Tag Archives: walmart

NC police seek man who sucked toes at Wal-Mart

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NC police seek man who sucked toes at Wal-Mart

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NC police seek man who sucked toes at Wal-Mart


 


LINCOLNTON, N.C. – Police say a man in North Carolina sucked a woman’s toes at a Wal-Mart after he convinced her he was a podiatry student and persuaded her to take off her shoes.

Detective Dennis Harris said the woman agreed to try on several pairs of shoes at the discount store in Lincolnton, and that at some point during the process, the man stuck her foot in his mouth. Harris said the man apparently tried the same thing at another Wal-Mart 15 miles away, where he told a woman he was conducting a survey on the feet of different races and nationalities.

The second woman also agreed to take off her shoes, but left when the suspect asked her to remove her socks.

Both confrontations happened Monday. Police are looking for the man.

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THE AMERICAN NOMADS OF WALMART’S PARKING LOTS

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Meet the American Nomads of Walmart’s Plentiful Parking Lots

 
  • “€œWe sold everything we have and decided to find, as we put it, our American dream,” says Josiane Simpson. She, Jared Holfeltz, and their son Gabriel are currently living out of their car. Jared Hopes to start a contracting business helping rebuild after natural disasters, but he recently hurt his wrist working a construction gig. So their dreams are on hold for a few weeks until his wrist improves.

  • Stephen Pike and girlfriend Christina Plascencia are traveling north with no destination in mind. They started in Bisbee, AZ. They were kept awake by a street cleaner driving in circles through the parking lot the night before. Stephen says, “I think he’s a subliminal irritant – keeping us up, instead of asking us to leave.”

  • From left: Megan Hoffman; Sophia Stauffer and her boyfriend, Alex Daby; Deanna Bunch and Kerouac (dog). They were traveling from Prescott, AZ, to Montana. Each of them plays at least one instrument, and they fund their travels by “€œjamming” on street corners. Sophia describes the nomadic life as an opportunity to “€œdo what I want to do and not have to worry about all the bills and worry about what’s happening next.”

  • “These are the best years of my life,” says retiree Leroy Morris. He lives off social security in his small R.V. with Maggie, his dog. He stays in the Flagstaff Walmarts in the summer and winters in southern Arizona.

  • Sheldon and Jackie Britton from Phoenix, AZ enjoy their morning coffee by the gas fire in their “fifth wheel” camper trailer. They were on their way to Milwakee for the 110th Anniversary of Harley-Davidson. “€œI have everything in there that I require without having to pack a suitcase and take it into a hotel,”€ Jacquie says. “€œI have a full-size walk-in closet. I even have my china if we’€™re entertaining somebody.”

  • J.D. Gilkey sold the family home and has been driving around the country researching his family’s genealogy. He says his travels have brought him to 500 Walmarts in the U.S. and Canada. “€œChristmas of 2011, there were about nine of us in the Walmart parking lot in Albuquerque,”€ he says. “Christmas Eve I put a note on everybody’€™s door to come over in the morning, and I fixed Christmas breakfast for everybody.”€

  • Caleb Goodaker-Craig from Austin, TX, a painter on an 11,000-mile solo bike trip. “€œI was riding through to check out Walmart, and I met an older guy who invited me for a glass of wine. He let me sleep between the truck and his R.V.”

  • Arther Ellis bought this school bus on Ebay for $2,500. He fetched it from Inglewood, CA and is on his way home to Fairfield, TX.

  • Bob Floyd, right, with his dog Tank. “€œMy wife is in a wheelchair. She had a stroke in 2006, and we were planning to leave on a trip around the United States. It took us ‘€˜til 2013 for her to get strong enough and for us to figure out how to do it. It took us six weeks. We just came up from the Grand Canyon that afternoon, headed for Birmingham. The guard came by and checked on us every two hours to make sure we were alright.”

  • Dave Gooding, Liz Deno, and Shaggy (dog), from Georgia, are on their way to Montana. “You meet a lot of good people who like to help out, so when people do that,”€ Liz says, “€œit’€™s like a karma broker. You give people an opportunity to give good karma back.”

  • “€œMy wife threw me out, because I’m a drunk,” says Sal. “€œI drink too much vodka.” He currently works odd jobs and lives out of his pickup.

  • Al Van Abbema sold his house to live out of his R.V. He travels around the mountain states in the warm months and spends the winter in southern Arizona.

  • Captain John inspects the shocks on his recently acquired R.V. When his mother came into some inheritance she offered to by him some property, but he declined, asking for this R.V. instead. Ever since he lost his job as a merchant marine master captain, he’s been living out of different vehicles doing odd jobs.

  • Joe Torpey has been alternating between stays in a Walmart lot and spots in the woods for the past seven years. Due to a back injury he received several years ago, he’€™s had a tough time finding work. “This car saved my life,”€ he says of his 1998 Ford Taurus station wagon. He fears that his car will break down, because he doesn’€™t think he’ll last living on the street.

