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THE BEATS-PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED PHOTOS OF LARRY FINK

THE BEATS-PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED PHOTOS OF LARRY FINK

The Beats: Previously Unpublished Larry Fink Photos

In 1958, Larry Fink — the photographer best-known today for celebrity portraits in magazines like Vanity Fair and GQ — was an 18-year-old college dropout. He moved from his native Long Island to Greenwich Village, and decided to hitchhike across the country with the second generation of Beat artists. “It was my fate to be aligned with the Beats because of my propensity for drugs, anger, and poetry,” Fink writes in The Beats, a new book of previously unpublished photography from his 1958 and 1959 travels. “Since they were second generation, without the same sense of immortal obsession such as the like of Kerouac and Ginsberg, they had a distinct need to be documented.”

Despite confessing that his traveling companions “did not like me much,” (a fact he attributes to his Marxist upbringing), Fink traveled with artists like Amiri Baraka and Hugh Romney (Wavy Gravy) from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to Houston and Mexico, and back to Chicago and Cincinnati. “They desperately needed a photographer to be with them, to give them gravity, record and encode their wary but benighted existence,” he reflects. Click through the slideshow for a look at the intimate, glamorous, and gritty photographs that resulted.

Larry Fink will speak at the Strand in New York on May 21 to celebrate the book’s release.

THE BEATS-PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED PHOTOS OF LARRY FINK

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This is a fantastic clip of Anchorage-based violinist Bryson Andres

Amazing BRYSON ANDRES IN DOWNTOWN SPOKANE WA.

This is a fantastic clip of Anchorage-based violinist Bryson Andres playing his sampled and looped version of OneRepublic’s Secrets on the streets of Spokane, Washington. As somebody who played violin for close to nine years I’m in awe in what Andres has accomplished in just eight … I had difficulty keeping my instrument in tune, let alone, y’know, being able to produce things that sounded like music. (via the awesomer)violin

This is a fantastic clip of Anchorage-based violinist Bryson Andres

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CHARLES BUKOWSKI “BARFLY” THE MOVIE

CharlesBukowski“BARFLY” IN SPANISH, WITH SUBTITLES-WORTH WATCHING- “images (107)LEAVES YOU FEELING SLEEZY AND DIRTY WITH A PUNCH TO THE FACE” Ana Christy
ONE OF MY FAVORITE MOVIES.

“BARFLY”

 

FOR TOM GEORGE. CHECK OUT HIS VERY COOL BLOG tomgeorgearts.wordpress.com

CHARLES BUKOWSKI “BARFLY” THE MOVIE

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RICHARD BRAUTIGAN-HIS LIFE-ABOUT HIS BIOGRAPHY AND SOME POEMS

RICHARD BRAUTIGAN -HIS LIFE-HIS BIOGRAPHY,A READING AND POEMS

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The Brautigan PagesPosted by jen. Sponsor a Poet Page |  Much of the information regarding Richard Brautigan’s life and death is uncertain. He was born in 1935 in Tacoma, Washington. His father left home before he was born, and his childhood was apparently a troubled one marked by poverty. He did not attend college. At some point in the mid-1950s, he left home for San Francisco, where he became involved in the Beat scene. In 1957, Brautigan married Virginia Dionne Adler, the mother of his only child, Ianthe. (They would divorce in 1970.) Although Brautigan, whose work largely defies classification, is not properly considered a Beat writer, he shared the Beats’ aversion to middle class values, commercialism, and conformity.  Brautigan’s success as a poet was marginal. He published several slim volumes, all with small presses, but none of these received much recognition. It wasn’t until the publication of Trout Fishing in America (1967), which many consider his best novel, that Brautigan caught the public’s attention and was transformed into a cult hero. By 1970, Trout Fishing in America had become the namesake of a commune, a free school, and an underground newspaper.  In 1972, Brautigan withdrew from the public eye and went to live on in a small home in Bolinas, California. In the eight years that followed, he only rarely accepted invitations to lecture and consistently declined to be interviewed. In 1976, he made his first trip to Japan, where he lived off-and-on until his death. There he met Akiko, whom he married in 1978; the marriage failed, and they were divorced two years later. During the year of 1982, Brautigan taught at Montana State University in Bozeman. He then withdrew again. In October of 1984, his body was discovered at his home; he had shot himself in the head some four or five weeks earlier.  Richard Brautigan’s poetry collections include June 30th, June 30th (Delacorte, 1978), Loading Mercy with a Pitchfork (1975), Rommel Drives on Deep Into Egypt (1970), The San Francisco Weather Report (1969), and Please Plant This Book (eight poems printed on separate seed packet envelopes, 1968). His novels include The Tokyo-Montana Express (1980), Willard and his Bowling Trophies (1975), In Watermelon Sugar (1967), and A Confederate General from Big Sur (1964). Brautigan’s last novel was recently discovered and published posthumously, under the title An Unfortunate Woman (Rebel Inc., 2000). A Selected Bibliography Poetry June 30th, June 30th (1978) Loading Mercury with a Pitchfork (1976) Rommel Drives on Deep Into Egypt (1970) The Octopus Frontier (1960) The Return of the Rivers (1957) Prose Willard and His Bowling Trophies (1975) In Watermelon Sugar (1967) Trout Fishing in America (1967) A Confederate General From Big Sur (1964 – See more at: http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/678#sthash.CI1wcSPh.dpuf

