Tag Archives: tv

DOCUMENTARIES I HAVE NEVER SEEN ON TV

Standard

GIF3

screenshot_20160924-090319

Check this out: ‘Documentaries | Never Seen on TV’ – http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1MJa2Y/:1zZ3YsTJ8:TdYZreWj

Hold On To Your Cheesecake, A ‘Golden Girls’ Cafe Is Coming

Standard

 Though you may not find it cool to watch “The Golden Girls.” I did. My ex mother-in-law who has since passed away, got me hooked on the show. I thought it was for “old people” but began to watch it too. It was a fun show with cool characters.

Hold On To Your Cheesecake, A ‘Golden Girls’ Cafe Is Coming

betty

We’re more excited than Blanche Devereaux on a first date.

06/22/2016 08:55 am ET

NBC via Getty Images
It won’t be quite like the “Golden Girls” kitchen, but close. 

If you threw a party, invited everyone you knew, you might want to consider hosting it here.

DNAInfo reported Monday that Michael J. LaRue, a longtime friend of actress Rue McClanahan (or as any fan knows her, Blanche Devereaux), plans to open a “Golden Girls”-themed café in the Washington Heights area of Manhattan alongside McClanahan’s son.

LaRue, who told the site he’s been planning to open a restaurant since McClanahan’s death in 2010, promises live music from McClanahan’s piano, “Golden Girls” memorabilia and even outdoor seating. A lanai, if you will!

LaRue even told DNAInfo he’s arranged for Betty White to attend the ribbon-cutting ceremony when the restaurant opens, which Entertainment Weekly reports will be in August.

Aside from the obvious cheesecake, dishes on the menu will include “Bea Arthur’s pasta salad, Estelle Getty’s chocolate chip cookies, and Rue’s orange poppy seed cake. Of course we’ll have Sophia’s lasagna al forno and goodies from St. Olaf by Rose,” LaRue told EW.

But as loyal “Golden Girls” fans ourselves, we couldn’t help but dream up a few suggested menu items of our own. Picture it:

1. Devereaux-ni and cheese: a Blanche-worthy mac-and-cheese dish made with extra cayenne pepper for a spicy, sassy punch.

2. Soph-ijitas: Fajitas that you love even though they sometimes make you feel bad about yourself.

3. Eggs Lanai: eggs any style, but served only outdoors.

4. Shady Pines-wich: A sandwich no one ever orders but simply exists to haunt customers about what they could be eating if they don’t behave.

5. The St. Olaf Special: A dish that doesn’t really make any sense, but for some reason, you keep ordering it episode after episode visit after visit.

So, yeah. You might want to consider being a friend and canceling whatever plans you might have made for August that aren’t this.

More:

Passionate Pioneers Restaurants Golden Girls Rue Mcclanahan

#the_golden_girls#golden_girls_cafe#wahington_heights#manhattan#n.y.#Rue McClanahan#ana_christy#beatnikhiway.com

COOL PEOPLE – The Lone Ranger – Who Was The Real Lone Ranger and What Becomes a Legacy Most?

Standard

What Becomes a Legacy Most

lone9

 

To put you in the mood here is the theme song from the #Lone Ranger series that ran from 1949-1957

https://youtu.be/uUpDG680uew

 Glen Campbell Plays “The #William Tell Overture” (acoustic)

Published on Aug 18, 2015

From September 1974 in New York’s Central Park, Glen Campbell plays an acoustic version of “The William Tell Overture”. In later years he always used an electric guitar for this. Sometime around 1974 Glen recorded an acoustic studio version of William Tell that sounds much like this, but it went unreleased for years until it was accidentally released on the 1997 Razor & Tie 2-CD set “The Glen Campbell Collection”. I say accidentally because the track listing for the compilation lists the live 1977 version with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, but what you hear is the 1974 studio acoustic version.

https://youtu.be/0bhuxkzjuQc

The Lone Ranger S01E02 – The Lone Ranger Fights On [TV Series]

https://youtu.be/xKTDqn_zQwc?list=PLHB8ZB5j3QSqHwFeGRWjL-RxUq5J6Mbz6

 

.45 Long Colt – 1.5 oz. Silver Bullet

lone6

Hi-ho  Silver! Awaaay! The only bullet the Lone Ranger would think of using to disarm his opponents, #ana christy

lone3lone5

  Become a fan Writer, designer and California Girl

 I was asked on Father’s Day, what my dad #Clayton Moore’s legacy was. No small question to anyone, but when layered on to a man who portrayed The #Lone Ranger for over five decades, slightly more daunting for a daughter to answer.