If you’ve ever tried to sleep in your car on a long trip without planning ahead, you may have run into the law at some point. Each U.S. city has a different policy and tolerance for car-sleeping and it’s hard to find a legit spot if you don’t know where exactly you’ll be stopping.

What you can count on is one of Walmart’s over 3,000 stores being nearby. The company’s policy of allowing overnight stays in their parking lots is intended to boost sales, but has the tangential effect of creating a subculture around its locations (though they’re still at the mercy of local laws).

The two separate Walmart parking lots in Flagstaff, Arizona are specifically known for their long-term residents, and this past summer photographer Nolan Conway spent several days making a series of portraits of both the overnighters and the people who call these asphalt grids a temporary home.

“Flagstaff is the one place in Arizona where it’s not too hot in the summer and a lot of people who live in their cars or RVs stay there,” he says.

Conway’s portraits capture a broad and varied slice of America. He photographed people like Leroy Morris, who parks his RV in one of the Walmart parking lots every summer. Morris is a retiree who lives off Social Security with his dog Maggie as his only companion, but he says his years on the road have been the best of his life.

Then there’s Sheldon and Jackie Britton from Phoenix who were on their way to Milwakee for Harley-Davidson’s 110th Anniversary. Their tricked-out and enormous fifth wheel had almost every amenity of a normal house, including a full-size walk-in closet and a set of china.

The younger people Conway photographed were usually on long road trips. Caleb Goodaker-Craig from Austin, who is pictured sleeping under a tarp on the asphalt, was on an 11,000-mile solo bike trip. Dave Gooding, Liz Deno, and their dog Shaggy were on their way from Georgia to Montana.

“It was definitely a diverse crowd,” says Conway.

Sometimes managers will say no to campers because space is limited. Conway says he’s unsure what the exact rules were for the Flagstaff Walmart parking lots but there were stories of the police coming and telling all the long-term campers to leave.

Conway says he first tried to make the Walmart portraits in another city during the winter but was routinely turned down. In Flagstaff people seemed more amenable, partly because it was summer and they were outside and more approachable, but also because these parking lots had so many long-term residents that they developed relationships and interacted on a regular basis. Their dogs would play together and residents shared meals and holidays.

“There was definitely a sense of community,” he says.

 

ATTENTION WALMART SHOPPERS!

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Gator goes shopping at Walmart

ORLANDO — 

An interesting shopper was found outside of an Orange County Wal-Mart late Saturday night. A 6-foot gator was found by the sliding glass door at the Wal-Mart on Orange Blossom Trail in Apopka.

It got a lot of attention from customers and workers.

Walmart employees eventually had to lock the door because it kept sliding open.

Robin Watkins was inside shopping around when someone told her there was a gator outside so she and many others went to check it out. Watkins says she never felt scared; it was just cool to see. “It was just… it was neat. But I am glad they locked the doors for safety because I do have my child with me.”

Watkins says she believes there is a lake nearby, and that’s most likely where the gator came from.

After a while the gator walked into the woods.

 

MAN HIDING OVERNIGHT IN A K-MART TO HUFF CANS OF AIR DUSTER

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This past Sunday, an early morning Kmart crew in Jonesboro, Arkansas came to work, only to find a pair of unfamiliar feet sticking out of a back-room cubby hole. The store manager called the local cops, who discovered the man, Robert Pry, was a retail stowaway who’d passed out in the storage area after huffing 16 cans (!) of air duster.

From Arkansas local ABC affiliate KAIT 8:

The store manager led the officer to the back room and pointed to a pair of feet sticking out from a cubby hole beneath some stairs.

Landreth said when Pry was “covered in vomit and urine.”

When asked what he was doing inside the store, Pry reportedly said “huffing.”

The night before, Pry came into Kmart before closing and hid. Once the premises were empty, the 21-year-old located the air-duster supply and started huffing, until he passed out underneath the set of stairs. This wasn’t his first air-duster binge of the day: Pry went to Kmart because he’d already exhausted the $100-worth of air duster he’d bought at Walmart earlier on Saturday.

Pry reportedly said he took his friend’s truck and drove to the Walmart on Parker Road where he purchased $100 worth of air duster. Officers located the truck on the Kmart parking lot. Inside were several more empty air duster cans.

Pry stated that “he had spent all of his money on air duster and that he wanted more,” Landreth reported. “That is why he was inside Kmart.”

According to the report, Pry said he was “addicted to huffing.”

Pry now faces a litany of charges, including commercial burglary.

Look at that man’s mugshot. Don’t huff.

[photo via Craighead Co. Sheriff’s Office]

To contact the author of this post, email camille@gawker.com.