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RICHARD BRAUTIGAN INTERVIEW AND POETRY

Books of The Times

In Pursuit of Pleasure and Trout

Richard Brautigan Biography, ‘Jubilee Hitchhiker’

Vernon Merritt III/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Richard Brautigan

By DWIGHT GARNER

Published: May 22, 2012

For a committed sensualist and prototypical hippie, a man who wore floppy hats, granny glasses, love beads and a droopy mustache that made him look like General Custer at an acid test, Richard Brautigan (1935-1984) had a potent work ethic.

JUBILEE HITCHHIKER

The Life and Times of Richard Brautigan

By William Hjortsberg

Illustrated. 852 pages. Counterpoint. $42.50.

Alessandra Montalto/The New York Times
Janie Camp

William Hjortsberg
He wrote nearly every morning, regardless of keening hangovers. He spent the rest of the day, William Hjortsberg notes in “Jubilee Hitchhiker,” his sprawling and definitive new biography of this most offbeat of American writers, “in pursuit of happiness.” Happiness for Brautigan usually meant, to borrow the title of an undervalued W. M. Spackman novel, an armful of warm girl. In San Francisco, where he mostly lived, and elsewhere, he had groupies and would hit on “anything that wasn’t nailed down,” one friend commented. He put some of his favorite bohemian cuties on the front of his books. “Richard’s sexual archive,” another friend said, “is reflected on his book covers.” Happiness meant seeing plenty of movies. Once he began making money, in the early 1970s, it also meant good food (oysters, pork buns, the most expensive lobsters at The Palm steakhouse) and guns, which, when drunk, he would frequently discharge indoors. Brautigan and the film director Sam Peckinpah, a friend, once opened fire with a .357 Magnum and a .38 Colt at an alley cat through an open hotel room window.

Brautigan’s signal pleasure, though, from the time he was a young boy, growing up poor in a broken family in Tacoma, Wash., until the end of his life, was trout fishing. It was an obsession that fed his first and probably best novel, “Trout Fishing in America,” written in 1961 but not issued by a major publishing house until 1969.

Generations of anglers have picked up “Trout Fishing in America” based on its title alone, expecting a how-to volume. What they get instead is akin to a gentle tab of LSD: an eccentric and slyly profound novel, seemingly narrated by the ghost of trout fishing past and filled with surreal post-“Walden” visions like a dismembered trout stream for sale at a junkyard.

Brautigan wrote his best novels — “Trout Fishing in America,” “A Confederate General From Big Sur” (1964), “In Watermelon Sugar” (1968) and “The Abortion” (1971) — and books of poetry, notably “The Pill Versus the Springhill Mine Disaster” (1968) before fame swamped him in the early ’70s, when he was in his mid-to-late 30s.

He got rich suddenly and enjoyed himself vastly. His writing got woolier and worse, however, and the critics turned on him. He spent most of the money. His looks began to go. (One of his best-known poems is titled “My Nose Is Growing Old.”) Neurotic and increasingly in debt, he committed suicide with a handgun in 1984, at 49.