Nope, I’ve not yet seen the Johnny Depp/Armie Hammer version. I hope it’s fantastic. I hope it’s a rip-roaring, shoot-em-up adventure that brings the message the character carries into the 21st century. At least, that’s what I hope.

Last weekend, the Memphis Film Festival honored the legendary western lawman’s 80th anniversary and invited me along with many other first and second-generation links to Hollywood’s cowboy heritage. Dad, in fact, had attended that very festival exactly 30 years ago and indeed, some of those same fans were on hand to greet me. Some brought their copies of his autobiography, others 8×10 glossies, still others their costumed toddlers — mask and all — to take a picture or give me a hug. Their toddlers.

Just to lay the foundation here, I have chosen my own path far from the film industry’s blinding Klieg-lights. My talent for entertainment abruptly ends when any group larger than Thanksgiving dinner assembles, and my inherent childhood shyness turns to sheer terror. Yes, I suppose all the world’s a stage, but I have been cast as a reluctant performer.

That said, there I sat on a panel to receive questions from fans passionate about my father’s embodiment of the Masked Man. The day’s first question came to me. “Miss Moore,” (this is the Bible-belt, after all), “what do you consider your father’s legacy to be?” The answer — and emotions — came quickly.

Thirteen years after my father’s passing, I continue to receive fan letters — not just from the United States, but from all over the world. The letters come from policemen, firemen and teachers who say they chose a life of protecting others wanting to emulate the example my father set — not just as an actor, but as a man. What’s his legacy? That he inspired and continues to inspire the notion of offering assistance without seeking acknowledgement or fame. To come to the aid of someone in need. Pretty powerful stuff.

As is the Lone Ranger Creed. Written by Fran Striker in 1933 as the template for the radio show’s writers — as in, “What would the Lone Ranger do?” — it remains remarkably timeless. Its tenants set quite a high moral bar few people could master; fewer still would even attempt. My dad was quoted often as saying portraying the character made him a better person. A little hokey perhaps, but hey, if the love that flows from his multi-generational fans is any measure of that effort, then I would say he accomplished his goal.

It’s ironic that almost 60 years after my father grasped hundreds of tiny hands on Disneyland’s opening day, that Disney is the studio holding the fate of the character in its hands. Well, Frontierland could use a little make-over…

2013-06-19-OpeningDayDisneyland.jpg

Considered one of the 100 Most Interesting Items in The Smithsonian’s collection, the mask Clayton Moore wore has become an icon of Americana. Now, that’s what I call a legacy.

2013-06-19-LoneRangerMaskSmithsonian.jpg

WAY BACK WHEN – JOHNNY CARSON FULL EPISODE 1987

Standard

 New Year’s Eve, Smothers Bros, Singing Dogs, Tonight smobromain1

http://youtu.be/u9lh83qqQJM

the singing dogs

http://youtu.be/9Eg-myT7PDE

Wild Child & Touch Me (Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour)

http://youtu.be/_RieoV8a9cE

COOL PEOPLE – HARRY DEAN STANTON

Standard
download (10)download (7)Harry Dean Stanton

Harry Dean Stanton Biography

Film ActorTelevision Actor (1926–)
HARRY DEAN STANTON INTERVIEW FOR SPIN MAGAZINE
Actor Harry Dean Stanton is known for early appearances in iconic films such as Cool Hand Luke (1967) and Repo Man (1984) as well as for his present-day roles. Here are some images from his movies.
Born in 1926 in Kentucky, Harry Dean Stanton has had one of the longest and most diverse acting careers in Hollywood. He is known for early appearances in iconic films such as Cool Hand Luke (1967) and Repo Man (1984) as well as for his present-day roles in television series such as Big Love.

