://www.citylights.com/ferlinghetti/

Freedom of speech is always under attack by Fascist mentality, which exists in all parts of the world, unfortunately.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Freedom, Speech, Exists

Constantly risking absurdity and death whenever he performs above the heads of his audience, the poet, like an acrobat, climbs on rhyme to a high wire of his own making.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Death, Making, High

We have to raise the consciousness; the only way poets can change the world is to raise the consciousness of the general populace.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

QChange, General, Poets

Don’t patronize the chain bookstores. Every time I see some author scheduled to read and sign his books at a chain bookstore, I feel like telling him he’s stabbing the independent bookstores in the back.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti quotes

Time, Him, Read

Anyone who saw Nagasaki would suddenly realize that they’d been kept in the dark by the United States government as to what atomic bombs can do.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Government, Dark, Realize

Everything the Beats stood for was the opposite of the dominant culture today.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/l/lawrence_ferlinghetti.html#TXTmAeYWi67tHCLb.99