Critics have clashed over the merits of even his best stuff, many agreeing with Jonathan Yardley, who said that Brautigan was “the Love Generation’s answer to Charlie Schultz. Happiness is a warm hippie.” But the novelist Thomas McGuane, later to become a close friend, reviewed an omnibus edition of his early work with admiration in The New York Times Book Review. In a letter, the critic Malcolm Cowley called Brautigan’s poems, “pensées, like grasshoppers in flight.”

In this overly long but involving new biography, Mr. Hjortsberg, a novelist who was a friend and neighbor of Brautigan’s during his Montana years, nails the qualities that I’ve admired about Brautigan’s work, notably his “easy offhand voice, his concern for average working-class people, his matter-of-fact treatment of death, and his often startling juxtaposition of wildly disparate images.”

One of the merits of “Jubilee Hitchhiker” is that it not only tracks Brautigan’s life but also deftly flips open any number of worlds, from the Beat and counterculture scenes in San Francisco to gonzo times in Montana with writers like Mr. McGuane and Jim Harrison, and wildcats like Warren Zevon, Rip Torn, Jeff Bridges, Dennis Hopper and Harry Dean Stanton.

Brautigan was essentially a loner, but he had a Zelig-like quality and seemed to know everyone and go everywhere. He drank heavily in Western bars with the young Jimmy Buffett. He shot basketball and tore up money (a long story) with Jack Nicholson. He had an impromptu pasta sauce cook-off with Francis Ford Coppola. He drunkenly pointed a rifle at Wim Wenders, who had mildly criticized the translation in one of Brautigan’s German editions. Janis Joplin wanted him to name her new band.

Bored at a party one night, he hurled a brick through a window, a typical Brautigan performance. When the host screamed at him, he replied, “I don’t want things to be predictable.”

Brautigan and his three siblings grew up in and around Tacoma, Wash., (and later, Eugene, Ore.); his mother worked as a cashier, among other jobs. He never knew his father.He was a tall, shy, pale kid, a Boo Radley whom few at his high school paid attention to. He knew from a young age he wanted to write, but didn’t attend college.

When Brautigan was 20, sick with unrequited love for a girl named Linda, he wandered into a police station and asked to be arrested. To make sure he was, he threw a rock through a glass panel. He ended up in a mental institution, receiving electroshock therapy 12 times.

A year later, in 1956, Brautigan made his way to San Francisco, falling in with a scene that included the poets Jack Spicer, Robert Creeley and Gary Snyder. Allen Ginsberg didn’t like Brautigan, nicknaming him Frood. Brautigan was livid when the publicity material for his novel “A Confederate General From Big Sur” linked him with the Beats.

He slowly developed his literary style and cultivated his look. By the mid-’60s he was a San Francisco celebrity. He printed poems on seed packets and gave them away in a collection titled “Please Plant This Book.” He appeared regularly in Herb Caen’s popular San Francisco Chronicle newspaper column. In the late 1960s he published some two dozen short stories in his friend Jann Wenner’s new magazine, Rolling Stone.

Brautigan went national in 1969, when Delacorte Press published “Trout Fishing in America,” “The Pill Versus the Springhill Mine Disaster” and “In Watermelon Sugar” in one volume. Before long he dearly wished to shed his whimsical image.

He never could. When he got drunk and said something cruel about Mr. McGuane in public at a party, the author writes, Mr. McGuane spat back, “You’re nothing but a pet rock.” He then called Brautigan a “hula hoop” and concluded, “You should get down on your knees every day and thank God for creating hippies!”

Brautigan was a generous man who had a dark side. He was prone to anger and jealousy. He married twice but was never faithful for long. He was sexist, even for his time. He had a bondage fetish that spooked some women. He wrote a comic poem about venereal disease, but his own recurring bouts of herpes weren’t funny at all.

This jumbo-size biography is perhaps an odd tribute to a writer whose books were tiny, like small sachets of fragrant rice. It’s on the Robert Caro side of things. It’s total overkill. But it’s an enjoyable soak in American literary bohemia, and a cleareyed portrait of a man whom Mr. Hjortsberg aptly calls “a connoisseur of the perfect moment.” His book is full of them.