Profile

Film actor. Born on July 14, 1926 in West Irvine, Kentucky, USA, indie film star Harry Dean Stanton served in the navy during World War II. He studied at the University of Kentucky and the Pasadena Playhouse.

A solid supporting actor, Stanton appeared in numerous feature films, many of them Westerns, before starring in 1984’s Paris, Texas and the cult classic Repo Man. Later films include The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), Hostages(1992), The Green Mile (1999), The Straight Story(1999), and The Pledge (2000).

Stanton also is credited with many television appearances over his long career fromGunsmoke during the late 1950s-60s, to the popular recent series Two and a Half Men. Since 2006, Harry Dean Stanton also has starred on the HBO series Big Love as Roman Grant, the manipulative leader of a polygamous sect.

Harry Dean Stanton. (2014). The Biography.com website. Retrieved 03:36, Jun 23, 2014, fromhttp://www.biography.com/people/harry-dean-stanton-9492224.

THE BEATLES ARRIVING IN AMERICA 1964

Standard

103243598-the-beatles-1964 imagesLWQ6L3X5 beatles images (2) images (3) images8NTZFQ2Q images

Yesterday and Today

          Eric Francis Coppolino          •     2 days ago          •     4 Comments


    

THE BEATLES “I WANNA HOLD YOUR HAND”

http://youtu.be/3MHkgwA8t-g

The following originally appeared on planetwaves.net.

When The Beatles landed at the newly named John F. Kennedy Airport on Feb. 7, 1964, it was just 78 days after one of the most profound collective griefs in decades, one that unlike many before it was amplified by the power of television. The young president had been struck down in broad daylight in an American city, sending the Western world into shock.

The Beatles did not merely arrive; they stepped into a gaping void, a psychic and emotional cavern that had been violently ripped open like the president’s skull. With JFK’s death, the nation had lost it’s father and was still reeling with disorientation. Even people who detested him cried. The loss is palpable till this day.

The death of the president also meant there was a vacuum of male presence and leadership. Then a group of young men in their early 20s had unwittingly stepped up to the task, though I am sure this was not recognized for what it was at the time.

We cannot say what would have happened with The Beatles had JFK lived, whether they would have had the same impact or been received so passionately. We only know what actually happened.

When you consider the morbid scenes from that prior November, the presidential motorcade passing through Dealey Plaza, the unshakable Walter Cronkite crying on the air, Jackie Kennedy with her dress stained in her dead husband’s blood, Lyndon Johnson being sworn in aboard Air Force 1, the ambulance taking the president’s body to the morgue, the funeral procession with its riderless horse — it seems like a different universe from the screaming girls and clever lads taking questions from the press.

People huddled around their televisions watching Kennedy’s casket go by morphed into families clinging to their TVs as screaming teenagers stampeded through airport corridors and Ed Sullivan introduced The Beatles that Sunday night.

Indeed it was a different universe. Sometime during those 78 days, the Sixties had begun. That contrast of a collective wound and something to fill the void, or some element of healing, set a pattern and would repeat many times in this era.

Though the Sixties aspect, the Uranus-Pluto conjunction, would not make its first exact contact until October 1965, encounters between these two slow-moving, world-changing planets have a long warmup during which the most notable effects can be felt in advance.

If you want to understand the influence of this aspect, consider that The Beatles went from “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” to “I Am the Walrus” in a few short years.

The Sixties were a rough time in history. For many, it was an exciting time; for many others, painfully controversial, as many facets of the old order were stripped away and something else began to take their place. Many more people struggled to hold onto the familiar as everything seemed to change around them — not recognizing that the changes were within them as well.

The nascent Civil Rights movement, which had begun to make progress in the Fifties, had some successes and also came under ongoing violent attack, surveillance and infiltration.

At the same time, there were numerous artistic and technological breakthroughs, and many horrid political tragedies. It’s difficult to sum up an era that included the assassinations of the Kennedy brothers and Martin Luther King, Jr., the Vietnam War, the election of Richard Nixon, Woodstock, the Moon landing, protests on campuses across the nation and students murdered at Kent State.