30 Cents, Two Transfers, Love
by Richard Brautigan

Thinking hard about you
I got on the bus
and paid 30 cents car fare
and asked the driver for two transfers
before discovering
that I was
alone.

The Beautiful Poem
by Richard Brautigan

I go to bed in Los Angeles thinking
about you.

Pissing a few moments ago
I looked down at my penis
affectionately.

Knowing it has been inside
you twice today makes me
feel beautiful.
3 A.M.
January 15, 1967

San Francisco
by Richard Brautigan
This poem was found written on a paper bag by Richard
Brautigan in a laundromat in San Francisco. The author is unknown.

By accident, you put
Your money in my
Machine (#4)
By accident, I put
My money in another
Machine (#6)
On purpose, I put
Your clothes in the
Empty machine full
Of water and no
Clothes

It was lonely.

Deer Tracks

Beautiful, sobbing
high-geared ****
and then to lie silently
like deer tracks in the
freshly-fallen snow beside
the one you love.
That’s all.

Love Poem

by Richard Brautigan

It’s so nice to wake up in the morning all alone and not have to tell somebody you love them when you don’t love them any more.

RICHARD BRAUTIGAN-HIS LIFE-ABOUT HIS BIOGRAPHY AND SOME POEMS

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Burger King Employees Make a Grandma Cry By Writing Profanity On Her Receipt

Burger King Employees Make a Grandma Cry By Writing Profanity On Her Receipt

And now we have our contenders for the Worst Person of the Year award

 

<img src=”http://timenewsfeed.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/burger-king1.jpg?w=480&h=320&crop=1″ alt=”Burger King” title=”Burger King”/>Burger King

Scott Olson / Getty Images

[See update at bottom]

Some jokesters working at a Virginia Burger King decided to pull a little prank on two customers and ending up making a grandmother cry.

The woman — who only gave her first name, Lorel, to protect her identity — said she and her daughter-in-law purchased dinner at the fast food joint and then realized their receipt labeled them “bitch ass hoes,” WTVR reports. Lorel was so offended she had to fight back tears.

“This is more than an insult. I mean calling you names on a piece of a paper, that will hurt somebody,” Lorel told WTVR. “I liked going there. But after this they won’t get my business anymore.”

The Richmond resident noticed the profanity after picking up her order from the drive-through window and immediately asked to speak with the manager, who apologized. In the meantime, Burger King offered the following statement to WTVR:

At Burger King Corp. (BKC) we have great respect for all of our guests and customer service is a top priority every day at BURGER KING® restaurants. BKC has recently been made aware of a photo that shows an alleged receipt from a franchisee-owned and operated restaurant that does not comply with our customer service policy. We are working with the franchisee, who is investigating the matter, to determine the origins of this photo.

No word yet on whether or not the culprits will be fired, but we’re pretty sure making a nice old grandma cry is the most fireable offense of all time.

Update: Burger King has fired the employee involved in this incident, and has offered the following statement:

Customer service is a top priority every day at BURGER KING® restaurants and we have great respect for all of our guests. Burger King Corp. (BKC) is aware of a receipt from a franchisee-owned and operated restaurant that does not comply with our customer service policy. The franchisee has taken swift action to investigate this matter and has informed BKC that he terminated the employee involved in this incident

Read more: Burger King Receipt Calling Grandma a Bitch Ass Hoe Makes Her Cry | TIME.com http://newsfeed.time.com/2014/02/25/burger-king-receipt-profanity/#ixzz2uRf5o900

Burger King Employees Make a Grandma Cry By Writing Profanity On Her Receipt

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Top 25 Pot Songs Of All Time

TOP 25 POT SONGS

Top 25 Pot Songs Of All Time

        Tue Feb 18, 2014
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PETER TOSH SINGING “LEGALIZE IT”

THE MARIJUANA ANTHEMS! HIGH TIMES Presents the Top 25 Pot Songs:

1. PETER TOSH “Legalize It” (1976) “Don’t criticize it,” Tosh toked. He criticized the Jamaican government and paid for it with his life in 1987. Updated by Sublime on HEMPILATION.