From the Conjunction to the Square

Fifty years after The Beatles arrived, we are now at the next major meeting of Uranus and Pluto — the square. These two planets move so slowly that it’s taken them nearly half a century to go from their conjunction, the equivalent of the New Moon phase, to the square, the equivalent of their first quarter phase.

The first quarter is a major turning point in any planetary cycle, and also a time of structural change. It’s a time of re-evaluating events since the beginning of the cycle, though usually history moves so fast at the time of Uranus-Pluto events that you can have the feeling that there’s no time to think. What the Sixties and our era have in common is how easy it is to feel overwhelmed.

The square can have many properties similar to the conjunction, though of course it happens in a different historical context. The square also lasts longer. The conjunction had three exact contacts in 1965 and 1966. The square has seven exact contacts from spring 2012 through winter 2015. Both have a wide margin on either side.

We saw the early influence of the square with the Arab Spring movement, the public union protests in Wisconsin and then the global Occupy movement, all of which began and peaked in 2011. Those protests were suppressed by governments pretty effectively, and also by various chilling effect measures like discovering that the NSA is databasing everyone’s phone records, email and other communications.

Laws that define participation in the environmental movement as a form of terrorism are going to deter some people. So will mass arrests, pepper spray and the prospect of lifelong surveillance. It all adds up.

Though there are some similarities, I think there is one significant difference between the Sixties and today. In the Sixties, many people believed that change was possible, and moreover, that their personal actions could lead to progress — not merely to personal or corporate profit. There was widespread idealism in the air, despite the many terrible events that took place.

There was the sense that anything is possible. The craving for freedom first described in Jack Kerouac’s On the Road had become a sweeping social movement.

There was the feeling that if we don’t do something about this — that is, about whatever problem society is facing — nobody will. That value may not have saturated the culture, but there were plenty of people who felt that way, and they got a lot done. Out of the Uranus-Pluto conjunction era were born many movements that are still active today — anti-war, environmental, women’s liberation, gay rights, black power and others.

Today, cynicism has replaced idealism. The sensation that ‘we’re goin’ down’ has replaced ‘we can change the world’. I am aware that there are activists in our time working earnestly for change. What I object to is how little help they have, and how easy it is to dismiss their efforts as futile.

That so many people are overwhelmed is, I believe, the result of many factors. We know more than we did then — for example, about how serious the environmental situation is. What can anyone do, or think they can do, about a radioactive plume spilling out of a nuclear power plant in Japan, encompassing the north Pacific Ocean and spreading into all of its currents? What can we do about the tons and tons of plastic collecting in ocean gyres? Imagine trying to live without using plastic, no matter how much you want to.

What can we do about the rate at which fossil fuels are being extracted from the ground and injected into the atmosphere, trapping heat on the planet? What about all the methane being released from frozen reservoirs as the Arctic ice cap melts, doing far more damage than carbon?

How about politicians wasting time and resources trying to ban birth control and take away food stamps when the world is headed for a diversity of different brinks?

Every individual problem is overwhelming on its own, with 100 more like it right behind: GMO foods, the banks that get away with anything, billionaires by the million, chaos reigning in Iraq and Afghanistan and Syria and many, many other countries, an economy that is vacuuming wealth to the top faster than the Fed can print cash, people in massive debt from educations that are now worthless for getting a job, the cancer pandemic…and it goes on and on.

It’s amazing that anyone has the gumption to be able to confront the future at all, much less envision some great improvement that might happen. Many people are reduced to getting through the day. Many are reduced to doing whatever it takes to get by.

In this environment, you could describe cynicism as the more appropriate response than idealism, or hope, or faith. It’s hard to have faith when greed has gone from being a problem that some people had to the religion of the masses.

At the Uranus-Pluto conjunction, Bob Dylan came up to The Beatles’ hotel suite and encouraged them to do something relevant with their platform; to recognize that they could deliver a message. They listened. Dylan may have been the single biggest moral and artistic influence on The Beatles.

It was Dylan, the visionary, who warned of “guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children” before anyone outside of Rand Corporation, the White House or the Foreign Relations Committee had heard of the Vietnam War.