2. BOB MARLEY — “Kaya” (1978) Marley’s most famous ganja tune was written in the late ’60s with the help of Lee “Scratch” Perry, but wasn’t released as an album until the late ’70s.

3. BOB DYLAN — “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” (1966) The song’s chorus, “Everybody must get stoned,” makes you forget about those rainy day women, whatever numbers they’re high on. Updated by the Black Crowes on HEMPILATION and Cypress Hill on Temples of Boom.

4. BLACK SABBATH — “Sweet Leaf” (1971) “You give me a new belief,” Ozzy Osbourne espoused in this pre-metal glorification of ganja. Updated by Sacred Reich on HEMPILATION.

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5. RICK JAMES — “Mary Jane” (1978) “It’s my main thang,” James sang. “I love you Mary Jane.” The funkiest ode to pot . . . ever.

6. CAB CALLOWAY — “Reefer Man” (1932) “Have you ever met that funny, funny reefer man?” was the question posed in this period piece, recorded by Cab Calloway and many others.

7. BREWER & SHIPLEY — “One Toke Over the Line” (1971) The highest-charting pot tune of the ’70s is the song the Grateful Dead should’ve written. Updated by the Rainmakers and Brewer & Shipley on HEMPILATION 2.

8. MUSICAL YOUTH — “Pass the Dutchie” (1982) Also a Top 10 hit, this remake of the Mighty Diamonds’ “Pass the Kutchie” came courtesy of five British youths.

9. DAVID PEEL — “I Like Marijuana” (1968) The master marijuana minstrel championed pot to the tune of 1961’s “Peanut Butter.” Updated by the 360’s and David Peel on HEMPILATION and Technohead as “I Wanna Be a Hippie.”

10. NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE — “Panama Red” (1973) Peter Rowan’s smuggler tale harkens back to the days when the best weed came from Latin American.

11. FRATERNITY OF MAN — “Don’t Bogart Me” (1969) Better known as “Don’t Bogart That Joint,” this originally appeared on the Easy Rider soundtrack, was popularized by Little Feat and earned an update by Robert Bradley’s Blackwater Surprise on HEMPILATION 2.

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12. RITA MARLEY — “One Draw” (1981) Also written by Bob Marley, the song’s catchy refrain, “I wanna get high,” served as the basis for Cypress Hill”s 1993 version.

13. CYPRESS HILL — “Stoned Is the Way of the Walk” (1991) Hip-hop nation’s highest band put themselves on the map with this stoner masterpiece

14. LEROY “STUFF” SMITH — “If You’re A Viper” (1937) This reefer-jazz classic was recorded by numerous artists, renamed “Reefer Song” by Fats Waller and updated by Wayne Kramer on HEMPILATION 2.

15. BLACK UHURU — “Sinsemilla” (1980) “I’ve got a stalk of sinsemilla in my pocket,” Michael Rose exhaled on the chorus to one of reggae’s most enduring ganja classics.

16. REDMAN — “How to Roll a Blunt” (1992) Named for the HIGH TIMES centerfold featuring Cypress Hill, Redman took blunt-smoking to new heights.

17. DASH RIP ROCK — “(Let’s Go) Smoke Some Pot” (1995) This New Orleans trio transformed Bill Haley’s “At the Hop” into a veritable stoner anthem.

18. COMMANDER CODY & HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN — “Seeds & Stems (Again)” (1971) A country weeper complete with tears-in-your-beer steel guitar that’s both heartfelt and parody, as the Commander sings, “I’m proud to be a toker from Muskogee.”

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19. STEPPENWOLF — “Don’t Step On the Grass, Sam” (1968) A stab at a government that prohibits pot, this was one of Steppenwolf’s most political tunes. Updated by Gov’t Mule on Hempilation.

20. MURPHY’s LAW — “Big Spliff” (1990) New York’s premiere hardcore band were the first ’90s rockers to support pot legalization with tunes such as this one.

21. LOUIS ARMSTRONG — “Muggles” (1928) Before pot was illegal, it was known as gage, mezz and muggles to a coterie of weed-smoking jazz cats like Armstrong. The great trumpet player and founder of jazz wrote this instrumental with pianist Earl “Fatha” Hines.

22. NEIL YOUNG — “Roll Another Number (For the Road)” (1975) This road-trippers’ anthem is one of several weed-friendly tunes from the former member of Buffalo Springfield and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

23. TOYES — “Smoke Two Joints” (1991) Covered by Sublime and Norman Nardini, the Toyes’ wake & bake anthem is an underground reggae favorite.

24. TOM PETTY — “You Don’t Know How It Feels” (1994) This Top 10 hit was censored by MTV and radio stations because of the repeated lyric, “Let’s get to the point and roll another joint.”

25. TRADITIONAL — “La Cucaracha” The theme song of the Mexican revolution contains the memorable lyric, “Marijuana que fumar” (smoke marijuana).

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HONORABLE MENTION Certain songs, like Donovan’s “Mellow Yellow,” the Association’s “Along Comes Mary” (1966) and Peter, Paul & Mary’s “Puff the Magic Dragon (1963), have long been associated with marijuana, but actually were not pot songs per se. Outcries about these songs at the time of their releases, however, requires us to give them honorable mention. Also deserving honorable mention are all songs with the word “high” or “stoned” in the title, such as the Byrds’ “Eight Miles High” (1966), Sly and the Family Stone’s “I Wanna Take You Higher” (1968), Paul McCartney’s “Hi, Hi, Hi” (1972), Van Morrison’s “And It Stoned Me” (1971) and Ray Charles’ “Let’s All Get Stoned” (1964). Special mention to the Beatles’ for advising us “to smoke pot, smoke pot, everybody smoke pot” at the end of “I Am the Walrus” (1969).

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List written and compiled by Greg Casseus, Steve Bloom, Steven Wishnia, John Holmstrom, Chris Simunek and Mike Edison.

Top 25 Pot Songs Of All Time

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informationliberation

The news you’re not supposed to know…

An Introduction to Austrian Economics: Understand Economics, Understand EverythingThe Century of the Self: The Untold History of Controlling the Masses Through the Manipulation of Unconscious Desires The Disappearing Male: From Virility to Sterility The Obama Deception: The Mask Comes OffOperation Gladio: The Hidden History of U.S. Sponsored False Flag Terrorism in EuropeThe New American Century: The Untold History of The Project for the New American Century(more)
Article posted Nov 23 2006, 12:57 AM Category: Tyranny/Police State Source: The Vancouver Sun Print

Couple accidentally dials 911, hangs up — Police respond by breaking their door down, threatening them with tasers, breaking their ribs, and forcibly jailing them

Couple plan to sue RCMP over 911 reaction Joanna Habdank, North Shore News NORTH VANCOUVER – A North Vancouver couple has complained to District of North Vancouver council and said they will sue the North Vancouver RCMP after officers responded to their hang-up 911 call by breaking down their door, making a forceful arrest and jailing them overnight when the couple refused to allow a house-search. :.:

                                                                     The RCMP said, however, that in this case, federal policy commands a home-check, designed to ensure public safety.
North Vancouver resident Marget Lieder said that in the early evening of Oct. 25 she was having wine with her partner and a guest when she misdialed the emergency number, meaning to call 411 instead. After promptly hanging up, the police contacted her, saying two officers were dispatched and warned her her home would be searched to confirm she wasn’t in danger.
“I don’t want my privacy to be invaded just because I misdial a number,” she said. Once the officers arrived, she only spoke to them on her porch, refusing entrance. “They didn’t have a search warrant and they didn’t have anything to do in my house.”
She insisted she had nothing to hide and there was no cause for distress. Three more officers arrived shortly after, broke down the door and arrested Lieder and her partner, Larry Pierce, for obstruction of justice, she said.
“I was sitting on the couch. They stuck a Taser in my face, threatening me with 50,000 volts,” said Pierce, a well-known lawyer. “They threw me on the floor, twisted my left arm. A police officer stuck his knee into my ribs and jumped on me.” Later he found out that his two ribs were cracked, recalled Pierce. The couple said the officers began taping them right away even though their rights weren’t read until they were in the car. Once in jail, Pierce remembered he was interrogated for over an hour.
North Vancouver RCMP Const. John MacAdam said police are obliged to search the premises after a hang-up 911 call. Pierce maintained his rights

couple accidentally dial 911 and then read what happened!