Now at the Uranus-Pluto square, we have Bob Dylan doing a Chrysler advertisement on the Super Bowl. No doubt he rationalizes it on the basis of American pride, the theme of the ad. Would that be the same patriotism that was drummed up to start the past 10 wars?

This one-time passionate advocate for blacks and the poor, who has decried slave labor in Singapore, Malaysia and Taiwan working for 30 cents a day, personally encouraged tens of millions of Americans watching the ad to “let Asia assemble your phone” — because they do it out of pride in their work.

Ask people why Dylan did the ad and they will probably say “he needed the money,” as if that’s a good reason for someone who has put out 35 studio albums and a heap of boxed sets. He can only top this one by going onto FOX News and encouraging us all to support the bombing of Iran.

The Common Ground of Pisces

Besides top-shelf Uranus-Pluto aspects, the astrology of our era has something else in common with the Sixties, which is Chiron in Pisces. This placement is a profound spiritual longing, which has many potential answers.

It is interesting that throughout the entire Uranus conjunct Pluto era of the Sixties and the current Uranus square Pluto era, Chiron is simultaneously in Pisces. The astronomical synchronicity involves Chiron’s 50-year cycle and the nearly 50 years it’s taken Uranus and Pluto to go from conjunction to square (0 degree relationship to 90-degree relationship).

Pisces, particularly with such a strong influence as Chiron, can be activated as a vast common ground, where people can discover how much they have in common, how much they can share and how much they can accomplish together.

I consider Chiron in Pisces The Beatles factor of the Sixties — the loving and spiritual element without which there would have been very little grounding or sense of purpose. It was not just The Beatles, but they personified it effectively, in a way that millions of people could relate to.

This can be expressed as well as related to or identified with — for example as art, music, community, intimacy and sex — among a million other friendly activities.

Yet Chiron in Pisces can also evoke a mystical longing that can be answered in toxic ways as well. The mystical longing is usually evoked by suppressing healthy expressions of emotion, passion, desire and creativity. People need to be people, which means we need to be together, feel together, do tribal things together and have collective experiences. When that natural instinct is suppressed, it expresses itself in many toxic ways.

One of them is rallying around the flag — a poisonous abstraction of the tribe. Another is worshipping a charismatic leader, which Dr. Wilhelm Reich identified as one of the key ingredients of a fascist takeover. Get people so desperate for sex and closeness, they will flock to a dangerous substitute, one that can destroy a society or a culture.

In our era, we are seeing the corporate form of this. It seems that every last thing is sponsored by a multinational or “nonprofit” corporation. Capitalism and greed are revered with religious fervor, and violating them can get someone branded a heretic or infidel. This common ground is becoming so crowded by corporate culture, I am surprised there aren’t Nike ads in yoga studios.

Oh wait — there already are, on yoga mats, garments and bags. Next we will have advertisements telepathically broadcast into meditation.

What corporate authority can interfere with but not completely suppress is the authentic inner spiritual and creative calling. No matter how much the Merlins of advertising and branding and finance may strive to do so, they cannot entirely vanquish your humanity. That’s why they have to spend so much money trying to do so.

They can come close. You can be anesthetized into thinking you’re not who you are, for a while. You can be lured away from your humanity, conditioned what to think, distracted from your soul or consume alcohol and fast food until you’re semi-blotto — but you’re still human, because you possess the Inner Light, the inner connection to the same intelligence that orchestrates your DNA. You are, even if you forget. So you may as well remember.

Yes, remembering your humanity can be painful in such dehumanized times. One of the paradoxes of awakening is the encounter with how many other beings are struggling. As you improve your life, you have to figure out what to do with any potential guilt that you have it good and others do not.

If you pay attention, you will find some people who have their ideals intact. Be kind to them and keep them in your life. There is very little you can accomplish alone, though you are personally the starting point for everything that happens to you. You are the one thing that all your relations have in common.

Remember that, as the world seems to grow darker than we ever dreamed it could.

Lead image: The Beatles, moments after stepping off their Pan Am flight on Feb. 7, 1964: Library of Congress.